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Masters Degrees (Transnational Studies)

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With the advancement of communication technology and growing political awareness of globalisation, the impact of transnationality on our social, cultural and economic lives has increased dramatically. Read more

With the advancement of communication technology and growing political awareness of globalisation, the impact of transnationality on our social, cultural and economic lives has increased dramatically. This MA is a cross-disciplinary programme taught by specialists from different UCL faculties.

About this degree

This MA focuses on the transnational movement of people, ideas and goods on a global scale, and the impact of such connections on our social, political and cultural worlds. Approaching transnationality as a historical and contemporary phenomenon, students will be taught by specialists in human rights, international relations, economics, health and migration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of the core module (30 credits), compulsory modern language modules (up to 30 credits), optional modules (up to 45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Approaches to Transnational Studies: core readings, social theory and case studies
  • Modern Language Module: from Beginner's to Advanced Level

Optional modules

Students select up to three optional modules from a list that may include:

  • Cultural Exchange: Methods and Approaches
  • Consumerism and Globalisation
  • International and EU Refugee Law
  • Economics of Transition
  • Population and Development
  • Migration and Transformation
  • Comparable Peace Processes
  • Security, Identity, Polarity
  • Anthropology of Art and Design
  • Practical Documentary Filmmaking
  • Nations and States in Transnational Perspective
  • Globalisation in the 20th Century
  • People and Populations: an Interdisciplinary Perspective
  • History and Theory of European Integration
  • Globalisation and Latin American Development: Latin America in the 21st Century

This list is indicative only; not all modules are taught every year.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project written up as a dissertation up to 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and discussion seminars. Assessment is through unseen examinations, oral presentations, written coursework and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Transnational Studies MA

Careers

The programme will equip students for further academic study of transnational developments. It will also position students at an advantage for careers with international organisations, the development sector and NGOs. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Account Executive, Ogilvy & Mather
  • Freelance Copywriter, Freelance Copywriter
  • Researcher, ReSeT
  • Community Development Intern, Westway Trust
  • Consumer Services and QA Manager, LeapFrog Toys

Employability

The programme is strongly focused on career opportunities for students, particularly within NGOs, the charity sector, international organisations and development. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This cross-disciplinary programme is hosted by UCL's Centre for Transnational History, one of the UK's leading hubs for transnational research. The degree draws on research and teaching expertise from across UCL, offering optional modules that are taught by social scientists, historians and geographers, together with specialists in languages and area studies, law, politics and international health.

UCL is situated in the heart of London, one of the world's leading centres of cultural exchange, and home to numerous international organisations and NGOs. Within walking distance of institutions such as the British Library and the School of Advanced Study, UCL offers excellent conditions for transnational research.



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At a time when national frameworks are increasingly being called into question by globalisation, this programme analyses the historical, social, cultural and linguistic effects arising from the traffic across national boundaries. Read more

At a time when national frameworks are increasingly being called into question by globalisation, this programme analyses the historical, social, cultural and linguistic effects arising from the traffic across national boundaries. Individual modules examine historical and contemporary transnational phenomena at the intersection of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Transnationalism challenges our thinking within national frameworks yet also throws up new questions about the sites and processes of power in an interconnected human world. We examine these questions from the perspective of different case studies and examples, based on a wide range of geographical locations. The MA in Transnational Studies explores the role and impact of cross-border relations in a globally interconnected space. We examine transnationalism both as a concept and a set of practices and politics in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Introducing your course

Are you passionate about the global community? Fascinated by the movement of populaces and the impact this has had on culture, history and society? An MA in Transnational Studies at the University of Southampton unlocks interdisciplinary modes of inquiry which allow you to understand a rapidly transforming globalized world. Study modules that focus on a range of cultures and periods, from imperialism and decolonisation to the transnational movement in the age of globalisation. Through the masters course, you will not only learn how worldwide thinkers conceptualise the global traffic of people, goods, and ideas but be encouraged to locate your own research interests within global frameworks. This masters degree can lead to a variety of successful careers in politics, marketing and teaching.

Overview

The programme takes a unique interdisciplinary approach, combining insights from the Humanities and the Social Sciences. The course investigates new and historical population movements and their impact on our understanding of contemporary societies; it analyses the transnational flow of cultural texts and products; it takes into focus the role of artists and thinkers in a global cultural network, and brings to light new cultures of dissemination and consumption. It engages transnationalism as an approach that asks new questions about the role of nation and state and opens up inquiries into the creation, articulation and contestation of national identities and collective memories; it explores the role of multilingualism in transnational spaces and the ways in which beliefs about language inform social inclusion and exclusion.

