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The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Read more
The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Our faculty consists of specialists in the archaeology and history of art of the civilizations that have flourished in the area of modern Turkey. Students will learn about prehistoric Anatolian archaeology, the Greek and Roman eras, Late Antique and Byzantine studies, and the Ottoman period, and can decide to focus more specifically on one of these time periods. Cultural heritage management practices and museum operations are inseparable from the study of archaeology and the history of art, and students will also be instructed in these areas during their four-year undergraduate program. Students in our department have the opportunity to take courses in ancient languages of the Mediterranean and Anatolian worlds such as Greek, Latin, and Ottoman Turkish. Our lectures are enriched through field trips to archaeological sites and museum excursions, and participation in conferences and workshops organized by visiting lecturers and specialists from Turkey and abroad. We provide hands-on training in methods of analysis and conservation in our archaeological laboratory. Our students are also encouraged to participate in one of our archaeological excavation projects during the summer or to complete internships with museums or cultural heritage organizations.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Archaeology: Archaeology of the Neolitic, Chalcolithic, Bronze or Iron Ages.
• Hellenistic and Roman Art, architecture and archeology.
• Late Antique and Byzantine Art, architecture and archeology.
• Museum studies and cultural heritape management.

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 2.5 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 149 (new exam format), or 610 (older exam format), the minimum scores refer only to the quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL: Paper based (550/4), IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6.Writing Sample
The writing sample should be at least eight pages and could be a research paper or an article. We would prefer the writing sample to be in English, but if your previous academic training has been in another language, we can accept a sample in another language.

7. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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Koç University is one of the best places to obtain a MA degree in economics. The Economics faculty at Koç University has a solid reputation as contributors to the frontiers of knowledge in Turkey and abroad. Read more
Koç University is one of the best places to obtain a MA degree in economics. The Economics faculty at Koç University has a solid reputation as contributors to the frontiers of knowledge in Turkey and abroad.
Recently, the department has been ranked number 1 in Turkey and continues to improve its ranking in Europe and the world (Rankings are available here) Students are supported by research and teaching assistantships. They will have the opportunity to participate in the research projects of faculty members and teach their own classes so that they can develop their teaching skills further.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Mathematical Foundations
• Mathematics for Economists
• Microeconomics
• Macroeceonomics
• Econometrics
• Game Theory
• Law and Economics
• Mechanism Design
• International Trade
• Financial Economics
• Experimental Economics
• Economics of Information and Contracts
• The Economics of Instıtutions

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 3.0 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 155 Quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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Committed to a liberal arts tradition of intellectual curiosity and diversity, the International Relations Department at Koç University offers students a rigorous program of study that prepares them for successful careers in a rapidly globalizing world. Read more
Committed to a liberal arts tradition of intellectual curiosity and diversity, the International Relations Department at Koç University offers students a rigorous program of study that prepares them for successful careers in a rapidly globalizing world.

Koç University offers BA, MA and PhD degrees in International Relations. The students examine the basic questions of International Relations, including how nations struggle over power and wealth, how political communities reconcile claims of authority, liberty, and justice, and how governments and societies produce the policies that influence our lives. Students choose courses from the major subfields of international politics, comparative government, Turkish politics, and political theory. They develop critical analytical skills allowing them to explain, compare, and generalize about political phenomena in a broad range of countries, employing the key methodologies of the discipline.

Master of Art. in International Relations program reflects the Department’s emerging strength in the areas of European Integration, International Political Economy, and Security Studies. Graduates of the program are continuing their studies in top-ranking programs throughout the world in addition to working in multinational corporations, non-governmental agencies, and for the state. Scholarships are offered.

The Center for Research on Globalization Peace and Democratic Governance (GLODEM) has been operating as a research center at Koç University since November 2004 to enrich the debate about globalization and democracy on campus and to promote the flow of ideas between Koç and the global policy arena. The Center encourages comparative and multidisciplinary research on globalization and democratic governance, and serves as an intellectual platform for dialogue between academic and research scholars.

Koç University is the first university from Turkey to partner with the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations. This was established, at the initiative of the Governments of Spain and Turkey, under the auspices of the UN to promote understanding among societies.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Citizenship
• Civil Society
• Conflict Studies
• Democratization
• Development
• Ethnic Politics and Nationalism
• European Union
• Foreign Policy
• Globalization
• International Political Economy
• International Relations Theory
• Middle East Politics
• Migration
• Religion and Secularism
• Turkish Politics

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 3.0 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 155 Quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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The Master of Architecture provides a vibrant, challenging and expansive programme aimed at equipping you with the professional and creative skills for a successful career as an architect and leads to Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 exemption. Read more

Why take this course?

