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This London-based course is an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a dissertation of around 25,000 words, aspects of the history of the Tudor dynasty and its international importance. Read more

Course outline

This London-based course is an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a dissertation of around 25,000 words, aspects of the history of the Tudor dynasty and its international importance.

Students will be encouraged to consider the interrelation of political, architectural, art, and social history. After the Course Director’s general introduction, there will be a series of twelve seminars which explore the origins of the Tudor dynasty in the Wars of the Roses and the government of the early Tudor state (and its limitations). The reign of Henry VIII will be examined as an example of ‘Renaissance monarchy’. Female monarchy and its implications for Tudor government will be another major theme. The course will also consider the material culture of Tudor England at all social levels, examining propaganda and print, architectural patronage and its development throughout the Tudor period. It will review the evidence of artistic patronage and the development of Renaissance literature and drama in the Tudor period. Reading lists will be made available before each lecture to allow for background reading and discussion with the expert speakers.

Each seminar will take place in the early evening at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, and will include a 40-minute question-and-answer session with the seminar speakers, all recognised experts in their fields.

Each seminar will be followed by a dinner at which there will be further discussion with the speaker and a general conversation about the topic in hand. The cost of the dinners is included in the tuition fees.

Tutorials and meetings will take place at the University of Buckingham’s London offices at 51 Gower Street, Bloomsbury, WC1E 6HJ.

The Course Director:

Glenn Richardson, BA (Hons), PhD, FRHistS, FSA, FHA (Hon), FHEA

Glenn Richardson is Professorial Research Fellow of the Humanities Research Institute, University of Buckingham, and is also Professor of Early Modern History at St Mary’s University London. He is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the Society of Antiquaries, and an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association. He lectures regularly for the University of Oxford’s Department of Continuing Education.

His research interests are grounded in Anglo-French relations in the sixteenth century, but encompass early-modern European diplomacy and cultural exchanges more widely. His other principal areas of research are European Renaissance monarchy, the Tudor and Valois courts, and royal masculinity. Professor Richardson’s most recent publication is The Field of Cloth of Gold (Yale UP, 2013). He is currently writing a biography of Cardinal Wolsey.

Associate students

For those wishing to attend the evening research seminar programme, but unable to devote the time to the coursework or to register for the MA degree, there is the option of becoming an Associate Student. This status will enable the student to attend the ten research seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, in the first six months of the programme, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

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This two-year, part-time Master’s programme is designed for those who wish to study at postgraduate level and are keen to develop high-level skills in historical research. Read more
This two-year, part-time Master’s programme is designed for those who wish to study at postgraduate level and are keen to develop high-level skills in historical research.

The course offers two thematic strands in which students specialise. The first, British local and regional history, is constant throughout all intakes. The second, which changes for each intake, is Politics and religion in Tudor and Stuart England for the 2016-2018 course. You will specialise in one of these two themes, studying taught modules and undertaking original research, culminating in a dissertation of 16,000 to 20,000 words.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-history

Course detail

The MSt is taught over two years in short, intensive study blocks, and begins in October 2016 (Michaelmas Term). It has been designed to be accessible to those in full- or part-time employment and to international students.

Successful applicants will become members of a Cambridge college and will join the wider graduate community, with full access to the facilities of the University.

By the end of the course students should have:

- developed an understanding of, and ability to apply critically, the main academic theories and concepts underpinning the study of history;
- extended and developed their analytical, evaluative and critical capacities;
- developed the ability to form independent judgements based on their reading, research and writing;
- demonstrable specific subject knowledge and analysis relevant to their dissertation;
- developed research skills required for further postgraduate research.

Format

The MSt is structured around four residential modules that students must attend. All students take modules 1 and 3 together; modules 2 and 4 are subject pathway modules. In the first year, each of the four residential blocks is preceded by guided preparatory reading and other activities.

A Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) offers learning support to students while they are on the programme, including learning resources, peer-to-peer and student-to-tutor discussion between modules, to build a virtual community of practice. Students are expected to have sufficient IT skills to engage with the VLE and all assignments are uploaded to the VLE for assessment.