View the programme specification document for this course



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Questions about security – what drives it and what undermines it – shape global politics. Read more
Questions about security – what drives it and what undermines it – shape global politics. Terrorism, conflict, environmental catastrophe, weapons of mass destruction and weak states are all security issues that are reflected in our media, dominate policy-making in international politics, and increasingly impinge on our daily lives.

This stream in Transnational Security Studies is an exciting new course that brings together many of the existing strengths of the Department of Politics and International Relations, including expertise in the areas of security studies, comparative politics, international law and conflict, political theory, and global politics.

The core of the course traces the security studies discipline from its traditional approaches through its evolution to include ever more transnational dynamics. You can tailor the course to your specific interests through optional units in subjects such as political violence, biopolitics, media, communication and conflict, international law of targeting, and regional international politics. You will be provided with both a firm academic foundation in the security studies discipline and a base of knowledge for careers in fields of policymaking, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and more.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdiptransnationalsecuritystudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

- The course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research.

- The course offers an advanced grounding in security studies while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- Our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alister Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has recently hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), and David Willetts MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills).
Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Dr Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global.
The Centre recently won £54,000 from NORFACE, a partnership of European Research Councils including the ESRC, for a pan-European research network on globalisation and the transformation of Europe's borders, and £20,000 from the joint AHRC/ESRC Religion and Society programme for a research network on the normative foundations of public policy in a multi-faith society.
Dr Yasmin Khan’s recent book The Great Partition: The Making of India and Pakistan (Yale University Press) won the Royal Historical Society’s Gladstone Book Prize of 2007.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Dr Ben O'Loughlin and Akil N. Awan, together with colleague Andrew Hoskins at the University of Warwick, were awarded £300,000 from the ESRC for a study of terrorist networks on the internet.
Unit Co-Director Professor Andrew Chadwick is one of the founding members of the US National Science Foundation's International Working Group on Online Consultation and Public Policymaking, a three year project focusing on how political interaction on the internet can contribute to better government policy. It is funded through part of an overall grant of $1m to the State University of New York at Albany, from the NSF Digital Government Programme. Andrew Chadwick’s recent book Internet Politics (Oxford University Press) was awarded one of the American Sociological Association Best Book Prizes in 2007.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to security studies

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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What is the Master of European Studies. Transnational and Global Perspectives all about?. This.  interdisciplinary programme. Read more

What is the Master of European Studies: Transnational and Global Perspectives all about?

This interdisciplinary programme engages students to study Europe both as a transnational community and as an actor in a globalised world. The programme offers insight and knowledge about the nature and functioning of Europe both in the contemporary world and in a historical perspective. Interaction with staff members from various disciplines and faculties (Social Sciences, Arts, Law, Economics, and Theology) exposes students to a wide range of theoretical approaches and allows them to acquire the necessary methodological skills. The programme strongly emphasises the need to engage in a critical debate about the challenges that confront Europe with respect to its internal, diversified identities and its interaction with other actors in the world. 

Structure

The programme consists of five interdisciplinary modules. You choose four courses from one particular module.

  • Module 1: European History, Diversity, and Culture focuses on historical diversities and transnational movements and institutions in Europe.
  • Module 2: EU External Relations analyses the external policies and relations of the European Union within the context of globalisation and new forms of global governance.
  • Module 3: Globalising Europe investigates different dimensions of globalisation and their relevance for contemporary European society, politics, and culture.
  • Module 4: Europe - Asia: Interactions and Comparisons offers students the possibility to complement their European perspective with knowledge of developments in contemporary Asia.
  • Module 5: Russia, Wider Europe and the EU unveils connectivities and dynamics in the history and current affairs of wider Europe and its relations with Russia.

In addition, you will be asked to select two courses from the list of electives. Finally, all students take the course 'Transnational and Global Perspectives on Europe' and write a master's thesis.

This initial master's programme can only be followed on a full-time basis. All courses are taught during the day and for most courses your attendance is required. It is therefore not possible to combine a job with this demanding programme.

Objectives

The multidisciplinary ‘Master of European Studies: Transnational and Global Perspectives’ engages students to study Europe as a continent of strong interactions across national boundaries and constant exchanges with the outside world. By choosing one of the five modules, students focus on

  • transnational perspectives on European history, society, diversity and culture;
  • the external relations and policies of the European Union;
  • the position and interactions of Europe in a context of globalisation and global governance;
  • the interactions and comparisons between Europe and Asia or the connectivities and dynamics in the history and current affairs of Russia, wider Europe and the European Union.

