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Masters Degrees (Translational Oncology)

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Carolyn Staton. Translational oncology is the process by which laboratory research informs the development of new treatments for cancer. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Carolyn Staton

Translational oncology is the process by which laboratory research informs the development of new treatments for cancer. It’s a rapidly advancing field with massive therapeutic and commercial potential.

Our MSc(Res) is taught by leading research scientists and clinicians. The course offers training in the theory and practice of translational oncology and provides you with transferable skills for your future career. It includes a six-month research project for which you’ll work as part of a team within the oncology research community at Sheffield.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cancer; Cancer Epidemiology; Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment; Tumour Microenvironment; Cancer Technologies and Clinical Research; Literature Review; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by lectures, seminars, class discussions/workshops, interactive tutorials, practical demonstrations, student-led group work and patient encounters.

Alongside the taught modules students attend the Sheffield Cancer Research seminars which include question and answer sessions with the experts, and a series of professional skills development tutorials.

Assessment is by a combination of written seen exams, oral and poster presentations, case studies and written assignments. The research project is assessed by an oral presentation and a written dissertation.

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The MMedSci Oncology at Keele has been specifically designed to enable an introduction to a research programme whilst offering sustained clinical interaction throughout the course. Read more

Overview

The MMedSci Oncology at Keele has been specifically designed to enable an introduction to a research programme whilst offering sustained clinical interaction throughout the course. Keele University has a strong track record of clinically translational research, enabled by the close interaction of clinical interventionists with world leading academic researchers. This course benefits entirely from this bench-to-bedside ethos and will support like-minded students across this multidisciplinary environment. The course should serve as a platform to develop a medical research career.

As would be expected from such a clinically involved course, much of the teaching takes place at Keele University’s hospital campus located in the Royal Stoke University Hospital, University Hospital of North Midlands (UHNM) Trust. Keele University’s flagship research Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine (ISTM) is integrated with the hospital with the strategically aligned Guy Hilton Research Centre being located directly adjacent to the hospital. Being opened in 2006, this research centre offers patient treatment alongside state-of-the-art equipment and translational research. The centre has enabled research active clinical members to drive cutting-edge research and streamline the pipeline to patient benefit. The Oncology Department located in UHNM provides chemotherapy, radiotherapy, brachytherapy, clinical trials, and lymphoedema and haematology/oncology outpatients to a population of approximately 845,000. It is one of the top ten performing Trusts in the UK for delivering Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). This course offers the opportunity to interact closely with both clinical and research environments, with theoretical, practical and research-centric approaches underpinning the delivery of taught modules, clinical attachments and research projects.

Advances in the management of oncological patients are much needed in our rapidly aging community. New methods are continually being introduced allowing clinicians to better understand and react to patient care in an effort to maximise patient benefit and minimise in-patient time and treatment side effects. The MMedSci Oncology course offers the opportunity to harness the capabilities of cutting edge research to drive new concepts in a clinically transformative capacity.

The course has been awarded 50 CPD credits by the Royal College of Radiologists.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalscienceoncology/

Course Aims

MMedSci Oncology draws together the fundamental principles of current oncological patient management, clinical practice, stem cell and pathology techniques for clinical assessment of tissue and biological samples, with a focus on research-driven work closely related to ‘real world’ clinical practice. Further, transferable skills are delivered through intensive Clinical Audit, Health Informatics, and Leadership & Management modules. The course is open to third year medical students and above, qualified doctors and qualified health professionals with an interest in Oncology.

Course Content

The course is structured to sit within the framework of Keele University’s MMedSci route, with module timescales allowing, if necessary, to be taken full-time within the one year of entry. The structure has been specifically designed to maximise both clinical engagement, support from taught components and research experience. The course is split between non-optional core modules that students must take to progress on the MMedSci Oncology route, with at least 4 of the elective modules as listed below.

Non Optional Core Modules (60 credits + 60 credit dissertation)

- Independent Practice-based Study (30 credits)
- Management of the Oncological Patient (15 credits)
- Experimental Research Methods (15 credits)
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Choice of Four Optional Modules (60 credits)
(subject to availability)

- Clinical Audit (15 credits)
- Health Informatics (15 credits)
- Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Ethics and Law (15 credits)
- Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits)
- Introduction to Medical Imaging (15 credits)
- Cell and Tissue Engineering (15 credits)
- Stem Cells: Types, Characteristics and Applications (15 credits)
- Molecular Techniques: Applications in Tissue Engineering (15 credits)

Teaching & Assessment

All content is delivered from leaders in representative fields, either from academic staff in the University, or from active clinical staff in the National Health Service. Course content will develop students’ fundamental knowledge of the diagnosis and management of oncological patients. An appreciation regarding patient informed consent and establishment/ delivery of clinical trials is also covered alongside Research Methods, accumulating to a 6 month research project. Students will attend clinical seminars, multidisciplinary and mortality meetings within the UHNM Oncology Department to sustain engagement of the clinical delivery of topics taught throughout the course.