The Master of Architecture provides a vibrant, challenging and expansive programme aimed at equipping you with the professional and creative skills for a successful career as an architect and leads to Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 exemption. Through the design studios you will be exposed to a range of related architectural interests, including urbanism, landscape, practice, sustainability and culture, providing a cross-disciplinary learning environment that is appropriate in today’s professionally complex architectural world. We can also provide all incoming, full-time MArch students with funding toward a Course field trip.

What will I experience?

On this course you will undertake studio-based design projects, with opportunities to:

Engage with current collaborative projects with academic institutions in other countries – in the past these have included Turkey, Spain, Denmark and Australia
Work on projects with 'live' clients through our RIBA registered Project Office practice
Opt to study at a choice of European universities through the ERASMUS exchange scheme

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is professionally accredited by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). It is structured to ensure the integration and synthesis of contextual, technical and professional complexities inherent within the design process, helping you to engage with the prescribed ARB/RIBA criteria, and attain RIBA Part 2 exemption.

Module Details

The design curriculum is delivered through studios, each having a distinct research topic relating to the research and practice of the studio tutors. The studio topics and pedagogy provide a framework and guidance for student projects in Year One and support in Year Two as you develop your particular thesis questions into design propositions. Studios topics change annually in response to current issues in practice and society, challenging the architectural profession, and offering variety in scale,content and context in the UK and abroad.

Please see our proposed 2016/17 MArch studios below. You can find more information on our course blog and see output in our MArch Gallery.

MArch Studios 2016-17*

Latent Culture- Exploring the Reading, Mapping and Making of Place: Mapping, reading and drawing out, Studio 1 will explore cartography, archaeology, memory, narrative and material of place. Through a series of thematic studies – text and making based – the studio will bring together an understanding of place using artefacts, films, maps and narratives.

Littoral Landscapes: Change Labs for Coastal Experimentation: This studio will experiment with the ‘seeds’ of transformation, focussing on littoral landscapes – coastal villages, towns and cities in the UK and abroad. The studio is the Lab, the seeds are about speculation, growth, invention and entrepreneurialism - small changes which can lead to revolutions.

Urban Futures. Cities constantly change in response to changes in society: Today, major environmental and economic challenges we are facing require new models for the built environment that are capable to be resource efficient, adaptable to environmental modifications and designed to facilitate placemaking.

The Emergent Studio: Architecture of, on and around the Edge: The Emergent Studio explores the idea of making architecture within cultural contexts that are not ‘our own’; always in a location that in some way exemplifies an edge condition. Our theoretical platform for exploring these conditions has been, and continues to be, rooted within phenomenology, drawing from the writings of the humane Nordic modernist tradition, in informing our methodologies of interrogation and design.

Portsmouth: The Anatomy of "The Island City”: This studio continues our reflections on Portsmouth's response to climate change induced rise in sea levels adding an analysis of infrastructures and their impact on developing Urban & Architectural visions for the city.

Tactical Urbanism: Tactical Urbanism will investigate, in a radical and provocative way, how a university environment will change in the future and create alternative and hypothetical social scenarios as starting point for your design project. The aim is not to create a futuristic environment but to challenge the current paradigms and try to address the real problems and issues that our society will face in a near 2050 future.

Coastal Latent Dynamics: Material Voids: This new studio will frame the architectural process, starting with a close up of the Micro (the detail, the material qualities of place, prototyping), continuing to a wide shot of the Macro (the notion of municipality in a coastal context) and then zooming into the Meso (dealing with the opportunities of voids, empty buildings and their environs).

*Please note: studio offers may change due to staff and student numbers.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a combination of individual and group tutorials in your selected studio, while year-wide units are lecture-based, complemented by seminars and workshops. Our studio-teaching method will mean that you will be working with tutors with professional and academic experience in their field and all unit programmes are complemented by contributions from external professionals.

Studio programmes will often entail shared sessions with European and, sometimes, other overseas institutions, in countries such as Denmark, Turkey, Morocco, Italy and Spain. Representatives of local public and private bodies and agencies frequently contribute to studio tutorials and crits. All this helps to ensure that your learning and studio research outputs can have regional impact and global reach.

Design assessment is through studio review (crit) as work progresses and portfolio assessment at the end of the academic year. ‘Taught’ units, in support of the design curriculum, are assessed through various forms of illustrated written coursework – both individual and group, such as reports and the Dissertation.

Student Destinations

Careers in architecture are demanding ever-increasing specialism and professional competence.

The unique learning experience we offer on this course will enable you to develop as an expansive, creative and professional individual capable of success in a range of creative and professional environments. The breadth of engagement with the discipline and range of studios ensures that you will become confident in responding to the demands of the profession. The regional, national and international destinations of the School’s alumni are testament to this, as are our graduate employment take-up statistics.