The multidisciplinary and research-based education enables students to acquire skills to understand, contextualize and assess complex challenges that transcend disciplinary boundaries as well as national and regional borders. It allows students to engage in a critical debate about Europe within a context of complex internal and external dynamics, and formulate alternative options. Interaction with staff members of various disciplines and faculties exposes students to a wide range of academic approaches in the study of Europe. Supervision by individual staff members, particularly in the context of their master thesis, provides students with focus and guidance for their own research.

Career paths

 MAES graduates are equipped with in-depth knowledge of various aspects of European politics, law, history and culture, are schooled in various research methodologies, and are able to communicate their findings to a diverse audience. MAES graduates are thus well positioned for a wide range of professional pursuits.

Many alumni work for European institutions and interest groups, provide advice on European affairs to national, regional or local administrations and governments, or work as European affairs officers for private companies and non-governmental organisations. Others are engaged in national and multinational diplomacy.

Many hold academic positions in European politics, economy, history and culture at universities all over the world. Still other alumni inform the public about European affairs as journalists and cultural officers.

Having delivered its first graduates 20 years ago, MAES counts many prominent figures in European affairs among its alumni. Many of them attribute their MA degree in European Studies as a decisive factor in their career success.



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MLitt in Film Studies. The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level. An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas. Read more

MLitt in Film Studies

• The opportunity to study Film Studies at an advanced level.

• An emphasis on international and transnational cinemas.

• Both core and specialist modules are assessed by essay.

• Two specialist modules provide you with the opportunity to transfer and apply the theoretical knowledge and research skills acquired in the core module to a more concrete level of intellectual investigation, focusing on the creation of meaning and aesthetic value in the context of global dynamics of cultural production and distribution.

• The specialist modules vary annually and reflect current staff research interests. Emphasis throughout the year is placed on individual research.

Features

* Film Studies was ranked first in Scotland for world leading and internationally excellent research in the UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.

* Senior expertise of high profile scholars, such as Professor Robert Burgoyne, Professor Richard Dyer, Mr Jean Michel Frodon and Professor Dina Iordanova, all internationally known and respected leaders in the field .

* Regular visits from high-profile film critics, film. The most recent have been celebrated Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán, who in April 2015 visited the Department and attended a screening of two of his films, followed by a Q&A session.

* The new programme in Global Cinema: Managing and Cultural Curation, is offered out of the Institute for Global Cinema and Creative Cultures (IGCCC: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/globalcinema ) which capitalise on achievements, global connections and on our reputational advantages as leaders in the study of global culture, film circulation and film festivals.

In learning and teaching, St Andrews sets the highest of standards and attracts students from all over the world with understandably high expectations. In its first five-yearly review in 2009, the Department’s teaching provision achieved the highest possible commendation. Teaching and research are closely co-related, and postgraduate teaching is informed by the staff’s research activity.

At St Andrews, we investigate cinema as a key form of cultural output and as the dominant type of creative expression. Focusing on the global dimension, our programmes cover key aspects of Film Studies through the lens of transnational cultural studies.

Film Studies at St Andrews is committed to questioning the traditional view of what is ‘normal’ cinema. We attempt to uncover the agendas (be they national, ‘western’, cultural, commercial, industrial, and so on) that define how we think about cinema, both in terms of the kinds of films we watch for pleasure, and those we study at university. There is much to be learned by studying what is produced at the margins of dominant societies, in addition to the canonical films of Hollywood and the European art house. We are interested in exploring the ways in which racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual subcultures conceptualise their identities. Similarly, we are keen to look at films produced at the periphery of established nations, co-productions between smaller players struggling to survive in the global marketplace and popular genre films often deemed unworthy of high-brow critical attention. Similarly, we

look at films that focus on transnational communities or appeal to international markets that deal with lesser-known histories and are made in foreign languages but are nonetheless worthy of critical examination and intellectual engagement.

Studying film at St Andrews will help you master a range of advanced research skills and acquire knowledge related to the construction and analysis of the moving image, the past and present day realities of various national and regional film traditions, the dynamics of the global film industry, and the theoretical approaches related to film.

Facilities and collections

The Department is housed in its own buildings, in North Street. They are within easy walking distance of the University Library, local cinema and town centre. The Department is well resourced with a dedicated teaching room. Recently the Department has started to use the wonderful facilities at the nearby Byre Theatre for most of our seminars, and for other film-related activities. MLitt classes are usually held at the Byre. A Film Studies Postgraduate Study Centre houses a DVD collection, postgraduate workspaces, viewing stations and off-air recording facilities.

