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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting (MATI) is a specialised variant, with special emphasis on interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation. It is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Translation and Interpreting

At the core of the MA in Translation and Interpreting lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, interpreting (in one or two of the following environments: local government, health, police and court), and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Translation and Interpreting degree also includes opportunities to develop further specialised skills in interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Translation and Interpreting Course Structure

Part One – Full-time Translation and Interpreting students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are four compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above, and one of the three Interpreting modules. Translation and Interpreting students then choose two optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, a second module in Interpreting, History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Translation and Interpreting student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation or Interpreting Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“My experience so far of the programme I have studied has been very useful and constructive. Above all, I have been able to practice interpreting at an advanced level with professional and real life criteria. The Translation and Interpreting programme, on the whole, offers a wide variety of both theoretical and practical modules which have reinforced my knowledge on the related fields (i.e. translation and interpreting). Teaching meticulously planned (especially the interpreting modules), good interaction and supplementary opportunities to put language knowledge into good use (extra sessions and lectures). I expect my course to be of great value and hope it will help me achieve my professional goals for, I consider, it has provided me with the necessary skills to help me build a future career.”

Maria Chaikali, Translation and Interpreting, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs

- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

Specialisation options:

Interpreting, further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

Language pairs (subject to demand):

- From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation typically include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Part One – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1).

Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), History and Theory of Translation, Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Student Quote

‘After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme in Professional Translation gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green, Professional Translation, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting is a specialised variant, emphasising interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation.

Key Features of MA Translation and Interpreting (Extended)

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs

- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

- Public Service Interpreting (Local Government, Health, Police and Court).

Specialisation options: Further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

- Language pairs (subject to demand): From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Welsh.

- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh.

Translation and Interpreting (Extended) Course Structure

Part One of Translation and Interpreting – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1), Interpreting (1).

Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), Interpreting (2), History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two of Translation and Interpreting – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

"After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green



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This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. Read more

This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. You’ll also work with students specialising in a wide range of languages to produce multilingual translation projects.

You can specialise in translation between English and one or two languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. In addition, you’ll be able to choose from optional modules informed by the research of our experts on topics such as audiovisual translations, machine translation and genre analysis.

You’ll be taught by both leading researchers and contracted practitioners through our Centre for Translation Studies, to equip you with a good knowledge base and practical skills to launch an exciting career.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. A core module will run throughout the year developing your skills through multilingual group projects, which also give you valuable experience of translation project management.

You’ll study another core module introducing you to approaches and research methods in translation studies, then choose optional modules to build your specialist written translation skills between English and one or two languages of your choice. You could also choose from any of the research-led optional modules exploring topics such as audio-visual translation or genre analysis.

Throughout the year, you’ll be sharpening your skills and developing your theoretical and practical understanding of translation. You’ll showcase this in your summer project, which you’ll hand in by the end of the course in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period. If you take the PGDip, you’ll study the same content but without completing the summer project.

Compulsory modules:

  • Computer-Assisted Translation 45 credits
  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. If completing the MSc you’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Applied Translation Studies equips you with valuable skills that are increasingly important in a globalised world. You’ll also develop advanced IT, research, analysis and communication skills that are very attractive to employers across different industries.

Many of our students go straight into practice with their translation skills, whether they work in large organisations, small or medium-sized language service providers or as freelance translators. Others pursue related careers such as project management or administrative roles in language services. They work in organisations such as the UN and affiliated organisations, the European Parliament and European Commission, commercial enterprises and NGOs.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



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This challenging and exciting programme will introduce you to key methods and approaches in translation studies, specialising in the processes and practices of audiovisual translation. Read more

This challenging and exciting programme will introduce you to key methods and approaches in translation studies, specialising in the processes and practices of audiovisual translation.

You’ll work between English and one or two languages, including Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. You’ll also have the chance to study modules informed by research taking place at our Centre for Translation Studies on topics such as computer-assisted translation, machine translation, interpreting and genre analysis.

