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The University of Kent's Two Capitals Programme gives students a unique opportunity to learn about international affairs in a global context. Read more
The University of Kent's Two Capitals Programme gives students a unique opportunity to learn about international affairs in a global context. Students spend one year at the Brussels School of International Studies before moving to Washington DC, Beijing or Brasilia for their second year. On successful completion they are awarded two master’s degrees; one from the University of Kent and the other from the relevant partner institution.

The programme allows students to specialise in one of the following disciplines; international relations, conflict and security, international political economy, public policy or international development, as well as experience different approaches to international studies on different continents and in different global capitals. Students on the programme gain an insight into the nature of change as an endemic feature of politics on a national, regional and global scale; an understanding of the causes of change; and ways in which to manage that change. They also gain a firm understanding of the complex relationship between the concerns of domestic and international politics, and global and geopolitical issues.

Applicants, who should initially apply for one of the programmes listed below, will be expected to have completed the taught courses of their chosen programme and have achieved an average of a Merit before applying for one of the exchanges as part of the Two Capitals Programme. A decision on whether a student may undertake an exchange will be made in May for those students who started their masters in the previous September and in February for those students who started in January.

MA in International Relations
MA in International Conflict and Security
MA in EU External Relations
MA in International Development
MA in International Political Economy

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/twocapitals/

Washington DC

The Two Capitals Programme in Washington DC is based on agreements with Virginia Tech and George Mason University.

• Students wishing to undertake the second year of their programme at Virginia Tech (VT) will be enrolled on the Government and International Affairs programme of the School of Public and International Affairs on VT's National Capital Region Campus in Alexandria and will study towards a Masters in Public International Affairs (MPIA). Details on how the two year programme will work in practice will be published shortly.

•Students wishing to study at George Mason University will be enrolled on Master of Public Policy programme at the School of Public Policy in Arlington, VA. Details on how the two year programme will work in practice will follow.

Beijing

The Two Capitals Programme in Beijing will be based upon an agreement with the Chinese Foreign Affairs University (CFAU) which is the only institution of higher learning which operates under the guidance of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China. The University trains high calibre Chinese diplomats in the fields of Foreign Service, international studies, and international business and law and offers an unparalleled experience for foreign students. While the format of the exchange programme is developed, the Brussels School of International Studies runs a very successful and much sought after exchange programme through which two or three students experience a term in each other’s institution. To find out more about the exchange programme please contact .

Brasil

Work is currently underway to develop a version of the Two Capitals Programme in Brasil with the University of Brasilia

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/brussels/studying/admissions/index.html

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Read more

The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Through sets of specialist modules, skills-oriented classes and workshops, and dissertation research it provides the opportunity to advance your skills and knowledge in archaeology with a view to progressing to doctoral level research, or to pick up vital transferable skills ready for working in commercial archaeology or in the wider employment market.

A unique feature of our MA is the provision of specialist strands within which you will study, allowing you to gain breadth and depth in your understanding of particular periods, areas and topics. The current strands are:

  • Prehistory
  • Egypt / Ancient India / Near East (EAINE)
  • The Classical World
  • Medieval and Post Medieval Archaeology

By the end of this course, you will have had a chance to engage in advanced collection, management and analysis of archaeological data and materials; to develop a sound understanding of current archaeological approaches, concepts and practice; and to acquire specialist skills and knowledge related to their strand from our team of leading experts in the field.

Course Structure

The MA in Archaeology is a 180 credit programme comprising

  • Two 15 credit modules in research and practical skills training in the first two terms (one per term)
  • Two 30 credit specialist research topic modules in the first two terms (one per term)
  • One 90 credit research dissertation of 20,000 words (developed in term 3 and summer)

Students can take a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study in lieu of the practical skills module. 

There is also the option of substituting a specialist research topic module with another MA module on offer in the department, and in some instances one offered by another department in the University. See below of other modules offered in the department.

Part-time students are expected to complete the course in 2 years. Typically part time students complete the two 15 credit and two 30 credit modules in the first year and the dissertation in the second year.

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and workshops or practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among archaeologists in a specific area or on a particular theme. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practical classes and workshops allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Archaeology. Finally, independent supervised study enables you to develop and undertake a research project to an advanced level. Throughout the programme emphasis is placed on working independently outside the contact hours, in order to synthesise large datasets and to develop critical and analytical skills to an advanced level.

The balance of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge and abilities as independent learners and researchers, in order to prepare them for work or advanced study once they have completed the programme. In the first two terms students typically attend around four hours of lectures and two one hour seminars per week. These are supplemented with two hours a week of workshops or practical classes. The practical work complements desk-based analytical skills, and are intended to develop skills applicable within and outside the field of Archaeology. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare effectively for your classes, focus your subject knowledge and develop a research agenda. During these first two terms you have the opportunity to do one or two formative essays or practical projects in preparation for summative (assessed) work. Typically you will submit around three to four pieces of summative work per term (essays of c. 3,000 words; practical projects such as photographic portfolios or posters).