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The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. Read more
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered.

In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe.

Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaime/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - Mediterranean studies (MAEIS). provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the globalised world. Read more

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - Mediterranean studies (MAEIS) provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the globalised world. The MAEIS is an international, interdisciplinary and itinerant programme which aims to educate the next generation of Euro-Mediterranean decision-makers. Following the slogan "Learning and living the Mediterranean", the participants rotate each trimester, moving their place of studies from Nice to Tunis and then Istanbul including a workshop in Rome. The programme is structured into three terms and is taught in English and French.

Programme

Nice

The first term (October to January) starts in the European Union, in Nice, France. It encompasses classes on the basics of the five modules (Conflict Management and Peace Making, Sustainable Development and Globalisation, Regional Integration and Transformation, Mediterranean Politics and Societies as well as Professional Skills Workshops). Studying in France helps the students to analyse the Mediterranean region and Euro-Mediterranean relations from an EU perspective. Courses will introduce to the institutional architecture of the EU and its neighbourhood policy. They will also discuss the shared risks of populism, terrorism and climate change. Mid-term exams will take place in December. The trimester concludes with a simulation exercise.

Tunis

The second term (January to April) starts off in Tunis, Tunisia. Our cooperation partner, the Université Internationale de Tunis, is famous for its integration of international students in Tunisia. Thanks to our partner, the Institut de Recherche sur le Maghreb Contemporain (IRMC), students will have access to the expertise and the library of one of the most renowned think tanks in the Maghreb. Researchers from the region will analyse transformation processes in the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean in times of globalisation. Studying in Tunisia will provide the students with a unique experience of a historic democratisation process that turns the nobelpeace-prize winning country into a role model throughout the MENA region. For non-Arab speakers an Arab language course is compulsory.

A study trip to Rome will take place during the 2nd or the 3rd term. Here, a special focus will be given to Foreign Policy Analysis (EU, Russia, US, Iran), as well as migration, poverty and food security, including visits of relevant UN institutions and conférences at our Partner, the renowned think tank, Istituto Affari INternazionali (IAI).

Istanbul

The programme concludes in Istanbul, Turkey (April to July) where the courses are organised in cooperation with our long-term partner, the Istanbul Bilgi University. Courses will deal with the changing EU-Turkey relations. Students will have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation on the Bosphorus, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict Management and Peace Making

The Mediterranean is a case study par excellence for Peace and Conflict Studies. Understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of „International Relations“ as an academic discipline – from its very beginning, after the First World War. In the last two decades Mediterranean societies have been significantly affected by inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Syria to Lybia. Mediterranean conflicts are partly characterised by external interventions. The module will focus at causes and dynamics of escalation and de-escalation, including international law and peace-making in a multiperspective approach. Theories on violence and peace will help to analyse the case studies proposed.

Sustainable development and Globalisation

The Mediterranean in the 21st century faces unprecedented economic, environmental and social challenges. As economic development exercises increased pressure on limited resources, deteriorates the environment and creates growing inequalities, Mediterranean economies struggle to find their way through these challenges. An introduction into economics as an academic discipline will set the ground for a regional analysis of sustainable development, energy policies, climate action and demographic dynamics.

Regional integration and transformation

The European Union became a model of regional integration. Nation states agreed to transform their sovereignity into a multi-level governance system sui generis to keep regional peace, increase welfare and economic power. How is the dynamic architecture of European institutions functioning – in times of both Europeanisation and Euroscepticism? And to what extent are the Arab League or the Union for the Mediterranean comparable models of regional integration?

Regional integration is primarily an elite-driven, government-sponsored transformation process. However, socio-economic and political change can be triggered by civil society and social movements, as the „Arab Spring“ has shown transregionally in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Change and continuity differ significantly in the MENA-region. Why? And which repercussions for the Union for the Mediterranean?

Mediterranean Politics and Societies

Mediterranean Politics are shaped by an interplay of different policy fields and policy actors. Theories of International Relations (i.e. Foreign Policy Analysis, Migration Theories) will help to understand the dynamics of policy making towards and in the Mediterranean region. Migration constitutes a challenging and complex policy field throughout the Mediterranean.

In a second part of this module we will approach Mediterranean societies with a generational focus upon „youth“. The current number of youth in the Mediterranean is unprecedented. Meanwhile, youth unemployment is a phenomenon that nearly all Mediterranean societies have in common. At the crossroads of theory and practice this module will identify solutions to the challenges the young generation faces in the Mediterranean.

