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An invitation. A ship is setting sail from England. It’s a very old, very particular kind of ship. It’s the magnificent, creaky timbered, curly roped, burgundy sail kind. Read more

An invitation

A ship is setting sail from England.

It’s a very old, very particular kind of ship.

It’s the magnificent, creaky timbered, curly roped, burgundy sail kind. You’ve seen bigger ships surely, and certainly more streamlined, but this one is hard to get over. It’s the kind that straightens your back and brings a tear to your eye as you shyly lift your gaze to its regal shape. This is the kind of ship that shouldn't exist anymore. 

Standing on the dock in the dusking light, you can hear singing carried over the waves, and excited laughter. Figures are calling to you from the deck, beckoning to you, calling to you in your old names. These are the names no one should know, the ancient names, how can this possibly be happening?

The evening moon is emerging from behind clouds. But let us lean forward, the captain is lifting her lantern: To all scholar-explorers and heretical investigators … there is something pressing to say, something urgent. This is an invitation.

We are setting sail to un-map the world.

Join us for this voyage … the world’s first postgraduate programme in Myth and Ecology – The Mundus Imaginalis.

Background

In a time when every square inch of the globe seems to be neutered, quartered and googled, we intrepids are journeying out to glimpse the Otherworld that is secreted most wonderfully in this one - to peer into the steaming foliage and bright feathered world that still exists underneath the grid - whilst we still can. The hour is late.

This is an Otherworld that wriggles in your fist like the archaic trout of the smoky Thames and disappears (carrying all of Shakespeare in its scales) when we attempt to tell it what-it-is. This right-by-our-side Otherworld causes ink to slide off the page and evaporate when we produce the T-square too avidly.

We set sail to do nothing less ambitious than to court the mysteries: the small and gentle ones, the elaborate and complex gnashing teethed ones, the ones you glimpsed at the edge of your garden when you were little. We set sail to un-map our presumption that we know what the earth is.

When we un-map the world, we start the un-colonising of our own imagination and we move from personal fantasy to an imagination that is bigger than ourselves. We understand that psyches don’t only dwell within, we dwell amidst them, and their imagination help create our reality every day. When we un-map the world it starts to talk back to us, we begin to trail not trap. We start to witness not just thinking about the earth, but thoughts from the earth.

Our travels through the waters of time and place will bring us to people and traditions where the weaving of the human and non-human are at their most permeable, their most acute and most sophisticated. In the end, we will trade our tired maps for the best compass of all, the one that really matters - a truth north - what the Troubadours called ‘the educated heart’. It is time, as the poets say; ‘to think in ways we’ve never thought before’. It is time to trade comfort for shelter.

Make no mistake, study awaits. An un-gridded world reveals not just knowledge but wisdom, an un-mapped world will reveal not chaos but cosmos. With that wisdom, with that cosmos, comes tangible learning and focused application. Be prepared. This will be the most exacting journey. Take not one single step towards the gangplank without knowing that we take no passengers. So, here we stand on the dock. It is night, but the scholar-explorers are preparing to raise anchor. The captain leans forward with her lantern one more time, peers towards us and asks:

“Shall we go?”

Aboard The Ship


This is a residential and immersive postgraduate programme that takes imagination seriously. It is delivered by Schumacher College, and is validated by University of Wales Trinity Saint David and led by mythologist Dr Martin Shaw and anthropologist Dr Carla Stang. Carla brings her knowledge of different cultures, her fieldwork and phenomenological study, Martin brings mythology and two decades of work as a wilderness rites-of-passage guide. As they rove through mythology, anthropology, philosophy and poetics, they will also invite guest teachers on a module by module basis.

This is a year-long programme where you will walk in and out of other centuries. It will be a deep and exacting study of image, cosmology, storytelling, myth and lived experience that reaches out to an earth that is profoundly more than human. From Amazonia to Siberia, from the Hermetic, Troubadour, Sufi and Romantic faiths and traditions, we are journeying out to study cultures that celebrate a world ensouled, alive and radiating intelligence.

The main counterweights of the year will be a progression through western mythologies (many hidden or barely remembered), and the lived philosophy of the Mehinaku people of Amazonia. There will be the study of many other lifeworlds, together with which we will learn how people in different times and places have and do respond to an earthy consciousness of extraordinary wonder, regarding such as both magical and utterly ordinary. Such experiential study is how we will begin to tune our ear.

Cloistered in the beautiful setting of the Dartington estate and upon the wild moors of Devon, England, is the chance to apprentice to subtle and often secret knowledge, the reason being that we are living in a time when many of these secrets need to become public, need to be practiced and need to be lived. In doing so we encounter the wonder of ordinary reality and that far from being a rarefied state available to only a few, we will find that a dynamic relationship to what the neo-platonists called the ‘Anima Mundi’- is our natural state.