At St Andrews you will be exposed to a rich and diverse film programme. Regular course-related film showings take place in a custom-built theatre. In addition, a range of screenings takes place across the University during term time, featuring films related to anthropology, international relations, and history.

St Andrews has excellent library provision, with book, journal and other information resources in Film Studies at a level consistent with an international centre of excellence. The Main Library hosts one of the best collections of international cinema on DVD and video (over 9,000 titles). The Library also holds over 1,000,000 print monographs, over 32,000 electronic books, and substantial journal title holdings in print and over 33,900 full-text electronic titles. Well over 2,000 monographs are classified under Film Studies and related subjects. There are holdings of approximately 100 film, television and media-related journals, of which about 65 are available electronically; there is also networked access to various databases, including Box of Broadcasts, Film Indexes Online and Film & Television Literature Index Full-Text.

Careers

In our media saturated culture, the opportunities for Film Studies graduates are remarkably diverse. Directly related are careers in academia, creative industries, development, distribution, film festival/cinema programming, and arts administration.

A Film Studies degree opens doors to many other spheres, including media management, film and TV research, journalism, publishing, advertising, cultural entrepreneurship, nongovernmental organisations, marketing, public relations and education. Recent destinations include: Junior Assistant Producer, European Tour Productions (IMG Media); Adjunct Instructor, SUNY (State University of New York) at Oswego; Consultant for Propel London Media.



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This new LLM is the only programme of its kind to teach core legal courses from a distinctly transnational perspective. Read more

This new LLM is the only programme of its kind to teach core legal courses from a distinctly transnational perspective. With the globalisation of law at its centre, it prepares graduates for a career in a fast-changing global context, teaching competence to analyse complex legal problems through solid legal doctrine, training in transnational legal cultures, lawyerly practice, legal theory, and law’s global socio-economics.

Key benefits

  • Taught by world leaders in their fields with a strong emphasis on rigorous analysis combined with ‘thinking outside the box’.
  • A foundational core module on ‘Transnational Law and Global Governance’ and a ‘Transnational Law Colloquium’ featuring intensive interaction with experts from legal London and global practice and academia.
  • Covering key areas in public law from a transnational law perspective, including human rights, development, refugee law, criminal law, policing & security and the interplay between domestic and international organizations.
  • Covering key areas in transnational private law, including corporate governance, corporate restructuring, commercial arbitration, labour law, business & human rights, and family law.
  • Modules will investigate through an inter-disciplinary lens the co-existence of different normative orders and discuss issues of jurisdiction, legal pluralism, indigenous law and the tension between ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ law with a view to addressing urgent transnational legal problems of poverty, climate change, financial governance and post-conflict justice.

 Description

The pathway will feature a foundational core module on ‘transnational law and global governance’ and a ‘transnational law colloquium’ featuring intensive interaction with experts from legal London and global practice and academia. 

It will cover key areas in public law from a transnational law perspective, including human rights, development, refugee law, criminal law, policing & security and the interplay between domestic and international organizations. 

With view to transnational private law, it covers corporate governance, corporate restructuring, commercial arbitration, labour law, business & human rights, and family law. It will also offer a module in transnational legal theory and legal sociology, 'film and transnational law' as well as a module on law's treatment of global piracy.

The leader of this pathway is Professor Peer Zumbansen.

Course purpose

This new pathway provides an in-depth engagement with core areas of transnational law today, it offers an unprecedented opportunity for students preparing for a career in global private practice, as in-house counsel or international public service, the non-profit sector or an international organisation or with adjudicatory bodies, agencies and networks.

Course format and assessment

In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. 

Please see further details for each individual module in the LLM module list that can be found by clicking here

Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations.

Career destinations

In a competitive world we can give you the competitive edge to take your career to the next level. That’s why you’ll find our LLM programme is supplemented by opportunities to develop your skills and professional networks.

The result is that students are presented with a wide range of employment destinations when they leave; from positions at the European Central Bank, European Commission and UN to commercial roles as investment bank analysts, tax or public affairs advisers, as well as careers in the legal profession; accountancy; management consultancy; human rights organisations and other voluntary bodies; academia.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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Why American Studies in Nijmegen?. The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Read more

Why American Studies in Nijmegen?

The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Our Master's program gives students the opportunity to become experts in the concept of ‘America' in a variety of fields: US history, literature, culture (including popular culture, film, theatre, political history, foreign policy, constitutional law, religion and social science. Radboud University's programme distinguishes itself from other's by emphasizing the cultural and political relations between the United States, its neighbours and Europe.