Lectures, seminars and classes: c.75 hours in Year 1 (including some reading/prep time), c.18 hours in Year 2.

Supervision: 5 x 1-hour sessions in Year 2.

Year 1

The taught elements of the syllabus are offered during Year 1 in four intensive study blocks, usually scheduled inside Full Term, each of which is examined by an assessed essay. Sessions are offered in research training, and essay and dissertation writing.

Module 1: Theory, concepts and historiography (3 - 6 October 2016)*
Induction Day: Introduction to the course, tours of the University and Seeley History libraries, talk on Cambridge colleges.

The Annales School, international history, gender, feudalism, race, class and social status, nations and states, religion, essay workshop.

Module 2: (30 November – 2 December 2016)*
a) British local and regional history
Approaches to local history, manors and tour of medieval Cambridge, the parish, early modern culture, religion and belief, urban history, consumption, family and household, essay workshop.

OR

b) Politics and Religion in Tudor and Stuart England 1520 - 1625
Parliamentary history, Reformation history, politics, religion and memory.

Module 3: Sources, methods and research skills (22 - 24 February 2017 )*
Using library resources and archives, the census, global and transnational history, micro-history, sources for early modern history, IT for historians, Excel for historians, practical, quantitative and economic history, oral history and its discontents, anthropology and history, essay workshop.

Module 4: (19 – 21 May 2017)*
a) British local and regional history
Disease, death and doctors, plague and venereal disease, why were towns the principal determinant of mortality change from 1600 to 1900?, the old Poor Law and charity, the new Poor Law, charity and the state, workhouse medicine and mortality, smallpox, childbirth, midwifery and the man-midwife, mutual aid and self-help, the ‘professionalisation’ of medicine, essay workshop.

OR

b) Politics and Religion in Tudor and Stuart England 1625 - 1715
Sources for Tudor and Stuart political history, sources for Tudor and Stuart religious history.

* module content subject to change

Year 2

The second year is characterised by focus on the dissertation. Students will work independently on their chosen topic under the supervision of an expert in their chosen field with whom they will have regular contact. Students will be required to attend five supervisions between May 2017 and May 2018, at least three of which must be face-to-face and two of which can be online.

There will also be three day-schools at Madingley Hall, at which students provide short presentations on their research to date and at which there is some research training:

- Saturday 21 October 2017
- Saturday 2 December 2017
- Saturday 14 April 2018

Assessment

- A dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words (including footnotes and appendices, but excluding bibliography)
- Four essay assignments, each of 4,000 words maximum.

Some assignments and the dissertation require literature reviews.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

You may be interested to know that from 2016/17, Student Finance England (SFE) is introducing a postgraduate loans scheme for full-time and part-time Master’s courses. Information on eligibility, the amount of the loan and the level of repayment can be found in SFE’s The Student Room: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=5659-Student-Finance

Please note that SFE is planning to take applications via its main Student finance website, from summer 2016: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

Sources of government funding and financial support - including Professional and Career Development Loans

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This is a one-year full time (with part time routes available) programme of study designed for graduates seeking to develop specialist knowledge in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics. Read more
This is a one-year full time (with part time routes available) programme of study designed for graduates seeking to develop specialist knowledge in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics.

The MSc in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics, therefore, provides students with an opportunity to study at a postgraduate level to fulfil the initial requirements for BASES accreditation, to develop their knowledge of the sport and exercise sciences and to increase their skills in applying such knowledge in both sporting and exercise populations.

Course content
Within the past decade there has been a marked growth in the career opportunities available for sport and exercise biomechanists (eg teaching in further and higher education, World Class Support programmes). Coupled with this growth there has also been an increased need for appropriately qualified and accredited individuals to fill such positions. The British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences has developed procedures for the accreditation of suitably experienced individuals that stipulate the possession of a relevant form of postgraduate qualification. The MSc in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics, therefore, provides students with an opportunity to study at a postgraduate level to fulfil the initial requirements for BASES accreditation, to develop their knowledge of the sport and exercise sciences and to increase their skills in applying such knowledge in both sporting and exercise populations.