Leading researchers work alongside contracted practitioners to equip you with a range of practical skills, as well as a solid understanding of the principles that underpin audiovisual translation. It’s an opportunity to gain the knowledge and skills to launch an exciting career in a growing industry.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted audiovisual translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. In addition to the processes and practices of professional audiovisual translation, core modules will introduce you to essential concepts in translation studies

In addition you’ll choose optional modules specialising in translation from one or two languages, while you can also choose from modules informed by the research of our experts in key areas such as computer-assisted translation, machine translation or genre analysis. You’ll also complete a summer project by the end of the programme in September, which could take the form of extended translations, a dissertation or subtitling project.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules each year.

Course structure

Year 1 Compulsory modules

  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits
  • Audiovisual Translation: Processes, Strategies and Industry-Driven Practice 30 credits
  • Monolingual Subtitling 15 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Audiovisual Translation Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Audiovisual Translation Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities. In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. You’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Audiovisual Translation Studies equips you with valuable practical skills, underpinned by a solid theoretical foundation. You’ll also develop advanced skills in IT, research, communication and analysis that are very valuable to employers.

Graduates have launched careers in subtitling and translation in locations such as London, Hong Kong, Taipei and Tokyo. They work for organisations such as the BBC, UN, World Bank and World Trade Organization, as well as major translation companies. Many also go on to work as freelancers, making use of the experience and significant networks that they start to build at Leeds.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



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This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. Read more

Why take this course?

This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. It has a strong practical orientation, embracing technology and research skills that are highly relevant to translation as a career.

You can study this as a campus-based or distance learning course.

What will i experience?

On this course you can:

Specialise in translation between English and your choice of language from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian or Spanish
Balance your study between translation skills, technological competence and the acquisition of theoretical methodologies
Follow a programme accredited by the European Masters in Translation network

What opportunities might it lead to?

The MA Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth is an accredited member of the European Masters in Translation Network, and the University is also a member of the OPTIMALE translator training network funded by the Erasmus lifelong learning scheme of the European Commission.

The course includes a strong practical element, as well as a careers element, which enables those who wish to become professionals to understand the basics of staff, agency and freelance translation work.

This course is accredited by European Masters in Translation. The EMT is a partnership project between the European Commission and higher-education institutions offering master's level translation programmes. The project has established a quality label for university translation programmes that meet agreed professional standards and market demands.

Module Details

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block, plus their dissertation. A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Core units

Critical Approaches to Specialised Translation:
For the theoretical strand of this unit, students will be introduced to a series of concepts and theoretical frameworks in linguistics and translation studies. This unit makes substantial use of task-based learning in order to help the students to learn to apply these concepts and frameworks to the analysis of translations by other people and to their own translation practice.

Dissertation:
Students have the choice to complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a translation related topic or an extended translation and commentary. (Taken once core unit and options have been passed)

Options: 2 of the following:

Translation Technologies and Subtitling:
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with software tools which are relevant and in use in the professional world of translation. It will cover both the theory and the practice of glossary development, translation memory/machine translation usage and subtitling.

Technical Communication:
This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems

Translation Project:
The Translation Project provides an opportunity for students to produce an extended translation in a domain of their choice. Students will be required to address a range of practical and professional issues, including market demand, time and resource management and billing, and reflect critically on them.

Professional Portfolio:
The Professional Portfolio is designed as a unit which allows students to profile their studies in a way which is academically or professionally important to them on the basis of previous professional experience, a work placement or internship, or any specific interests they may have in translation.

Professional Aspects of Translation:
This course will provide students with tools to maximise their employability in the sector and to enhance their professional business skills.

Please note: Specialised Translation workshops will run on campus depending on student numbers. Students will join the Distance Learning workshop variant of this unit if numbers for a specific language pathway are low on campus.

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught programme from October to June and a research programme, in which the dissertation is written from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. Their dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

The distance learning programme will provide you with online learning materials for the units. These will be supported by asynchronous online discussion with the tutors responsible for the various course units and with other students on the course. You will also be able to communicate with your tutors on a one-to-one basis (e.g. by email, Skype or telephone).

You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor, who will oversee your work throughout the process and you will be encouraged to start thinking about your dissertation from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Assessments include translations, essays and projects. All translation-related assessments provide the opportunity to practise your translation skills and simultaneously to reflect on this practice. Other assignments will evaluate your technical expertise, research skills, ability to read critically and grasp of the principal theoretical concepts relating to translation.

