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Masters Degrees (Translational Oncology)

We have 24 Masters Degrees (Translational Oncology)

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This M.Sc. program in Translational Oncology will provide high-quality training for basic scientists and clinicians in the theoretical and practical aspects of the causes and treatment of cancer. Read more
This M.Sc. program in Translational Oncology will provide high-quality training for basic scientists and clinicians in the theoretical and practical aspects of the causes and treatment of cancer. A major focus of the programme is the cellular genetic and epigenetic basis of cancer. The course also covers the scientific and clinical challenges pertinent to the management of site specific cancers, and all aspects of cancer treatment from standard therapies to 'individualised' molecular targeted therapies. The focus of the course is research led teaching in the practical aspects of translational cancer research. This innovative M.Sc. program in Translational Oncology is aimed at scientists and doctors in training who wish to:

Develop their research skills
Broaden their expertise in oncology
Develop advanced knowledge in specific areas of scientific, translational and clinical oncology.

The proposed course will offer an opportunity for graduates from a variety of backgrounds to specifically train in translational oncology in advance of undertaking an MD or PhD. Modules are taught using a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials, workshops and laboratory practicals. Lectures are provided by leaders in the field of translational oncology from both scientific and medical backgrounds. The core modules are Cellular and Molecular Oncology, Cancer Epigenetics, Disease Specific Cancers, Radiation / Chemotherapy and Molecular Targeted Therapies, Tumour Immunology, Molecular Pathology and Imaging, Clinical Statsitics and Research Skills. Students can tailor the course to their interests with optional modules in Obesity, metabolism and Cancer, Gemomic Instability, Cancer Drug Development, Tumour Microenvironment, Clinical Pharmacology, and Surgical Oncology and Economics. Students will be required to submit a dissertation based on an emperical research project conducted in one of the many oncology groups located within or affiliated with Trinity College Dublin and the Institute of Molecular Medicine. Opportunities for national and international placements to conduct research projects will also be available in collaborating universities, hospitals and industry.

All applicants should provide two academic or clinical references confirming their eligibility and suitability for the course, before their application can be considered. Applicants should also include a 500 word personal statement addressing why they are interested in the course, their suitability for the programme and how it will impact on their future career development. Applications for admission to the course should be made through the online system no later than July 31st. Late applications will be considered provided places are available.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Carolyn Staton. Translational oncology is the process by which laboratory research informs the development of new treatments for cancer. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Carolyn Staton

Translational oncology is the process by which laboratory research informs the development of new treatments for cancer. It’s a rapidly advancing field with massive therapeutic and commercial potential.

Our MSc(Res) is taught by leading research scientists and clinicians. The course offers training in the theory and practice of translational oncology and provides you with transferable skills for your future career. It includes a six-month research project for which you’ll work as part of a team within the oncology research community at Sheffield.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Cellular and Molecular Basis of Cancer; Cancer Epidemiology; Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment; Tumour Microenvironment; Cancer Technologies and Clinical Research; Literature Review; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by lectures, seminars, class discussions/workshops, interactive tutorials, practical demonstrations, student-led group work and patient encounters.

Alongside the taught modules students attend the Sheffield Cancer Research seminars which include question and answer sessions with the experts, and a series of professional skills development tutorials.

Assessment is by a combination of written seen exams, oral and poster presentations, case studies and written assignments. The research project is assessed by an oral presentation and a written dissertation.

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Designed in close collaboration with an international team of clinicians and research specialists, this focused MSc provides an understanding of the causes and treatment of cancer from 'bench-to-bedside'. Read more

Designed in close collaboration with an international team of clinicians and research specialists, this focused MSc provides an understanding of the causes and treatment of cancer from 'bench-to-bedside'. You study both theory and practice to gain the specialist knowledge and skills required to pursue an academic career in cancer research or move into the more applied fields of cancer treatment, hospital pathology or industry.

The University has an international reputation for medical research and places a strong emphasis on cancer. This MSc is taught by a team of cancer research-focused staff from the School with internal and external expert guest lectures and seminars. We enjoy close collaborative links with NHS clinicians, clinical researchers and oncology staff who also deliver aspects of the programme.