Professional Skills Workshops

The participants will take part in negotiation and mediation trainings, simulation games and follow career workshops as well as workshops on project cycle management and intercultural communication.

Applications and Scholarships

Candidates can submit their application via the online application form. They should also include all the relevant documents, or send them by post or e-mail. An academic committee meets regularly in order to review complete applications.

A limited number of scholarships can be awarded to particularly qualified candidates. There are different funds available for this programme.

The application deadline is 15 May 2018.



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Learning and living Europe. Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul. The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies. Read more

Learning and living Europe: Study in 3 cities! Berlin - Nice - Rome or Istanbul

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - European integration and global studies provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the present times. Its encompassing teaching method at the crossroads of theory and practice helps the students to gain thorough academic expertise in European affairs as well as a first hand-insight into the work as a Policy Officer at a European institution or international organisation. With its leitmotiv "Learning and living Europe", the programme follows an original approach that distinguishes it from other Master's courses in European Studies and International Relations: the European integration and global studies programme is taught in English and takes place in three different study locations: Berlin, Nice, Rome or Istanbul. After two common terms, the participants have the possibility to chose between two options for the spring term: they can opt to finish their studies either in Rome or in Istanbul.

Programme

Berlin, Germany

The academic year starts in Berlin (from October to December), it encompasses classes on the basics of all the four modules (Conflict and cooperation in the international system, European integration and external action; Federalism and multi-level governance; Globalisation and sustainable development), completed by the seminar « Project cycle management », the core part of the fifth module "Professional Skills Workshops".

Nice, France

In Nice, teaching focuses on the current international order, examining the reasons for conflict and the perspectives for cooperation. Lectures explore Europe's policies in diverse fields (trade, democracy promotion, conflict resolution, climate change, development aid) to explain how important a role the EU plays on the international stage.

At the same time, the programme looks into the current challenges the European integration project is facing (euroscepticism, the challenges of economic governance, Brexit, refugee crisis). During this term, students take their mid-term exams.

A one-week study trip takes the students to European and international institutions in Brussels, Strasbourg and Luxembourg. Visits to the European Council, the European Commission and NATO are highlights of the stay in Brussels, whereas Strasbourg hosts not only the headquarters of the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rignts, but also the plenary sessions of the European Parliament.

Rome, Italy or Istanbul, Turkey

According to their choice, students will do their third trimester either in Rome or in Istanbul.

In Rome, special focus is given to the Mediterranean region and Africa with particular emphasis on the issues of migration, poverty and food security. Students will visit relevant UN institutions.

In Istanbul, students study the changing EU-Turkey relations and focus on area studies of the Black Sea region, the Caucasus including ENP, and Central Asia.

During the third term, students have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict and cooperation in the international system

A theoretically grounded approach to revisit the continuities and changes of international relations. Following a theoretical introduction into the grand schools of thought of international relations theory, we will approach the interdisciplinary field of conflict and violence studies. From its very beginning, understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of 'International Relations' as an academic discipline. A special focus will be given to inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts in both the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Ukraine to Syria.

European Integration and external action

This module aims at familiarising the students, who could well become the next generation of European and international decision-makers, with an expert knowledge of the structures, institutions, and problems of the European Union.We focus firstly on the historical development of European integration and then go on to analyse the Union’s institutions and study the basics of EU law. The last part of the program is devoted to the different policies of the EU and especially emphasises the challenges of enlargement.

Federalism, multi-level governance and conflict resolution

For the last fifteen years, federalism has known a revival as an international field of studies. In this framework, three major developments can be considered. The first is the study of the European Union, not analysed any more as a process of integration but in terms of federal institutional comparative approach. The second development is multi-level governance, that can be conceived as an extension of federalism as it deals with any form of multi-tier institutional system. This cooperative/competitive approach has appeared to understand the institutional consequences of the process of globalisation in post-industrialised societies, and of the subsequent changing of nature of sovereignty in the relevant states. Eventually, federalism has become a tool of conflict resolution, in order to resolve violent conflicts all over the world.

Economy, globalisation and sustainable development

The module puts a specific focus on the role of the EU as an economic actor on the global stage, with its opportunities and challenges driven both by European specific evolutions and globalisation trends. Finally, the module proposes an introduction to global sustainable development issues (climate change, access to water, etc.), as they are among the most decisive challenges that will shape the future of the world economy.

Professional Skills Workshops

This module equips the participants with the professional skills and competences that will enable them to work in the context of the European and international organisations. They will take actively part in several simulation games and follow workshops on project cycle management, intercultural management, as well as on mediation and negotiation.

The deadline for applications is 15 May 2018.