Student Destinations

Graduates of the MA Translation Studies work in a variety of translation-related roles, in the UK and abroad. The course can enhance a specialism that students already have, or can help develop the relevant knowledge and skills for the profession. It is quite common to begin one's in-house career as a project manager, co-ordinating translation commissions before moving on to work as a translator. Quite a few of our graduates also go into freelance translation. A number of our graduates go on to pursue further research in translation.

Read less
This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. Read more

Why take this course?

This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. It has a strong practical orientation, embracing technology and research skills that are highly relevant to translation as a career.

You can study this as a campus-based or distance learning course.

What will i experience?

On this course you can:

Specialise in translation between English and your choice of language from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian or Spanish
Balance your study between translation skills, technological competence and the acquisition of theoretical methodologies
Follow a programme accredited by the European Masters in Translation network

What opportunities might it lead to?

The MA Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth is an accredited member of the European Masters in Translation Network, and the University is also a member of the OPTIMALE translator training network funded by the Erasmus lifelong learning scheme of the European Commission.

The course includes a strong practical element, as well as a careers element, which enables those who wish to become professionals to understand the basics of staff, agency and freelance translation work.

This course is accredited by European Masters in Translation. The EMT is a partnership project between the European Commission and higher-education institutions offering master's level translation programmes. The project has established a quality label for university translation programmes that meet agreed professional standards and market demands.

Module Details

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block, plus their dissertation. A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Core units

Critical Approaches to Specialised Translation:
For the theoretical strand of this unit, students will be introduced to a series of concepts and theoretical frameworks in linguistics and translation studies. This unit makes substantial use of task-based learning in order to help the students to learn to apply these concepts and frameworks to the analysis of translations by other people and to their own translation practice.

Dissertation:
Students have the choice to complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a translation related topic or an extended translation and commentary. (Taken once core unit and options have been passed)

Options: 2 of the following:

Translation Technologies and Subtitling:
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with software tools which are relevant and in use in the professional world of translation. It will cover both the theory and the practice of glossary development, translation memory/machine translation usage and subtitling.

Technical Communication:
This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems

Translation Project:
The Translation Project provides an opportunity for students to produce an extended translation in a domain of their choice. Students will be required to address a range of practical and professional issues, including market demand, time and resource management and billing, and reflect critically on them.

Professional Portfolio:
The Professional Portfolio is designed as a unit which allows students to profile their studies in a way which is academically or professionally important to them on the basis of previous professional experience, a work placement or internship, or any specific interests they may have in translation.

Professional Aspects of Translation:
This course will provide students with tools to maximise their employability in the sector and to enhance their professional business skills.

Please note: Specialised Translation workshops will run on campus depending on student numbers. Students will join the Distance Learning workshop variant of this unit if numbers for a specific language pathway are low on campus.

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught programme from October to June and a research programme, in which the dissertation is written from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. Their dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

The distance learning programme will provide you with online learning materials for the units. These will be supported by asynchronous online discussion with the tutors responsible for the various course units and with other students on the course. You will also be able to communicate with your tutors on a one-to-one basis (e.g. by email, Skype or telephone).

You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor, who will oversee your work throughout the process and you will be encouraged to start thinking about your dissertation from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Assessments include translations, essays and projects. All translation-related assessments provide the opportunity to practise your translation skills and simultaneously to reflect on this practice. Other assignments will evaluate your technical expertise, research skills, ability to read critically and grasp of the principal theoretical concepts relating to translation.

Student Destinations

Graduates of the MA Translation Studies work in a variety of translation-related roles, in the UK and abroad. The course can enhance a specialism that students already have, or can help develop the relevant knowledge and skills for the profession. It is quite common to begin one's in-house career as a project manager, co-ordinating translation commissions before moving on to work as a translator. Quite a few of our graduates also go into freelance translation. A number of our graduates go on to pursue further research in translation.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Literary Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Literary Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

We are an established centre for research into literary translation with expertise in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh. We are currently leading a project on the Visualisation of Translation Variation and are particularly interested in proposals which articulate with it. See: http://www.delightedbeauty.org/vvv/Home/Project.

Key Features of MA by Research in Literary Translation

An MA by Research in Literary Translation gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Literary Translation, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (in the private sector, the Civil Service, education, or the translation industry).