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Objectifs. - Au plus haut degré académique, le Mastère Spécialisé Analyse Financière Internationale (accrédité par la Conférence des Grandes Écoles à un niveau post bac+5) vous prépare aux différents métiers associés à l’analyse financière, dans un environnement international. Read more
Objectifs:
- Au plus haut degré académique, le Mastère Spécialisé Analyse Financière Internationale (accrédité par la Conférence des Grandes Écoles à un niveau post bac+5) vous prépare aux différents métiers associés à l’analyse financière, dans un environnement international.
- Son articulation pédagogique unique favorise l’insertion professionnelle dès la deuxième période de cours à Paris et permet d’acquérir un excellent niveau d’expertise.
- Exclusif dans son contenu, ce programme ambitionne à la fois l’acquisition intensive des fondamentaux de la finance à haut niveau avec une forte dimension éthique, tout en favorisant l’accès à un ensemble de certifications reconnues.

Programme:
- Développement personnel 25h
- Séminaire interculturel 12h
- Anglais 20h
- Analyse, Évaluation, Théories financières : 120h
- Gestion d’actifs, Marchés financiers, gestion des risques : 120h
- Study tour New York 25h
- Thèse professionnelle
- Premia, CFA, SFAF

Cursus:
- Rentrée : 3ème semaine de septembre.
- Durée : 412 heures sur une durée totale de 12 mois.
- Octobre à décembre : 300 heures de cours en temps complet sur le campus de Reims.
- Janvier à juin : 100 heures en temps partagé sur la base d’un séminaire d’une journée tous les 15 jours sur le campus de Paris.
- Préparation à l’examen CFA®
- Study Tour d’une semaine à New York au Finance Institute et au Baruch College

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Le Master en Acoustique et Mécanique de l’Université du Maine (Le Mans, France) propose une formation solide relevant des principaux domaines de l’acoustique fondamentale et appliquée. Read more
Le Master en Acoustique et Mécanique de l’Université du Maine (Le Mans, France) propose une formation solide relevant des principaux domaines de l’acoustique fondamentale et appliquée : Acoustique physique, Acoustique non linéaire et aéroacoustique, Acoustique de la matière condensée, Electroacoustique, Vibroacoustique, Acoustique musicale et acoustique des salles, Perception et psychoacoustique, Acoustique physiologique, Méthodes expérimentales en acoustique, Méthodes numériques en acoustique, etc.

Le Master Acoustique se dessine de la manière suivante :

La première année :
- Un parcours commun de manière à apporter à l’étudiant les connaissances de base en acoustique
- Des modules spécifiques pour chaque spécialité en acoustique

La deuxième année :
avec trois parcours différents
- Parcours Recherche Acoustique (MR AC),
- Parcours Recherche CND, Acoustique et Matériaux (MR CND),
- Parcours Professionnel Acoustique des Transports, de la Ville et de l’Environnement (MP ATVE),
- avec un socle commun de modules fondamentaux et des modules plus spécifiques pour chaque domaine,
- un stage en fin de Master, obligatoire, de 4 à 6 mois dans un laboratoire, dans un grand organisme ou dans une entreprise.

Important : tout au long du Master en Acoustique et Mécanique, une partie des enseignements scientifiques est dispensée en anglais (le reste des cours étant enseigné en français).

Les cours sont donnés en ANGLAIS dans les proportions suivantes :
Master 1, semestre 1 : 74%
Master 1, semestre 2 : 52%
Master 2, semestre 1 : 45%
Master 2, semestre 2 : 0% (stage obligatoire de 4 à 6 mois)

Visitez le site du Master (en français) : http://sciences.univ-lemans.fr/MASTER-Acoustique
Master's degree website (in English) : http://sciences.univ-lemans.fr/master-acoustique/?lang=en

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Languages offered. - French, German, Italian, Russian or Spanish. Qualifications and durations. - Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation). Read more
Languages offered
- French, German, Italian, Russian or Spanish

Qualifications and durations
- Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation)

Overview

This programme is designed to prepare linguists for careers in several areas of specialised language work in which there is a rapidly growing demand for highly trained speakers of English, both in the UK and abroad.

These include translation, editing and revision, précis writing, public service interpreting and proofreading. The programme also covers real-world skills such as translation management and setting up in business as a translator.

Placements are normally organised during the year with the language services of international organisations, government departments or translation companies.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-tran-and-prof-lang-skil/

Why study with us?

- Team of highly experienced professional staff
- State of the art digital interpreting suites provide excellent teaching and practice space.
- Small class sizes provide high levels of student and teacher contact.
- Work placements in translating are often an option during the programme and provide invaluable practical experience.
- Motivated and multi-national student cohort offers a diverse and stimulating learning environment.
- Students are exposed to realistic training from experienced translation and interpreting trainers which prepares them for work after graduation.
- The University and city of Bath offer ample exposure for non-native students to the English language and culture of the UK.

Programme structure

Semester 1

- Editing and revision (core unit)
- Professional translation (core unit)
- Proofreading (optional unit)
- Translation management (optional unit)
- Public speaking (optional unit)

Semester 2

- Editing and revision (core unit)
- Professional translation (core unit)
- Précis writing for UN (optional unit)
- Enterprise skills (optional unit)
- Using technology in the T&I Industry (optional unit)
- Public service interpreting (optional unit)
- 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

If you are interested in taking the German-only or Italian-only pathway, you will not be able to take the Precis writing for the UN unit (as German and Italian are not UN languages), therefore you will have to take all the other units listed below. If you have any queries about this then you can contact us (http://www.bath.ac.uk/polis/about/contact-us/).

