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Masters Degrees (Translation)

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Who is it for?. The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture postgraduate course is for you, if you. are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels. Read more

Who is it for?

The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture postgraduate course is for you, if you:

  • are interested in popular culture, films, TV, literature, comics or graphic novels
  • love languages, other cultures and their differences
  • are interested in translation and want to learn about systematic decision-making
  • know about translation and want to specialise
  • have an amateur or fan background in translation and want to become a professional
  • have studied foreign languages, linguistics, literature, media, film, theatre, drama or cultural studies.
  • are looking for a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of translation.
  • want to gain an insight into professional practice in audiovisual translation or in literary translation.

The Masters course aims to make students fit for the market as properly trained and highly qualified translation experts.

Objectives

This course:

  • provides you with training in audiovisual translation techniques
  • uses industry-standard software for subtitling, dubbing and voice over
  • specialises in the translation of children’s literature; crime fiction; science fiction and fantasy; comics, graphic novels, manga and video games
  • introduces you to the different conventions and styles associated with popular culture in its varied forms and genres
  • focuses on the specifics of genre translation and how these shape translation decisions
  • provides a theoretical framework for the practical application of translation, working with a wide range of source texts from different popular genres and media.

The Audiovisual Translation and Popular Culture degree:

  • aims to give you a secure foundation in theoretical strategies underpinning and supporting the practice of translation
  • develops your awareness of professional standards, norms and translational ethics
  • works closely with professional translators and the translation industry helping you to develop a professional identity
  • has optional modules in dubbing, translation project management, screenplay translation and publishing.

Placements

There are no course-based placements on this course. Literary translation does not offer placements, while audiovisual companies offer internships which are competitive.

We support and guide our students through the application process for audiovisual translation internships and have a very good record of achievement. Each year, several of our students win one of these very competitive internships and they tend to be offered full time work on completion.

The course is very industry-oriented and we work closely with the translation industry. Industry professionals teach on the course, supervise students or give guest seminars and lectures.

Academic staff have run Translation Development courses, for example in genre translation for professional translators for the Chartered Institute of Linguists, and they are involved in running Continuing Professional Development courses in specialised translation.

We run a preparatory, distance learning course for the professional Diploma in Translation examined by the Chartered Institute of Linguists.

We organise a Literary Translation Summer School each July which is taught by professional, literary translators and with lectures by prestigious translators, academics or writers.

John Dryden Translation Competition

The Translation department runs the John Dryden Translation Competition for the British Comparative Literature Association. The competition is sponsored by the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Institut Français. We offer one internship per year in working on this Translation Competition, interacting with translators, translation judges, managing competition entries and learning about the judging process.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics, industry professionals (for example, audiovisual translation project manager) and translation professionals (for example, award winning literary translators, experienced subtitlers).

Teaching is delivered in a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and lab-based sessions for audiovisual translation. In workshop sessions students work individually, in pairs, group work or plenary forum in a multilingual and multicultural environment.

In all translation modules, there is also a translation project prepared in independent guided study under the supervision of a translation professional in the student’s language pair and language directionality. You can expect some on-line learning, supported by seminar sessions, and industry visits to audiovisual translation companies.

In the Translation project management module, students work in project groups performing real-life translation roles and tasks in a collaborative environment.

Assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework – there are no examinations.

Coursework assignments are a mixture of essays, translation projects, translation commentaries, subtitling and voice over files or project work.

The dissertation is 12,000 to 15,000 words long and can either be a research project on any topic relevant to Audiovisual Translation or Popular Literary Translation / Culture or it can be practice oriented: a translation of an extended text or AV clip with critical introduction to and analysis of the translation.

Coursework assignments: 66.6% (120 credits)

Dissertation: 33.3% (60 credits)

Modules

There are five compulsory taught modules plus three elective taught modules, selected by the student from a pool of module choices, plus a dissertation which can be a research dissertation or a practice-oriented dissertation of an extended translation with critical introduction and analysis.

Each taught module is an estimated 150 hours of study. Teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops plus independent individually supervised work.

The first part of the translation modules is taught in three-hour sessions (lecture + seminar + practical workshop). In the second part of each translation module, students work on a translation project which is individually supervised by a translation professional who gives written feedback on drafts and provides tailored advice and guidance in individual supervision sessions.

Students can expect between ten and 12 hours of classroom-based study per week, plus time spent on preparatory reading, independent study and research, preparation of assignments.

The dissertation is 60 credits and an estimated 600 hours of study. There are four two-hour research method seminars guiding students through the process of writing a dissertation, plus individual supervision sessions.

All taught modules are in term 1 and term 2 (January – April). Term 3 is dedicated to the dissertation (and completion of assignments from term 2 modules).



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



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The Specialised Translation MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages. Read more

The Specialised Translation MA is open to native and non-native speakers of English, who combine English with any of the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Italian, Polish, or Spanish. At the heart of the Specialised Translation MA lie our weekly practical translation classes between English and one of the languages listed above. If you are a native speaker of English and would like to study translation with two of the above languages, you can choose to replace the Audiovisual and Computer-Assisted Translation and Quality Assurance and Project Management modules with a further two Specialised Translation modules in your second foreign language.

