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The Department of Oncology and the Department for Continuing Education’s CPD Centre offer a part-time MSc in Experimental Therapeutics that brings together some of Oxford's leading clinicians and scientists to deliver an advanced modular programme designed for those in full-time employment, both in the UK and overseas. Read more
The Department of Oncology and the Department for Continuing Education’s CPD Centre offer a part-time MSc in Experimental Therapeutics that brings together some of Oxford's leading clinicians and scientists to deliver an advanced modular programme designed for those in full-time employment, both in the UK and overseas.

The Programme draws on the world-class research and teaching in experimental therapeutics at Oxford University and offers a unique opportunity to gain an understanding of the principles that underpin clinical research and to translate this into good clinical and research practice.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-experimental-therapeutics

The first deadline for applications is Friday 20 January 2017

If your application is completed by this January deadline and you fulfil the eligibility criteria, you will be automatically considered for a graduate scholarship. For details see: http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/graduate-scholarships.

Programme details

The MSc in Experimental Therapeutics is a part-time course consisting of six modules and a research project and dissertation. The programme is normally completed in two to three years. Students are full members of the University of Oxford and are matriculated as members of an Oxford college.

The modules in this programme can also be taken as individual short courses. It is possible to transfer credit from up to three previously completed modules into the MSc programme, if the time elapsed between commencement of the accredited module(s) and registration for the MSc is not more than two years.

Programme modules:

- The Structure of Clinical Trials and Experimental Therapeutics
- Drug Development, Pharmacokinetics and Imaging
- Pharmacodynamics, Biomarkers and Personalised Therapy
- Adverse Drug Reactions, Drug Interactions, and Pharmacovigilance
- How to do Research on Therapeutic Interventions: Protocol Preparation
- Biological Therapeutics

Course aims

The aim of the MSc programme is to provide students with the necessary training and practical experience to enable them to understand the principles that underpin clinical research, and to enable them to translate that understanding into good clinical and research practice.

By the end of the MSc programme, students should understand the following core principles:

- Development, marketing and regulations of drugs
- Pharmaceutical factors that affect drug therapy
- Pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics and pharmacodynamics
- Adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, and pharmacovigilance
- Designing phase I, II and III clinical trials for a range of novel therapeutic interventions (and imaging agents).
- Application of statistics to medicine
- Laboratory assays used to support trial end-points
- Use of non-invasive imaging in drug development
- Application of analytical techniques

By the end of the programme, students should be equipped to:

- demonstrate a knowledge of the principles, methods and techniques for solving clinical research problems and translate this into good clinical and research practice
- apply skills gained in techniques and practical experience from across the medical and biological sciences
- develop skills in managing research-based work in experimental therapeutics
- carry out an extended research project involving a literature review, problem specification and analysis in experimental therapeutics and write a short dissertation

Guidance from the UK Royal College of Physician's Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine

The Faculty have confirmed that if enrolled for Pharmaceutical Medicine Specialty Training (PMST), trainees may be able to use knowledge provided by Experimental Therapeutics modules to cover aspects of a module of the PMST curriculum. Trainees are advised to discuss this with their Educational Supervisor.

Experimental Therapeutics modules may also be used to provide those pursuing the Faculty's Diploma in Pharmaceutical Medicine (DPM) with the necessary knowledge required to cover the Diploma syllabus. Applicants for the DPM exam are advised to read the DPM syllabus and rules and regulations.

Members of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine who are registered in the Faculty's CPD scheme can count participation in Experimental Therapeutics modules towards their CPD record. Non-members may wish to obtain further advice about CPD credit from their Royal College or Faculty.

Assessment methods

To complete the MSc, students need to:

Attend the six modules and complete an assessed written assignment for each module.
Complete a dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor and the Course Director.

Dissertation:
The dissertation is founded on a research project that builds on material studied in the taught modules. The dissertation should normally not exceed 15,000 words.

The project will normally be supervised by an academic supervisor from the University of Oxford, and an employer-based mentor.