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/pl/pl-proglist-pg.html#H) for further information.

Placements

Through our extensive network of contacts, we try to organise placements for all students with the language services of international organisations, government departments or translation companies.

They provide an invaluable insight into the work of professional linguists and are valued highly by employers. They are not however compulsory and are not always guaranteed.

Our students have previously undertaken placements in:
- United Nations
- Institutions of the European Union
- Council of Europe

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

We also use the software MemoQ for the delivery of the unit, Using Technology in the Translation & Interpreting Industry; this is one of the leading tools in the industry.

Careers

We have a worldwide reputation for training professional translators and conference interpreters. This programme draws on that expertise and extends into new and specialised areas of language work where there is a great demand for highly trained linguists with English as their first or ‘A’ language.

This programme has been established following feedback from a wide range of employers, including the Association of Translation Companies, the European Commission, the European Central Bank and numerous UN agencies.

Organisations are keen to recruit the linguists we produce.

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/polis/) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

International and industrial links:
- Our department has links with 22 Erasmus partner institutions, as well as universities in Russia and Mexico.
- Research students regularly engage in fieldwork abroad, especially in the countries of the European Union, but also in Russia, Latin America and the United States.
- Students on the Euromasters programme study at two or three different sites in either Europe or the USA.
- In the case of the MA Interpreting & Translating and the MA Translation & Professional Language Skills, a number of work placements in Western Europe are made available to students in the language services of international organisations, government departments and commercial enterprises.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

- Conflict, Security & International Order
- Governance, Citizenship & Policy
- Memory, History & Identity

International collaboration:
Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)
- European Commission Framework Programme
- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Stimulating cutting edge research:
Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Fi­nanz­ma­nage­ment, Rech­nungs­le­gung, Wirt­schafts­prüfung, Un­ter­neh­mens­be­wer­tung – wenn Sie sich für die ana­ly­ti­schen Pro­zes­se in­ner­halb ei­nes Un­ter­neh­mens in­ter­es­sie­ren, bie­tet Ih­nen der Mas­ter­stu­di­en­gang Management & Finance & Accounting ein in­ter­es­san­tes Stu­di­en­feld. Read more
Fi­nanz­ma­nage­ment, Rech­nungs­le­gung, Wirt­schafts­prüfung, Un­ter­neh­mens­be­wer­tung – wenn Sie sich für die ana­ly­ti­schen Pro­zes­se in­ner­halb ei­nes Un­ter­neh­mens in­ter­es­sie­ren, bie­tet Ih­nen der Mas­ter­stu­di­en­gang Management & Finance & Accounting ein in­ter­es­san­tes Stu­di­en­feld. Im Ma­jor Fi­nan­ce & Ac­coun­ting er­wer­ben Sie be­triebs­wirt­schaft­li­che Hand­lungs­kom­pe­tenz für viel­sei­ti­ge und an­spruchs­vol­le Führungs­auf­ga­ben nicht nur im Fi­nanz- und Rech­nungs­we­sen, son­dern auch in Be­ra­tungs- und Prüfungs­un­ter­neh­men. Da­bei ler­nen Sie – ins­be­son­de­re vor dem Hin­ter­grund der letz­ten Fi­nanz­kri­se – wie sich die­se be­triebs­wirt­schaft­li­chen Kern­dis­zi­pli­nen zur Lösung ak­tu­el­ler ge­sell­schaft­li­cher Pro­ble­me so­zi­al ver­ant­wort­lich und nach­hal­tig ge­stal­ten las­sen, so­dass die Un­ter­neh­men selbst und ex­ter­ne In­ter­es­sen­grup­pen glei­cher­maßen pro­fi­tie­ren.

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This interdisciplinary MA explores the processes through which actors have attempted to define and build peace in areas affected by war and violence, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Read more

This interdisciplinary MA explores the processes through which actors have attempted to define and build peace in areas affected by war and violence, particularly since the end of the Cold War. Drawing on expertise from the fields of history, politics, anthropology and the arts, this newly revamped course will offer students the opportunity to engage with conflict management, conflict resolution, conflict transformation, peacebuilding and statebuilding theories and practices.

 Moreover, the programme will critically address the conceptualization of peace and the implementation of peacebuilding projects by global, regional, national and local actors, including the UN, the International Financial Institutions, development agencies and donors, INGOs, and local organisations in conflict-affected environments. In particular, it will focus on social agency for peace, the question of the nature of the `peaceful state', and the ever-fraught question of the reform of the international system. The dynamics of these various contributions to peace will be the focus of a guided engagement, via local partner organisations, with the range of peace and conflict management actors present in either Bosnia Herzegovina or Cyprus (in Semester II).

Aims

Students will be able to show a critical understanding of:

1. Key issues and debates related to the theories of peace and practices of peacebuilding, statebuilding, conflict management, resolution, and transformation. They will become familiar with the range of international actors and organisations, their policies and practices, and their pros and cons.

2. The range of social science topics that influence peacebuilding, statebuilding, conflict management, etc., (including political, historical, anthropological understandings of peace and related programming strategies). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.