The open classroom experience is what teachers and researches of the Master`s program “North American Studies” want to create for their students. For an example of the experience, in the project “Politics & Culture of Liberation” students and teachers worked closely with the National Liberation Museum in Groesbeek, the Regional Archive in Nijmegen and the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The project resulted in an exhibition on the impact of American culture on Europe and the Transatlantic World. This is only one example of the many creative seminar projects that students realize in the Master`s program.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Specializations

Specialisations in the Master's in North American Studies. The Master's programme in North American Studies offers two specialisations:

1. Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

2. Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

America's cultural icons are the world's cultural icons. From Walt Disney to the Statue of Liberty, from Hollywood to Time magazine, and from Jack Kerouac to Philip Roth, the influence of American culture and literature around the world is huge. Our program allows students to critically explore the significance of American culture in countries around the globe. Aside from studying the variety of meanings assigned to American cultural products abroad, students will explore the diversity of the American cultural expressions themselves.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks beyond national borders. In this program you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States within, outside and at its borders. Central themes are the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe, and related issues in the field of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

Study American issues with an interdisciplinary view

True to the tradition of American Studies, our program teaches students to approach issues from different angles and to think in multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary ways. We also offer excellent internships, thanks to our global network. Furthermore, we are the only university in the Netherlands to teach oral communication skills in the American language throughout our Bachelor's program, so that students who go on to study for a Master's degree have near-native language abilities.

High level of communication in American English

In Nijmegen, you will find yourself in a dynamic learning environment where the level of scholarship and communication in (American) English is extremely high. This is one of the reasons why our program is so popular. Another reason is the choice the University offers between two fascinating fields within which you can create your own custom-made program: ‘Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective' and ‘Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society.'

Program outline

Within the program in North America Studies, you can choose from the following two specialisations. Each specialisation comprises of a one-year, 60 EC program including a 20 EC Master's thesis project. For more information about program outline, structure, and courses, please click on the links below.

Literature and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

All students enrolled in this Master's specialisation take compulsory foundational courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is an elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include courses on Native Americans, African-American literature and the American borderlands.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

If you follow this specialisation, you will take several obligatory foundation courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is a small elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include a special course on the Beat Generation, one of America's most influential avant-garde movements; Native Americans; African-American Literature and Culture; American Borders: Contact Conflict and Exchange; or American Constitutional Law (taught in Dutch).

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies



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Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;. Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;

Students who wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;

Students who wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;

Students who come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist migration and diaspora related topics along with regional or language-based study
Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in issues relating to migration and diaspora.
The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.
The programme encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Core course:

- African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit)
- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (1 unit)
- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology (1 unit). This is recommended for students without a previous anthropology degree.

OPTION COURSES
- Students choose their remaining unit (or two units if not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) from the Option Courses list. A language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures may also be included.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and African and Asian Diasporas in the Contemporary World (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Migration and Diaspora Studies and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 253kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-migration-and-diaspora-studies-and-intensive-language/file93570.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- To introduce students to important areas of contemporary social theory which deal with issues of migration, globalisation, the postcolonial world, and cultural transformations.

- To ground students in the historical basis of these issues

- To encourage transdisciplinary thinking on issues of migration

- To enable students to translate theoretical perspectives for practical application in the material world.

- To provide students with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be expected to grasp the key debates in migration and diaspora studies from a critical perspective

- To understand the global/historical/political and cultural background within which issues of migration and diaspora occur.

- A critical understanding of the ways that migration has shaped the modern world, and the implications of this for future research.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- The development of analytical and theoretical skills based on a detailed understanding of the social science literature on migration and diaspora.

- To approach theories and debates from a critical and reflexive basis.

- To develop their presentation skills and their ability to articulate arguments coherently in order to promote class discussion and critical engagement with ideas and practices.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Communicate effectively in writing, in academic English

- Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources including print and other forms of mass media

- Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.

- Students with no knowledge of media technologies will have the opportunity to learn photographic and film making techniques through the Media unit.

- Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
Students will be expected to learn to:

- Plan, organise and write masters’ level essays and dissertations.
- Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
- Understand unconventional ideas.
- Present (non–assessed) material orally.
- Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
- Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
- Be prepared to enter a Social Science PhD programme.
- An ability to work, and be at ease in, a multicultural environment

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The field of media is constantly shifting and in the last decade the changes have been rapid, and a new media landscape has emerged. Read more

The field of media is constantly shifting and in the last decade the changes have been rapid, and a new media landscape has emerged. Digital media of today are characterised by participation and cooperation; media are wholly collaborative, in terms of both production and consumption. 