Over Term 2 and into Term 3 the balance shifts as you develop your abilities as independent researchers. The lectures and workshops already attended have introduced them to and given them the chance to practice archaeological research methods in specific fields of study. You will also engage with academic issues, archaeological datasets and their interpretation, which are at the forefront of archaeological research. The dissertation is regarded as the cap-stone of the taught programme and as an indicator of advanced research potential, which could be developed further in a professional or academic field. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff, with whom they will typically have up to ten one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake independent, detailed study of a particular theme, area or research problem, and produce a substantial piece of academic written work of around 20,000 words.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet with their adviser two to three times a year. In addition, all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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Who is it for?. This course will appeal to you if you want to specialise in finance and economics – either immediately after completion of an undergraduate degree or as a mid-career professional. Read more

Who is it for?

This course will appeal to you if you want to specialise in finance and economics – either immediately after completion of an undergraduate degree or as a mid-career professional.

Developed to meet the increasing demand for specialists in finance and economics, you will receive rigorous training in financial economics and mathematics. It combines solid education in economic theory with exposure to the field of finance through several specialised options. As a result, this MSc will help you prepare for a range of exciting career possibilities, in roles such as financial economist or quantitative analyst.

You have the option of studying full-time over the course of one year or part-time over the course of two.

Objectives

The Financial Economics MSc aims to help you:

  • Gain combined exposure to the regulatory and policy aspects of finance with world-class academic training in theory and quantitative methods
  • Develop your critical and analytical abilities in mathematics and economics
  • Prepare academically for a career as a financial economist or quantitative analyst
  • Acquire an advanced understanding of modern economic theory relevant to financial topics
  • Critically interpret current research in financial economics and evaluate its relevance to financial practice
  • Recognise the roles and obligations of the major financial institutions, especially as seen from the point of view of financial regulators and policy makers
  • Understand financial markets
  • Perform routine financial calculations, using widely available computer software for the purpose of forecasting, regulation and analysis
  • Undertake empirical investigations in the field of financial economics, employing appropriate quantitative methods
  • Develop a deep understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the relevant empirical and theoretical research methodology.

Should you with to pursue further study, the dissertation track can also serve as a stepping stone to an Economics or Finance PhD.

Teaching and learning

The Financial Economics MSc course is delivered through a flexible combination of lectures, seminars and computer lab sessions. Lectures introduce you to the key theories, concepts and economic models. In seminars, you have the opportunity to solve applied problems, analyse case studies and make presentations of research published in leading academic journals.

The computer labs provide you with practical experience of using computer software to perform calculations and conduct realistic simulations. In addition, econometric methods are taught in lab sessions, so you have the opportunity to apply econometric software to empirical research and financial market estimations.

When appropriate, practitioner slots – such as research seminars conducted by external financial experts or presentations by invited academics – will be incorporated into module delivery.

We also offer pre-sessional induction courses on economic analysis for students who need to build up their background in the fundamental aspects of financial economics.

Teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review.

Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Part-time students complete their modules over the course of four terms from September to June before undertaking their dissertation or literature review.

Pre-sessionals

Pre-sessional activities covering Micro-and Macroeconomics, Stata, Excel, Probability and Mathematics run in September before the start of term. These are available for all students who secure a place on the MSc Financial Economics course. Pre-sessionals are included in your degree fee and are designed to prepare you for the course. We therefore strongly encourage you to make every effort to attend.

You are not required to register for the above pre-sessionals, you just need to turn up on the day. Further information, such as the exact times and locations will be provided in your induction schedule.

Assessment

Assessments are a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module).

Modules

You will take 180 credits – two 30-credit taught modules, four 15-credit taught modules and  60 extra credits through one of the following routes:

  • Dissertation: you will take a dissertation worth 60 credits (Economics Research Project).
  • Literature survey: you will take two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a literature survey (Economics Literature Survey) worth 30 credits.

For each route, there are two core modules:

  • Dissertation route: you will take three core modules – Financial Markets Econometrics and Asset Pricing. You will also select three electives -  one module from group one, two module from group two.
  • Literature Survey route: you will take three core modules – Financial Markets, Quantitative Methods and Asset Pricing. You will also take five electives – one module from group one, two modules from group two, and two further electives, including possibly one from each of groups one and two.

It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other depending on which electives the students choose.

Career prospects

On completing the Masters in Economics you will have a wide range of career options. Graduates of this course enjoy numerous employment possibilities in both the public and private sectors, including consultancy and financial analysis.

On completing the Masters in Financial Economics course you will have a range of employment possibilities to explore. To some extent, your career options will be determined by the electives you choose.

For example, you may wish to work in the financial industry as a consultant, banker, quantitative analyst. Alternatively you may wish to explore options in the health industry as a financial analyst, or in any industry that requires a financial or industry analyst.