Home tuition fees for 2017

1 Year full-time including dissertation £5670.00.

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas fees for 2017 are £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite. In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities
5 x Kistler force plates
1 x RS Scan pressure plate
3 x EMG systems
14 camera Vicon T-Series motion capture
Integrated Visual 3D analysis
Quintic video based kinematic analysis
Cybex Norm isokinetic dynamometer
Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
Sports hall
110m synthetic athletics track
Modern fitness suite
Strength and conditioning room
Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
Grass football and rugby pitches
Outdoor netball and tennis court
Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
Two seminar rooms
Cricket nets
Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs
Two dedicated biomechanics labs
Five dedicated physiology labs
An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
Where this can take you
We provide performance support for elite athletes and competitive teams. We consistently perform well against the elite of university sport. A high number of our performance teams compete in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) programme at the elite level.

Several teams are supported with high-level coaching, training facility support and sports science analysis. Numerous local and national sports clubs links with our student sports teams provide additional high-level playing opportunities.

Indicative modules
All students are required to complete four modules in their chosen pathway plus the two modules in research methods and statistics and either a research dissertation or a supervised experience portfolio.

Modules currently available are:

Applied Techniques in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics
Biomechanical Instrumentation and Measurement
Ergonomics in Sport and Exercise
The Research Methods and Statistics I
The Research Methods and Statistics II
The Supervised Experience Portfolio
Tissue Mechanics and Assistive Devices
Independent Project
In addition, all students have the option of substituting one module for an Independent Study module.

Assessment

To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics, students need to complete three modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment.

To gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics, students need to complete six modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment.

To gain an MSc in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics, students need to complete six modules, and a dissertation of 12,000 words or a supervised experience portfolio.

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Our MSc Sport and Exercise Physiology programme is designed for graduates seeking to develop specialist knowledge in Sport and Exercise Physiology. Read more
Our MSc Sport and Exercise Physiology programme is designed for graduates seeking to develop specialist knowledge in Sport and Exercise Physiology. Within the past decade there has been a marked growth in the career opportunities available for sport and exercise biomechanics (eg teaching in further and higher education, World Class Support programmes). Coupled with this growth there has also been an increased need for appropriately qualified and accredited individuals to fill such positions.

The British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences has developed procedures for the accreditation of suitably experienced individuals that stipulate the possession of a relevant form of postgraduate qualification. The MSc in Sport and Exercise Physiology, therefore, provides students with an opportunity to study at a postgraduate level to fulfill the initial requirements for BASES accreditation, to develop their knowledge of the sport and exercise sciences and to increase their skills in applying such knowledge in both sporting and exercise populations

Home tuition fees for 2017

1 Year full time including dissertation £5670.00.

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees for 2017 are £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite. In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:
Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
Sports hall
110m synthetic athletics track
Modern fitness suite
Strength and conditioning room
Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
Grass football and rugby pitches
Outdoor netball and tennis court
Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
Two seminar rooms
Cricket nets
Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs
Two dedicated biomechanics labs
Five dedicated physiology labs
An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
Where this can take you
We understand the importance of ensuring that you have the knowledge, skills and experience to compete successfully in today’s challenging jobs market. Our students have gone on to work & train in a variety industries including:

Athletic trainer
Sports science support personnel
Sports equipment consultant
Health promotion
We provide performance support for elite athletes and competitive teams. We consistently perform well against the elite of university sport. A high number of our performance teams compete in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) programme at the elite level.

Several teams are supported with high-level coaching, training facility support and sports science analysis. Numerous local and national sports clubs’ links with our student sports teams provide additional high-level playing opportunities.