The Specialised Translation MA will prepare you for a career in the translation market. Building on your existing language skills, you will learn how to research specialised subjects to produce, with and without the use of translation memory software tools, commercially usable translations of specialised technical and institutional texts, applying insights drawn from linguistics and translation theory as well as from professional practice.

If you are studying the Specialised Translation MA with English and one other language, you will also be attending modules that introduce you to audio-visual and computer-assisted translation, revision, editing, post-editing, quality assurance, and project management skills for translators, and a comprehensive programme of professional development activities. You will also be able to complement the knowledge and skills acquired on the core modules by choosing either Translation as Cultural Practice or International Organisations and Institutional Discourses as an option module. At the end of the course, you will submit an MA Translation Project or an MA Thesis.

You will be able to benefit from our wide range of resources, including an extensive collection of volumes and electronic materials in our library, specialised software applications, and additional resources made available through the University's Virtual Learning Environment. Our teaching staff include full and part-time lecturers, all with professional expertise in translation and other specialist fields. You will be allocated a personal tutor and be given academic guidance by the course team.

The course emphasis is on practical training in translation, developing your skills to a high level and learning about the professional environment. Your core Specialised Translation modules will involve both direct and inverse translation training between English and Chinese, French, German, Italian, Polish or Spanish. The majority of your translation assessments, including the final translation exam, will, however, be conducted into your mother tongue only. All students will translate institutional texts (such as economic, political, legal and EU/UN texts) and technical material, and acquire a wide range of additional skills, including career building and professional development skills, through the remaining core and option modules.

You will also complete a research-based MA Thesis or an MA Translation Project (an extended translation with a preface and annotations).Your studies are further supported by weekly lectures on the theoretical concepts and principles of translation, introductory workshops to a range of translation memory tools, guest lectures and workshops delivered by external speakers from industry and international institutions, and the opportunity to take part in a post-graduation mentoring programme.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Option modules

Professional recognition

The University of Westminster is a Higher Education Language partner of the Chartered Institute of Linguists, member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting, the Conférence Internationale permanente d’Instituts Universitaires de Traducteurs et Interprètes (CIUTI), Elia Exchange, and the UN MoU Network, a group of international signatories to a memorandum of understanding with the United Nations on cooperation in the training of language professionals for the UN language competitive examinations.

Career path

The Specialised Translation MA has an excellent graduate employment record. Many of our graduates work as in-house translators in international organisations such as the United Nations and the European Commission, or within translation companies both in the UK and across many other countries all over the world.

Other graduates work as freelance translators, or as translation project managers, subtitlers, editors, revisers, proofreaders, or terminologists.

Our membership of the European Graduate Placement Scheme and Elia Exchange ensures that we can assist our students in securing high-quality work placements both during the course and following graduation. We are also a member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting and have a Memorandum of Understanding with the United Nations on cooperation in the training of language professionals for the UN language competitive examinations.



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The Translation Studies pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to advance your practical language, translation and technology skills while developing a comprehensive understanding of translation in social, cultural and historical contexts. Read more

The Translation Studies pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to advance your practical language, translation and technology skills while developing a comprehensive understanding of translation in social, cultural and historical contexts. The programme is taught in the Centre for Translation Studies, generating international networks and the language skills to enhance your employability in today's multicultural workplace.

About this degree

In addition to a range of translation options covering theoretical and technological topics, you can focus on a specific language and choose to study interdisciplinary modules, gaining practical experience of translation and the critical and analytical skills required for research and employment. The final dissertation project provides an opportunity to showcase your translation interests and abilities in an extended annotated translation. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The Translation Studies pathway has two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is also available.

Core modules

  • Language and Translation
  • Translation Theory

Part-time students take both core modules and 30-60 credits of optional modules in year one.

Optional modules

Students select optional modules with a total value of 90 credits from the following:

  • Translation Technologies 1
  • Translation Technologies 2
  • Language modules including Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian languages, Spanish (up to 30 credits)
  • Translation in History
  • Corpora for Translation
  • The Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
  • The Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
  • Translation and the Web
  • Translating Literary Culture
  • Specialised Translation MSc modules (up to 15 credits)
  • CMII modules (up to 30 credits)

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) offers modules in African and European area studies, comparative literature, European thought and culture, film studies, gender & sexuality studies and health humanities. Optional modules are subject to availability and language prerequisites where applicable.

Dissertation/report

All students complete a 12,000-word dissertation consisting either of an annotated translation or a critical discussion of theoretical, practical or historical aspects of translation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical translation exercises, case studies and web-based classes, depending on the options chosen. The core modules are assessed by essays and coursework. Optional modules are assessed through unseen and written examination, coursework, translation projects and essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Translation: Translation Studies MA

Careers

There is an ever-growing demand for highly-trained commercial, literary and other types of translators in the private as well as in the public sector and in international organisations, in Britain and abroad. Other career paths include the media, publishing and education. 