The following are topics of dissertations completed by previous students on the course:

- The outcomes of non-surgical management of tubal pregnancy; a 6 month study of the South East London population

- Analysis of the predictive and prognostic factors of outcome in a cohort of patients prospectively treated with perioperative chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the stomach or of the gastroesophageal junction

- Evolution of mineral and bone disorder in early Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD): the role of FGF23 and vitamin D

- Survey of patients' knowledge and perception of the adverse drug reporting scheme (yellow cards) in primary care

- The predictive role of ERCC1 status in oxaliplatin based Neoadjuvant for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) to the liver

- Endothelial Pathophysiology in Dengue - Dextran studies during acute infection

- Literature review of the use of thalidomide in cancer

- An investigation into the phenotypical and functional characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells for clinical application

- Identification of genetic variants that cause capecitabine and bevacizumab toxicity

- Bridging the evidence gap in geriatric medicines via modelling and simulations

Teaching methods

The class-based modules will include a period of preparatory study, a week of intensive face-to-face lectures and tutorials, followed by a period for assignment work. Attendance at modules will be a requirement for study. Some non-classroom activities will be provided at laboratory facilities elsewhere in the University. The course will include taught material on research skills. A virtual learning environment (VLE) will provide between-module support.

The taught modules will include group work, discussions, guest lectures, and interaction and feedback with tutors and lecturers. Practical work aims to develop the students' knowledge and understanding of the subject.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?. Read more
Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?

Building on the internationally recognised expertise of both our Departments of Language and Linguistics, and our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, our MA Translation and Literature course will allow you to further specialise in literature and general translation. In the second term you will also learn techniques of professional literary translation. You develop your own personal translation skills, allowing you to translate a literary work accurately and creatively from one language to another for your dissertation.

Our course is offered with the combination of English and one of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. You can be a native or near-native speaker of any of these languages, as you learn to translate to and from both languages. You work with native speakers in developing your ability to move accurately and quickly between your chosen language and English.

Explore our hands-on, practical modules, including:
-Principles of Translation
-US and Caribbean literatures in dialogue
-Translation Portfolios
-Technologies of Translation

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK (REF 2014)

Our Department of Language and Linguistics is ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet and our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies is ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet, according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016].

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our lecturers are skilled interpreters and translators, experienced in training students with the necessary skills for professional practice. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

Our lecturers come from around the world including France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Cuba, China, and the UK. They will share their expertise with you in the areas of professional translation.

Within our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, Professor Karin Littau specialises in book and film history, reception, adaptation and translation studies, and is especially interested in the effects of print, cinematograph, and computers on practices of reading, writing and translation. Dr Clare Finburgh has translated several plays from French into English, and worked as dramaturg for productions of British plays in France, and French works in the UK.

Specialist facilities

-24-hour self-access to our translation lab dedicated to translation students
-Use specialist software such as SDL Trados Studio 2015
-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at the department’s Myth Reading Group
-Access the University’s Media Centre, equipped with state-of-the-art studios, cameras, audio and lighting equipment, and an industry-standard editing suite
-Weekly multilingual workshops led by internationally renowned experts from the industry
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost

Your future

If you love literature and languages and would like to acquire professional translation skills, then our MA Translation and Literature is for you. Takers of our courses in translation can use the skills gained to further their future career in this area.

You develop a range of key employability skills including researching, writing for specific purposes, and translation. Our course typically leads to a career in translation, but could also lead to a career in education, publishing and administration.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Principles of Translation and Interpreting
-Technologies of Translation
-Dissertation
-Translation Portfolio I (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Italian) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Italian) (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-The Tale: Tellings and Re-Tellings (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Adaptation (optional)
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital (optional)
-Film and Video Production Workshop (optional)
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose

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In this dynamic programme you’ll build on your existing musical skills and develop a greater understanding of the theories and techniques of digital composition and performance. Read more

Programme description

In this dynamic programme you’ll build on your existing musical skills and develop a greater understanding of the theories and techniques of digital composition and performance.