Students are immersed in an excellent research environment and infrastructure, specifically the recently completed £6 million, state-of-the-art, cancer research facility housed in the Allam Building. The University has invested in preclinical optical and radiological imaging and radiotherapy research. Students engage in research in cutting edge facilities employing these and other technologies used for the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer, both on campus and within the Hull Royal Infirmary and Castle Hill Hospital.

Study information

This MSc is delivered by leading academic cancer scientists, research specialists, consultant clinical and medical oncologists, diagnosticians, radiologists, nurses and cancer surgeons, through a combination of lectures, expert seminars, state-of-the-art oncology-based practicals and projects supported by 'problem classes', workshops and tutorials.

Laboratory-based work is an important part of the programme, which includes an extended 12-week oncology research project carried out in the laboratory of an internationally-recognised cancer researcher. This MSc programme is designed to provide a highly supportive environment, in which teamwork, project management and communication skills are as important as technical proficiency.

Core modules:

  • Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer
  • Tumour Immunology and Microenvironment
  • Treatment of Cancer
  • Organ specific cancers: Bench-to Bedside
  • Oncology Research Skills
  • Research Project and Dissertation

Optional modules:

  • Clinical Statistics/Ethics in Oncology
  • Cancer and Modifiable Risks

Students are provided with in-depth specialist knowledge and insight into the fundamentals of Translational Oncology, alongside research-led teaching into the practical applications of cancer research. There is a strong emphasis on scientific method and associated skills.

* All modules are subject to availability.

Future prospects

Graduates of the MSc will be highly attractive candidates for competitive PhD programmes with a basis in oncology.

The programme provides a platform for developing transferable skills that are appropriate for employment within industry, basic science laboratories, clinical laboratories, and education and research.

You also learn transferable skills, highly valued by employers in many fields, including team work, critical analysis, IT skills, time management, presentation skills, problem solving, project management and discipline.



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Our MRes Oncology course will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge you need to prepare for a career in cancer research. Read more

Our MRes Oncology course will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge you need to prepare for a career in cancer research.

Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Approximately 300,000 people develop the disease each year in the UK.

Understanding the basis of tumourigenesis and developing new therapies are high priority areas for investment, especially since the economic burden of cancer is increasing. The field of oncology encompasses a wide variety of biological and physical sciences.

You will learn from renowned basic, translational and clinical scientists at the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Manchester Institute and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, with a focus on developing practical research skills.

Our course covers the clinical and research aspects of cancer care, and you will have access to an exceptionally wide range of research projects in basic cancer biology, translational areas and clinical cancer care and imaging.

This MRes has both taught and research components and is suitable for those with little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our MRes course aims to provide postgraduate level training that will equip you with the specialist knowledge and research skills to pursue a research career in the fields of medical and clinical oncology.

You will gain an understanding of the scientific basis of cancer and its treatments, as well as the skills needed to evaluate the potential efficacy of new treatments.

This course also offers the potential to:

  • gain hands-on research experience;
  • work with world-renowned experts;
  • use state-of-the-art research equipment;
  • publish your work and attend national and international conferences;
  • be taught by speakers at the forefront of national and international cancer research;
  • undertake laboratory or clinical-based research projects at the Christie Hospital site, the largest cancer centre in Europe with some of the UK's leading cancer researchers;
  • enhance your research skills and gain confidence in your research abilities.

Special features

Clinical and research components

This is one of only a handful of MRes Oncology courses in the UK. Unlike many other oncology courses, ours has both clinical and research elements, making it suitable for both medical undergraduates and graduates, as well as biomedical science graduates.

Teaching and learning

Our MRes is structured around a 2:1 split between laboratory/clinical-based research projects and taught elements.

Laboratory and clinical research experience is gained through two research placements, one lasting approximately ten weeks (October to December) and the second lasting approximately 25 weeks (January to August).

You may choose to carry out one project for both placements, which most students do, or separate projects for each placement.

Most research placements are based at the Christie site, either within the hospital, the Manchester Cancer Research Centre or CRUK Manchester Institute premises. Projects are also available on the Central Manchester University Hospitals and University Hospital of South Manchester sites.

A list of available projects will be provided to offer holders in August.

Coursework and assessment

Students are assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and a dissertation.