Employability

The programme provides graduates with a range of vocational skills that enable them to pursue successful careers in the fields of translation and interpreting. Former students have gone on to work as translators for companies such as KPMG, SDL International and Alpha CRC; some have set up their own translation business. Graduates also acquire transferable skills that lead them into successful careers in publishing, media, finance, fashion, PR and education; examples include our graduates who are now working for Newsweek, the British Library, Morgan Stanley, Sainsbury's and Deloitte.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of multicultural London, UCL provides a uniquely rich environment for studying and researching translation in all its facets. Students are taught by specialist translation staff with a diverse range of research interests including translation and the web, theatre translation, and Chinese translation.

The MA is truly interdisciplinary, with access to experts in an unrivalled variety of languages and disciplines from across Europe and further afield. This allows students to customise their own programmes in relation to their language competencies and other academic and professional interests.

UCL translation students are highly valued by the translation industry, with workshops and networking events organised during the year.



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The Translation and Culture pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to focus on your practical language, translation and technology skills, with the option of studying an additional language, while developing a comprehensive understanding of the nature of translation. Read more

The Translation and Culture pathway of the MA in Translation enables you to focus on your practical language, translation and technology skills, with the option of studying an additional language, while developing a comprehensive understanding of the nature of translation. In this multilingual environment, you will build international networks and the language skills to enhance your employability in today's multicultural workplace.

About this degree

In addition to a range of translation options covering theoretical and technological topics, you can focus on one or more languages and choose to study interdisciplinary modules, gaining practical experience of translation and the critical and analytical skills required for research and employment. The final dissertation project provides an opportunity to showcase your translation interests and abilities in an extended annotated translation. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The Translation and Culture pathway has two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is also available).

Core modules

  • Language and Translation
  • Translation Technologies 1

Part-time students take both core modules and 30-60 credits of optional modules in year one.

Optional modules

Students select optional modules wih a total value of 90 credits from the following:

  • Translation Theory
  • Translation Technologies 2
  • Language modules including Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Scandinavian languages, Spanish (up to 60 credits)
  • Translation in History
  • Corpora for Translation
  • The Historical and Social Context of Interpreting
  • The Interaction and Language Management of Interpreting
  • Translation and the Web
  • Translating Literary Culture
  • Specialised Translation MSc modules (up to 30 credits)
  • CMII modules (up to 30 credits)

The Centre for Multidisciplinary and Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) offers modules in African and European area studies, comparative literature, European thought and culture, film studies, gender & sexuality studies and health humanities. Optional modules are subject to availability and language prerequisites where applicable.

Dissertation/report

All students complete a 12,000-word dissertation consisting either of an annotated translation or a critical discussion of theoretical, practical or historical aspects of translation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical translation exercises, case studies and web-based classes, depending on the options chosen. The core modules are assessed by essays and coursework. Optional modules are assessed through unseen and written examination, coursework, translation projects and essays.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Translation: Translation and Culture MA

Careers

There is an ever-growing demand for highly-trained commercial, literary and other types of translators in the private as well as in the public sector and in international organisations, in Britain and abroad. Other career paths include the media, publishing and education. 

Employability

The programme provides graduates with a range of vocational skills that enable them to pursue successful careers in the fields of translation and interpreting. Former students have gone on to work as translators for companies such as KPMG, SDL International and Alpha CRC; some have set up their own translation business. Graduates also acquire transferable skills that lead them into successful careers in publishing, media, finance, fashion, PR and education; examples include our graduates who are now working for Newsweek, the British Library, Morgan Stanley, Sainsbury's and Deloitte.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Located in the heart of multicultural London, UCL provides a uniquely rich environment for studying and researching translation in all its facets. Students are taught by specialist translation staff with a diverse range of research interests including translation and the web, theatre translation, and Chinese translation.

The MA is truly interdisciplinary, with access to experts in an unrivalled variety of languages and disciplines from across Europe and further afield. This allows students to customise their own programmes in relation to their language competencies and other academic and professional interests.

UCL translation students are highly valued by the translation industry, with workshops and networking events organised during the year.



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Translation, as a trade and an art, plays and important part in bringing nations together, and facilitating dialogue, understanding and co-operation. Read more

Translation, as a trade and an art, plays and important part in bringing nations together, and facilitating dialogue, understanding and co-operation.

Our innovative MA is ideal for those looking to embark on, or develop, careers as professional translators. Translation practice is at the heart of the programme, and you will undertake extensive practical and specialised translation in Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese or Russian. The programme offers training in state-of-the-art translation technology and the opportunity to study another foreign language at beginners, intermediate or advanced level. From September 2017, we are also able to offer an optional module in English-Chinese Interpreting.

There is a range of optional modules focusing on theory and methodology, meaning that this MA also provides excellent preparation for further study at PhD level.

We also offer a distance learning programme over 2.5 years – for more information, see Translation Studies MA by distance learning.

Course details

The Translation Studies MA is a degree offered by the Department of Modern Languages. It features a balance of theory and practice which provides an ideal foundation both for careers in the translation industry or for further study in translation.