3. The analytical and policy literature concerning peacebuilding, international governance structures, statebuilding, and the role of key actors and institutions including NGOs and military and other security actors. Concurrently, students will be able to evaluate the theory and policy tools in the context of the recent history of peacebuilding and statebuilding since the end of the Cold War, in a range of examples, including across the Balkans, Cambodia, Timor Leste, Cyprus, Northern Ireland, Afghanistan, the recent and various Arab Revolts, and others.

4. An understanding of local approaches to peacebuilding, including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with `bottom up' approaches. Students will examine current debates on the nature of everyday peace and hybrid forms of peace, related questions about `local agency' and forms of resistance, activism, and social mobilisation.

5. Students will experience the on-the-ground realities of peacebuilding and statebuilding through a guided research visit to the range of actors involved in Bosnia-Herzegovina or Cyprus. This will form a key part of one of the core modules of the programme and will be run in association with local partners.

6. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferrable skills through both independent and group-based work.

7. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of peacebuilding along with the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. This will be delivered via the dissertation.

Special features

The Institute is developing a novel configuration for research and teaching which will uniquely associate practitioners, non-governmental organisation (NGO) partners, theoreticians, policy makers and analysts in sustained intellectual engagement. Combining a targeted programme of research with the provision of timely analysis on current emergencies and conflicts, the institute will seek to develop new methodologies in the emerging field of humanitarian and conflict response research.

Additional voluntary workshops and events throughout the year further enhance study including:

   The evidence of objects, a trip to the Imperial War Museum (North)

   Other Case Briefings (e.g., Cyprus, Arab Uprisings)

   Policy Sessions: UN system and INGOs (Professor Dan Smith, International Alert)

   Manchester Peace and Social Justice Walk

   Working with Governments (Professor Dan Smith, International Alert)

   Regular `Leading Voices' workshops, with key thinkers in the field

Students studying this programme will also benefit from possible additional activities, such as:

   Student organised trips to London (International Alert ), New York (UN/IPA ) and Brussels

   Case Study Internships

   Attendance at the annual Peacebuilding conference in Manchester and potential participation in student panels.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will take a range of forms, including lectures, seminars, tutorials, directed reading, a guided walk, a museum trip, a field trip and independent study. Much of the delivery will be problem based/enquiry based learning.

This MA will be influenced and informed by the research of both staff and postgraduate research students at the Institute including research projects on:

  •    Political space in the aid industry
  •    Local/hybrid approaches to peacebuilding
  •    The contribution of BRICS nations to peace and security programming
  •    Critical peace studies
  •    The role of the state in peace and security programming
  •    Ethnographic approaches to understanding violence
  •    Refugees and internally displaced persons
  •    The political economy of conflict
  •    Performance in conflict and disaster zones
  •    Historical analyses of aid

Career opportunities

 Students completing this MA may consider a wide range of career choices, including careers with:

  • Civil Service (working within various government ministries, including the foreign office, international development office)
  • International Institutions (such as the UN Peacebuilding Commission, Department of Peacekeeping Operations and regional bodies such as the European Union, African Union, Organization of American States)
  • NGOs (local and international) working on peacebuilding initiatives
  • Academia/Research Institutes/Think-Tanks


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In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS). Read more
In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Programme Content

In the light of the close inter-relationship of international criminal justice and human rights, the International Criminal Justice & Human Rights programme offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of both these areas of law. The international criminal justice side of the programme sets out to provide students with a detailed understanding of contemporary issues relating to international criminal justice. Organised crime, terrorist threats and internal civil wars transcend national boundaries, impacting far beyond the interests of individual nation states. The effective detection, investigation and prosecution of crime are now dependent upon increased harmonisation and co-operation amongst global institutions. It is therefore no longer helpful or sufficient to confine the study of criminal justice to narrow jurisdictional confines. Similarly, the human rights dimension of the programme seeks to develop students' understanding of the main global and regional systems for the protection of human rights, as well as their appreciation of a selection of major issues of controversy in contemporary human rights law.

The programme offers five modules

Individual Criminal Liability in International Law focuses on the principles of individual liability and procedures in regard to the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Transnational Crime and Counter-Terrorism considers the impact of the international response to organised crime and terrorism on traditional liberties and fundamental tenets such as freedom from torture, coercion and oppression in the state's pursuit of criminal investigations. It examines the judicial response to the admissibility of evidence obtained by torture into the legal process and explores the developing tensions between human rights and the duty of governments to protect their citizens from attack by organised terrorist networks.

UN Human Rights Law introduces students to the major UN human rights treaties and the other UN mechanisms for the protection and promotion of human rights. Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Africa, America, and Europe focuses on three advanced regional legal systems governing and affecting fundamental rights, examining their constituting treaties and associated institutions. Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations seeks to promote students' understanding of human rights at a conceptual level by considering the issue of the universality of human rights in the light of varying cultural traditions from across the globe.