Indicative modules
All students are required to complete four modules in their chosen pathway plus the two modules in research methods and statistics and a research dissertation or support placement. Typical modules include:

Applied Techniques in Exercise Physiology
Cardio-respiratory Physiology in Sport, Exercise and Disease
Professional Skills in Sport and Exercise Physiology: Towards a Theoretical Framework
Research Methods and Statistics
Skeletal Muscle: Structure, Function and Plasticity
The Research Dissertation
The Supervised Experience Portfolio

Teaching and Assessment
To gain a Postgraduate Certificate students need to complete three modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment
To gain a Postgraduate Diploma students need to complete six modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment
To gain an MSc students need to complete six modules and a dissertation of 12,000-words

Read less
Our MSc Sports Performance analysis programme is designed for graduates seeking to develop specialist knowledge in Sports Performance Analysis. Read more
Our MSc Sports Performance analysis programme is designed for graduates seeking to develop specialist knowledge in Sports Performance Analysis. Within the past decade there has been a marked growth in the career opportunities available for sports performance analysts (e.g. professional sporting teams, nationally and internationally, World Class Support programmes, and teaching in Further and Higher Education). Coupled with this growth there has also been an increased need for appropriately qualified and accredited individuals to fill such positions.

The MSc in Sport Performance Analysis will help towards accreditation from International Society of Performance Analysis of Sport (ISPAS). The course is aligned to some of the key benchmarks for accreditation, and fulfils the initial requirements if the graduate would like to apply for accreditation.

Home tuition fees 2017

1 year full-time including dissertation £5670.00.

Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas fees 2017

1 year full-time £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite. In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:

Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
Sports hall
110m synthetic athletics track
Modern fitness suite
Strength and conditioning room
Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
Grass football and rugby pitches
Outdoor netball and tennis court
Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
Two seminar rooms
Cricket nets
Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs
Two dedicated biomechanics labs
Five dedicated physiology labs
An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
Where this can take you
We understand the importance of ensuring that you have the knowledge, skills and experience to compete successfully in today’s challenging jobs market.

We provide performance support for elite athletes and competitive teams. We consistently perform well against the elite of university sport. A high number of our performance teams compete in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) programme at the elite level. Some of our graduates have gone on to secure jobs with England Netball, Southampton FC, AFC Bournemouth, Brighton FC, Bristol City FC, London Scottish RFC, Surrey County Cricket Club, amongst others.

Several teams are supported with high-level coaching, training facility support and sports science analysis. Numerous local and national sports clubs’ links with our student sports teams provide additional high-level playing opportunities.

Work placements
The course includes an extensive work placement module involving work related learning and the development of skills specific to the world of commercial sports performance analysis. You will be involved within an elite, semi-professional or professional sports setting through organisations connected with the University, or even one of your choice providing an agreement is arranged. Through the departments' consultancy work, there is opportunity to work with a variety of clubs from various sports. This placement has ranged from a variety of sports over the years including football, rugby, cricket, basketball and netball.

Previous students have worked with the following clubs and franchises:

AFC Bournemouth
Surrey Cricket
Surrey United Basketball
Southampton FC
Brighton and Hove
Harlequins
London Scottish
and many more...
The work placement module provides a platform for students to get involved in performance analysis in a real world situation, working closely with coaches, players, strength and conditioning coaches, physios and management support team. Students are expected to utilise this opportunity to practise skills learned in the university and use innovative ideas to provide the teams with advanced analysis services.

Indicative modules
All students are required to complete modules in their chosen pathway (one as an elective) plus the two modules in research methods and statistics and a research dissertation.

Modules currently available are:

​Advances in Performance Analysis of Sport
Applied Performance Analysis
Work Placement
Research Methods & Statistics I
Research Methods & Statistics II
Research Dissertation
In addition, all students have the option of an elective module from:

Applied Techniques in Biomechanics
Motor Learning & Control
Independent Study

Teaching and Assessment
To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Sports Performance Analysis, students need to complete three modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment.

To gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Sports Performance Analysis, students need to complete six modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment.

To gain an MSc in Sports Performance Analysis, students need to complete six modules, and either a 12,000 word thesis or a 6,000 word journal article and an oral presentation.

We use a broad range of assessments, which are also novel and vocational to help enhance key employability skills i.e. job application, job interview, CPD portfolio, scout reports, and oral presentations, as well as scientific reports and independent research projects.

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Our MSc Strength and Conditioning is carefully aligned to the UKSCA accreditation process, and focuses on both the scientific principles of the strength and conditioning process, their practical application, and assessment using both laboratory and field based measurement systems to provide the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary for a successful career in Strength and Conditioning. Read more
Our MSc Strength and Conditioning is carefully aligned to the UKSCA accreditation process, and focuses on both the scientific principles of the strength and conditioning process, their practical application, and assessment using both laboratory and field based measurement systems to provide the knowledge, skills, and experience necessary for a successful career in Strength and Conditioning.