In addition to being accredited by the EMT Network, we are a member of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI). We are also part of the SDL University Partner Program, which allows us to allocate free SDL Trados Studio 2017 Freelance licenses to the top two students studying translation technology each academic year.

The programme is available to students who are proficient in English and one of the following languages: Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese or Russian. We can accommodate all language pairs in both directions except Mandarin, where we offer English to Mandarin but not Mandarin to English.

The core programme content offers ample opportunity for translation practice. You will study four core modules:  

  • Introduction to Translation Theory 
  • Practical Translation*
  • Specialised Translation*
  • Research and Critical Commentary Skills

* Language combinations offered are as stated above

You will also choose two modules from a range of options

Assessment

Most core and optional modules on this course are assessed by coursework, rather than by written examination. The exceptions are Practical Translation which is assessed by exam and English-Chinese Interpreting which features a classroom-based live interpreting test. See module descriptions for further details.

You will also complete a 15,000-word Translation Studies dissertation or an Extended Translation Project.

Learning and teaching

All of our students are offered the opportunity to work in small groups with tutors and to receive training in the use of state-of-the art translation technology.

All modules make use of our modern facilities, and teaching will take place in a lecture theatre or a computer lab. For your translation classes (Practical Translation and Specialised Translation) you will be divided into language groups – each year we can have up to ten language-specific groups. 

We also make extensive use of Canvas, the University’s virtual learning environment, and this is where you can find all material related to your studies and also contribute to online discussions. 

Course delivery

Teaching takes place over ten weeks in the Autumn Term (September-December) and ten weeks in the Spring Term (January-March) through weekly seminars.

Full-time students will take two core modules in the Autumn Term, and two core modules in the Spring Term, as follows:

  • Autumn Term: Introduction to Translation Theory; Practical Translation
  • Spring Term: Research and Critical Commentary Skills; Specialised Translation

You will then take two optional modules; one in each term. During the Summer Term, you will be working on your dissertation or extended translation project, and you will be assigned an appropriate supervisor according to your chosen topic and language pair. 

Part-time students will take three modules in year one and three modules in year two. To cater for the needs of part-time students, we make an effort to group classes on specific days of the week. There is some flexibility, but the recommended structure is as follows:

  • Autumn Term, year one: Introduction to Translation Theory and Practical Translation
  • Spring Term, year one: Research and Critical Commentary Skills or Specialised Translation
  • Autumn Term, year two: Your choice of optional module
  • Spring Term, year two: Research and Critical Commentary Skills or Specialised Translation; your choice of optional module 

During the Summer Term of year two, you will be working on your dissertation or extended translation project, and you will be assigned an appropriate supervisor according to your chosen topic and language pair. 

Learning and teaching methods

The course will: 

  • Encourage reflective practice in translation
  • Familiarise you with state-of-the-art technological tools currently used in the translation industry and with the professional environment in which translators operate
  • Provide you with the opportunity to carry out extensive practical translation work with the guidance of experienced tutors so as to develop skills in line with current professional practice
  • Enable you to develop a sophisticated understanding of the most up-to-date concepts and theories of the discipline of translation studies
  • Develop a critical understanding of the social constraints on and consequences of translation, and the differing contexts of translation throughout the world
  • Encourage an understanding of how English and other languages work and how they may usefully be analysed, in particular with reference to its grammar, lexis and discourse, and how such an analysis may benefit you as a translator
  • Provide a practical understanding of established techniques of research and enquiry used to created and interpret knowledge in the discipline, so as to enable you to undertake further research, either as part of your future professional career or by enrolling for a research degree.


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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting (MATI) is a specialised variant, with special emphasis on interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation. It is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Translation and Interpreting

At the core of the MA in Translation and Interpreting lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, interpreting (in one or two of the following environments: local government, health, police and court), and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Translation and Interpreting degree also includes opportunities to develop further specialised skills in interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Translation and Interpreting Course Structure

Part One – Full-time Translation and Interpreting students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are four compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above, and one of the three Interpreting modules. Translation and Interpreting students then choose two optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, a second module in Interpreting, History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Translation and Interpreting student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation or Interpreting Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“My experience so far of the programme I have studied has been very useful and constructive. Above all, I have been able to practice interpreting at an advanced level with professional and real life criteria. The Translation and Interpreting programme, on the whole, offers a wide variety of both theoretical and practical modules which have reinforced my knowledge on the related fields (i.e. translation and interpreting). Teaching meticulously planned (especially the interpreting modules), good interaction and supplementary opportunities to put language knowledge into good use (extra sessions and lectures). I expect my course to be of great value and hope it will help me achieve my professional goals for, I consider, it has provided me with the necessary skills to help me build a future career.”

Maria Chaikali, Translation and Interpreting, MA



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This programme will equip you with Arabic-English and/or English-Arabic translation skills for different types of texts, as well as an understanding of the theory underpinning your practice. Read more

This programme will equip you with Arabic-English and/or English-Arabic translation skills for different types of texts, as well as an understanding of the theory underpinning your practice.