Methods of Assessment

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

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Global issues of environment, security and development have never been so important. Read more

Programme Overview

Global issues of environment, security and development have never been so important. A long war on terror with no end in sight, ongoing structural economic inequalities on a global scale, and the threat of climate change have brought questions of Western interventionary practices, neoliberalism and environmental sustainability to the fore. The MA in Environment, Society and Development is designed to enable students to synthesize both theoretical and practical concerns in bringing critical thinking to these vital challenges. The programme involves engagement with a number of core areas in critical human geography, including issues of geopolitics, development and political ecology, and exposes students to global concerns that encompass a complex and dynamic mesh of environmental, social and economic processes.

Field-Based Learning

Running through the MA is an overarching aim to impart understanding of how different philosophical and ideological approaches to environment-society relations influence policy formulation and implementation. In this context, our hope is to empower students to become critically informed by, and ethically engaged with, the various geopolitical, social, economic and environmental processes that shape the world in which we live. The practical emphasis of the MA is reflected in a field-based learning module in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where students intersect with the development work of UN agencies, and range of CSOs and NGOs. In connecting with the work of UN agencies like the United Nations Development Programme, a key challenge for students involves thinking through the scalar nature of all forms of development, in which initiatives on the ground are framed by broader geopolitical, economic and institutional structures that both enable and hinder development in complex ways.

Career Opportunities

The programme will prepare students for a range of workplaces including government departments, non-governmental organizations, planning and environmental management agencies and specialist research and policy institutes. The transferable and problem-solving skills gained from the field-based learning practices embedded in all modules are a particular strength for graduates. Each year, students gain vital experience working on the ground in Bosnia and Herzegovina with a variety of international development practitioners and local community leaders. Since its inception, the programme has had ICOS and other international students from a range of countries, including Ethiopia, Germany, Italy, Malawi, Norway, Russia, Sri Lanka, UAE, UK, USA and Vietnam. Many have gone on to work in NGOs and UN agencies and, in addition, to pursue PhD research in leading Geography Departments across the world. In terms of a critical human geography Masters, the depth and breadth of the programme puts students in a very strong position in applying for PhDs, and post-MA we strongly encourage applications, internationally, nationally and here at NUI Galway, where Geography has strong research clusters in Geopolitics and Justice and Planning and Sustainability.

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Nid oes llawer o eiriau sydd mor atgofus a chyfareddol â ‘Cheltaidd’, yn dwyn i gof cywreinrwydd gemwaith yr Oes Efydd, adeiladwaith enfawr Côr y Cewri a Newgrange, chwedlau Arthur a Cú Chulainn a chrefft Farddol brenhinoedd a thywysogion y canol oesoedd. Read more
Nid oes llawer o eiriau sydd mor atgofus a chyfareddol â ‘Cheltaidd’, yn dwyn i gof cywreinrwydd gemwaith yr Oes Efydd, adeiladwaith enfawr Côr y Cewri a Newgrange, chwedlau Arthur a Cú Chulainn a chrefft Farddol brenhinoedd a thywysogion y canol oesoedd. Ond mae ‘Celtaidd’ hefyd yn gysylltiedig â’r Dadeni, yr Ymoleuo a’r Byd Newydd; Rhamantiaeth, Chwyldro a brwydr ieithoedd, llenyddiaeth a hunaniaethau cenedlaethol cyfan i oroesi yn y cyfnod Modern.

Mae’r cwrs course newydd hwn ym Mhrifysgol Bangor yn rhoi’r cyfle a’r gallu i fyfyrwyr fedru didoli’r ffeithiau a’r ffuglen, ac i ateb yn fanwl y cwestiwn:

‘Pwy oedd – a phwy yw – y Celtiaid?’

Yn ystod un flwyddyn academaidd bydd modiwlau yn cael eu dysgu gan arbenigwyr yn Ysgolion Cymraeg; Hanes, Hanes Cymru ac Archaeoleg; a Cherddoriaeth, yn canolbwyntio ar lenyddiaeth, archaeoleg, crefydd, mytholeg, hynafiaeth, hanes celf a cherddoriaeth, er mwyn archwilio diwylliant a hunaniaeth y bobl Geltaidd o’r bryngaerau cynhanes i seneddau datganoledig ac annibynnol heddiw.

Bydd myfyrwyr hefyd yn cael arweiniad wrth wneud eu hymchwil eu hunain ar gyfer traethawd hir gradd Meistr ar bwnc o’u dewis.

Mae’r holl gyfarwyddyd ar gael yn Gymraeg a Saesneg, ac mae cefnogaeth gynhwysfawr ESOL ar gael lle bo angen.

Dyma rai o’r prif bynciau sy’n cael eu trafod yn y cwrs course:

A yw’r ‘Celtiaid’ yn bodoli mewn gwirionedd, ac os felly, pwy a beth ydynt? Sut allwn ni drafod cwestiynau o’r fath, gyda pha fethodoleg a gyda pha dystiolaeth?
Sut mae’r gair ei hun (‘Celt’, ‘Keltoi’, ac yn y blaen) wedi cael ei ddefnyddio ar hyd y canrifoedd, o haneswyr Clasurol i gerddorion pop modern?
Beth yw cryfderau a gwendidau ‘Celtomania’ a ‘Celtosgeptigiaeth’? Sut mae’r cysyniad o’r ‘Celtiaid’ wedi ei ddarganfod a’i wrthod mewn gwahanol feysydd fel Llenyddiaeth, Archaeoleg, Ieithyddiaeth, Cerddoriaeth, Crefydd?
Sut y cyfrannodd ysgolheigion cyfandirol y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg at greu’r ‘Celtiaid’?
Sut y gwnaeth y bobl sy’n siarad ieithoedd Celtaidd ennill eu hunaniaeth eu hunain a sut maent yn dal i wneud hynny? Beth mae’r testunau canoloesol (Cyfreithiau, Chwedlau, Barddoniaeth Llys, Bywydau’r Seintiau) a chanfyddiadau archeolegol yn dweud wrthym, a beth sydd gan hanes diweddar i’w ddweud?
Beth yw’r prif ffynonellau tystiolaeth am hanes a hunaniaeth y bobl ‘Geltaidd’ (hynny yw, y rhai sy’n siarad ieithoedd Celtaidd yn y cyfnod modern)? Sut ydym ni’n defnyddio’r ffynonellau hyn? A all Arthur a Cú Chulainn ddweud rhywbeth buddiol wrthym?
Sut mae hunaniaethau ethnig a chenedlaethol y ‘Celtiaid’ modern wedi eu portreadu a’u trafod mewn perthynas â’r cysyniad hwn o’r ‘Celtaidd’?
Beth oedd perthnasedd gwleidyddol ac ideolegol y ‘Celtiaid’ a beth ydyw erbyn hyn?
Gyda materion fel hyn dan sylw, mae’r cwrs course wedi ei lunio i ddatblygu sgiliau’r myfyrwyr trwy gynllun astudiaeth uwch arbenigol. Un amcan pwysig yw rhoi hyfforddiant dadansoddol perthnasol i’r myfyrwyr, fel eu bod yn gyfarwydd â’r datblygiadau damcaniaethol ac ymarferol diweddaraf mewn perthynas ag Astudiaethau Celtaidd. Ar ôl cwblhau’r cwrs, bydd gan fyfyrwyr sail gadarn ym mhrif ddulliau a ffynonellau’r ddisgyblaeth, a byddant hefyd wedi datblygu sgiliau y gellir eu trosglwyddo’n eang ac a fydd yn berthnasol i amrywiaeth fawr o yrfaoedd.

Fframwaith y Cwrs
Mae’r course yn gwrs un flwyddyn (llawn amser) a gellir hefyd ei wneud yn rhan amser (gan amlaf hyd at dair blynedd). Ceir dwy ran i’r rhaglen gradd:

Rhan 1:

Mae hon yn elfen gwbl hyfforddedig, ac mae’n cyfrannu 120 credyd. Mae gan bob modiwl hyfforddedig bwysiad credyd o 40 credyd. Dysgir rhan 1 yn ystod dau semester y flwyddyn academaidd. Mae’r dysgu yn ystod semester 1 gan amlaf rhwng diwedd mis Medi a mis Rhagfyr. Mae’r dysgu yn ystod semester 2 gan amlaf rhwng diwedd mis Ionawr a dechrau mis Mai.

Bydd y modiwlau yn Rhan 1 yn cael eu hasesu trwy gyfrwng traethodau.

Rhan 2:

Mae rhan 2 yn cynnwys traethawd hir dan oruchwyliaeth o oddeutu 20,000 gair, ar bwnc o’ch dewis, a benderfynir ar ôl trafod gyda chynghorwr traethawd hir. Cwblheir yn ystod misoedd yr haf, rhwng diwedd mis Mai a mis Medi, a dylai myfyrwyr llawn amser gyflwyno eu traethodau hir erbyn mis Medi yn y flwyddyn galendr ar ôl cofrestru.

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MA Security and International Law offers the benefits of a specialised master's without the requirement of an undergraduate law degree. Read more

The MA Security and International Law offers the benefits of a specialised master's without the requirement of an undergraduate law degree.

You will gain advanced knowledge in the main areas of international security and the UN system, and the tools necessary to understand the issues surrounding armed conflicts, terrorism, modern warfare, and the security of international transactions and intellectual property.

This master's course draws on Manchester's established reputation in international legal research to offer you a wide range of optional subjects, and the opportunity to customise your curriculum according to your career ambitions, needs and areas of interest.

The course will also afford you the research skills to continue to advance your knowledge of contemporary securities in international law and apply them to a range of professional careers.

Aims

The MA in Security and International Law is designed for students who seek to acquire a recognised expertise in the main areas of security and international law and become generalist in international security and the UN system.. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be all-rounders and have knowledge and understanding of the rules, systems, techniques, practices, dynamics and discourses by virtue of which international security discourse develops. The course will also endow students with the necessary research skills to autonomously continue to expand, sharpen and update the knowledge of international organisation and the UN system after the completion of the course.

Special features

This course offers the strongest students the opportunity of an internship with a renowned law firm or international organisation.

Teaching and learning

The course is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by our research-active teaching staff as well as invited external experts.

This master's degree is offered part time to allow those with a professional occupation to follow the course.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

Students must also submit two research papers for the LL.M degree (one research paper submitted in April, and one submitted in September).

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each).

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you must submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. The first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken.

Career opportunities

This is a specialised master's offering you training for a range of legal careers in government agencies, the armed forces, international organisations, NGOs, law firms and multinational corporations.