Recent graduate for this course have secured roles such as:

  • Economic Analyst, BlackRock
  • Cash Funding Analyst, Mizuho International
  • Quantitative Analyst, BNP Paribas.

The Financial Economics MSc also provides a solid academic foundation for students wishing to pursue doctoral research in economics.



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Our Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases, directed by Professor Andrew Pollard of Oxford University Department of Paediatrics, is designed to provide a variety of different teaching methods (face-to-face and online) directing students through the syllabus required in the EU for clinical training in the subspecialty. Read more
Our Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases, directed by Professor Andrew Pollard of Oxford University Department of Paediatrics, is designed to provide a variety of different teaching methods (face-to-face and online) directing students through the syllabus required in the EU for clinical training in the subspecialty. The Programme will also be appropriate for those outside the EU.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/pgdip-in-paediatric-infectious-diseases

Description

The Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases is supported by the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID), the Paediatric European Network for Treatment of AIDS (PENTA), and the IIC Course: Oxford.

Worldwide, two thirds of the deaths in children under five years of age are caused by infectious diseases, and the prevention and treatment of infections in children is the number one priority for global health.

Reflecting this imperative, we recognise that investment in research and intervention programmes related to leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality, including acute respiratory infections, measles, infectious diarrhoea, malaria, HIV, and TB is vitally important. We believe that professionally-oriented education in paediatric infectious diseases is essential in the training of clinicians and clinical academics who will provide the future leadership in this key area for global health.

The Postgraduate Diploma also places the practice of paediatric infectious diseases in the broader context of applied sciences, such as pathogenesis, population biology and epidemiology. The Programme focuses on clinical (applied) aspects, underpinned by basic science to provide both breadth and depth.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Paediatric Infectious Diseases is a part-time two-year programme taught via a blend of online and residential components.

Syllabus:

- Infectious Syndromes
- Therapeutics and Infection Control
- Epidemiology, Immunity and Immunization
- Bacterial Infections
- Important Viral Infections and Prions
- Imported and Tropical Diseases and Mycobacterial Infection
- Congenital and Neonatal Infection, Sexually Transmitted Disease, and Parasitic Disease
- The Immunocompromised Host
- Fungal Infection

Dates:
The 2016 Paediatric Infectious Diseases Programme starts in September 2016. The next PENTA-ESPID HIV course online component beings in May 2016, with the residential component taking place in October 2016. The Infection and Immunity in Children: Oxford residential course takes place in June/July each year.

The Postgraduate Diploma is normally completed within two years.

The following course components can be taken before applying for the Postgraduate Diploma and if successfully completed and if taken within two years of starting the Postgraduate Diploma, then these elements of the Programme requirements will normally be dispensed:The Infection and Immunity in Children course, which runs each summer in Oxford, and thePENTA-ESPID online and residential HIV course. For example, the online PENTA-ESPID paediatric HIV Medicine course starts in May each year culminating in the residential course in October. Whether undertaken before registration for the Postgraduate Diploma or within the two-year duration of the Postgraduate Diploma, all components must be completed in order to satisfy the requirements of the Postgraduate Diploma. See the course structure above for further details.

Course aims

The Programme will provide students with:

- Knowledge and critical understanding of the well-established principles of paediatric infectious diseases, and of the way in which those principles have developed

- An ability to apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they were first studied, including, where appropriate, the application of those principles the real world of paediatrics

- Knowledge of the main methods of enquiry in the paediatric infectious diseases and ability to evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems

- An understanding of the limits of your knowledge, and how this influences analyses and interpretations based on that knowledge

At the end of the Programme students will know and understand how to:

- Use your broad knowledge of paediatric infectious disease in your practice and have learnt where to find the necessary resources when you have reached your limit of knowledge

- Understand how to find evidence-based information to facilitate rational decision making in diagnosis and management of children with infection

- Effectively communicate information, arguments, and analysis about paediatric infection, in a variety of forms, to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- Undertake further training, develop existing skills, and acquire new competences that will enable you to assume significant responsibility within organisations

- Qualities and transferable skills necessary for your future career in paediatrics and infectious diseases

Assessment methods

Assessment is via "formative elements" (online case rounds and discussions and multiple choice sessions) and "summative elements" (including written assignments, an oral presentation and an examination).

Formative elements:

- Online Case Rounds: at least seven ESPID case rounds over two years.
- Online Case Discussions in paediatric HIV medicine ([email protected]): actively participate in one four-week session over two years.
- Online multiple choice sessions: at least six sessions over two years.

Summative elements:

Written assignments:
Three written assignments of no more than 4000 words each over the course of two years.

Year 1: Oral presentation
A short oral presentation based on one of the written assignments.

Year 2: Examination
An examination consisting of multiple choice questions in paediatric infectious diseases.

Teaching methods

There are three main teaching elements to the Programme:

- A two-year online course in Paediatric Infectious Diseases which covers the full syllabus outlined above with online tutor support and student discussion forums

- Two residential courses in Oxford: Infection and Immunity in Children.