A focus of the programme is bridging the gap between the musical vision and its performance. With this in mind, you will be encouraged to perform your own music in live situations and take your place at the forefront of your music’s realisation.

An emphasis is also placed on the field of digital composition within a wider context, which you will address through seminar work. You’ll learn how to plan a technological project and translate your musical ideas into interactive computer music programmes and/or scores.

Programme structure

Your study will take the form of weekly lectures or seminars, as well as at least 10 hours a week on project work.

You will complete six courses.

In semester 1:

Real-Time Performance Strategies and Design
Composers’ Seminar A
a choice of Sound Design Media, Compositional Practice A, Principles of Composition for Screen or another course as agreed with the Programme Director

In semester 2:

Non Real-Time Systems
Composers’ Seminar B
a choice of Digital Media Studio Project, Compositional Practice B or another course as agreed with the Programme Director
In addition, over the spring and summer, you will prepare a final digital composition and performance project.

Learning outcomes

Students will gain in-depth knowledge of:

how to make music with computers
the combination of hardware and software systems in music performance
music programming both in real-time (e.g. Max/MSP) and non-real-time e.g. slippery chicken
audio production and post-production
how to plan, execute, realise, and document a musical-technological project
how to translate musical ideas into fully-functioning interactive music software
their own creative practice in the context of past and present cultural developments

Career opportunities

As this programme involves a wide range of disciplines both technical and artistic, you will gain a number of transferable skills ranging from the core matters of composition, audio production and music programming to more indirect but highly employable skills such as research, documentation, critical thinking, oral presentation, teamwork and software development.

Our graduates have gone on to be employed as composers, performers, researchers, Cirque du Soleil sound technicians, university lecturers, software engineers, BBC sound recordists, web designers, multimedia/ video streaming engineers, and DJs.

See our alumni webpage for details of the careers of recent graduates:

[Music Alumni] (http://www.dcp.music.ed.ac.uk/alumni.php)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Classics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Classics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Greek and Latin languages are the key to our knowledge of the ancient world, and the origin of many modern European languages. This MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in the ancient languages, and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world. In addition to developing their ability to read fluently in the ancient languages and to translate them accurately and sensitively, students are introduced to the critical and analytical methodologies that shape the study of Classical literature in the twenty-first century. Students in the MA in Classics should normally already have studied either Latin or Greek, and will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of the other.

Key Features of MA in Classics

The MA Classics studies Greek and Latin language, literature and civilisation.

The MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in ancient languages and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Classics MA is split across the year offering three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time Classics MA students take three modules in the first year, three in the second year and write the dissertation in the third year.

MA in Classics Aims

To acquire advanced reading skills in ancient Greek and Latin.
To develop the ability to translate from ancient Greek and Latin accurately and sensitively.
To develop the theoretical and analytical skills relevant to the study of ancient texts in the original languages.
To prepare for further text-based research on any aspect of Greek or Roman history and culture.
Through the precision and awareness to detail entailed in the study of ancient languages, to acquire a range of transferable skills relevant to a range of employment opportunities, including those which involve language acquisition and translation.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Classics course typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin Language
• Ancient Greek or Latin Texts
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, history and archaeology.
Particular strengths include:

• Ancient Narrative Literature
• The Ancient Novel
• Plato and Platonism
• Greek Tragedy
• Ancient Technology
• The Archaeology of Roman Egypt
• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation
• Greek Social History
• The History and Archaeology of Asia Minor
• Late Antiquity
• Roman Military History

All staff in History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. In addition, regular research seminars and lectures are run through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are
encouraged to attend.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Classics graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.

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If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies. Read more

MSc International Development Studies

If development aid is just a waste of money, how can we find a better way to improve the livelihoods of people? With regions and countries fighting for land, water, and resources, how can we help people recover from conflict and war? How can we transform the right to food, water, and a clean environment into reality? These are just a few examples of issues relating to development studies.