The Literary Translation research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your own choosing in Literary Translation and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student enrolled on the MA by Research in Literary Translation, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Literary Translation degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in Literary Translation is ideal for those who want:

-an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying (see staff web pages).

For informal enquiries regarding Literary Translation please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Research Interests

Staff research interests in Translation and Interpreting cover a range of themes, including:

• Literary Translation

• Theatre translation/adaptation

• Translation Theory (including non-Western)

• History of Translation

• Comparative Translation Studies

• Translation and Social Discourse

• Corpus-based Translation Analysis

• Translation and the Lexicon

• Computer-based Lexicography and Terminography

• Translation processes: psycholinguistics of translation, translation workflows

• Translation tools and technologies

• Translation visualisation

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. The Department benefits from extensive library holdings in print and online form. All postgraduate students have access to two computer-based language laboratories, an advanced Translation and Media computing lab, and a more specialised Translation Research facility housing the latest digitisation, corpus analysis and computer assisted translation tools.



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This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research. Read more

This varied degree will allow you to explore the cultural, social, political, theological and other aspects of medieval history while gaining valuable skills for further research.

Core modules will allow you to gain an understanding of medieval Latin and palaeography so you can work with primary sources. You’ll also study research methods and bibliography to sharpen your research skills – all of which will allow you to make the most of the fantastic archives, library resources and collections both within the University and in the region.

You’ll also choose from a range of optional modules offered by our School of History and Institute for Medieval Studies, allowing you to gain specialist knowledge in the areas that interest you while cutting across disciplines and using different critical approaches. You could study a broad range of topics, reflecting the diverse research interests across the University which is home to the International Medieval Congress.

The Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS) has access to excellent resources, both in the University and beyond. The world-class Brotherton Library contains extensive facsimiles and microfilms of primary materials as well as a wide range of online resources. Its Special Collections also contain a wide range of manuscript, archive and early printed material, including the Melsteth Icelandic Collection, archives of the Yorkshire Archaeological Society, the old library of Ripon Cathedral, and the manuscripts and incunabula of the Brotherton Collection.

Leeds is also home to the Royal Armouries and its extensive medieval collections, while the West Yorkshire Archives are dotted around the region and the British Library has a Document Supply Centre in nearby Boston Spa.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Core modules throughout the degree will allow you to develop important research skills, equipping you to work with primary sources. You’ll gain a working knowledge of medieval Latin, look at research methods in historical study and learn to read and transcribe medieval manuscripts by studying palaeography.

Then you’ll build on this foundation with your choice of optional modules. You’ll choose at least one module offered by the School of History, but you could also choose from the range of interdisciplinary modules offered by IMS. You’ll also specialise further when you complete your dissertation, allowing you to conduct independent research on a specific topic of your choice to showcase the skills you’ve acquired.

If you choose to study this programme part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Details of compulsory modules can be found in the table below; for details of optional modules please see the online module catalogue.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation (Medieval History) 30 credits
  • Introduction to Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Intermediate Medieval Latin 30 credits
  • Research Methods and Bibliography 15 credits
  • Palaeography: Reading Medieval Manuscripts 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Bede's Northumbria 30 credits
  • Christian Society and the Crusades, 1185-1230 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Warfare in the Age of the Crusades (1095-1204) 30 credits
  • The Bible in the Medieval World 30 credits
  • Religious Communities and the Individual Experience of Religion, 1200-1500 30 credits
  • The Medieval Tournament: Combat and Spectacle in Western Europe, 1100-1600 30 credits
  • The Holy Land under the Franks: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and its Enemies, 1099-1187 30 credits
  • Medieval Bodies 30 credits
  • Preaching History: Understanding Sermons as Literature and Historical Source 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Medieval History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

IMS tutors are experts in their fields, and their cutting-edge research will inform your teaching. To help you make the most of their expertise, all IMS modules are taught in small groups.

You may study skills in seminar groups of 12 or more students, but languages and other interdisciplinary options are usually taught in tutorials of up to eight students. You’ll also have one-to-one meetings with your supervisor during your dissertation.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you’ll be assessed by a range of methods to develop skills that are useful across the field of medieval studies. These will include transcriptions, bibliographies, essays, reports, translations and occasionally exams.