Indicative course content:

Strength and Conditioning Theory and Practice

Planning, Programming and Application

Applied Measurement Techniques

Work Placement

Research Methods

Students also deliver a research dissertation and undertake a dedicated work placement module.

Home tuition fees for 2017

1 Year full-time including dissertation £5670.00.

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees for 2017 are £12,360.00


Our facilities
Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite. In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:

Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
Sports hall
110m synthetic athletics track
Modern fitness suite
Strength and conditioning room
Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
Grass football and rugby pitches
Outdoor netball and tennis court
Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
Two seminar rooms
Cricket nets
Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs
Two dedicated biomechanics labs
Five dedicated physiology labs
An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
Where this can take you
We understand the importance of ensuring that you have the knowledge, skills and experience to compete successfully in today’s challenging jobs market.

We provide performance support for elite athletes and competitive teams. We consistently perform well against the elite of university sport. A high number of our performance teams compete in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) programme at the elite level.

Several teams are supported with high-level coaching, training facility support and sports science analysis. Numerous local and national sports clubs’ links with our student sports teams provide additional high-level playing opportunities.

Indicative modules
Indicative course content:

Strength and Conditioning Theory and Practice

Planning, Programming and Application

Applied Measurement Techniques

Work Placement

Research Methods

Students also deliver a research dissertation and undertake a dedicated work placement module.

Read less
Our MSc Sports Coaching Science programme is carefully aligned to employer needs and aims to provide the knowledge, skills and experience to successfully pursue a career in the area of Sports Coaching Science. Read more
Our MSc Sports Coaching Science programme is carefully aligned to employer needs and aims to provide the knowledge, skills and experience to successfully pursue a career in the area of Sports Coaching Science.

The processes and theories underpinning sports coaching science will be explored, together with key practical competencies, all delivered in conjunction with an intensive work placement offering invaluable industry relevant experience.

This course is highly vocational in nature and beneficial to those either wishing to seek future employment in Sports Coaching Science, or, those currently employed within a professional club or organisation.

The advent of this course is in response to the marked growth in career opportunities available to sports coaching scientists across a range of sporting clubs and organisations. This is exemplified by the large number of job vacancies advertised on websites such as SportsCoachUK, UK Sport, BASES, County Sports Partnerships and LinkedIn.

**Candidates must hold at least a Level Two Governing Body of Sport coaching award; having currently (within the last 3 years) attended a Safeguarding and Protecting Children workshop and hold current coaching insurance and a current DBS check.

Home tuition fees for 2017

1 Year full-time including dissertation £5670.00.

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees for 2017 are £12,360.00



Our facilities
Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite. In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:

Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
Sports hall
110m synthetic athletics track
Modern fitness suite
Strength and conditioning room
Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
Grass football and rugby pitches
Outdoor netball and tennis court
Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
Two seminar rooms
Cricket nets
Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs
Two dedicated biomechanics labs
Five dedicated physiology labs
An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
Where this can take you
Typical Careers include

Professional clubs - coaching in academies, centres of excellence, club/community coaches
Amateur clubs - tennis, squash and golf clubs etc.
Industry - hotels, holiday companies, sports development for Sports Governing Bodies, British and overseas
Coach education - Sports Coach UK (SCUK) and equivalent overseas bodies
Teaching
We provide performance support for elite athletes and competitive teams. We consistently perform well against the elite of university sport. A high number of our performance teams compete in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) programme at the elite level.

Several teams are supported with high-level coaching, training facility support and sports science analysis. Numerous local and national sports clubs’ links with our student sports teams provide additional high-level playing opportunities.

Indicative modules
All students are required to complete four modules in their chosen pathway plus two modules in research methods and statistics and either a research project or a supervised experience portfolio.