The International Development Studies programme allows you to develop a critical understanding of development theories. You will learn to plan and conduct research. You acquire the skills to translate your finding into development policies, intervention strategies and institutional innovations. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams.

Programme summary

This programme deals with worldwide processes of development and change related to livelihoods, agro-food networks and the environment in a dynamic international context. Special attention is given to exclusion processes, equity, unequal access to resources and sustainability. Social, economic, political, technological, and environmental change is studied from various perspectives and at different levels. You will develop a critical understanding of recent development theories, learn to plan and conduct research, and acquire skills to translate research findings into recommendations for policies and intervention strategies. You will learn to include the diverging views of various stakeholders and to work in multidisciplinary teams. Depending on your previous education, you can follow one of the specialisations. .

Specialisations

Students can choose one of the following three specialisations after consultation with the study advisor. The selected specialisation mainly depends on your academic background.

Sociology of Development
This specialisation focuses on social transformation processes, especially the local consequences of globalisation and environmental change, and the way people cope with uncertain circumstances. Themes studied include natural resource degradation, refugees, migration, post-disaster reconstruction, social unrest, poverty, and lack of access to resources crucial to the livelihoods of people. This specialisation applies sociological and anthropological perspectives to development problems with special attention given to understanding the differing interests and views of numerous actors. You can choose a major in Disaster Studies, Environmental Policy, Sociology of Development and Change, or Rural Sociology.

Economics of Development
The central themes in this specialisation are the role of agriculture in development, food security and the global food crisis, regional economic issues, sustainable use of natural resources, rural-urban income disparities, and issues related to poverty and the role of institutions. These themes are examined from a microeconomic perspective to gain insight into the behaviour of individuals and institutions, as well as from a macroeconomic perspective to obtain insight into development processes at regional and national levels. You can major in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Development Economics, Environmental Economics and Natural Resources, or Regional Economics.

Communication, Technology and Policy
In this specialisation, social transformation and sustainable development are examined with a specific focus on communication, technological innovations, and policy processes. An important theme is how technologies and policies are developed in the interaction between various parties (e.g. governments, social organisations, and citizens) and the role of communication in these processes. Another theme is the relationship between technological change (in the agricultural and food sectors), institutional processes and social transformation. You can choose a major in Knowledge, Technology and Innovation, Law and Governance, or Strategic Communication.

Your future career

Graduates are employed in various (inter-) national organisations as a programme/ project coordinator, trainer, consultant, advisor, policymaker or researcher. You could work, for example, as policymaker in a government or semi-governmental institute, as programme coordinator or advisor in an international (non-)governmentalorganisation or (consultancy) company, or as researcher and/or teacher at a university or research institute. Examples of organisations include: FAO, World Bank, European Union, UTZ Certified, Oxfam Novib, Rabobank Foundation, CARE, Sustainalytics and UNICEF.

Alumnus Luckmore Jalisi.
“I have really benefitted from what I learnt during my studies. This master has opened doors for me." Luckmore did the specialisation Sociology of Development and conducted both his internship and thesis research in a refugee camp in Uganda. These experiences were important in getting him his job as Youth and Governance Advisor at ActionAid in Liberia. “I support postconflict youth development programmes based on a human rights approach, and develop monitoring & evaluation tools for governance and youth development work. I draw on the knowledge and skills acquired during my studies and my classmates from Wageningen remain valuable contacts in my network.”

Related programmes:
MSc Development and Rural Innovation
Health and Society (specialisation)
MSc Applied Communication Science
MSc International Land and Water Management
MSc Leisure, Tourism and Environment
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies

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The Aberystwyth Masters course in Applied Translation is your opportunity to deepen your knowledge of translation as a professional activity either for a career in translation or to establish a strong foundation in translation studies for possible further study at PhD level. Read more
The Aberystwyth Masters course in Applied Translation is your opportunity to deepen your knowledge of translation as a professional activity either for a career in translation or to establish a strong foundation in translation studies for possible further study at PhD level. You will receive thorough training in translating for businesses, communities, individuals and academic institutions – all of whom require a unique set of skills and approaches. You will translate from and into at least two of the following languages: English, French, German and/or Spanish.