Career opportunities

This degree is excellent preparation for further study in related fields. It will also equip you with advanced research, communication and analytical skills that are valuable to employers in a wide range of careers such as in museums and business.

We offer a range of paid opportunities for you to gain experience that can really help with your career plans. You’ll be able to provide a mock tutorial for first-year undergraduates during their induction week, or become an academic mentor for final-year students as they complete their dissertations to gain experience of teaching, one-to-one communication and people management.

We also run several paid one-year internships throughout the year on projects such as the International Medieval Bibliography, IMS website and the International Medieval Congress to gain practical experience.

Read more about Employment in IMS.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This programme aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating technical texts. The programme will familiarise you with the sociocultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise specialised multilingual material. Read more

Summary

This programme aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating technical texts.

The programme will familiarise you with the sociocultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise specialised multilingual material. Through working with dedicated software and high-tech industry standard equipment, you will learn the skills you need to enter the professional market and gain the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

There is a particular emphasis on learning translation tools (in particular SDL Trados) and on localisation, especially for video games. This programme is not limited to specific language pairs. You can work into and out of English and another language of your choice.

You will be taught by staff who are leaders in the field of translation and whose work has influenced organisations such as OFCOM. They work closely with industry and bring in key professionals in the field to teach and give talks, thus helping you to make vital industry contacts.

Roehampton boasts state-of-the-art language labs with cutting-edge translation software, including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS. The lab also features a training suite and an open access area where you can work independently.

In recent years our graduates have found work with a broad range of organisations including: media companies and broadcasters such as the BBC, France TV, and RTVE; subtitling companies such as IMS, Deluxe, ITFC; and translation and localisation providers including Pole To Win, London Translations and JF Traduções e Interpretações.

As a Specialise Translation student you will become a member of the Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, which promotes excellence in research into translation-related areas including language learning, audiovisual translation, accessibility to the media and other areas of translation.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of specialised translation. In the compulsory module ‘Technical and Scientific Translation’ you will practice your skills in translating highly specialised documents into your chosen language. During the course you will also address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation.

IT skills are central to a translator's work so the compulsory module ‘Translation Tools’ will familiarise you with some of the translation tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer-assisted translation systems. You will be taught how to carry out efficient documentation and make appropriate use of research tools in solving technical and scientific translation problems.

You could also study ‘The Localisation of Video Games’ where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. Other optional modules currently include ‘Subtitling: Concepts and Practice’, where you will explore the techniques of subtitle synchronisation using specialised software. MA students will also undertake a dissertation, which will provide you with the ideal opportunity to undertake an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic that is of interest to you.

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Now running for over twenty five years, the MA in Children’s Literature is recognised internationally as a benchmark programme in the field and is delivered by the award-winning National Centre of Research in Children’s Literature. Read more

Summary

Now running for over twenty five years, the MA in Children’s Literature is recognised internationally as a benchmark programme in the field and is delivered by the award-winning National Centre of Research in Children’s Literature.

On this acclaimed MA/PG Dip in Children’s Literature you will explore landmark books such as The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe or The Railway Children, alongside the contemporary innovations of Patrick Ness or Emily Gravett.

You will work alongside staff with international reputations in areas such as adolescence, critical theory, landscape, and philosophy. Plus, many of you will have the chance of working with Roehampton's Chancellor and renowned author Professor Dame Jacqueline Wilson.

As a Children’s Literature student you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in Britain. NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children’s Books) and Booktrust. The centre also hosts and co-organises an annual one-day British IBBY/NCRCL MA Conference and runs a biennial NCRCL Conference, showcasing themes from members' research interests. Keynote speakers have included Michael Rosen, Matthew Grenby, Emer O’Sullivan, Neil Gaiman, and Julia Eccleshare.

The University is the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, London’s largest event dedicated to children’s writing. The partnership provides paid and voluntary work experience opportunities for students at the festival, as well as opportunities to attend events for free.

Roehampton also hosts a number of Children’s' Literature collections in our library containing 3,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals. We are also home to the Richmal Crompton Collection. This includes her personal library, editions and translations of her famous Just William stories and scripts including short stories and radio plays.