Modules currently available are:

Independent Study Module (elective)
Applied Techniques in Exercise Physiology (elective)
Applied Performance Analysis (elective)
Motor Control and Skill Acquisition
Applied Coaching Practice (Work Placement – double credit module)
Research Methods and Statistics I
Research Methods and Statistics II
The Research Dissertation

Teaching and Assessment
To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Sports Coaching Science, students need to complete three modules. Each module is assessed by the equivalent of a 4,000-word assignment.

To gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Sports Coaching Science, students need to complete six modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment.

To gain an MSc in Sports Coaching Science students need to complete six modules, and a dissertation of 12,000 words or a sport science support placement.

Read less
The MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology (BPS Stage 1) seeks to provide you with an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of the discipline and to increase your skills in applying such knowledge in the context of sport performance and exercise for health and wellbeing. Read more
The MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology (BPS Stage 1) seeks to provide you with an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of the discipline and to increase your skills in applying such knowledge in the context of sport performance and exercise for health and wellbeing.

The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as a recognised stage 1 qualification for those wishing to pursue a career as a Sport and Exercise Psychologist whilst also fulfilling the requirements for graduates wishing to pursue professional training through the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES).

By studying a Chichester you will have the opportunity to become involved in the wider research and consultancy work of the department which include Sport and Exercise Psychology academics and consultants.

The Sport & Exercise Psychology MSc is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS).

It is a one-year full time (with part time routes available) programme of study designed for graduates from either Psychology or Sport and Exercise Sciences who are seeking to gain professional recognition through the BPS Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology (QSEP).

Graduates would therefore practice as an Accredited Sport & Exercise Scientist.

The MSc will also act as a suitable postgraduate qualification for those seeking research positions and other professions.

Within the past decade there has been a marked growth in the career opportunities available for sport and exercise psychologists (eg, working with individual athletes or clubs, teaching in further and higher education and health promotion).

Coupled with such growth has also been an increased need for appropriately qualified and accredited individuals to fill such positions.

The British Psychological Society (BPS) has developed procedures for the accreditation of suitably experienced individuals that stipulate the possession of a relevant form of postgraduate qualification.

Similarly BASES require applicants for Supervised experience to also have a postgraduate qualification in a specialist discipline.

The MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology therefore seeks to provide students with an opportunity to study at a postgraduate level to fulfill the initial requirements for BPS and BASES accreditation, to develop their specialist knowledge of the psychology and to increase their skills in applying such knowledge in both sporting and exercise populations.

Home tuition fees for 2017

1 Year full-time including dissertation £5670.00

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas fees for 2017 are £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we have redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available as you study for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students. All of our facilities are designed for academic teaching, research, British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions and for your social/recreational use throughout the week and weekends.

The world-class Tudor Hale Centre for Sport is the focus of sporting activities, both academic and recreational, at the University. The Tudor Hale Centre for Sport incorporates a suite of state of the art sport science laboratories, a sports injury clinic, a strength and conditioning room and a fitness suite. In addition, there is a sports hall used for basketball, netball, trampolining, badminton, volleyball, cricket, soccer, table tennis, hockey and ultimate frisbee. Located beside the Tudor Hale Centre for Sport you will find our brand new Sports Dome, incorporating four indoor tennis courts, our all-weather astro turf pitch, and grass rugby pitch.

Facilities:

Brand new Sports Dome, with four tennis courts, three netball courts
Sports hall
110m synthetic athletics track
Modern fitness suite
Strength and conditioning room
Two multi-purpose gymnasiums
Indoor and outdoor climbing walls and climbing boulder
Grass football and rugby pitches
Outdoor netball and tennis court
Floodlit synthetic Astro Turf pitch
Two seminar rooms
Cricket nets
Sport Science Laboratories:

Four dedicated psychology labs
Two dedicated biomechanics labs
Five dedicated physiology labs
An environmental chamber to simulate heat, altitude, etc
A sports injury clinic and adjoining rehabilitation space
Where this can take you
We understand the importance of ensuring that you have the knowledge, skills and experience to compete successfully in today’s challenging jobs market.

The course prepares students for a range of graduate careers; our students have gone on to further work or training in a variety of fields including:

Sport and Exercise Psychology
Health Promotion
Higher research Degrees (PhD)
Teaching
Sports science support personnel
Sports coaching
Exercise Referral
Business management and recruitment

For those wishing to commence training for BPS QSEP Stage 2 and BASES SE, there are opportunities for supervision from academic staff who are qualified supervisors and associates of the Sports Performance Rehabilitation Unit.