The master’s programme in Media and Communication studies gives you advanced knowledge of digital media through practical approaches in the field. You will work creatively and in an explorative manner with different types of media, while learning to evaluate them from a critical perspective.

What is collaborative media?

The field of media is constantly shifting. In the last decade the changes have been rapid, and a new media landscape has emerged – forever reshaping not only the consumers but also the creators and distributors of media. Digital media of today are characterised by participation and cooperation; media are wholly collaborative, in terms of both production and consumption – and this is what is meant by the term ‘collaborative media.’

What will I learn?

The one-year master’s programme in Media and Communication Studies – Culture, Collaborative Media, and Cultural Industries – will equip you with advanced knowledge of digital media. The programme is oriented towards practical approaches to the field. You will work creatively and in an explorative fashion with different types of media while you learn to approach them from a critical perspective.

During the programme you will develop three primary skill sets: the ability to analyse and strategically approach media and its impact on society; the capability to work with media and communication both methodologically and systematically; the knowledge required to produce media texts, both individually and collaboratively. Compared to bachelor-level degrees, this advanced programme has a clear focus on the development of strategic expertise, a skill crucial for those intending to pursue a professional career in media and communication. During the year, you will furthermore obtain an in-depth knowledge of the workings of the creative industries.

The programme is developed alongside and conducted in collaboration with Media Evolution, a media cluster with over 350 member companies based in Malmö. This facilitates a crossover between the academic and professional worlds and allows you as a student to develop skills in both areas throughout your studies. Throughout the duration of the programme you will get the chance to meet a number of international guest lecturers from universities all across the world, further adding to the global relevance of the programme.

The first and second semester

The first semester focuses on examining key themes in communication studies and on how the creative industries of today are operated. During the second semester you will learn more about the possibilities with collaborative media. The year ends with a (one-year, 15 credits) master's thesis.

Malmö University also offers the two-year master's programme Media and Communication Studies: Culture, Collaborative Media and Creative Industries, 120 credits. Read more

The pedagogical approach

The programme, which is web-based and full-time, makes education available to students globally and offers a unique blend of distance and campus based learning. The seminars are compulsory, and you can either attend in Malmö or online. This approach makes it possible for international students to enrol in the programme without having to relocate, leading to a diverse and intercultural student body that increases the opportunities for students to form transnational networks and to benefit from international lecturers.

The programme is hosted on an online platform through which communication between students and lecturers takes place and where student projects are uploaded. As the main theme of the programme is collaborative media, this pedagogical approach leaves room for experimentation, and students are encouraged to use collaborative media during this process.

What can I do with my degree?

After graduating, you will have the qualifications necessary to work in media and communication. The skill set and knowledge you develop during your studies are valuable to the fast-growing creative indutries. Companies, government, and organisations are other possible employers as they become increasingly dependent on communication and media in their business. This programme is for those of you who want to take an active role in the development of the media field. It also provides a foundation for further post-graduate studies.

Learning outcomes

After completing the programme students should be able to: 

Knowledge and understanding 

1) demonstrate knowledge and understanding of media and communication studies, including both an overview of the field and deeper knowledge of specific parts of the field as well as insight into current research and development work 

2) demonstrate specialised methodological knowledge in media and communication studies 

Competence and skills 

3) demonstrate the ability to integrate knowledge and to analyse, assess and deal with complex phenomena, issues and situations even with limited information 

4) demonstrate the ability to independently identify and formulate issues and to plan and, using appropriate methods, undertake advanced tasks within predetermined time frames 

5) demonstrate the ability verbally and in writing to report clearly and discuss his or her conclusions and the knowledge and arguments on which they are based in dialogue with different audiences 

6) demonstrate the skills required for participation in research and development work or employment in some other qualified capacity 

Judgement and approach 

7) demonstrate the ability in media and communication studies to make assessments in relation to relevant disciplinary, social and ethical issues and also to demonstrate awareness of ethical aspects of research and development work 

8) demonstrate insight into the possibilities and limitations of research, its role in society and the responsibility of the individual for how it is used 

9) demonstrate the ability to identify the personal need for further knowledge and take responsibility for his or her on going learning

Degree

Master's Degree (60 credits).

Degree of Master of Arts (60 credits) in Media and Communication Studies



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The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere. Read more
The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is a broad-based degree for students who want to receive specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language, which will prepare them to proceed to advanced postgraduate research in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS or elsewhere.