Course unit details

The course features the following components:

  • Research Methods course unit - 15 credits
  • Clinical Masterclass course unit - 15 credits
  • Lecture Series course unit - 15 credits
  • Tutorial course unit - 15 credits
  • Two research placements (1 x 10 week - 30 credits; 1 x 25 week - 90 credits)

The  Research Methods  course unit covers topics relating to:

  • Critical analysis of scientific/medical research and literature
  • Information management
  • Study design
  • Basic statistical analysis
  • Ethics, fraud, plagiarism and medical and academic misconduct
  • Presentation skills
  • Scientific writing and publishing skills

The  Clinical Masterclass  course unit provides a truly multidisciplinary foundation in the key issues in oncology. Delivery is by lectures and site tours and these classes will offer the student the chance to debate with internationally recognised experts in their field. Areas covered include: 

  • Cancer epidemiology, screening and prevention
  • Diagnosis
  • Chemotherapy
  • Radiotherapy
  • Hormonal therapy
  • Surgery

Following attendance at these classes, you will be able to understand how cancer is diagnosed and the principles of cancer surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

The  Lecture Series  course unit comprises two intensive one-week courses, one in November and the other in February. The November course covers the biological basis of chemotherapy, pharmacology and cancer biology. The February course covers the biological basis of radiotherapy and translational aspects of cancer research, including biomarkers and new technologies.

The  Tutorial  course unit allows students to choose from a selection of clinical and academic oncology topics. The unit aims to improve ability to interpret and criticise literature as well as improve verbal communication skills in a small group setting. 



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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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For health care professionals from diverse backgrounds who wish to expand their knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects of oncology, this full-time programme is particularly suitable for medical professionals with an interest in clinical, medical, surgical and translational oncology. Read more
For health care professionals from diverse backgrounds who wish to expand their knowledge of theoretical and practical aspects of oncology, this full-time programme is particularly suitable for medical professionals with an interest in clinical, medical, surgical and translational oncology. Unique to this programme is the exciting opportunity to gain clinical observership status and log your hours observing in a UK based hospital.

The aim of this programme is to give you a scientific understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of cancer, its epidemiology and pathology, and to place this in a clinical context. We will then address how this knowledge effects therapeutic approaches, and disease management.

Aiming to allow you to understand the research process, this programme draws on examples within the department and its associated clinical trials unit. A key part of the Masters programme is the planning, execution and reporting of a piece of independent study leading to submission of a dissertation.

At all levels we aim to encourage interactive rather than didactic learning and lecturing. Therefore, as well as assembling and learning facts you will also consider some of the philosophical challenges which underlie the treatment of cancer.

You can opt for a Postgraduate Diploma on completion of the core modules and 40 credits of optional modules, or a Masters on successful completion of the taught programme and an independently researched dissertation.

About the College of Medical and Dental Sciences

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences is a major international centre for research and education, make huge strides in finding solutions to major health problems including ageing, cancer, cardiovascular, dental, endocrine, inflammatory diseases, infection (including antibiotic resistance), rare diseases and trauma.
We tackle global healthcare problems through excellence in basic and clinical science, and improve human health by delivering tangible real-life benefits in the fight against acute and chronic disease.
Situated in the largest healthcare region in the country, with access to one of the largest and most diverse populations in Europe, we are positioned to address major global issues and diseases affecting today’s society through our eight specialist research institutes.
With over 1,000 academic staff and around £60 million of new research funding per year, the College of Medical and Dental Sciences is dedicated to performing world-leading research.
We care about our research and teaching and are committed to developing outstanding scientists and healthcare professionals of the future. We offer our postgraduate community a unique learning experience taught by academics who lead the way in research in their field.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This full-time MSc course is designed to provide graduates with advanced knowledge, understanding and skills in the rapidly advancing field of Cancer Biology and Therapeutics. Read more
This full-time MSc course is designed to provide graduates with advanced knowledge, understanding and skills in the rapidly advancing field of Cancer Biology and Therapeutics.

The course offers advanced teaching in the cellular aspects of cancer biology together with the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. It provides in-depth training in cancer therapeutics, encompassing biomarkers and diagnosis, therapeutic targets, drug discovery and clinical trials and chemo/radio therapy, as well as aiming to develop your theoretical and practical research skills. This postgraduate programme offers a balanced combination of theory and practice that would serve as preparation for doctoral research or as a self-contained advanced qualification in its own right.