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Profitable design and operation of modern industrial systems requires integration of human, material, equipment and financial resources. Read more
Profitable design and operation of modern industrial systems requires integration of human, material, equipment and financial resources. In recent years this integration has become tighter due to the inclusion of information technology, and resulted in more complex systems. Industrial Engineering research focuses on quantitative analysis, synthesis and management of such complex systems. The affiliated faculty members come from the Industrial Engineering department of the College of Engineering, the Operations and Information Systems group of the College of Administrative Sciences and Economics, and other related fields. Our research areas are diverse, including Logistics, Supply Chain Management, Service Operations, Production Systems, Stochastic Processes, Financial Engineering, Mathematical Programming, Data Mining and Bioinformatics. The programs are built on the basic methodologies of operations research and their applications in manufacturing, distribution and service industries. Graduates of the M.Sc. program have been placed in respectable Ph.D. programs in North America, Europe and Turkey as well as various professional positions in industry.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Production Systems
• Service Operations
• Logistics
• Optimization Theory & Algorithms
• Stochastic Processes
• Finanacial Engineering
• Data Mining
• Bioinformatics
• Revenue Management
• Supply Chain Management

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Global-MINDS is a comprehensive 2- year study programme focusing on insights from Social and Cultural Psychology and applying them to contemporary societal issues. Read more

About Global-MINDS

Global-MINDS is a comprehensive 2- year study programme focusing on insights from Social and Cultural Psychology and applying them to contemporary societal issues. Students receive a thorough education in social and cultural psychological theory, research and methods, as well as training in intercultural skills – assets that are indispensable in today´s global knowledge economy and multicultural working environments. The programme includes an internationalization component that is indispensable for such a master.

Universities from five countries jointly deliver the Global-MINDS programme in English:

• ISCTE – Lisbon University Institute (ISCTE-IUL), Lisbon, Portugal

• University of Oslo (UiO), Oslo, Norway

• University of Social Sciences and Humanities (SWPS), Warsaw, Poland

• Koç University (KU), Istanbul, Turkey

• University of Limerick (UL), Limerick, Ireland

Global-MINDS has received a grant from the European Union to implement the master and fund a total of 58 scholarships of various kinds (programme countries, partner countries, and targeted regions) over 5 years, including 3 classes of students. The first class of students will begin in the Fall semester of 2017.

Education Paths

Global-MINDS students opt for one of three mobility paths for their first year of study, during which most of the course work is completed. Each mobility path focuses on a specific societal issue and provides students with diverse cultural experiences and educational contents:

A. Diversity & Inclusion (ISCTE-IUL, then UL)

B. Global Mobility & Acculturation (ISCTE-IUL or SWPS, then UiO)

C. Culture & Organizations (SWPS, then KU)

(Students may opt for an additional mobility in their second year to complete their internship and master thesis.)

Each of the program institutions is expert in their respective part of the Global-MINDS educational programme. Graduates will be awarded a joint master degree. A group of world-leading scholars from different countries also contributes to the delivery and quality assurance of the programme. An international network of associate partners – private companies, civil society organisations, public service providers, practitioners, policy makers, governmental organisations and NGOs – assures high quality student internships and assistance in graduates’ employment.

Application procedures

Global-MINDS uses the management platform eConsort to facilitate the application process. Only after registering with your name and email address will you be able to access the online application form.

Each eligible application will be evaluated for quality and those applicants who pass the first stage will be interviewed by video or telephone (see details below). Final ranking of candidates will be made after the interviews.

Applications are due 20 March, 2017 (midnight GMT). Please subscribe to our blog or check this site for updates and email inquiries to info[@global-minds.eu.

For more information please visit our website at: http://global-minds.eu/application/applications/

Financial Aid

If requested and eligible, Global-MINDS applicants will be considered for an Erasmus Mundus scholarships. The program also offers country specific scholarships for certain countries.

For more information about eligibility and the countries that are supported by the scholarship program, please visit our website at: http://global-minds.eu/application/costs-and-funding/

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Who is it for?. This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics students will care for the environment as a sustainable system and ultimately have a desire to improve conditions for the wider population.

Students come from a range of backgrounds, including engineering, finance and economics – and from within the energy industry itself.

Objectives

This MSc degree has been designed to give you a wide perspective when it comes to analysing and forecasting the future for energy, environmental technology and economics.

The Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics MSc will help you:

  • Understand the technologies for energy production: fossil fuels, nuclear and renewable
  • Assess the economic factors affecting energy production and supply
  • Know the economics governing consumer use and purchase of energy
  • Analyse and forecast the future of energy, environmental technology and economics
  • Evaluate the environmental effects of energy and other industrial production
  • Gain a real-world understanding of the issues – from regulation and government funding, to behavioural psychology and emerging technologies
  • Understand the technologies for reducing environmental impact and their economics
  • Consider ethical responsibilities in relation to energy use
  • Rapidly assess the most important features of a new technology
  • Integrate information across a broad range of subject areas, from engineering
  • through economics to risk assessment
  • Identify a range of perspectives, and look at the influence of a myriad of other forces at play by engaging with practising businesses and trade associations
  • The discipline of auditing energy consumption
  • Monitoring performance and engaging with international energy management standards
  • Relate to professionals from a wide variety of backgrounds, academic, commercial and industrial, from professors in engineering and mathematics through to consulting engineers to senior managers and directors of large, publicly quoted companies.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Energy Institute and fulfils the learning requirement for Chartered Engineer status.

Placements

There is no formal requirement to do an industry-based placement as part of the programme. However, some students arrange to undertake their dissertation research within a company or within their part of the world. A recent student investigated the future of coal-fired generation in Turkey, and another student is combining a work placement at The World Energy Council with their dissertation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised into modules comprising four consecutive day courses taken at a rate of one a month or so. This format makes the programme accessible for students who want to study part-time while working. Full-time students are also welcome.

Whether you choose to take the course as a part-time or full-time student, we will offer a great deal of support when it comes to helping you prepare for the modules and project work. You will be expected to devote a significant part of your non-taught hours to project work as well as private study.

Our course is led by an exceptional group of experts in energy, supply, demand management and policies. As an example, one of our module leaders leads the UK contribution to writing international energy management standards and informing policy through the European Sector Forum for Energy Management. This forum looks at methodologies across the continent.

There is also input to global standards development through the International Standards Organisation (ISO). At City we bring on board people with well-established academic careers, as well as leaders from the energy industry. The programme has strong links with industry and commerce and involves many visiting lecturers who hold senior positions in their fields.

You will be assessed by examination on the four core modules and you will need to complete a post modular assessment (a 2,000 to 3,000-word essay) on all of the eight modules.

Modules

You will take four core modules and have six elective modules from which you can choose four topics from diverse subjects relating to energy supply and demand.

Each course module is taught over four consecutive days of teaching with one module each month. Alongside the teaching, you will have coursework to complete for each module. The modules run from October to April, and in the remaining time, you will concentrate on your dissertation, which forms a significant part of the programme.

You are normally required to complete all the taught modules successfully before progressing to the dissertation.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to create your own questions and to decide on your own area of interest. It should be a detailed investigation into a subject on energy supply and/or demand, with your own analysis and conclusions outlining the way forward. You may see the focus of your dissertation as a future career path, but whatever your area of study, these final few months of the degree should embody your vision of the future.

If you are interested in sustainability, you have the option of taking up to two elective modules from the MSc in Environmental Strategy offered by the University of Surrey.

Core modules

  • Introduction to energy and environmental issues (15 credits)
  • Energy policies and economic dimensions (15 credits)
  • The energy market from the purchaser's perspective (15 credits)
  • Corporate energy management (15 credits)

Elective modules

  • Energy, economics and finance (15 credits)
  • Transport energy and emissions (15 credits)
  • Energy in industry and the built environment (15 credits)
  • Renewable energy and sustainability (15 credits)
  • Risk management (15 credits)
  • Water supply and management (15 credits).


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Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Read more

Overview

Environmental problems are indisputably a part of the contemporary political landscape. Societies across the globe increasingly confront innumerable and often inter-related environmental challenges ranging from climate change and loss of biodiversity to local conflicts about land-use. Each of these challenges has political, economic, cultural and ethical dimensions; each provides an opportunity to rethink longstanding debates and opens up new fields of political enquiry.

SPIRE’s Masters in Environmental Politics has run since 1996 and is taught by some of the most prominent figures in the field. The course is designed for people who wish to understand and analyse the wide range of political and policy questions thrown up by increasingly complicated environmental problems. It has attracted students from all over the UK, the EU and the world. The international mix of students and staff adds greatly to the nature of discussion and learning.