You will receive individual tuition from expert departmental staff, all of whom are active researchers and have published in their own specialist fields. Under their guidance, you will become a first class translator with a host of transferable skills which will help you excel in further academic study or employment.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/applied-translation-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you are looking for comprehensive training in translation methods
- If you want to develop translation experience at a professional standard
- If you want tuition from published and professionally active experts
- If you are keen to develop a career in translation

Course detail

This MA course is designed to help you undertake translations, reflect on your translation practice and improve upon it. You will do this through a programme of translation workshops and practical exercises designed to simulate the rigours of work as a professional translator. You will translate real-life texts, liaise with ‘clients’ and provide businesses and communities with professional-standard translations. In completing these exercises, you will gain valuable experience and generate an impressive portfolio of translation work for use in seeking employment or research positions.

Five out of the six course modules follow an innovative structure: the first five weeks of your teaching will be in lectures, seminars or workshops. After this, you will be allocated a tutor whose language interests match your own. As you work, you will benefit from your tutor's specific knowledge and experience in translating your chosen language. This will help prepare you thoroughly for your final dissertation in which you demonstrate a mastery of all that you have learned on the course.

In addition to this tailored course of study and instruction, you will have the opportunity to develop a set of general study skills. You will graduate with improved linguistic abilities, direct experience of translation and a host of transferable skills. These will make you a desirable employee for a wide range of public and private sector organisations and businesses.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of translations, commentaries, projects, presentations and a portfolio. Each student will produce a substantial final project piece in the form of a traditional masters dissertation in their subject or a substantial translation and commentary.

Employability

Your Masters in Translation will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional linguist with highly desirable skills suitable for almost any postgraduate workplace. This is because every Master's course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation; you will be challenged to tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence; and you will gain direct, practical experience of operating at a professional level in your chosen field.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
Upon graduating from this Masters in Translation, you will have mastered an array of critical and creative approaches to translation. You will be highly competent in factual research, evaluation, contextualisation and problem-solving within the process of translation. You will understand the importance of defining the boundaries for professional translation work, managing expectations and completing work to suit the client's needs.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at Master’s level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff; you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

- Transferable Skills:
The Masters is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of academic and employment contexts. You will become a first class translator whilst developing your general study skills, imporoving your linguistic ablitis, experience of translation and a host of other trasnferable skills. These will make you a highly desirable employee for a wide range of public and private sector organistaions and businesses.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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This course would appeal to students who enjoy performing arts and are keen to consider their wider significance and are open minded to creatively exploring new possibilities and experimenting. Read more
This course would appeal to students who enjoy performing arts and are keen to consider their wider significance and are open minded to creatively exploring new possibilities and experimenting.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/arts-and-creative-industries/pt/performing-arts-pt-1718

What will this course cover?

On this course you will explore how the boundaries between drama and dance, performance and life, creativity and work are always shifting. These shifting boundaries mean that performing is very much a process of adaptation: from idea to stage, from voice to body, from research to practice.

You will study innovative, interpretive research methodologies such as video- based examinations and reminiscence workshops, and traditional qualitative methods such as one-to-one interviews and hermeneutics, in order to capture, record and transform narratives, adapt concepts, translate ideas into performance, and performance into ideas. You will also explore a range of performance styles, from documentary and verbatim theatre to forum theatre and devised/ physical theatre and dance.

In particular, the course provides a unique opportunity to explore creatively how the performing arts can be developed as a discipline and applied to the world at large, as a way of thinking and conceptualising business, as an educational tool, as pure artistic endeavour.

In projects led by experienced practitioners, you will use your acting, dance and devising skills to look into creative processes beyond the performing arts.