You’ll work with a range of text types, including journalistic, administrative, technical and literary texts. You’ll also deepen your knowledge of methods, approaches and concepts in translation studies.

You’ll also choose optional modules that suit your interests and career aspirations, on issues in translation and language more generally, such as Arabic/English stylistics, translation for international organisations, computer-assisted translation, applied linguistics and genre analysis.

Taught by expert researchers and contracted practitioners, this programme makes use of the expertise across the Centre for Translation Studies and Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies within the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies. It’s a great opportunity to learn valuable skills in a city full of cultural and linguistic diversity.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Throughout the programme you’ll develop your understanding of theories, approaches and methods in translation studies through a core module. You’ll then apply that knowledge in your specialised translation modules, when you’ll gain the intercultural skills to make sound translation decisions and build skills in computer-assisted translation.

You’ll complete the course with your choice from a range of optional modules to suit your interests and career plans. You could expand your knowledge of translation by studying translation for international organisations, comparative Arabic/English stylistics, or explore broader topics such as genre analysis in translation or different aspects of applied linguistics like language acquisition or syntax.

By the end of the course in September, you’ll submit work which showcases the skills you’ve acquired – this could be a long translation, long dissertation or shorter versions of both.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Optional modules

  • Comparative Arabic/English Stylistics 1 15 credits
  • Comparative Arabic/English Stylistics 2 15 credits
  • Long Annotated Translation 60 credits
  • Long Dissertation 60 credits
  • Short Annotated Translation 30 credits
  • Translation for International Organisations (English-Arabic)15 credits
  • Pragmatics 30 credits
  • Second Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Foundations of Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Foundations of Syntax 15 credits
  • Topics in Phonetics and Phonology 15 credits
  • Topics in Syntax 15 credits
  • Approaches to Linguistics and Language Acquisition 30 credits
  • Computers and the Translator 15 credits
  • Introduction to Screen Translation 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics for Translators 15 credits
  • English for Translators 15 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Introduction to Interpreting Skills 15 credits
  • Genres in Translation 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Literary Translation 15 credits
  • English in International Communication 30 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Specialised English-Arabic Translation A 15 credits
  • Specialised English-Arabic Translation B 15 credits
  • Specialised Arabic-English Translation 15 credits
  • Specialised Arabic-English Translation B 15 credits
  • Dissertation: Translation Studies 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arabic/English Translation MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arabic/English Translation MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies and Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies run a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as areessays and individual and team projects. You’ll also be assessed on yourindividual summer project, which can be either a long annotated translation, a long dissertation, or a combination of a short annotated translation and short dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with practical translation skills between two major world languages which are increasingly valuable to a wide range of employers across industries.

It’s excellent preparation for working in fields where Arabic is a working language, or where translation in and out of Arabic is needed. These include foreign diplomacy, the media, NGOs and international organisations, the travel and tourism sector, teaching and areas of the publishing, cultural and marketing industries.

Other graduates progress to PhD research, or work as specialised freelance translators.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting is a specialised variant, emphasising interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation.

Key Features of MA Translation and Interpreting (Extended)

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs

- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

- Public Service Interpreting (Local Government, Health, Police and Court).

Specialisation options: Further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

- Language pairs (subject to demand): From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Welsh.

- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh.

Translation and Interpreting (Extended) Course Structure

Part One of Translation and Interpreting – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1), Interpreting (1).

Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), Interpreting (2), History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two of Translation and Interpreting – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

"After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Literary Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Literary Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

We are an established centre for research into literary translation with expertise in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh. We are currently leading a project on the Visualisation of Translation Variation and are particularly interested in proposals which articulate with it. See: http://www.delightedbeauty.org/vvv/Home/Project.

Key Features of MA by Research in Literary Translation

An MA by Research in Literary Translation gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Literary Translation, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (in the private sector, the Civil Service, education, or the translation industry).

The Literary Translation research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your own choosing in Literary Translation and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student enrolled on the MA by Research in Literary Translation, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Literary Translation degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in Literary Translation is ideal for those who want:

-an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying (see staff web pages).

For informal enquiries regarding Literary Translation please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Research Interests

Staff research interests in Translation and Interpreting cover a range of themes, including:

• Literary Translation

• Theatre translation/adaptation

• Translation Theory (including non-Western)

• History of Translation

• Comparative Translation Studies

• Translation and Social Discourse

• Corpus-based Translation Analysis

• Translation and the Lexicon

• Computer-based Lexicography and Terminography

• Translation processes: psycholinguistics of translation, translation workflows

• Translation tools and technologies

• Translation visualisation

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. The Department benefits from extensive library holdings in print and online form. All postgraduate students have access to two computer-based language laboratories, an advanced Translation and Media computing lab, and a more specialised Translation Research facility housing the latest digitisation, corpus analysis and computer assisted translation tools.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs

- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

Specialisation options:

Interpreting, further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

Language pairs (subject to demand):

- From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation typically include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Part One – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1).

Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), History and Theory of Translation, Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Student Quote

‘After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme in Professional Translation gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green, Professional Translation, MA



Read less
This programme is designed to suit current market demands. You will practise specialised translation in language-specific groups and have opportunities to simulate real-life translation scenarios. Read more

This programme is designed to suit current market demands. You will practise specialised translation in language-specific groups and have opportunities to simulate real-life translation scenarios.

The domains covered include economic, business, legal, scientific and technical translation. Our strong emphasis on translation technologies will allow you to work with computer-assisted translation software and state-of-the-art corpus tools and resources.

Equally important, the programme highlights the business requirements of the industry so that you acquire the necessary project management and entrepreneurial skills to work as a professional language service provider.

Furthermore, our EMT membership gives you priority access to traineeships at the EU Directorate-General for Translation. 

Programme structure

The MA Translation is studied over one year (full-time mode) or two years (part-time mode). On successful completion of the programme, you will be awarded a Master’s degree in Translation accredited by the European Masters of Translation.

Language-specific options are paired with English. If you are a native speaker of English, you can take up to two Specialist Translation options. If you are not a native speaker of English, you will normally take one Specialist Translation option (your mother tongue paired with English).

You can also choose one ab initio language if you wish to expand your portfolio of translation languages. Options ending in ‘I’ in semester 1 must be taken in conjunction with modules ending in ‘II’ in semester 2.

Teaching staff

Experienced academic staff with excellent research records will help you to develop a broad understanding of the current and future challenges of translation, while professional native-speaker translators bring their real-world experience and standards, and an up-to-date view of the translation market into the classroom.

Professional development

In addition to enjoying regular contact with professional translators in your practice-based modules, you will benefit from course components that specifically address the business and wider industry aspects of the profession.

Further insights into the industry will be provided by the speakers we invite to our Translation Studies seminars series.

These include professional translators, interpreters, subtitlers and audio describers; professionals working in public services, companies and international organisations; representatives of professional translator/interpreter associations as well as translation/interpreting researchers.

In line with our aim to offer professionally relevant programmes, we have forged close links with the main professional bodies, i.e. the Institute of Translation and Interpreting and the Chartered Institute of Linguists, as well as with many professional language service providers, and we have an extensive network of visiting professionals.

In addition The Centre for Translation Studies has been granted free access to Memsource software, KantanMT and Lilt software to help further student's education in the area of translation technology.

Career prospects

Thanks to our emphasis on professional development, our students are well-equipped to begin work as freelancers or as language service providers at international organisations, government bodies, universities and private companies.

We also regularly have students who decide to stay on to study for a PhD and pursue an academic career in Translation Studies.  

Languages on offer

The practice-based translation modules on this programme are offered in English paired with Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish, according to demand.

What makes the programme special?

The MA programme is tailored to suit current market demands. You will practise specialised translation in language-specific groups, with a focus on professional standards and opportunities to simulate real-life translation scenarios.

The domains covered include economic, business, legal, scientific and technical translation. Our strong emphasis on the use of translation technologies will allow you to work hands-on with computer-assisted translation software and state-of- the-art corpus tools and resources.

The programme also emphasises the business requirements of the industry, providing you with an opportunity to acquire necessary project management and entrepreneurial skills, and knowledge to work as a professional language service provider.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, translation with opportunities for application and practice – with the aim of enabling students to:

  • Perform relevant translation tasks in different contexts
  • Reflect on their own practice, using scholarly and professional writing on relevant aspects of translation, transfer the acquired skills and knowledge to novel and unpredictable situations of translation
  • Develop a broad understanding of current and future challenges of translation in different contexts
  • Apply scholarly approaches to critically evaluate professional practice in the light of current and future requirements
  • Have the capacity for carrying out independent research in an area of translation

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. Read more

Why take this course?

This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. It has a strong practical orientation, embracing technology and research skills that are highly relevant to translation as a career.

You can study this as a campus-based or distance learning course.

What will i experience?

On this course you can:

Specialise in translation between English and your choice of language from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian or Spanish
Balance your study between translation skills, technological competence and the acquisition of theoretical methodologies
Follow a programme accredited by the European Masters in Translation network

What opportunities might it lead to?

The MA Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth is an accredited member of the European Masters in Translation Network, and the University is also a member of the OPTIMALE translator training network funded by the Erasmus lifelong learning scheme of the European Commission.

The course includes a strong practical element, as well as a careers element, which enables those who wish to become professionals to understand the basics of staff, agency and freelance translation work.

This course is accredited by European Masters in Translation. The EMT is a partnership project between the European Commission and higher-education institutions offering master's level translation programmes. The project has established a quality label for university translation programmes that meet agreed professional standards and market demands.

Module Details

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block, plus their dissertation. A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Core units

Critical Approaches to Specialised Translation:
For the theoretical strand of this unit, students will be introduced to a series of concepts and theoretical frameworks in linguistics and translation studies. This unit makes substantial use of task-based learning in order to help the students to learn to apply these concepts and frameworks to the analysis of translations by other people and to their own translation practice.

Dissertation:
Students have the choice to complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a translation related topic or an extended translation and commentary. (Taken once core unit and options have been passed)

Options: 2 of the following:

Translation Technologies and Subtitling:
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with software tools which are relevant and in use in the professional world of translation. It will cover both the theory and the practice of glossary development, translation memory/machine translation usage and subtitling.