Keele University has an unrivalled reputation for its work in Environmental Politics, with internationally recognised experts in various fields of social science environmental research particularly in the fields of sociology, political theory, economics, international relations, environmental ethics and public policy. Our interdisciplinary approach, together with a large and active research community on environmental issues within Keele, contributes to a thriving intellectual culture of which you can expect to be a part as an Environmental Politics student.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/environmentalpolitics/

Course Aims

The aim of the MA/MRes in Environmental Politics is to provide you with an intensive period of study in which to learn about environmental politics and policy in a systematic and critical manner. It aims to provide you with a foundation in the theoretical and practical dimensions of this challenging, interdisciplinary field. In addition to your core modules for the MA/MRes, we recommend that you take our Dimensions of Environmental Politics module, which introduces five key fields of political inquiry in relation to the environment. It looks at: green political theory; the political sociology of the environment; the environment and public policy; environment and political economy; and international environmental politics. Your other chosen elective modules and your dissertation project give a broad scope in which to pursue specific environmental topics of your own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Public Policy (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics (recommended)
• Environmental Diplomacy (recommended)
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy (recommended)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. Read more

Overview

In international politics, the primary day-to-day means of contact between states is through the institution of diplomacy. A rich legal tradition of how this diplomacy is governed has evolved, and the practices of diplomacy by states continue to change and shape the patterns of world politics around us. So one important way to understand international politics is to examine the practices of diplomats and the contexts within which they operate.

Keele's MA/MRes in Diplomatic Studies aims to meet this need. The first of its kind in the UK, it continues to provide a solid, advanced grounding in the legal foundations, and the theory and practice of diplomacy. Many students on the course are from diplomatic backgrounds, and so the course provides a useful link between the worlds of academia and of practical policy-making.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/diplomaticstudies/

Course Aims

The course aims to ground students in the central legal, theoretical and practical aspects of diplomacy. It does this within a context of a more general understanding of International Relations. It also prepares students for research – both research that they may do for their dissertation, but also research that they may undertake in their future academic or professional work. The optional modules and the dissertation give students a broad scope in which to pursue topics of their own choosing.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and international Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Diplomatic Studies (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management Reform (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law (recommended)
• Diplomatic Practice (recommended)
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China (recommended)
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Background reading:
There is no single textbook for this course. Some of the basic texts include: R.P. Barston, Modern Diplomacy, G.R. Berridge, Diplomacy: Theory and Practice, C.M. Constantinou, On the Way to Diplomacy, J. Der Derian, On Diplomacy, K. Hamilton and R. Langhore, The Practice of Diplomacy, H. Nicoslon, The Evolution of Diplomatic Method, E. Satow, Guide to Diplomatic Practice, and A. Watson, Diplomacy: The Dialogue Between States.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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As a discipline, International Relations is undergoing many transformations. Read more

Overview

As a discipline, International Relations is undergoing many transformations. From a discipline which focused closely on a certain set of interactions between sovereign states, it has expanded greatly to encompass a much wider set of questions about the nature of international or global political structures and processes.

Correspondingly, a whole set of theoretical tools have also emerged to try to explain or interpret this newly expanded field

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationalrelations/

Course Aims

The course aims to provide you with an innovative grounding in the central theoretical and practical aspects of both the traditional and the expanded conceptions of International Relations. It also aims to equip you with the conceptual and analytical skills to think critically about the nature of global structures and processes. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in International Relations (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in International Relations (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management reform
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda (recommended)
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques. Read more

Overview

Security matters. Because it matters, its study demands the development of complex analytical skills supported by cutting edge research as well as innovative and creative teaching techniques.

This novel exciting course reflects the latest trends in security studies and is designed to provide students with the elements to become world-class global security analysts. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students and offers direct applications for policy-makers, risk professionals, and students seeking to pursue an academic path.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/globalsecurity/

Course Aims

This novel exciting programme reflects the latest trends in security studies, cutting-edge security research developed at Keele, and innovative and creative teaching methods. The course is intended for UK, EU, and overseas students eager to develop their analytical skills on the breathtaking world of global security. The uniqueness of the programme lies on its creative approach to teaching and research designed to inspire critical thinking for the analysis of a complex world. Teaching is complemented by academic-trips intended to provide students with an opportunity to experience in situ security analysis. The overall objective of the programme is to help students to unleash their curiosity on learning and researching security.

This course aims to provide you with an up-to-date, advanced and critical introduction to the theory and politics of global security. In doing so it also seeks to promote and nurture the development of the complex analytical and conceptual skills that the study of this discipline requires. These skills are fundamental to postgraduate study and invaluable for vocational and personal development and for future professional life.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and Process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in Global Security (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice
• Comparative Public Management
• Comparative European Politics
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The European Union and the Global Commons
• The Politics of Global Security (recommended)
• The Theory of Global Security (recommended)
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

Options available outside SPIRE
It is also possible to take a modern foreign language as a replacement for one of your optional modules. Languages currently available are; French, Russian, German, Spanish and Japanese, at beginners, intermediate or advanced level.

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Read more

Overview

The nature and role of the state and its institutions and the relationship between the state, these institutions and society are undergoing fundamental transformations. Arguably, nowhere are these developments more evident than in contemporary Europe.