- A PENTA_ESPID online course Training for Paediatric HIV in Europe (paediatric HIV medicine) followed by a PENTA_ESPID residential course in Rome: Training for Paediatric HIV in Europe (paediatric HIV medicine).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research offers a pioneering Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice (DPRP). Read more
The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research offers a pioneering Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice (DPRP). The course is designed to enable experienced professionals working in a range of policy arenas – locally, nationally, and globally – to develop their policy analysis expertise without having to take a full career break. Combining advanced training in policy research and analysis with a thesis based on original research, it is based on a cohort model and can be spread out over up to six years.

Key features

- A combination of advanced policy research and analysis training with a thesis component based on original research
- Part-time programme structure designed to cater for busy professionals
- A means to enable participants to draw on their working experience at the same time as engaging with up-to-date academic research and thinking
- A cohort structure based around an annual two-week residential to provide networking with other participants as part of the programme
- Access to a wide range of sector-specific expertise across the University, including Technology Policy, International Development, Health, Education and Social Policy

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/prof-doct-in-poli-rese-and-prac/

Why take a professional doctorate in policy research and practice?

In all areas of government and public administration – whether in local government, national civil services or international organisations – the world of policy making is changing fast. There is an increasing recognition of the need for a secure and transparent evidence base on which to make policy, but there are also a range of approaches and methods that policy makers can use to assess the evidence base and consider the likely impact of different policies. This Doctorate will enhance professional capability and critical reflection on the theories, methods and practices of policy making.

The course involves a blend of face-to-face and distance learning. The academic coherence of the course is built around a ‘hub and spoke’ model comprising two core policy analysis units (in Transformational Policy and Practice and Policy Research Methodology) and two specialist units to enable students to broaden and deepen their understanding of policy research across a range of disciplines. You are required to complete four ‘taught’ units over three years of study – two core and two optional – followed by a supervised piece of original research over up to three years.

Educational aims of the programme

The Professional Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice is designed to:

- give particular priority to the transfer of multidisciplinary research and learning to the workplace, to enhance the academic and the professional contribution that policy makers and practitioners can make to theory and practice in their field
- engage current practitioners with knowledge, awareness and understanding of philosophical, organisational, political, social, economic, managerial, interpersonal, and technical dimensions of policy
- develop the capability to broaden an understanding of critical issues facing policy makers today
- provide you with a broad foundation from which you can hone your specific interests towards the conduct of supervised research and make an original contribution to your field
- support you in publishing and disseminating your research

Course structure

The Professional Doctorate in Policy Research and Practice is built around a part-time cohort model. You will advance through the course with a cohort of other participants from a range of countries, sectors and organisations. Teaching is focused on a two-week residential held in early September each year, with subsequent virtual seminars, tutorials, and supervision throughout the rest of the year.

This structure will enable you to interact, learn, and network with a stable cohort of participants, while ensuring the flexibility to continue your own professional career.

The course is structured into two stages: the taught stage and the thesis stage.

If your circumstances change and you are unable to complete the course, there are alternative qualifications that may be awarded depending on the number of credits accumulated.

- Taught stage:
The taught stage is based on four units. In the first year, two compulsory core units provide advanced training in policy analysis and research methods. The first year is designed to equip you with the knowledge and capability to understand and use a range of research methodologies, novel analytical frameworks and toolkits to address key issues within a broad policy context. The two core generic analysis units include:

- Transformational Policy and Practice – to introduce you to theoretical understandings of ‘policy’ and policy making and how they relate to practice. This will include a series of case studies of policy making and implementation from different countries

- Policy Research Methodology – to develop your knowledge and understanding of the methodologies (philosophic frameworks) employed in policy research, their advantages and disadvantages, as well as the merits of particular quantitative and qualitative methods.

Each of these generic units carry 18 credits and are assessed with an 8,000 assignment or equivalent. Successful completion of these units would normally entitle you to the PG Certificate exit award if appropriate.

- Specialist streams:
Over the subsequent two years you elect two specialised units, relevant to their field of practice, from a choice of up to four units. These are designed to enable you to develop and hone specific interests towards the conduct of supervised research: current optional units are listed below. The five initial units are:

- international development policy
- education policy
- health policy
- technology policy
- social policy (awaiting final approval).

Each specialist unit carries 18 credits and is assessed by an 8,000 word assignment.

You will be asked to choose a specialist unit in the first year, while undertaking your core modules so that teaching resources can be planned for the following year.

- Research enquiry:
You will spend the final three years of your study developing a supervised research enquiry. Supervision is primarily provided virtually over this period but it would normally be expected that you adhere to a minimum number of face-to-face contact hours. We also provide other online support for you during this time including webinars and online forums.

About the IPR

The University of Bath Institute for Policy Research (IPR) brings together many of the University’s research strengths to foster inter-disciplinary research of international excellence and impact. It bridges the worlds of research, policy and professional practice to enable us to address some of the major policy challenges we face on a local, national and global scale.