Indicative modules
All students are required to complete six taught modules, five discipline modules and one in research methods and statistics. In addition, students will complete a research dissertation.

Modules currently available are:

Social Processes in Sport
Performance Psychology
Motor Learning and Control
Enhancing Physical Activity and Wellbeing
Professional Practice in Sport & Exercise Psychology
Advanced Applied Research Skills for Sport
Research Dissertation

Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in small groups and is interactive. Students are encouraged to debate topics and lead their fellow students through presentations and discussions. In a number of modules there is also a practical element to gain experience of delivering mental skills techniques and developing the skills needed for applied practice.

Requirements for exit qualifications:

To gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Sport and Exercise Psychology, students need to complete three modules. Each module is assessed by the equivalent of a 4,000-word assignment.
To gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Sport and Exercise Psychology, students need to complete six modules. Each module is assessed by a 4,000-word assignment.
To gain an MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology students need to complete six modules, and a dissertation of 12,000 words or a sport science support placement.

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

Read less
The Renaissance and the eighteenth-century are two of the richest periods in English literature, as well as areas in which some of the most exciting new critical and textual scholarship has been concentrated. Read more
The Renaissance and the eighteenth-century are two of the richest periods in English literature, as well as areas in which some of the most exciting new critical and textual scholarship has been concentrated. The relations between these periods are made especially close by the conflicts as well as the continuities that can be traced between them.

All the major writers of the eighteenth-century were passionate readers of Shakespeare, Jonson Milton and Spenser, with some publishing major editions of their works. Yet Pope and Swift, Dryden and Johnson saw themselves not just as the inheritors of their literary forebears, but as their masters, correcting and improving the literature of the Tudor and Stuart eras before them, as the products of a golden but unrefined age. What is at stake in the mighty contests that arise from the great works and the cultural shifts of the Renaissance and the eighteenth-century is the development of ‘English Literature’ itself.

Conversation with other students and researchers through departmental talks, seminars, conferences, and associated research centres such as the Liverpool Medieval and Renaissance Research Centre and the Eighteenth-Century Worlds Centre will help you situate that reading within a thriving academic context.

Why English?

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), we ranked 10th out of 89 in the UK for 4* (world-leading) and 3* (internationally excellent) research.

Strong postgraduate community

With over 150 taught and research students from all over the world, you will be part of a genuine international community. You will be able to participate in our lively research culture through attending regular seminars and lectures by guest speakers as well as our own staff and students. A legacy from former tutor Miriam Allott has allowed the department to host a creative writing fellow (currently the poet Sean Borodale), and a vibrant series of international poetry readings. Recent conferences include ‘On Liberties’ at St Deiniol’s Library, and ‘Renaissance Old Worlds’ in collaboration with the British Library. As a doctoral student you can participate in the optional English Graduate Teaching Programme, which allows doctoral students to get the best of the teaching opportunities available without making significant demands on their time.

Career prospects

The independence of study, clarity of expression and management of time demanded by all our taught programmes equip the successful graduate with the skills and knowledge base required for further academic study and research in English and other areas.

However, many graduates choose to enter careers such as teaching, publishing and journalism, or to work in the business sector, often in human resources, administration, marketing or sales.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies to PhD level.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies at PhD level.

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A Master's by Research (MA) allows you to undertake a one year (full time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. Read more
A Master's by Research (MA) allows you to undertake a one year (full time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. Such programmes are attractive to those wanting a briefer research degree than a PhD.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught masters course.

You'll be expected to work to an approved programme of work which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies. Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events.

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

At the end of the project you'll write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words, which will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).
Every member of staff associated with the History Group is an active researcher with research covering a wide range of topics such as:

• Adult masculinity within the Angevin royal family

• Gender and Piety in late medieval England

• Catholicism in Tudor/ Early Stuart England

• Children and childhood in Vichy France: history and memory c. 1940-1944

• Hospital provision before the NHS

• Representations of Madness in the Great War

• English Battlefield archaeology

• Humanitarian organisations in modern war

• The Victorian Press

• Working-Class Gambling

• British Labour History

• Historical Geography of Europe

• Co-Production of historical knowledge.