Technical Communication:
This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems

Translation Project:
The Translation Project provides an opportunity for students to produce an extended translation in a domain of their choice. Students will be required to address a range of practical and professional issues, including market demand, time and resource management and billing, and reflect critically on them.

Professional Portfolio:
The Professional Portfolio is designed as a unit which allows students to profile their studies in a way which is academically or professionally important to them on the basis of previous professional experience, a work placement or internship, or any specific interests they may have in translation.

Professional Aspects of Translation:
This course will provide students with tools to maximise their employability in the sector and to enhance their professional business skills.

Please note: Specialised Translation workshops will run on campus depending on student numbers. Students will join the Distance Learning workshop variant of this unit if numbers for a specific language pathway are low on campus.

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught programme from October to June and a research programme, in which the dissertation is written from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. Their dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

The distance learning programme will provide you with online learning materials for the units. These will be supported by asynchronous online discussion with the tutors responsible for the various course units and with other students on the course. You will also be able to communicate with your tutors on a one-to-one basis (e.g. by email, Skype or telephone).

You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor, who will oversee your work throughout the process and you will be encouraged to start thinking about your dissertation from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Assessments include translations, essays and projects. All translation-related assessments provide the opportunity to practise your translation skills and simultaneously to reflect on this practice. Other assignments will evaluate your technical expertise, research skills, ability to read critically and grasp of the principal theoretical concepts relating to translation.

Student Destinations

Graduates of the MA Translation Studies work in a variety of translation-related roles, in the UK and abroad. The course can enhance a specialism that students already have, or can help develop the relevant knowledge and skills for the profession. It is quite common to begin one's in-house career as a project manager, co-ordinating translation commissions before moving on to work as a translator. Quite a few of our graduates also go into freelance translation. A number of our graduates go on to pursue further research in translation.

Read less
This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. Read more

Why take this course?

This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. It has a strong practical orientation, embracing technology and research skills that are highly relevant to translation as a career.

You can study this as a campus-based or distance learning course.

What will i experience?

On this course you can:

Specialise in translation between English and your choice of language from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian or Spanish
Balance your study between translation skills, technological competence and the acquisition of theoretical methodologies
Follow a programme accredited by the European Masters in Translation network

What opportunities might it lead to?

The MA Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth is an accredited member of the European Masters in Translation Network, and the University is also a member of the OPTIMALE translator training network funded by the Erasmus lifelong learning scheme of the European Commission.

The course includes a strong practical element, as well as a careers element, which enables those who wish to become professionals to understand the basics of staff, agency and freelance translation work.

This course is accredited by European Masters in Translation. The EMT is a partnership project between the European Commission and higher-education institutions offering master's level translation programmes. The project has established a quality label for university translation programmes that meet agreed professional standards and market demands.

Module Details

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block, plus their dissertation. A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Core units

Critical Approaches to Specialised Translation:
For the theoretical strand of this unit, students will be introduced to a series of concepts and theoretical frameworks in linguistics and translation studies. This unit makes substantial use of task-based learning in order to help the students to learn to apply these concepts and frameworks to the analysis of translations by other people and to their own translation practice.

Dissertation:
Students have the choice to complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a translation related topic or an extended translation and commentary. (Taken once core unit and options have been passed)

Options: 2 of the following:

Translation Technologies and Subtitling:
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with software tools which are relevant and in use in the professional world of translation. It will cover both the theory and the practice of glossary development, translation memory/machine translation usage and subtitling.

Technical Communication:
This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems

Translation Project:
The Translation Project provides an opportunity for students to produce an extended translation in a domain of their choice. Students will be required to address a range of practical and professional issues, including market demand, time and resource management and billing, and reflect critically on them.

Professional Portfolio:
The Professional Portfolio is designed as a unit which allows students to profile their studies in a way which is academically or professionally important to them on the basis of previous professional experience, a work placement or internship, or any specific interests they may have in translation.

Professional Aspects of Translation:
This course will provide students with tools to maximise their employability in the sector and to enhance their professional business skills.

Please note: Specialised Translation workshops will run on campus depending on student numbers. Students will join the Distance Learning workshop variant of this unit if numbers for a specific language pathway are low on campus.

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught programme from October to June and a research programme, in which the dissertation is written from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. Their dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

The distance learning programme will provide you with online learning materials for the units. These will be supported by asynchronous online discussion with the tutors responsible for the various course units and with other students on the course. You will also be able to communicate with your tutors on a one-to-one basis (e.g. by email, Skype or telephone).

You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor, who will oversee your work throughout the process and you will be encouraged to start thinking about your dissertation from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Assessments include translations, essays and projects. All translation-related assessments provide the opportunity to practise your translation skills and simultaneously to reflect on this practice. Other assignments will evaluate your technical expertise, research skills, ability to read critically and grasp of the principal theoretical concepts relating to translation.