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The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Conference Interpreting is designed to equip you with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills required for a career in conference interpreting. Read more

The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Conference Interpreting is designed to equip you with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills required for a career in conference interpreting. All our interpreting trainers are practising conference interpreters in language combinations that reflect market demands. Most trainers are also AIIC members. For a detailed list of regular and visiting trainers and their professional backgrounds, please visit: http://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/translation-and-intercultural-studies/about/people/external-trainers/

The programme offers simultaneous and consecutive interpreting training in five languages - French, German, Spanish, Russian and Chinese. These are key languages in international organisations such as the UN and EU and are also in demand on the freelance market.

The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Conference Interpreting can be studied over one year (full-time) or two years (part-time). Part-time study is strongly supported and is actively facilitated in the timetabling of teaching hours for the MA, wherever possible.

Postgraduate Diploma   (PG Dip)

The Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) in Conference Interpreting is a slightly shorter course available for students who do not wish to complete a professional portfolio or research dissertation.

Two distinct conference interpreter profiles

As a prospective student, you will offer one of two profiles, reflecting the two distinct profiles of practising conference interpreters:

  • Profile 1: You have English as your native language (A language) and two passive foreign languages (C languages). You will be trained in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting out of both C languages into your A language
  • Profile 2: You have Russian, Chinese, French, German or Spanish as your native language (A language) and English as an active foreign language (B language) or English as your A language and one of the five languages mentioned as your B. You will be trained in both types of interpreting in both directions (i.e. B-A and A-B)

Why Manchester?

The University of Manchester's MA/PG Diploma in Conference Interpreting is designed to offer intensive training to enable students to develop the necessary skills for a career as a professional conference interpreter. Class sizes are kept small, to ensure that students can receive individualised feedback. This in turn enables students to progress at their own pace. Students develop their interpreting skills under the guidance of a core team of interpreter trainers - all of whom have worked for international organisations such as the EU or UN, either as staff or on a freelance basis. In addition, students attend professional skills master classes, in which visiting conference interpreters and potential employers offer insights into the profession.

We have two interpreting suites equipped with 12 booths and Brähler consoles used widely in the profession.

Internationally recognised

The course design reflects best practice criteria set out by the internationally recognised professional body for conference interpreters, AIIC (the International Association of Conference Interpreters). It includes a module specifically focused on professional development, allowing students to focus on the contexts in which they can expect to work as conference interpreters. To ensure that students have an understanding of the dynamics of interpreting in multilingual meetings, simulated conferences are run during the second semester, during which interpretation is provided from several languages. Students considering a career in research benefit from MACINT's location within the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies - with staff research interests ranging from translation and conflict to the interpreting profession.

We strive to keep our course up-to-date with the latest developments in the profession and to find ways to make our course as useful and relevant as possible. To that end in 2015 we introduced the following exciting changes:

Additional simultaneous training

We now offer a four-week advanced simultaneous training course to MA students following their final exams. The aim is to give students a further opportunity to bring the standard of their interpreting up to the level required of professional conference interpreters. After the training, students wishing to complete the MA will produce a piece of written work outlining their preparation for a hypothetical interpreting assignment. Students will be encouraged to pick a meeting for which webcasts and documentation are available online, prepare, and then test the effectiveness of their preparation by having a go interpreting from the webcast.

For an additional fee, PG Dip students and graduates from other universities can attend this extra training period if the relevant language groups are running.

Subject-specific training to enhance background knowledge

A new module was introduced to increase students' knowledge of subject-matter that they are likely to encounter as interpreters. This includes the workings of major international organisations (e.g. EU, UN), diplomacy, international law, economics and foreign policy.

Additional language

Students taking the postgraduate diploma will be offered an opportunity, as part of their course, to work on a new or existing language by enrolling on one of the university's language courses.

For recent updates on our activities please visit our Facebook page  or find us on Weibo.  

Aims

  • To equip students with the knowledge and advanced interpreting skills for a career in conference interpreting
  • To provide specialist training in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
  • To provide a gradual transition into the professional world through practical, real-life interpreting tasks
  • To provide guidance on professional conduct and ethics
  • To enable students to reflect critically on their own and others' interpreting practice
  • To equip students for further study and research
  • For further information about the course, you can email  or  .


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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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This course offers an exciting opportunity to study human rights in the interdisciplinary context of law, politics and philosophy. Read more

Overview

This course offers an exciting opportunity to study human rights in the interdisciplinary context of law, politics and philosophy. The course content reflects that human rights is one of the key discourses of our times. The course is aimed both at people working in related fields (for example, professionals working in the fields of law, government and public sector, social services, human resource management, or human rights advocacy), and anyone else interested in further study in this area.

- The course is taught on a semesterised basis. Course content combines analysis of current human rights law and practices with a critical exploration of the structures, potential, and limits of law and legal reform, at the domestic, European, and international levels.

- The focus on ‘Globalisation and Justice’ emphasises the contemporary and interdisciplinary nature of the course. We do not aim at a simple endorsement of the discourse, but at a set of critical reflections that draw upon varied global and local human rights philosophies, policies and practice.