You are advised to take time to investigate the University's website to find out more details about the research we conduct. Please visit the Research section of the website to take a look at the information there.

To find out about the staff in this subject area please visit the subject area page, or alternatively, to look at profiles of any of our academic staff, you can visit our academic staff profile page.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and when this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

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This modular course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in history or a related subject by developing a particular specialism in the History of Wales. Read more
This modular course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in history or a related subject by developing a particular specialism in the History of Wales. The course may be taken in its own right or as a preparation for further research in this area. It combines training in research techniques and theoretical and historiographic analysis, with taught courses and a substantial dissertation. There is a choice of specialist modules covering a range of periods, matching the research interests of the teaching staff.

This programme aims to provide a detailed knowledge and understanding of a specific academic area of the history of Wales through rigorous research training. Students will become acquainted with relevant historical theoretical issues and methods of interpretation and the use of evidence. It also provides the student with the necessary research skills to carry out an original piece of historical research in the chosen area of study, under supportive supervision.

Courses
ONE Special Option module chosen from the following:

The Age of Llywelyn ap Iorwerth
State, Society and Culture in Tudor Wales
Plaid Cymru a Gwleidyddiaeth Cymru
Compulsory modules:

Themes and Issues in History
ONE Documents and Sources module (20 credits) chosen from the following: Documents and Sources in Medieval and Early Modern History OR Documents and Sources in Modern History
Initiating a Research Project
Skills Option module
MA Dissertation

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This course offers a flexible, challenging Masters experience. Read more
This course offers a flexible, challenging Masters experience. You can choose either the specialist pathway MA History (Public History and Heritage) or, alternatively, you may pursue a general History route selecting from a diverse range of units and independent study consistent with your own interests in the further study of History. This programme does not focus on one single historical period or theme and has modules that vary from year to year. These specialist modules draw on the research strengths of the department. We house the Manchester Centre for Regional History, which gives our students the advantage of our strong links with historians and archives that extend beyond the University.

Selected units on the part-time route of this course are available to distance learning students via the internet. These are currently - Historical Skills and Research Methods; A Good War; and Nobles, States and Societies.

Features and benefits of the course

-A long and successful record in teaching postgraduate students from a range of different backgrounds.
-Opportunities to become familiar with the rich range of sources available to historians in Manchester and the North West.
-Individual support available throughout the course.
-The Manchester Centre for Regional History is housed within the Department and you will benefit from our strong links with historians and archives that extend beyond the University.

The History Department has a wealth of expertise, with leading researchers whose published work covers a wide range of times and places:
• Roman Britain/archaeology
• Medieval Crusades
• Tudor religion
• Early Modern politics and culture
• Industrial Manchester
• World War Two
• Museums and Public Policy

Placement options

Public History and Heritage students have a placement element to the dissertation, working with a local heritage group, a library or archive. We will help you to source your placement.

About the Course

Core aspects include a research methods and historiographical unit and a dissertation which allows you to develop your own historical interests in a structured, supportive context.

Assessment details

Your assessment will take the form of essays, reviews, presentations and a dissertation.

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This programme offers a series of closely integrated core modules addressing key issues in medieval archaeology, enabling you to develop your experience and understanding of method and theory whilst developing your intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving and independent judgement. Read more

About the course

This programme offers a series of closely integrated core modules addressing key issues in medieval archaeology, enabling you to develop your experience and understanding of method and theory whilst developing your intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, problem solving and independent judgement. You will be encouraged to explore your own particular interests with a range of modules allowing you to focus on Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian and later medieval, and Tudor archaeology in Europe.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Heritage, Museum and Field: Archaeology in Practice; Ethnicity and Identity in the Early Middle Ages; Society and Culture in the Later Middle Ages; Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Viking-Age Britain; Wars of the Roses to Elizabeth: The Archaeology of England 1455-1603; Introduction to Human Osteology; Archaeozoology; Two modules from the Department of History.

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