Graduates from this course should gain a breadth and depth of cancer-focused training that will make them highly attractive candidates to start or continue a career within the healthcare sector and research establishments.

The course offers research skills training and a laboratory-based research project that can provide you with the skills required to develop research hypotheses and critically evaluate translational approaches with respect to the development of contemporary cancer therapeutics.

Distinctive features

• A broad ranging course that covers basic molecular cancer cell biology through to translational research and therapeutics.

• A course developed in collaboration with researchers, academics and clinicians and delivered by leading academic cancer researchers at Cardiff University.

• Key lectures and case study workshops delivered by practising oncologists and cancer surgeons.

• Opportunity to study at Cardiff University, one of the UK’s major teaching and research universities.

• Opportunity to undertake a research project in one of the internationally recognized cancer research groups at Cardiff.

• Close academic support from an experienced personal tutor.
Opportunity to join a vibrant postgraduate community studying at Cardiff.

Structure

This is a full-time course over one academic year. You will study 180 credits: 120 of taught material, followed by a 60 credit project.

Core modules:

Data Handling and Statistics
Cellular and Molecular Biology of Cancer
Translational Oncology and Therapeutics
Academic Research Skills
Research Methodology
Research Project

Teaching

The programme will provide advanced teaching in the cellular aspects of cancer biology together with the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. In-depth training will be provided in the area of cancer therapeutics, encompassing biomarkers and diagnosis, therapeutic targets, drug discovery and clinical trials and chemo/radio therapy, in addition to developing the student’s theoretical and practical research skills.

Assessment

Assessment for the course will comprise a combination of exams, written essays, posters, laboratory coursework and case studies.

Career Prospects

Graduates from this course should gain a breadth and depth of cancer-focused training that could make them highly attractive candidates to start or continue a career within the healthcare sector and research establishments.

Potential employment opportunities include PhD student, research technician, medical laboratory science officer, clinical trials co-ordinator, and medical writer.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Jonathan Wood. Translational Neuroscience looks at how laboratory research relating to brain structure and function informs the development of new therapies for diseases of the nervous system. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Jonathan Wood

Translational Neuroscience looks at how laboratory research relating to brain structure and function informs the development of new therapies for diseases of the nervous system.

Combining the research strengths from the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health and the Faculty of Science, leading international basic and clinical scientists will provide an innovative and progressive programme. You’ll study basic neurobiology and molecular biology through to neuroimaging and applied clinical practice.

The MSc will provide you with up-to-date knowledge of advances in the field, research experience with internationally renowned research groups and transferable skills to provide a springboard for your future career.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Molecular Neuroscience; CNS Structure and Function; Genetics and Modelling of Neurodegenerative Disease; Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disease; Applied Neuroimaging; Neurophysiology and Psychiatry. A 20 week Research Project will be undertaken in the Summer Term.

Examples of optional modules

Option one: Literature Review and Critical Analysis of Science; Ethics and Public Awareness of Science.

Option two: Computational Neuroscience: Neurons and Neuronal Codes; Mathematical Modelling and Research Skills.

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory demonstrations, computer practicals and student-led group work. Assessment is primarily by written assignments and coursework, although there are some written examinations and oral presentations. The research project is assessed by a thesis 
and presentation.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Julie Simpson. This course combines taught modules on the fundamental aspects of the major nervous system diseases, with the development of practical laboratory skills encompassing histopathology, molecular pathology and microscopy. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Julie Simpson

This course combines taught modules on the fundamental aspects of the major nervous system diseases, with the development of practical laboratory skills encompassing histopathology, molecular pathology and microscopy.

You’ll be trained to use tissue samples in neuroscience research aimed at understanding the pathophysiology of nervous system diseases and you’ll discover how laboratory breakthroughs have been translated into clinical benefits.

The course will be taught by scientists and consultant neuropathologists who are experts in their fields. You’ll get the opportunity to carry out neuroanatomy dissection and you’ll work with leading research groups during the research project.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Neuro-anatomy; Basic Principles of Pathology and Histopathology; Molecular Neuroscience; Ethics and Public Awareness of Science; Pathology and Modelling of Neurodegenerative Disease; Neuroinflammation, Neuro-Oncology and Neurovascular Disease; Literature Review and Critical Analysis of Science; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

The taught component of the MSc is delivered through practical laboratory classes and demonstrations, lectures, seminars and tutorials. Assessment is primarily through written assignments and coursework, along with practical laboratory assessments, spotter exams, presentations and debates. The research project is assessed by a thesis and oral presentation.