This MA is designed to appeal to students from a variety of backgrounds who:

- Wish to know more of the transnational nature of the modern world;
- Wish to continue their anthropological study at a postgraduate level and engage in critical contemporary theory;
- Wish to understand cultural transformation from a global perspective;
- Come from other disciplines, such as Law or Politics, and now wish to incorporate an anthropological perspective on issues of migration and diaspora.

The degree offers students a chance to pursue specialist interests by a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. A broad-based MA for students who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of continuing contemporary research;
2. A special interest MA, enabling students to study diaspora and migration issues in depth in relation to a particular discipline or region.

The programme attracts students from around the world. It encourages a transdisciplinary approach to issues of migration and diaspora, providing historical depth as well as perspectives from anthropology, sociology, and postcolonial studies. The programme also works closely with a number of departments across the school, such as Development Studies, the Centre for Gender Studies as well as Law and Politics, which also run migration and diaspora related courses. Most of these courses are available as options on the programme, making it a unique MA in terms of both its breadth and depth.

In the recent past, our students have been highly successful in going on to further study and a number have received scholarships for research degrees at SOAS and elsewhere. Many have also gone on to work with NGOs and in the public sector as well as arts organizations. We have a good staff-student ratio, which ensure the best support for personal academic development and training which enhances future career prospects.

The MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies is considerably enriched by the SOAS Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, which runs seminars, films and public lectures and also hosts a number of international scholars. The Centre is also a part of a migration research network of London colleges including LSE and UCL. Students on the programme therefore have unparalleled access to a critical body of scholars and scholarship on migration and diaspora related issue.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Programme Convenor, Dr Parvathi Raman at an early stage of their application to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study. The programme consists of four elements, three examined courses and a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/mamigdiaspstudies/

DURATION:One calendar year (Full-Time) Two or three years (Part-Time, daytime only) The expectation in the UK is of continuous study across the year, with break periods used to read and to prepare coursework. We recommend that part-time students have between two and a half and three days free in the week to pursue their course of study.

Programme Overview

The course is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests by a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of migration and diaspora who wish to enhance their knowledge in the light of continuing contemporary research.

2. a special interest MA, which will enable students to study diaspora and migration issues in depth in relation to a particular discipline or region.

Prospective students will be encouraged to contact the Programme Convenor, Dr Parvathi Raman, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study. The programme consists of four units, comprised of three examined courses and a dissertation.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 276kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/mamigdiaspstudies/file39769.pdf

Teaching & Learning

During the academic year, teaching is centred mainly around lectures and seminars. For the core course in the first term, there is a one hour thematic lecture, followed by a two hour seminar, where students are encouraged to develop their ability for critical analysis and reflexivity. Students will occasionally be required to give a group presentation, encouraging collaborative work and the creative exchange of ideas, and in selected classes there will also be an in depth reading of a particular text by the whole class. Each week, students will share the responsibility for reading other selected texts, ensuring that a range of arguments and perspectives are discussed.

In the second term, teaching is framed around a two-hour student led seminar session, where a small group of students are responsible for leading each class. They will be guided by pre distributed lecture notes from the class tutors and selected readings from the reading list, and the objective will be to initiate an informed and lively discussion on the week’s topic. The class tutor will mediate the discussion

The teaching format is designed to help students progress intellectually over the year, advance their writing skills, and instil confidence in forming opinions and developing the ability to express their views articulately.

Assessment is by class participation and written assignments.

SOAS also has a large range of options on migration and diaspora related issues across the school. Teaching methods and assessment vary across these options, and their availability will depend on appropriate staff being available in the relevant academic year.

In addition, students are required to attend the weekly seminars held by the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, where they will hear international scholars give papers on a variety of migration and diaspora related topics. The seminars provide an invaluable backdrop for the transdiciplinary approach of the programme overall.

The student learning experience is also be enhanced by the public lectures, films and workshops the Centre organises.

SOAS library also houses an array of texts which complement the course to help fuel independent thinking and learning.

Employment

Studying an MA in Migration and Diaspora Studies at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme with give students specialized research training in Migration and Diaspora Studies, including a relevant language. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Research profile. Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion. Read more

Research profile

Religious Studies or the Study of Religion/s is a vibrant research cluster, based in theoretically informed and comparative studies of religion.

You can specialise in a variety of areas which include contemporary and historical topics and fields such as Asian Studies, History of Religions/New Religions, and Jewish Studies.

You will be encouraged to frame your research using a range of theoretical and methodological approaches, from the classic to the cutting-edge. You will be able to draw on methodological expertise which includes biographical analysis, discourse analysis, ethnography, historical and textual studies, memory studies and narrative studies. The thematic interests of academic staff include ethnicity, gender, indigeneity, nationalism, textuality and the transnational.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.