Read more (http://www.bath.ac.uk/ipr/)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/index.html

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This counselling course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) and emphasises the integration of theory, research, practice, and self-awareness to help you develop and train to become a competent and ethically-sound counsellor. Read more
This counselling course is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) and emphasises the integration of theory, research, practice, and self-awareness to help you develop and train to become a competent and ethically-sound counsellor.

The PG Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy has been designed to serve as professional qualification for students seeking a career as a qualified counsellor/psychotherapist working in the statutory and voluntary sectors, in business or private practice. The course is part of a group of counselling courses delivered at the University of South Wales, which have an established national reputation for excellence.

The core integrative model taught is based on the relational approach comprising of three main elements: the Contemporary Relational Psychodynamic Approach, a Humanisitic-Existential approach and third wave elements of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy within a post modern/social constructionist overarching framework. The course facilitates students in developing a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of integrative counselling practice, with a view to them developing their own coherent, ethical and effective approach to counselling practice, which can be adapted for use in a wide range of work settings for short term and long term work. You will also be taken on a journey of self-discovery as the programme demands a high level of reflection and self-awareness.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1756-pg-diploma-integrative-counselling-and-psychotherapy

What you will study

The Postgraduate Diploma focuses on training as an integrative counselling and psychotherapy practitioner. On successful completion, you will be ready to work as a trained Integrative therapist.

Year One:
- Integrative Counselling Skills and Practice: Introduces the core model of the course and provides foundation theory & skills in humanistic/existential and relational psychodynamic counselling practice.

- Applied Integrative Practice: Introduces the foundations theory and skills of Cognitive Behavioural counselling and Mindfulness. Students learn to integrate these approaches in applied practice with client issues.

- Personal Development & Counselling Practice: This module runs throughout the year and places emphasis on personal development group work and skills practice within a sound ethical framework.

Year Two:
- Advanced Integrative Theory & Skills Practice: This module aims to further develop students understanding of core integrative theory taught in the course and how theoretical ideas can be applied to practice. Advanced research practices are introduced with a view to students being able to use research to inform their practice.

- Advanced Applied Practice: The emphasis of this module is on applied practice: showing students how the core integrative model taught can be used to work ethically with the range of client issues typically found in professional counselling practice. Research development is consolidated through students conducting a small-scale piece of research.

- Advanced Personal Development & Counselling Practice: This module runs throughout the year and places emphasis on personal development group work and skills practice within a sound ethical framework.

The Postgraduate Diploma is part of a three year MA Programme. After successful completion of the Diploma stage, which is two years, you can choose whether to proceed to the final Masters year.

Learning and teaching methods

Classes include interactive theoretical lectures, experiential workshops, personal development groups, role plays, skills groups, digital recording of skills sessions for assessment and presentations. In addition, you will need to be in placement seeing ‘real’ clients for the duration of the course and will have to have completed a minimum of 100 hours counselling practice by the end of the two years.

Attendance:
This course takes 2 years part-time to complete.

The PG Diploma is taught over 30 days each academic year. For the 2014/15 academic year the main teaching day will be on a Wednesday. Year one of the programme starts with a two-day block (Wednesday 24th & Thursday 25th September) and finishes with a two-day block (Wednesday & Thursday) at the end of May. In addition, students will be required to attend a weekend workshop each academic year (in year one, this is residential) and two one-day summer workshops. We expect that students attend all teaching sessions, and there is a minimum requirement of 80% attendance in order to complete the course successfully.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

While more practice experience will be required to build the hours to achieve personal BACP accreditation, having successfully completed the formal training hours and assignments, graduates of the course will be ready to look for work in the field of counselling and psychotherapy.

Former students from the course have enhanced their career profile within their current employment or found new positions in the voluntary sector, in health settings, in Higher or Further Education, in Employment Assistance Programmes (EAPs), in business and in private practice. It is also possible to undertake further specialised training in order to work with children and young people, or to apply for a research PhD.

Assessment methods

A range of assessments are used at the PG Diploma stage of this course to test your knowledge, skills, self awareness and practice ability.

Year One: Two essays, Two skills assessments, practice portfolio, research presentation, personal development review and a supervisor’s report

Year Two: A skills assessment, a case study with client audio, an in-class research project and a research portfolio, a personal development review and a supervisor’s report.

Facilities

We offer a suite of five spacious, dedicated rooms used by the counselling / psychotherapy courses, and a digital recording system for use in class.

Personal Therapy

Students on the Postgraduate Diploma Integrative Counselling and Psychotherapy are encouraged to have therapy to help with their personal and professional development as a counsellor. A course requirement is that students have a minimum of 10 hours personal therapy for each of the two academic years.

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The LLM International Business and Commercial Law offers you the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the law governing commerce and finance in today's international market. Read more

The LLM International Business and Commercial Law offers you the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of the law governing commerce and finance in today's international market.