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The course combines an introduction to the theory behind and technologies currently used in drug discovery, pharmacokinetics, role of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints, preclinical safety assessment, first-time-in-human studies, clinical investigation paradigms, research governance and medical statistics. Read more
The course combines an introduction to the theory behind and technologies currently used in drug discovery, pharmacokinetics, role of biomarkers and surrogate endpoints, preclinical safety assessment, first-time-in-human studies, clinical investigation paradigms, research governance and medical statistics.

Suitable for all medical disciplines, but of particular interest to Cardiovascular/Respiratory, Neuroscience, Oncology, and Metabolic medicine, the programme is highly suitable for graduates in medicine who wish to pursue a career as clinical academics and for medical professionals in industry.

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Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies. Read more

Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies.

You will learn how to master experimental cancer through a combination of traditional teaching and hands-on learning, spending a year as a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Team at The Christie while also taking four structured taught units.

The taught units will see you learn the details of designing and delivering Phase 1 clinical studies, understanding the pre-clinical data required before a clinical programme can commence, and how to optimise early clinical studies to provide evidence for progressing a promising drug into Phase II/III clinical testing.

Alongside the taught elements, you will be allocated to one or more clinical trials that are being conducted by The Christie experimental cancer medicine team. You will have a named trainer and be exposed to tasks required in the setup, delivery, interpretation and audit of a clinical study.

Nursing and physician students will be expected to participate in patient care, including new and follow-on patient clinics, treatment and care-giving episodes with patients.

For clinical trials coordinators, no direct patient contact is envisaged and duties will involve clinical trial setup, protocol amendments, database setup, data entry, costing and billing for clinical research.

You will be able to choose two aspects of your direct clinical trial research experience to write up for your two research projects in a dissertation format. This will give you the skills and knowledge required to critically report medical, scientific and clinically related sciences for peer review.

Aims

The primary purpose of the MRes in Experimental Cancer Medicine is to provide you with the opportunity to work within a premier UK Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit and, through a mix of taught and experiential learning, master the discipline of Experimental Cancer Medicine.

Special features

Extensive practical experience

You will spend most of your time gaining hands-on experience within The Christie's Experimental Cancer Medicine Team.

Additional course information

Meet the course team

Dr Natalie Cook is a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie. She completed a PhD at Cambridge, investigating translational therapeutics and biomarker assay design in pancreatic cancer.

Professor Hughes is Chair of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Strategic Director of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team at The Christie. He is a member of the research strategy group for Manchester Cancer Research Centre. He serves on the Biomarker evaluation review panel for CRUK grant applications.

Professor Hughes was previously Global Vice-President for early clinical development at AstraZeneca, overseeing around 100 Phase 0/1/2 clinical studies. He was previously Global Vice-President for early phase clinical oncology, having been involved in over 200 early phase clinical studies.

Dr Matthew Krebs is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie.

He has a PhD in circulating biomarkers and postdoctoral experience in single cell and ctDNA molecular profiling. He is Principal Investigator on a portfolio of phase 1 clinical trials and has research interests in clinical development of novel drugs for lung cancer and integration of biomarkers with experimental drug development.

Teaching and learning

Our course is structured around a 2:1 split between clinical-based research projects and taught elements respectively.

Taught course units will predominantly use lectures and workshops.

For the research projects, teaching and learning will take place through one-to-one mentoring from a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team.

The clinical and academic experience of contributors to this course will provide you with an exceptional teaching and learning experience.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and dissertation.

For each research project, you will write a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words. Examples of suitable practical projects include the following.