Students will be immersed in the clinical environment focussed on oncological management, with an emphasis on research procedures and translation of cutting-edge research into the clinic.

Assessment will be carried out by attending clinics, lectures and meetings, presentation of a patient case report, and a written assignment linked to the research project.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Translational Cancer Medicine enables you to gain detailed knowledge and understanding of research methods applied to rational drug design, clinical study design, molecular and cell biology, tumour immunology, genetics and cancer imaging. Read more
Translational Cancer Medicine enables you to gain detailed knowledge and understanding of research methods applied to rational drug design, clinical study design, molecular and cell biology, tumour immunology, genetics and cancer imaging. Practical experience gained through two six-month laboratory rotations.

Key benefits

- The range of topics including advanced imaging methods is unique for this translational cancer programme

- The sponsoring laboratories and departments all have international standing and have agreed to closely supervise the trainees

- Recently released data from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (Hefce) shows that King’s College London is equal top in England (with Queen Mary, University of London) for its PhD completion rates. This programme will potentially select candidates for the PhD programme within the Division of Cancer Studies

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/translational-cancer-medicine-mres.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Overview of subjects covered:

• Biomarkers, biostatistics and modelling
• Breast cancer
• Cancer bioinformatics
• Cancer imaging (optical)
• Cancer imaging (PET)
• Clinical trials and translational research
• Gene discovery through to therapeutic applications
• Haemato-oncology and associated genetics/genomics
• Immunology of cancers
• Molecular pathology
• Signal transduction in cancers

- Course purpose -

The programme will provide students with a detailed knowledge and understanding of research methods applied to rational drug design, clinical study design, molecular and cell biology, tumour immunology, genetics and cancer imaging, all of which are relevant to Translational Cancer Research. In addition, practical experience will be gained through two laboratory rotations of six months duration.

- Course format and assessment -

Work with 2 supervisors and their teams, 6 months in each lab

Assignments:

• 30 credit taught module:

2-3 weekly lectures during first 3 months

Throughout the year, students also attend literature reviews and journal clubs that their labs/departments organise and any other internal or external seminars deemed relevant to their projects/assignments.

The assessment for this module is an essay on the fundamentals and the overall concept of Translational Cancer Medicine

• 75 credit laboratory based research project 1:

Assessed by a written dissertation, a seminar presentation and an oral examination

• 75 credit laboratory based research project 2:

Assessed by a draft of a paper of the standard and format required by a scientific journal.

Career prospects

Future PhD studies. Clinical and non-clinical academic careers in cancer medicine.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Approximately 300,000 people develop the disease each year in the UK. Read more
Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Approximately 300,000 people develop the disease each year in the UK.

Understanding the basis of tumourigenesis and developing new therapies are high priority areas for investment, especially since the economic burden of cancer is increasing. The field of oncology encompasses a wide variety of biological and physical sciences.

The MRes in Oncology draws on the wide range of expertise in research and treatment within The University of Manchester’s Institute of Cancer Sciences and its partners within the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Manchester Institute and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust.

This comprises a unique grouping of basic, translational and clinical scientists of national and international renown.

This concentration of expertise offers high quality teaching on clinical and research aspects of cancer care from practising cancer clinicians and researchers, as well as access to an exceptional wide range of research projects.

Projects can be offered in basic cancer biology, translational areas, and in clinical cancer care and imaging.

This programme has both taught and research components and is suitable for those with little or no previous research experience.

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For health care professionals from diverse backgrounds who wish to expand their knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects of oncology, this full-time programme is particularly suitable for medical professionals with an interest in clinical, medical, surgical and translational oncology. Read more
For health care professionals from diverse backgrounds who wish to expand their knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects of oncology, this full-time programme is particularly suitable for medical professionals with an interest in clinical, medical, surgical and translational oncology. Unique to this programme is the exciting opportunity to gain clinical observership status and log your hours observing in a UK based hospital.