Multinational companies must regularly overcome a wide range of legal and governance issues in order to do business worldwide. This course will encourage you to explore the legal challenges faced by international business and analyse the fundamental legal framework for dealing with them, looking at areas such as corporate governance, international trade transactions and competition law.

You will also be given the opportunity to explore topical issues, such as the implications of the global financial crisis, corporate social and environmental responsibility, the role of brands in globalisation, global economic governance, and the legal challenges of business operation and foreign investment in a development country context.

Aims

On completion of this LLM course, you should have gained:

  • A thorough knowledge of the legal fundamentals of international commerce and finance;
  • Deeper insight into specific problems and critical issues faced by international business today and the international legal frameworks in dealing with them;
  • An understanding of the legal framework for business and commerce within regional economic blocs, such as the European Union;
  • Familiarity with the relevant academic debates and new developments in law.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website. 

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken, with at least one within the area of International Business Law. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Details of all current course units available in the School of Law can be found on the Faculty of Humanities website 

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for a career in law with specialisation in international business. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in international business law.



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The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business. Read more

The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business.

Our intellectual property (IP) experts will take you through the economic, social and philosophical aspects of IP law development and encourage you to critically analyse the current legal framework. You will gain advanced knowledge in IP law and concomitant policy, and learn about national and international grant, enforcement and defence of intellectual property rights on a multi-jurisdictional basis.

With research expertise in important industry sectors such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology, our teaching staff offer strong links to the wider IP profession. Contentious issues in intellectual property are connected to developments in high-tech sectors as well as the arts and popular culture, so the course has appeal to a wide range of backgrounds and IP-related careers.

Special features

Our award-winning careers service offers you all year round dedicated postgraduate support including employability sessions, and advice for those aspiring to a PhD and career in academia.

Teaching and learning

We use various teaching methods across the course to enable you to participate in debate and hone the analytical and reasoning skills vital to legal and business professionals.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

This LLM has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the elective units chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The LLM Intellectual Property Law has three core course units: Trade Mark Law and Policy ; Patent Law and Policy ; and Copyright Law and Policy . These core course units constitute 75 credits of the 120 taught credits required for the course.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's course offers training for a professional career in IP law in a range of industries, such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology sectors. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in IP law.



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The LLM International Financial Law offers you an opportunity to gain specialist knowledge in one of the most high-profile areas of legal practice today. Read more

The LLM International Financial Law offers you an opportunity to gain specialist knowledge in one of the most high-profile areas of legal practice today.

Global financial services law and regulations are the subject of ongoing legal debate. Our legal specialists have research expertise covering a range of topical global finance issues which they bring into the classroom.

This course will introduce you to the major regulatory and contractual issues in international financial and banking law. You will be encouraged to examine the financial practices of developed and developing countries, and how these relate to broader business law issues across the world.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. This involves taking one core course unit (International Financial Services Regulation ) of 30 credit value, and the remaining 90 credits from an approved list of commercial law options.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's degree will enable you to develop the specialist knowledge necessary for a career in legal practice in any developed or developing country with a financial services or business law profile. It is also suitable for those looking to work directly in the financial services industry, especially those interested in compliance issues.



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The LLM Corporate Governance is taught by Manchester's corporate governance and corporate social responsibility experts. The course will provide you with specialist knowledge about the law of conducting business in today's global society. Read more

The LLM Corporate Governance is taught by Manchester's corporate governance and corporate social responsibility experts. The course will provide you with specialist knowledge about the law of conducting business in today's global society.

During this course you will examine the major theories concerning the nature of corporations, and the concerns driving corporate governance law and practice, and reform proposals. You will evaluate the effectiveness of current corporation governance processes in setting and pursuing objectives, both nationally and internationally. You will also examine the evidence for European and global convergence of corporate governance practices and the ways in which this might evolve.

Coursework and assessment

All course units are assessed by either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The following course units are cores in semester one for students undertaking this course: The Principles and Practice of Corporate Governance and Corporations and International Business Law.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This is a rigorous degree which will give you up-to-date and globally applicable expertise for a career in the practice of corporate law.



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The LLM Transnational Dispute Resolution allows you to develop advanced knowledge of the rules and procedures along which international and transnational disputes are settled. Read more

The LLM Transnational Dispute Resolution allows you to develop advanced knowledge of the rules and procedures along which international and transnational disputes are settled.

The course focuses on the contemporary rules, procedures and practices of international courts and tribunals, including the International Court of Justice, interstate and mixed arbitration tribunals, investment dispute resolution mechanisms like International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), or World Trade Organisation (WTO) dispute settlement mechanisms. It also deals with mechanisms allowing the settlement of disputes which are of a hybrid nature, partly international, partly domestic.

You will gain a command of the techniques of argumentation before domestic, regional and international tribunals, as well as critical tools to understand, apprehend and analyse the politics and the dynamics of international dispute resolution mechanisms.