Content

This stimulating programme allows for the exploration of a range of literary texts from medieval learning materials, through landmark books such as Treasure Island, The Tale of Peter Rabbit or The Eagle of the Ninth, to the contemporary innovations of Mark Haddon, Shaun Tan or Jackie Kay.

Although this is a literature programme, study is not limited to children’s books. You will also examine the relationship (both historical and ongoing) between children’s books and social constructions of childhood.

The creative writing modules, which currently include ‘Writing for a Child Audience’ and ‘Creative Dissertation’, represent exciting additions to the programme, recognising the fact that many of our students have ambitions to write for children.

MA students will complete the course by undertaking either a dissertation or creative dissertation. The dissertation is a supervised research project involving an in-depth study of an aspect of children’s literature that interests you. For the creative dissertation, you will produce a creative portfolio that could include short stories, picturebook scripts, poems, or a novella, alongside a critical reflections of your work.

Children's literature can also be studied by distance learning.

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This course gives you the skills and knowledge to become a professional translator. You’ll work between English and one/two of the following languages. Read more
This course gives you the skills and knowledge to become a professional translator. You’ll work between English and one/two of the following languages: French, German, Italian or Spanish.

The professional translation focus is a special feature of the course. It'll equip you with the skills and strategies to enter a career:
-As freelance or in-house translator
-In public or private organisations
-In or beyond the language-services sector

You'll receive expert training in professional tools and software and work in different contexts, such as:
-Business
-Legal
-Technical
-Literary translation

In your professional life you'll only translate into your mother tongue and our teaching reflects this.

Accreditation

Our course is accredited by the European Master’s in Translation (EMT) network, ensuring you a top-quality professional qualification. We're also a member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting.

Teaching

We're proud to be part of Newcastle's School of Modern Languages. Our staff are a key strength of this course and you'll be taught by:
-Academics in translation studies or other relevant fields
-Translating and interpreting professionals
-Specialist translator and interpreter trainers

We work closely as a team and believe in supporting you as an individual. Find out about individual members of our Translating and Interpreting Studies team.

Delivery

We provide a friendly learning environment, with small teacher-student ratios in practical classes. The course structure allows you to tailor your own programme of study through:
-Compulsory modules
-A wide range of optional modules
-A translation project or dissertation

We use a variety of learning and teaching methods, including independent and group work. You'll have regular one-to-one consultations with teaching staff, plus a Personal Tutor to discuss other study or welfare issues.

In semesters one and two you have taught classes during office hours, Monday to Friday. From June to August, you'll work with a research supervisor on a long translation project or dissertation.

As part of the course, there is an optional visit to Brussels during the summer. In Brussels you will learn about the work of European Union translators and interpreters. We also visit The Hague to find out about translating in organisations for international justice.

If you're taking the MA part time, your work is split over two years. You'll agree your individual study plan with the Degree Programme Director. This will include your core practical translation modules in year one. You can start your Translation Project or Dissertation at any time in year two.

Work experience

Our membership of the European Master's in Translation network gives you:
-Priority access to traineeships in the Directorate-General for Translation
-Opportunities to apply for a work placement in the language and translation industry

We encourage you to seek work experience alongside the course and we'll support you in this. Opportunities are available through:
-Papillon Translations offering translation jobs to Newcastle MA students
-Our Newcastle Work Experience programme
-Our Careers Service
-The Careers Translated blog

Facilities

You'll have access to:
-Professional translation software
-The Language Resource Centre. It's equipped with audio-visual and computing facilities linked to a digital speech bank
-Three dedicated interpreting suites

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There is widespread interest in literary translation as a form of literary study, and as a discipline that extends the reading and writing skills obtained in an Arts degree. Read more
There is widespread interest in literary translation as a form of literary study, and as a discipline that extends the reading and writing skills obtained in an Arts degree. Trinity College builds on its large and successful language teaching experience in creating a programme specifically designed for the production and study of literary translations.

The course brings together in an interdisciplinary framework, the expertise to create a unique programme for practitioners, future practitioners and students of the art of translation. The target language is English, but the following source languages are also available: French, Italian, Spanish, German, Russian, Czech and Polish. Where requested, we will try to provide support in other languages. The programme is taught by experienced lecturers, several of whom have published translated books, and by guest translators. It features a seminar in which students present and discuss their own work.