Research proposal

  • Compilation of a research proposal to research council/charity
  • Writing a protocol and trial costings for sponsor
  • Research and write a successful expression of interest selected by grant funder for full development

Publication-based/dissertation by publication

  • Writing a clinical study report
  • Authoring a peer-review journal review/original article

Service development/professional report/ report based dissertation

  • Public health report/outbreak report/health needs assessment/health impact assessment
  • Proposal for service development/organisational change
  • Audit/evaluate service delivery/policy
  • Implement recommended change from audit report

Adapted systematic review (qualitative data)

  • Compiling the platform of scientific evidence for a new drug indication from literature
  • Review of alternative research methodologies from literature

Full systematic review that includes data collection (quantitative data)

  • Referral patterns for Phase 1 patients

Qualitative or quantitative empirical research

  • Design, conduct, analyse and report an experiment

Qualitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing quantitative data

  • Compilation, mining and analysis of existing clinical data sets

Quantitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing qualitative data/theoretical study/narrative review

  • Policy analysis or discourse analysis/content analysis
  • A critical review of policy using framework analysis

Facilities

Teaching will take place within The Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Withington.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to physician, nursing and clinical research students who are considering a career in Phase 1 clinical studies.

The course provides a theoretical and experiential learning experience and offers a foundation for roles within other experimental cancer medicine centres within the UK and EU, as well as careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, clinical trials management and medicine.

The MRes is ideal for high-calibre graduates and professionals wishing to undertake directly channelled research training in the clinical and medical oncology field.



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The course will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in fundamental and applied cancer biology, and focused training in laboratory research and associated methodology. Read more
The course will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in fundamental and applied cancer biology, and focused training in laboratory research and associated methodology.

Why study Cancer Biology at Dundee?

The MRes Cancer Biology is a research-centred taught Masters programme providing a focused training in molecular cancer research. It covers both the fundamental and translational science of carcinogenesis, cancer biology, diagnosis and therapy.

The programme delivers outstanding research-focused teaching from internationally-renowned scientists and clinicians.

Dundee University is internationally renowned for the quality of its cancer research and has over 50 cancer research groups: current funding for cancer research is about £40 million from research councils and charities. In 2009 the university became the first Scottish university to be awarded Cancer Centre status by the CRUK.

What's so good about studying Cancer Biology at Dundee?

The MRes Cancer Biology has been developed from the innovative collaboration between the College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing and the School of Life Sciences, and it complements the establishment of the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Centre here in Dundee.

The Dundee Cancer Centre aims to enhance cancer research and apply discoveries to improve patient care. Key to this is training the next generation of cancer researchers.

Areas of particular strength at the University of Dundee are in surgical oncology for breast and colon cancer, radiation biology and clinical oncology, skin cancer and pharmacogenomics. Areas of strength in basic cancer biology are DNA replication, chromosome biology and the cell cycle, cell signalling and targets for drug discovery.

Teaching and Assessment

This course is taught by staff based in the College of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing and the School of Life Sciences.

The MRes will be taught full-time over one year (September to August).

How you will be taught

The course will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures, tutorials, discussion group work and journal clubs, self-directed study and supervised laboratory research.

What you will study

The MRes degree course is taught full-time over three semesters.

The first semester provides in-depth teaching and directed study on the molecular biology of cancer, and covers:

Basic cell and molecular biology, and introduction to cancer biology
Cell proliferation, cell signalling and cancer
Cancer cell biology
Carcinogenesis, cancer treatment and prevention
Specific training in research methodology and critical analysis

Students will also be required to take part in a journal club to further develop their critical review skills.

In semesters two and three students will be individually guided to focus on a specific cancer research topic which will be the subject of a literature review and associated laboratory research project. The research project is based in laboratories with state-of-the-art facilities, and under the leadership of world-class researchers.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Places on the course are limited, so early applications are strongly encouraged.
Apply early to avoid disappointment.
Follow us on Twitter to keep up with news from the MRes Cancer Biology @Mrescancerbiol

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Peter Grabowski. Accredited by the Association for Nutrition. This course will give you a good understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Peter Grabowski
Accredited by the Association for Nutrition

This course will give you a good understanding of the fundamentals of human nutrition. You’ll learn research skills and techniques. It will prepare you for a career in research, the food industry, academia, community nutrition and nutrition consultancy.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Epidemiology and Community Nutrition; Nutritional Biochemistry; Molecular Nutrition; Nutritional Physiology; Nutrition for Developing Countries; Clinical Nutrition. The Diploma follows the same taught structure as the masters and students must complete all modules.