Aims

The LLM in Transnational Dispute Resolution provides students with a command of the techniques of argumentation before domestic, regional and international tribunals, advanced knowledge of the rules and procedures along which international and transnational disputes are settled, as well as critical tools to understand, apprehend and analyse the politics and the dynamics of international and transnational disputes.

Special features

This course offers the strongest students the opportunity of an internship with a renowned law firm or international organisation.

Teaching and learning

The course is based on small-group, seminar-style teaching by our research-active teaching staff as well as invited external experts and renowned practitioners.

This master's degree is offered part time to allow those with a professional occupation to follow the course.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description on The School of Law website. 

The course has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the modules chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our Funding for Masters courses page.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This highly relevant LLM offers you career opportunities with states, government agencies, international courts and tribunals, law firms and multinational corporations who are looking for lawyers with international and transnational dispute resolution.



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The LLM International Trade Transactions offers your specialist training in all aspects of international trade regulation, transactional requirements and the problems that threaten the success of trade. Read more

The LLM International Trade Transactions offers your specialist training in all aspects of international trade regulation, transactional requirements and the problems that threaten the success of trade.

There are a growing number of international trade practitioners all around the world as a result of globalisation. Developing countries require a deepening involvement in the international trade process and the legal structures which underpin it. This means more lawyers need to be educated in this area to help this their development. Globalisation also means that the same result follows in developed countries as trade becomes even more international.

This course aims to provide you with core knowledge and understanding of the background to international trade, the transactional conditions conductive to its development and the specific and general problems which threaten the success and integrity of individual transactions. It also aims to encourage you to develop research skills in these areas.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you will have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. This involves taking one core course unit (International Sale of Goods) of 30 credit value.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's degree will enable you to develop the specialist knowledge necessary for a career in legal practice as it relates to trade regulations, transactional requirements and the potential barriers to successful trade.



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Manchester Metropolitan University has a national reputation for initial teacher education which has been established over 100 years. Read more
Manchester Metropolitan University has a national reputation for initial teacher education which has been established over 100 years. Our Department of Primary Teacher Education has a team of over 40 primary teaching staff who between them have expertise in all primary curriculum subjects, enabling us to offer a wide range of specialisms. The majority of teaching staff are actively involved in research, linked to our Education and Social Research Institute, one of the leading UK centres for educational research. We have an Initial Teacher Education Partnership with over 500 primary schools and strong community links across the North West region, ensuring we can offer our trainees a diverse range of placement experiences.

Our aim is to train confident teachers and reflective practitioners who will have strong prospects for employment and career progression. Trainees have access to Manchester Met's dedicated Careers and Employability Service and within the PGCE programme are supported in securing their first teaching appointment.

After graduation we continue to provide support and advice to our Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs), including online resources, conferences and peer networking.

Our full-time PGCE Primary Education provides intensive training leading to Qualified Teacher Status ('QTS') for early years establishments and primary schools in the 3-7, 7-11 or 5-11 age range.

School-based training is combined with taught sessions at university and independent study. Applicants can choose our University-led ('Core') PGCE training route, or one of our School-led ('School Direct') routes, both of which lead to QTS. We work in partnership with 18 school alliances in the North West of England to offer School Direct places (salaried and non-salaried).

University-led ('Core') route

Trainees typically spend around 12 weeks in university during the year, including a block at the start of the course, combined with at least 120 days of school-based training, in at least two different schools. Manchester Met organises placements.

School-led ('School Direct') route

Trainees are attached to a lead school within an alliance of schools - Manchester Met works in partnership with 18 school alliances across the North West region. Depending on the term times of the school(s) involved they will typically spend around 30 weeks in school and around four weeks in university for taught sessions. Placements are organised by the lead school.

On both routes trainees will experience school-based training in at least two different schools, and have the opportunity to undertake an inclusion placement with a focus on Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND). The School-led also includes a visit to a Key Stage 3 setting. Throughout the PGCE trainees are supported by a personal tutor, experienced teaching staff and mentors in university and at school.

Candidates can apply for both School Direct and University PGCE routes; both have the same entry requirements. Successful completion of either route includes 60 Masters level credits.

Early Years route (Manchester only)

This route mirrors the PGCE Primary Education programme, with an Early Years focus. Completing this course will enable practitioners to teach in both the Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1.

Applications for PGCE routes starting in September 2017 should be made online via UCAS Teacher Training which is expected to open in late October this year. Early application is recommended as places are limited. Please check our entry requirements before applying.

Assessment Only Route to QTS in Primary sector

Experienced, but unqualified graduate teachers, wishing to complete a formal qualification to gain Qualified Teacher Status may be eligible for this route. It will suit those who have taught in at least two schools or colleges, and who have substantial experience in two consecutive age ranges. It is not sufficient for candidates only to have experience of two schools.