A graduate of the course will be well equipped to undertake literary, cultural, academic or philosophical translation, and will be qualified for employment in any area demanding intercultural awareness and excellent writing and analytical skills. The aim is to each translation as an art, and to form professionals who will have learned to work in an ethos of mutual intellectual and linguistic exchange.

The M.Phil combines two core courses, which address theoretical, linguistic and practical issues common to all, or most translation situations. It also provides a selection of specialized options, which include courses on the practical issues of literary translation and the comparative approach.

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The goal of the M.A. in Modern and Contemporary Art and the Market is for students to acquire essential knowledge about art, the art market and their reciprocal relationship, while simultaneously building practical skills in preparation for careers in the art world. Read more
The goal of the M.A. in Modern and Contemporary Art and the Market is for students to acquire essential knowledge about art, the art market and their reciprocal relationship, while simultaneously building practical skills in preparation for careers in the art world. The program emphasizes the importance of direct contact with original works of art, and through the use of Christie's sale rooms and specialist staff, exploration of the history of art.

This interdisciplinary program provides an in-depth study of modern and contemporary art and its markets from the mid-19th century to the present day. Led by an expert faculty, the integrated program combines the development of connoisseurship skills through object-based learning and investigative cataloguing and writing, art history, knowledge of current art business practices and the market, and art market history. Students study art works first-hand in sites of production and exhibition throughout New York City and beyond. Additionally, access to specialists and salerooms through our central location at Christie’s auction house enhances the program and provides a unique and exceptional learning opportunity.

Our Unique Approach

Access to a wide range of art professionals provides students with first-hand knowledge of the workings of the art world, and the transferable skills they need to become art world professionals. An intensive program, it takes only 15 months to complete and concludes with the writing of a Master’s thesis and a mandatory 45-day internship to help students launch their professional careers.

Who should apply?

The program is designed both for students who have recently graduated with a B.A. in art history or a related humanities discipline and for career changers wishing to gain access to the art world. Students from a wide variety of fields have successfully merged their prior backgrounds with the program, launching successful careers at auction houses, galleries, non-profits, art fairs and art advisories upon graduation.

Student Learning Results

- Acquire the skills to identify different mediums and assess an art work’s condition
- Learn to describe works of art and situate them in art history
- Gain an insider’s understanding of the structure of the art world and the interplay between the commercial and non-profit sectors
- Develop transferable professional skills such as cataloguing, building a collection for a client, and critical writing
- Acquire knowledge of the workings of the auction house
- Gain art business and art market knowledge
- Identify and apply different methodological strategies used in interpreting contemporary art
- Develop facility with current research resources for art history and the art market
-For gainful employment disclosures visit this page http://www.christies.edu/new-york/gainful-employment.aspx

Admission Requirements

NOTES: Students enrolled in the Master of Arts in Modern and Contemporary Art and the Market are eligible for federal financial aid. International students enrolled in this program are eligible for F1 Student Visas. Details on how to apply for a visa are included in your admissions packet after being accepted into the program.

All admissions materials, including recommendation letters, must be submitted in hard copy to Christie's Education Admissions 1230 Avenue of the Americas, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10020.


- Completed admission application form
- Non-refundable application fee of $95
- Bachelor’s degree or the equivalent international degree
- Official transcripts from all post-secondary institutions attended. All transcripts, diplomas or academic records must be official documents issued by the college or university and provided in the original language in sealed envelope. Transcripts in other languages must be accompanied by English translations certified by official translation professionals or agencies
- All international transcripts must be accompanied by an equivalency report from World Education Services, WES.org
- Essay statement, 2–3 pages on why you are interested in the program
- Sample of writing, no more than 10 pages, which can be taken from undergraduate work
- Official GRE score report (optional)
- Official TOEFL scores report if applicable
- Three letters of academic or professional recommendation from writers who know the applicant’s abilities well. Letters should be sent in hard copy on letter head with original signatures
- Personal interview (by invitation only). Invitations will be sent once all application materials have been submitted

More information on program content, available resources and accreditation

Please visit this link http://www.christies.edu/new-york/courses/masters-modern-contemporary-art-markets.aspx

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