Training and support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

  • At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.
  • In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.
  • From your first days as a student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.
  • Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.
  • You will be part of the research seminar in Religious Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.
  • You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

You will have access to excellent study facilities, dedicated to postgraduates. PhD and MPhil students have access 24/7, and can request an allocated desk. Masters by Research students have shared study space. All areas have printing/scanning and computer facilities. The main postgraduate study wing has a kitchen. New College has an on-site cafe that is open during term-time.



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The MA in Legal Studies allows students to create their own programme structure, choosing modules from a range covering comparative regional law, trade law, law and development, commercial law (including copyright and patent law), human rights, environmental law, Islamic law, dispute resolution, and international law. Read more
The MA in Legal Studies allows students to create their own programme structure, choosing modules from a range covering comparative regional law, trade law, law and development, commercial law (including copyright and patent law), human rights, environmental law, Islamic law, dispute resolution, and international law. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/maintcomplegstud/

Structure

To facilitate their study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before they begin their MA.

Students take taught modules to the value of 3.0 full units, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation worth 1.0 units. Students who wish to graduate with an MA in Legal Studies (General Programme) must select a minimum of 2.0 units from the Law Postgraduate Modules list.

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

- Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. It will suit practicing museum and heritage professionals who are interested in strengthening their knowledge of contemporary debates in critical museology, critical heritage studies and material culture studies. With its interdisciplinary focus, it will suit students interested in broadening their expertise across anthropology, art history and archaeology. It will also provide an excellent postgraduate foundation for students interested in pursuing PhD research concerned with museums, heritage, and material/visual culture in Asian, African, Middle Eastern and transnational/transcultural contexts.

This interdisciplinary programme brings together anthropological, art historical and archaeological perspectives to explore the interconnecting fields of museums, heritage and material culture studies. The MA disprivileges Western museum and heritage discourses and practices, and explores tangible and intangible cultural heritage as spheres of global interaction.

The MA will equip students with a theoretically-informed critical understanding of museums, heritage and material/visual culture. Taught across the Department of Anthropology and School of Arts, the MA provides a unique opportunity to learn about current debates in World Art and World Heritage, combining ethnographic, art historical and archaeological approaches.

Students will be introduced to a wide range of thematic and theoretical issues, and will have the opportunity to curate a small exhibition in the Curating Cultures module, and put into practice anthropological research techniques in the Ethnographic Research Methods course.

Situated in London’s ‘Museum Mile’, a few hundred meters from the British Museum, and with its own Brunei Gallery, SOAS provides a unique environment in which to study the cultural heritage of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits in total: 120 credits of modules and a dissertation of 10,000 words at 60 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed here - https://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-museums-heritage-and-material-culture-studies/

Students are advised to take one or both of the recommended modules listed below or may wish to select from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the School of Arts (Departments of Centre for Media Studies, History of Art and Archaeology or Music) options lists.

The remaining credits can be selected from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or the School of Arts options. See below for a detailed programme structure.

Language Entitlement Programme:

Many students choose to pursue a language through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Teaching & Learning

Students taking the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies will have the opportunity to achieve:

- A critical awareness of contemporary theoretical debates in museum studies, cultural heritage studies, and material/visual culture studies;
- A familiarity with the distinctive contributions of anthropology, art history and archaeology to these interdisciplinary fields;
- A critical awareness of World Art/World Cultures/World Heritage, with an emphasis on SOAS’s regional specialisms (Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as transnational/diasporic contexts;
- An understanding of ethnographic approaches to tangible and intangible heritage research;
- Experience of object-based knowledge and museological research methods.

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With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks across and beyond national borders. In this program, you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States, both within and outside the national borders. Read more

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks across and beyond national borders. In this program, you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States, both within and outside the national borders. A central theme is the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe and related issues in the fields of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies/political

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in American Studies or related area

You are required to have a Dutch Bachelor's degree (or equivalent, from a research university) in American Studies or a Bachelor's degree in English Language & Culture with a specialisation in American Studies. If you have specialised in English you can apply if you had at least 40EC in courses related to American Studies. If you have a different academic background, you will need to have achieved 60 EC in courses related to American Studies.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in the program, you need to have a sufficient level of English. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following

- A TOEFL score of at least 600 (paper-based), 250 (computer-based), 100 (internet-based);

- An IELTS score of at least 7.0;

- A Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of B or higher.

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

Our approach to this field

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks across and beyond national borders. In this program, you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States, both within and outside the national borders. A central theme is the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe and related issues in the fields of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies/political



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