- Postgraduate students will find a range of support structures, including: research training; accessible staff supervisors; good library resources; access to postgraduate study rooms; and access to IT and legal research tools.

- This course builds on existing strengths of the Law School and SPIRE in research and teaching. Both Schools are committed to maintaining our teaching at the highest standard. Law and SPIRE are both highly regarded in their subject areas with international reputations for teaching and research. In the recent 2014 REF, Keele University stood out for its world-leading impact of research in Philosophy, Politics, and Law (with Philosophy and Politics both ranked first for Impact nationally). Keele hosts a wide range of seminars, workshops, lectures and visiting fellowships. Many of these activities are available without charge to Keele students. Both Schools are characterised by their energy and enthusiasm, as well as their friendliness and collegiality.

- Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has constantly been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

Internship Programme:
As part of our concern to develop our students' experience in the field of human rights, one of our founding course team members and longstanding members of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD), Professor Patrick Thornberry will host students at the Committee's sessions in Geneva.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/humanrightsglobalisationandjustice/

Course Aims

- This Masters programme aims to enable students to develop strong practical and theoretical understandings of human rights law, politics and philosophy at domestic, regional and international levels.

- The course also aims to provide students with a set of critical reflections that draw upon the varied global and local social and political contexts in which human rights operates.

- The course aims to develop not only subject-specific knowledge and skills, but also transferable skills. In terms of the latter, particular attention is paid to research and analytical skills. The course also aims to provide a foundation for pursuing further study at doctoral level.

- Course content combines analysis of current human rights law and practices with a critical exploration of the structures, potential, and limits of law and legal reform at the domestic, European, and international levels.

Course Content

The programme consists of 3 core modules and 5 elective modules. Students taking the MA in Human Rights, Globalisation and Justice write 8 module essays and a dissertation of between 15,000-20,000 words.

The MA requires 180 credits, made up of taught modules (120 credits) and a 60-credit dissertation. The modules are taught between September and April, and the dissertation is submitted in the following September.

Students who prefer not to undertake a dissertation may conclude their studies with a Postgraduate Diploma, if they achieve 120 credits by taking 7-8 taught modules.

Teaching & Assessment

Assessment of taught modules is normally by means of coursework. This requires a written assignment of 2,000-3,000 words for each module. The pass mark is 50% and students must pass each of the modules in order to progress to the dissertation.

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

International

Keele Law School is known internationally for our outward-looking and distinctive law degrees delivered in a supportive and dynamic learning environment. Students at Keele Law School learn from leading, internationally recognised academics that come from all over the world. We work hard to ensure that our ever-expanding body of international students joining us from around the world are given every support to help them succeed while studying at Keele in order to achieve their aspirations as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons. We are committed to ensuring that your time at Keele Law School will be both successful and enjoyable.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Columbia, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, Turkey, France, Japan, Bangladesh, Israel, and Germany who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK

Special Features

Opportunity to apply for an Internship at the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (UN CERD) in Geneva, Switzerland. Internships will be offered to 1-3 students, following an interview.

Support from a personal supervisor and tutors.

In campus accommodation.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This programme deals with the management, planning and policy issues for public health services in countries with developing health systems. Read more

This programme deals with the management, planning and policy issues for public health services in countries with developing health systems. It will help you acquire the skills and knowledge necessary for building new health services and improving existing health systems.

You’ll learn to:

  • take a proactive role in problem-solving, critically reviewing evidence and arriving at informed decisions
  • design the investigation of a specific public health management issue, collect and analyse data, and make recommendations for further development
  • evaluate different strategies for disease control in order to select the most effective and feasible programmes
  • review policies, situations and issues in the field of health management, planning and policy-making, with particular reference strengthening health policy for government and NGO sectors.

The programme also helps you to develop analytical thinking, independent learning and an awareness of continuing professional development opportunities.

You’ll study in an international learning environment with fellow-professionals from a range of countries and areas of expertise.

More information

The programme is delivered by Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, based in the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences.

On this programme (unless you are a PG Cert student) you have the opportunity to take part in a one-week study visit to Geneva, attending workshops and meetings with World Health Organization staff and visits to other organisations, such as the United Nations (UN) Office at Geneva, UNAIDS, UN High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), United Nations High Commission for Human Rights (OHCHR), International Federation of Red Cross and Crescent Societies (IFRC), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), GAVI Alliance and the Geneva Global Health Hub.

Some modules include opportunities to visit health facilities in Leeds and discuss management issues with public health and/or health services managers.

This Master of Public Health (MPH) - Health Management, Planning and Policy programme is for you if you are a more experienced policy-maker, planner or manager working in a developing health system. You could be working in:

  • national, federal or state ministries of health at both senior and middle levels
  • national health programmes
  • NGOs and international organisations
  • training and research institutions.

The 12-month variant concludes with a 10,000-word dissertation which you write in your final semester which gives you spaces for in-depth examination of an area of health management, planning and policy that is relevant to your work or career plans. The 18-month variant replaces the dissertation with an independent research project in which you will design and carry out a study, involving primary data collection, to investigate a public health management issue in your workplace, or an organisation of your choice. 

Please contact the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences admissions team if you need further advice on which programme would be best for you.




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