Masters students complete an original Research Project and a literature review. PG Diploma students complete a library-based research project.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through lectures and seminars, practical sessions, workshops, group debates, self-study units and individual presentations. The taught modules include research skills tutorials. You’ll work independently on the research and library projects, with guidance from an academic.

You’re assessed on written reports, laboratory practical classes and group and individual assignments, which may involve oral presentations. There is a written examination at the end of each module with an original research project for the MSc and a library-based project for the Diploma. The research project is assessed by a written dissertation and an oral presentation. The library project is assessed by written dissertation.

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Lead academic 2016. Dr Mark Fenwick. The course provides training in reproductive and developmental medicine for scientists, clinicians and others, for instance ethical advisers or lawyers looking to specialise. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Dr Mark Fenwick

The course provides training in reproductive and developmental medicine for scientists, clinicians and others, for instance ethical advisers or lawyers looking to specialise. It’s a good platform for a research career or a career in clinical laboratory training for IVF or embryology.

Through the taught modules you’ll develop a solid understanding of reproductive science relevant to clinical applications. We cover the breadth of processes from gonadal development and production of gametes through to pregnancy and parturition. Each module is taught by leading scientists and clinicians in that field.

You’ll also have the opportunity to learn about the ethical issues and international laws regulating reproductive medicine. Finally, you’ll undertake a research project to develop a depth of knowledge in a specialist topic.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Research Skills in Reproductive Medicine; Gonads to Gametes: fundamentals of reproduction; Fertilisation, Implantation and Embryology; Fetal Development, Pregnancy and Parturition; Reproductive Technology and Infertility; Law, Ethics and Policy in Reproductive Medicine.

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Lead academic 2016. Professor Ilaria Bellantuono. This unique one-year programme is run by the Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) and funded by Medical Research Council and Arthritis Research UK. Read more

About the course

Lead academic 2016: Professor Ilaria Bellantuono

This unique one-year programme is run by the Centre for Integrated research into Musculoskeletal Ageing (CIMA) and funded by Medical Research Council and Arthritis Research UK. CIMA is a collaboration between the University of Sheffield, the University of Liverpool and the University of Newcastle.

The course provides multidisciplinary research training on the musculoskeletal system as a whole in the context of ageing. The training has a strong focus on employability. Topics range from basic science to clinical aspects, from in vitro to in vivo models, and from the latest advances in the assessment of the musculoskeletal system to lifestyle interventions.

Although you’ll be based at Sheffield, the course involves exchange visits to the other universities.

Our study environment

You’ll be based in teaching hospitals that serve a population of over half a million people and refer a further two million. We also have close links with the University’s other health-related departments.

Our research funding comes from many sources including the NIHR, MRC, BBSRC, EPSRC, the Department of Health, EU, and prominent charities such as the Wellcome Trust, ARC, YCR, Cancer Research UK and BHF. Our partners and sponsors include Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca and Eli Lilly.

You’ll also benefit from our collaboration with the Department of Biomedical Sciences.

How we teach

Classes are kept small (15–20 students) to make sure you get the best possible experience in laboratories and in clinical settings.

Our resources

We have a state-of-the-art biorepository and a £30m stem cell laboratory. The Sheffield Institute of Translational Neuroscience (SITraN) opened in November 2010. We also have microarray, genetics, histology, flow cytometry and high-throughput screening technology, and the latest equipment for bone and oncology research.

At our Clinical Research Facility, you’ll be able to conduct studies with adult patients and volunteers. The Sheffield Children’s Hospital houses a complementary facility for paediatric experimental medical research.

Hepatitis B policy

If your course involves a significant risk of exposure to human blood or other body fluids and tissue, you’ll need to complete a course of Hepatitis B immunisation before starting. We conform to national guidelines that are in place to protect patients, health care workers and students.

Core modules

Principles of Human Nutrition: relevance to ageing; Biology of Ageing; Biology and Assessment of Skeletal Health; Muscle in the Integrated Musculoskeletal System; Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

The taught element is online and may be taken remotely at home (live interactions will take place between 9–5pm UK time). This includes live lectures, wikis and blogs, and tutor support.

The research project involves hands-on laboratory work. It includes placements with all three universities.

You’ll also have the chance to take part in seminars, workshops and networking events delivered by industrial partners. You’ll be assessed through exams, coursework, a mock grant proposal and a research project dissertation.

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