On the one hand, European integration has undoubtedly challenged the role and powers of the nation state. While nation states remain in control of many aspects of domestic politics and policy, more and more policies are being shaped by decisions made at the European Union level. While these trends raise all sorts of questions about issues of sovereignty, democratic accountability, representation and efficiency, they also open up new opportunities for the nation states to cooperate more closely, and for the EU itself to develop further as a regional and global actor.

On the other hand, developments within nation states have challenged the ways political decisions are made and how citizens are linked with this decision-making. Traditional communities have become less cohesive, political loyalties have waned, and trust in democratic institutions has declined. At the same time, however, we have also witnessed the rise of new values, identities and actors. Together, these developments are putting pressure on longstanding patterns and processes of representation, political intermediation and decision-making and are challenging the traditional way of conducting politics.

This course is unique in the UK in that it examines developments within Europe through an interdisciplinary lens, combining political science and international relations perspectives with historical and cultural ones. This broad outlook is made possible by the range of expertise of the teaching staff at Keele and by SPIRE’s research strengths.

The course is taught over a 12 month period (September-September; January-January). It is available as a full-time and/or part-time mode of study. Students completing the course have gone on to a variety of careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/europeanpoliticsandculture/

Course Aims

The aims of this Masters course are to provide students with the conceptual and analytical skills and the factual knowledge to think critically about and develop an understanding of the political and cultural dynamics of contemporary Europe, viewed in a global, regional and national context.

In addition, the course aims to assist students in developing a range of cognitive and social skills relevant to their intellectual, vocational and personal development. In pursuing these aims, the course seeks to prepare students for a variety of professional careers, including those in governmental and non-governmental organizations, the European institutions, the media and business, or for research beyond the Masters level.

Course Content

Taught masters programmes require satisfactory completion of at least 180 credits, made up of 6 taught module (120 credits) plus a 15,000 word dissertation (60 credits). The MA and MRes programmes differ in that the MA programme contains more subject-specific modules and less research training, while the MRes programme contains more research training, in preparation for a research career or for undertaking a research degree such as a PhD.

MA
• Power, Knowledge and the World (30 credits)
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Research in Action (15 credits)
• Three (15 credits) optional modules chosen from the list below
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

MRes
• Research Design and process (20 credits)
• Two 15 credits optional modules chosen from the list below
• Perspectives in Politics and International Relations (30 credits)
• Quantitative Data Analysis I (20 credits)
• Qualitative Data Analysis (20 credits)
• 15,000 word dissertation on an approved topic in European Politics and Culture (60 credits)

Options
Optional modules can be drawn from modules such as those listed below, although the precise list of available modules may vary from year to year.

• Approaches to European Integration: History and Practice (recommended)
• Comparative European Politics (recommended)
• Comparative Public Management Reform
• Diplomatic Law
• Diplomatic Practice
• Dimensions of Environmental Politics
• Environmental Diplomacy
• Environmental Politics and Policy in India and China
• Environmental Movements: North and South
• Parties and Democracy
• Right-Wing Radical Parties
• The Changing International Agenda
• The Politics of Global Security
• The Theory of Global Security
• US Environmental Politics and Policy
• US Foreign Policy

It is also possible to take a modern foreign language (other than English) as one of the optional modules. Language modules run over both semesters. Languages currently available are:

* French (beginners, intermediate, advanced, post A-level 1 or post A-level 2 level)
* German (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Spanish (beginners, intermediate, advanced or post A-level 1 level)
* Japanese (beginners, intermediate or advanced level)
* Russian (beginners or intermediate level)

Teaching & Assessment

Postgraduate teaching and learning generally takes place in a combination of large seminars and smaller discussion groups. Our academics typically lead the sessions, encouraging discussion between all students. Sometimes students will give presentations, either individually or in groups.

There is a strong emphasis on independent learning and students are expected to work on their own to produce their essays and dissertation. Most modules are assessed by a diverse range of coursework (e.g., essays, critiques, reports, presentations), though some modules may also be assessed by seminar contributions and/or written exams. Students take three modules in each semester. The taught modules are completed by May, leaving the summer months for students to write their dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from purchasing textbooks and other sundry materials, no significant additional costs are compulsory for this course.

International

SPIRE is a thoroughly international school, and is particularly welcoming to international students, as well as providing plenty of opportunities for home students to broaden their horizons.

We have staff with educational backgrounds in a wide variety of countries, such as Sweden, Canada, Bulgaria, Italy, Austria, Romania, and Turkey, who present their research all around the world. Students have the opportunity to hear visiting lecturers from various different countries, arranged through our ERASMUS partnerships.

International students will join established international communities at Keele, and will find plenty of support mechanisms in place to help them make the transition to study in the UK.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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