The aim of this programme is to give you a scientific understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of cancer, its epidemiology and pathology, and to place this in a clinical context. We will then address how this knowledge effects therapeutic approaches, and disease management.

Aiming to allow you to understand the research process, this programme draws on examples within the department and its associated clinical trials unit. A key part of the Masters programme is the planning, execution and reporting of a piece of independent study leading to submission of a dissertation.

At all levels we aim to encourage interactive rather than didactic learning and lecturing. Therefore, as well as assembling and learning facts you will also consider some of the philosophical challenges which underlie the treatment of cancer.

You can opt for a Postgraduate Diploma on completion of the core modules and 40 credits of optional modules, or a Masters on successful completion of the taught programme and an independently researched dissertation.

About the College of Medical and Dental Sciences

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences is a major international centre for research and education, make huge strides in finding solutions to major health problems including ageing, cancer, cardiovascular, dental, endocrine, inflammatory diseases, infection (including antibiotic resistance), rare diseases and trauma.
We tackle global healthcare problems through excellence in basic and clinical science, and improve human health by delivering tangible real-life benefits in the fight against acute and chronic disease.
Situated in the largest healthcare region in the country, with access to one of the largest and most diverse populations in Europe, we are positioned to address major global issues and diseases affecting today’s society through our eight specialist research institutes.
With over 1,000 academic staff and around £60 million of new research funding per year, the College of Medical and Dental Sciences is dedicated to performing world-leading research.
We care about our research and teaching and are committed to developing outstanding scientists and healthcare professionals of the future. We offer our postgraduate community a unique learning experience taught by academics who lead the way in research in their field.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Jonathan Wood. Translational Neuroscience looks at how laboratory research relating to brain structure and function informs the development of new therapies for diseases of the nervous system. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Jonathan Wood

Translational Neuroscience looks at how laboratory research relating to brain structure and function informs the development of new therapies for diseases of the nervous system.

Combining the research strengths from the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health and the Faculty of Science, leading international basic and clinical scientists will provide an innovative and progressive programme. You’ll study basic neurobiology and molecular biology through to neuroimaging and applied clinical practice.

The MSc will provide you with up-to-date knowledge of advances in the field, research experience with internationally renowned research groups and transferable skills to provide a springboard for your future career.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Molecular Neuroscience; CNS Structure and Function; Genetics and Modelling of Neurodegenerative Disease; Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disease; Applied Neuroimaging; Neurophysiology and Psychiatry. A 20 week Research Project will be undertaken in the Summer Term.

Examples of optional modules

Option one: Literature Review and Critical Analysis of Science; Ethics and Public Awareness of Science.

Option two: Computational Neuroscience: Neurons and Neuronal Codes; Mathematical Modelling and Research Skills.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory demonstrations, computer practicals and student-led group work. Assessment is primarily by written assignments and coursework, although there are some written examinations and oral presentations. The research project is assessed by a thesis 
and presentation.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Julie Simpson. This course combines taught modules on the fundamental aspects of the major nervous system diseases, with the development of practical laboratory skills encompassing histopathology, molecular pathology and microscopy. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Julie Simpson

This course combines taught modules on the fundamental aspects of the major nervous system diseases, with the development of practical laboratory skills encompassing histopathology, molecular pathology and microscopy.

You’ll be trained to use tissue samples in neuroscience research aimed at understanding the pathophysiology of nervous system diseases and you’ll discover how laboratory breakthroughs have been translated into clinical benefits.

The course will be taught by scientists and consultant neuropathologists who are experts in their fields. You’ll get the opportunity to carry out neuroanatomy dissection and you’ll work with leading research groups during the research project.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Neuro-anatomy; Basic Principles of Pathology and Histopathology; Molecular Neuroscience; Ethics and Public Awareness of Science; Pathology and Modelling of Neurodegenerative Disease; Neuroinflammation, Neuro-Oncology and Neurovascular Disease; Literature Review and Critical Analysis of Science; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

The taught component of the MSc is delivered through practical laboratory classes and demonstrations, lectures, seminars and tutorials. Assessment is primarily through written assignments and coursework, along with practical laboratory assessments, spotter exams, presentations and debates. The research project is assessed by a thesis and oral presentation.

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The course combines an introduction to the theory behind and technologies currently used in drug discovery, pharmacokinetics, role of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints, preclinical safety assessment, first-time-in-human studies, clinical investigation paradigms, research governance and medical statistics. Read more
The course combines an introduction to the theory behind and technologies currently used in drug discovery, pharmacokinetics, role of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints, preclinical safety assessment, first-time-in-human studies, clinical investigation paradigms, research governance and medical statistics.