Important information

Manchester Metropolitan University has been undertaking a review of the long-term future of academic provision at its Cheshire campus. It has now been confirmed that the University will withdraw from the Cheshire campus. This means that we expect the campus to close in the summer of 2019.

As the withdrawal from the campus will be a phased process we are still pleased to receive applications for one year full time postgraduate taught courses starting in 2017 on the Cheshire campus. We also continue to welcome applications for part time postgraduate courses of two years in duration in the Exercise and Sport Science department starting in 2017. Applications for courses that are expected to take longer than two years to complete are currently on hold.

Features and benefits of the course

-Choice of location - Manchester or Cheshire* for PGCE Primary Education. Early Years route also available at Manchester
-Choice of University led or School Direct routes
-Strong mentor and tutor support for trainees' personal, academic and professional needs (identified as a key strength by Ofsted in their 2015 inspection)
-Varied placement opportunities, including opportunity to do an inclusion placement with SEND focus
-Research-led teaching
-NQT support and opportunities for continuing professional development at Manchester Met
-Assessment Only route to QTS available for experienced, but unqualified teachers

Placement options

Manchester Met organises placements for trainees on our University-led ('Core') PGCE route through our extensive Initial Teacher Education Partnership. Our Partnership vision is to train 'outstanding, critically-literate professional teachers who will challenge and inspire their learners'.

The schools we work with share our commitment to aspiration and excellence, with a focus on strong mentor training and support for trainees. There is also an emphasis on national priorities, including behaviour management, literacy and numeracy.

Our partner schools cover a wide geographical area and diversity of social, economic and cultural backgrounds, ranging across inner city, suburban and rural settings, enabling us to offer our trainees a broad range of placement opportunities.

We organise placements starting with the trainee's term-time postcode and matching this with placement offers from schools. Trainees are expected to travel up to 90 minutes each way from where they live and to arrive in school 45 minutes before the school day commences. We take into consideration special circumstances, such as disabilities, cultural requirements and medical conditions. In addition, we match carefully to ensure a breadth of experience across different key stages.

Trainees spend at least 120 days on contrasting placements in two schools related to the two age phases of their particular route through the course, with time spent in each key stage/phase. They are attached to each school for a substantial period of time and expected to engage in the full life of the school.

In their first placement trainees gain experience across the full age range of the school and teach in one class for an extended period, taking increased responsibility for that class.

They then begin to teach a range of curriculum areas, as well as gaining an understanding of cross-curricular themes.
The second placement focuses on the whole curriculum and extended management of the classroom in order to meet the requirements for the Teachers' Standards.

Trainees are required to pass both periods of school-based training.

School Direct trainees will undertake teaching practice at their lead school and other schools within the alliance. Placements are organised by the lead school.

All trainees are supported in various ways whilst on placement:
-Every trainee has a personal tutor - this is the tutor who knows the trainee best at university and will usually teach them for some aspects of their studies. Personal tutors write trainee references for employment. For School-led routes the school writes a reference.
-Every trainee is allocated a visiting tutor whilst on placement. This tutor supports the school when assessing the trainee's progress and do do this observes each trainee teaching.
-Every trainee has a school mentor, this may be their class teacher or someone in the school who oversees placements
-Often there are multiple trainees on placement in each school, providing an inbuilt support network

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Introduction. MA Contemporary Photography is a fine art photography course that explores the possibilities of both visual and conceptual expression, merging research deeply with practice. Read more

Introduction

MA Contemporary Photography is a fine art photography course that explores the possibilities of both visual and conceptual expression, merging research deeply with practice. The course is rooted in the idea that photography has no self-limiting identity or essence. In creating work that is visually exciting and intellectually compelling you’ll develop as an artist with photography at the core of your practice, defining, or redefining photography as the art form of the 21st century.

Content

MA Contemporary Photography understands photography as plural, trans disciplinary and multimedial global language that is situated at the core of contemporary visual art practice. The deep integration of theory and practice offers supportive environment in which to explore photography as form of expression that interlaces fine art, technology, aesthetics, politics and new media. Opportunities to research photography as a central component of discursive practices within the arts, the sciences and the construction of personal identities, provide students with tools to work in fields related to artistic production and the extended creative industries.

Unlike many other photography courses, this course is not committed to one notion of what photography is or to one form of media specific practice. Instead of working from a predefined notion of photography, the course aims to provide students with the tools to locate their own practice within a broad range of contemporary visual forms. 

Structure

MA Contemporary Photography is a two year (60 weeks) part-time course structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each. Course attendance is three days in year one, and two days in year two. In year one we expect you to commit an average of 40 hours per week. In year two, your study is predominantly self-managed but we expect you to commit an average of 20 hours per week. Across the two years, you're expected to commit an average of 30 hours per week.

MA Contemporary Photography is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises two units: Unit one (60 credits) and Unit two (120 credits).

Students successfully achieving Unit one may exit at this point with the award of Postgraduate Certificate.

Both units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from the mark for Unit two only.



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