Student Destinations

Graduates of the MA Translation Studies work in a variety of translation-related roles, in the UK and abroad. The course can enhance a specialism that students already have, or can help develop the relevant knowledge and skills for the profession. It is quite common to begin one's in-house career as a project manager, co-ordinating translation commissions before moving on to work as a translator. Quite a few of our graduates also go into freelance translation. A number of our graduates go on to pursue further research in translation.

Read less
This course responds to the increasing need in a globalised, interconnected world for highly qualified translators who can navigate different genres of text and negotiate the language needs of diverse audiences and industries. Read more

This course responds to the increasing need in a globalised, interconnected world for highly qualified translators who can navigate different genres of text and negotiate the language needs of diverse audiences and industries.

"Without translation, we would be living in provinces bordering on silence" - George Steiner

Based in a truly global city, Goldsmiths’ location makes it the perfect place to study translation.

You will study the theory and practice of translation, giving you the expertise to compete for work as a professional translator. Study in a department with expertise across linguistics, creative writing, and literary studies, with the option to tailor your studies and explore areas in other departments relevant to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to engage in and apply for translation work experience opportunities with a range of external organisations.

Pathways

You can choose between three pathways:

Translation Studies

This pathway is for people who are interested in the technical, legal, business, scientific, medical, financial, creative arts and academic fields and enables you to benefit from dedicated core modules offering a solid grounding in the theory and practice of translation across diverse areas of professional practice.

The Translation Studies pathway also opens up to you the specialist teaching and research expertise offered by subject experts in the Department of English and Comparative Literature in linguistics, comparative literature and literary theory, from discourse analysis, sociolinguistics and language and its interface with issues of gender, ethnicity and identity, to key currents of concern in literary and cultural theory and the role of the text in shifting boundaries of cultural and linguistic identity in a globalised, multicultural world.

Cultural Tourism, Hospitality and Cultural Heritage

This pathway focuses on translation for museums, galleries, cultural heritage sites, hotels and other tourist destinations. If you choose this pathway, you will benefit from the specialist research and teaching expertise offered by the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship where optional modules focus on a range of topics relating to the tourism, hospitality, cultural development and cultural heritage sectors, from cultural tourism, language, communication and intercultural mediation in museums, galleries and other cultural organisations, to destination management and the development of new tourism products.

Depending on your optional module choices you may also have the opportunity to undertake fieldwork in the cultural and creative tourism sector in central London.

English-Chinese Translation and Interpreting

This pathway is aimed at native speakers of Chinese (Mandarin) who have a high level of English-language competence and who wish to increase their understanding of professional written translation and oral interpreting practice from English to Chinese, to build their intercultural and interpretive skills and to develop their knowledge across a number of English-language subject areas. It is also open to native speakers of English who have a high-level of competence in Chinese (Mandarin) and who wish to increase their ability to translate and interpret confidently into Chinese from English and to expand their written and spoken Chinese skills.

The core specialist module for this pathway is co-taught by the Goldsmiths Confucius Institute and the Department of English and Comparative Literature and focuses on producing written Chinese translations of a wide range of English-language texts and text types and covers translation across a broad variety of professional domains, from scientific, academic, business and technical texts written in English, to journalism, finance, advertising and marketing, media, literary fiction, poetry, theatre and other creative industries.

Alongside this, and with the help of Chinese and English native speakers, you will develop consecutive and bilateral/liaison interpreting skills for facilitating communication between monolingual speakers of English and Chinese across a range of business, diplomatic, government, community, health and criminal justice contexts.

Modules & structure

Core modules on the MA in Translation cover both the theory and practice of translation. These are taught in seminar-based and tutorial small-group sessions and may include an individually supervised practice project.

Students undertaking the translation work placement module will work directly with an external organisation to provide a range of translation and other language services and gain first-hand experience of translation in a professional setting.

You also undertake a dissertation in which you will either reflect critically on one aspect of the theory and/or practice of translation, or focus on the practice of translation in the form of a concrete translation project.

Your choice of core modules will depend on your pathway choice,. Core modules from other translation pathways may also be taken as optional modules, subject to availability and eligibility. 

Core modules

Optional Modules

In addition, you are able to choose from a range of optional modules, which allows you to explore your interests and to gain specialist knowledge relating to your future career plans. This could include modules from within the Department of English and Comparative Literature, or from other departments such as the Institute for Creative and Cultural EntrepreneurshipMedia and Communications.

Skills

This MA provides you with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills in translation. The interdisciplinary option choices allow you to tailor your studies to your career plans. You'll develop professional behaviours and leadership skills through fortnightly workshops which will provide guided mentoring. 

Careers

This degree will equip graduates with the expertise to work as professional translators across the public and private sector, both in the UK and abroad. The possibility of taking option modules from other departments means that you could develop knowledge ideal for careers in translation for the arts industry, including in the media and publishing.

As part of the course you'll be brought face-to-face with representatives from across the language service industry, from translation agencies and multinational corporations where translations are commissioned or where in-house translators are employed, to international organisations with in-house translation departments, freelance translators and other language professionals. These connections will help you in your future careers.



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