Suitable for all medical disciplines, but of particular interest to Cardiovascular/Respiratory, Neuroscience, Oncology, and Metabolic medicine, the programme is highly suitable for graduates in medicine who wish to pursue a career as clinical academics and for medical professionals in industry.

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The course will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in fundamental and applied cancer biology, and focused training in laboratory research and associated methodology. Read more
The course will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in fundamental and applied cancer biology, and focused training in laboratory research and associated methodology.

Why study Cancer Biology at Dundee?

The MRes Cancer Biology is a research-centred taught Masters programme providing a focused training in molecular cancer research. It covers both the fundamental and translational science of carcinogenesis, cancer biology, diagnosis and therapy.

The programme delivers outstanding research-focused teaching from internationally-renowned scientists and clinicians.

Dundee University is internationally renowned for the quality of its cancer research and has over 50 cancer research groups: current funding for cancer research is about £40 million from research councils and charities. In 2009 the university became the first Scottish university to be awarded Cancer Centre status by the CRUK.

What's so good about studying Cancer Biology at Dundee?

The MRes Cancer Biology has been developed from the innovative collaboration between the College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing and the School of Life Sciences, and it complements the establishment of the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Centre here in Dundee.

The Dundee Cancer Centre aims to enhance cancer research and apply discoveries to improve patient care. Key to this is training the next generation of cancer researchers.

Areas of particular strength at the University of Dundee are in surgical oncology for breast and colon cancer, radiation biology and clinical oncology, skin cancer and pharmacogenomics. Areas of strength in basic cancer biology are DNA replication, chromosome biology and the cell cycle, cell signalling and targets for drug discovery.

Teaching and Assessment

This course is taught by staff based in the College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing and the School of Life Sciences.

The MRes will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures, tutorials, discussion group work and journal clubs, self-directed study and supervised laboratory research.

What you will study

The MRes degree course is taught full-time over three semesters.

The first semester provides in-depth teaching and directed study on the molecular biology of cancer, and covers:

Basic cell and molecular biology, and introduction to cancer biology
Cell proliferation, cell signalling and cancer
Cancer cell biology
Carcinogenesis, cancer treatment and prevention
Specific training in research methodology and critical analysis

Students will also be required to take part in a journal club to further develop their critical review skills.

In semesters two and three students will be individually guided to focus on a specific cancer research topic which will be the subject of a literature review and associated laboratory research project. The research project is based in laboratories with state-of-the-art facilities, and under the leadership of world-class researchers.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Places on the course are limited, so early applications are strongly encouraged.
Apply early to avoid disappointment.
Follow us on Twitter to keep up with news from the MRes Cancer Biology @Mrescancerbiol

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Peter Grabowski. Accredited by the Association for Nutrition. This course will give you a good understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Peter Grabowski
Accredited by the Association for Nutrition

This course will give you a good understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition. You’ll learn research skills and techniques. It will prepare you for a career in research, the food industry, academia, community nutrition and nutrition consultancy.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Epidemiology and Community Nutrition; Nutritional Biochemistry; Molecular Nutrition; Nutritional Physiology; Nutrition for Developing Countries; Clinical Nutrition. The Diploma follows the same taught structure as the masters and students must complete all modules.

Masters students complete an original Research Project and a literature review. PG Diploma students complete a library-based research project.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through lectures and seminars, practical sessions, workshops, group debates, self-study units and individual presentations. The taught modules include research skills tutorials. You’ll work independently on the research and library projects, with guidance from an academic.

You’re assessed on written reports, laboratory practical classes and group and individual assignments, which may involve oral presentations. There is a written examination at the end of each module with an original research project for the MSc and a library-based project for the Diploma. The research project is assessed by a written dissertation and an oral presentation. The library project is assessed by written dissertation.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Mark Fenwick. The course provides training in reproductive and developmental medicine for scientists, clinicians and others, for instance ethical advisers or lawyers looking to specialise. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Mark Fenwick

The course provides training in reproductive and developmental medicine for scientists, clinicians and others, for instance ethical advisers or lawyers looking to specialise. It’s a good platform for a research career or a career in clinical laboratory training for IVF or embryology.

Through the taught modules you’ll develop a solid understanding of reproductive science relevant to clinical applications. We cover the breadth of processes from gonadal development and production of gametes through to pregnancy and parturition. Each module is taught by leading scientists and clinicians in that field.

You’ll also have the opportunity to learn about the ethical issues and international laws regulating reproductive medicine. Finally, you’ll undertake a research project to develop a depth of knowledge in a specialist topic.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Research Skills in Reproductive Medicine; Gonads to Gametes: fundamentals of reproduction; Fertilisation, Implantation and Embryology; Fetal Development, Pregnancy and Parturition; Reproductive Technology and Infertility; Law, Ethics and Policy in Reproductive Medicine.

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Lead academic 2016. Professor Ilaria Bellantuono. This unique one-year programme is run by the Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) and funded by Medical Research Council and Arthritis Research UK. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Professor Ilaria Bellantuono

This unique one-year programme is run by the Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) and funded by Medical Research Council and Arthritis Research UK. CIMA is a collaboration between the University of Sheffield, the University of Liverpool and the University of Newcastle.

The course provides multidisciplinary research training on the musculoskeletal system as a whole in the context of ageing. The training has a strong focus on employability. Topics range from basic science to clinical aspects, from in vitro to in vivo models, and from the latest advances in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system to lifestyle interventions.

Although you’ll be based at Sheffield, the course involves exchange visits to the other universities.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Principles of Human Nutrition: relevance to ageing; Biology of Ageing; Biology and Assessment of Skeletal Health; Muscle in the Integrated Musculoskeletal System; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

The taught element is online and may be taken remotely at home (live interactions will take place between 9–5pm UK time). This includes live lectures, wikis and blogs, and tutor support.

The research project involves hands-on laboratory work. It includes placements with all three universities.

You’ll also have the chance to take part in seminars, workshops and networking events delivered by industrial partners. You’ll be assessed through exams, coursework, a mock grant proposal and a research project dissertation.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Martin Nicklin. This flexible course focuses on the molecular and genetic factors of human diseases. Understanding those factors is crucial to the development of therapies. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Martin Nicklin

This flexible course focuses on the molecular and genetic factors of human diseases. Understanding those factors is crucial to the development of therapies. Core modules cover the fundamentals. You choose specialist modules from the pathway that interests you most. We also give you practical lab training to prepare you for your research project. The project is five months of invaluable laboratory experience: planning, carrying out, recording and reporting your own research.

Recent graduates work in academic research science, pharmaceuticals and the biotech industry.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

From Genome to Gene Function; Human Gene Bioinformatics; Research Literature Review; Human Disease Genetics; Modulating Immunity; Laboratory Practice and Statistics.
You choose: six optional pathways

1. Genetic Mechanisms pathway:


Modelling Protein Interactions; Gene Networks: Models and Functions.

2. Microbes and Infection pathway:


Virulence Mechanisms of Viruses, Fungi and Protozoa; Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity; Characterisation of Bacterial Virulence Determinants.

3. Experimental Medicine pathway:


Molecular and Cellular Basis of Disease; Model Systems in Research; Novel Therapies.

4. Cancer pathway:

Molecular Basis of Tumourigenesis and Metastasis; Molecular Techniques in Cancer Research; Molecular Approaches to Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment.

5. Cardiovascular pathway:

Vascular Cell Biology; Experimental Models of Vascular Disease; Vascular Disease Therapy and Clinical Practice.

6. Clinical Applications pathway:

Apply directly to this pathway. Available only to medical graduates. Students are recruited to a specialist clinical team and pursue the taught programme (1-5) related to the attachment. They are then attached to a clinical team for 20 weeks, either for a clinical research project or for clinical observations. See website for more detail and current attachments.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory demonstrations, computer practicals and student presentations. Assessment is continuous. Most modules are assessed by written assignments and coursework, although there are some written exams. Two modules are assessed by verbal presentations.

Your research project is assessed by a thesis, possibly with a viva.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Charlotte Codina. This is a part-time distance learning course for practising Orthoptists and other eye care professionals. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Charlotte Codina

This is a part-time distance learning course for practising Orthoptists and other eye care professionals. It’s taught online so you can study for a higher degree without having to leave your current post.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Course content

Concomitance and Incomitance in Depth or Stroke; Insight into Disease or Low Vision; Eye to Vision; Research Methods (option for Postgraduate Diploma); Dissertation (Postgraduate Diploma only); Research Project (MMedSci only).

Teaching

Teaching is by distance learning, supported 
by four weekend residentials.

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