Beginning with lecturer input and increasingly moving to independent study, the course encourages you to think of the performing arts as both an autonomous art form and as something that can have a range of applications in the world.

The course will conclude with a project led by you, in which you develop either an artistic concept or use ideas explored during the course in a wider social context.

Modules

• Research Skills and Professional Contexts
• Residency and Project Development
• Investigating Creativity
• Approaches to Performance
• Professional Workshops
• Placement and Creative Challenge
• Practical Dissertation/Project
• Written Dissertation/Project

Careers

On this programme, you will study research methodologies such as video-based examinations and reminiscence workshops, as well as one-to-one interviews and hermeneutics, in order to capture, record and transform narratives, adapt concepts, translate ideas into performance, and performance into ideas.

You will explore a range of performance styles, from documentary and verbatim theatre to forum theatre and devised/physical theatre and dance. In particular, the course provides a unique opportunity to explore creatively how the performing arts can be developed as a discipline and applied to the world at large, as a way of thinking and conceptualising business, as an educational tool and as pure artistic endeavour.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/

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Your learning will cover two main strands involving an enquiry-based approach to geography and real-world practical activities, which you will then translate into your classroom lessons. Read more
Your learning will cover two main strands involving an enquiry-based approach to geography and real-world practical activities, which you will then translate into your classroom lessons.

Your initial training will be based around developing your own personal vision of geography, which will feed into your teaching style by drawing on influences of your own geographical background and knowledge.

We will encourage you to take an enquiry-based approach to learning, actively posing questions and investigating geographical issues through exploring and questioning.

You will be taught how to use a range of geographical resources through practical tasks, including maps and atlases, photographs and images, meteorological equipment, geographical media and cultural artefacts. Developing your understanding of key geographical practical resources and equipment and how they are used will enable you to then enhance your pupils' learning.

You will have the opportunity to participate in and lead outdoor field experiences which will investigate physical and human geography. These experiences will develop your understanding of how to infuse classroom-based learning with practical outdoor sessions.

Your training will also involve exploring key issues in geography such as migration, war and sustainability from, enabling you to develop a better understanding of these modern issues which you will then translate into a classroom context and will ensure your teaching is current.

You can choose from two different training models.

University-led: You will develop your theoretical knowledge at our Headingley Campus, which offers a superb learning environment, modern facilities and excellent resources. Your learning will be informed by the very latest research and the expertise of our supportive teaching staff. We will organise your extensive school placements so you can apply your knowledge in a classroom setting and your placements will be timetabled to fit with your taught seminars on campus.

School Direct: For the vast majority of your course, you will be based in your provider school or schools, learning on the job while being supported by experienced teachers and mentors. You will attend our Headingley Campus one day a week (usually a Friday) for key module seminars.

To view our full range of PGCEs, and for more information, please visit our teacher training pages (http://leedsbeckett.ac.uk/teach).

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/PGCE_geography

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Completing this course will enable you to be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status. Subject to ratification by the Department for Education, you will then be qualified as a secondary school teacher, with a specialism in geography.

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

We have more than 100 years' experience of training the next generation of teachers and you'll find an experienced course team ready to bring out the best in you as a future teacher of geography. You will become part of a supportive teaching and learning community, where you will be able to pick up advice and tips from your course tutors and share ideas on lesson plans and classroom experiences with your fellow students.

Helping you to develop your confidence, identity and style through a critically reflective approach to your practice will form a key element of your training.

To help with your preparations for your course, you will have the opportunity to attend a residential, where you will meet your tutors and fellow trainees, start to develop your support networks and discover how the outdoors can be used to inspire your teaching.

You will gain substantial training in a school environment. Many of the partnership schools involved in the delivery of your course are located in and around Leeds to ensure your travelling is limited and you will have the maximum time to prepare your lessons. You will complete three teaching placements in at least two contrasting schools, receiving support from your school mentor and University tutors.

You will learn from lecturers who have been practising teachers and are now active in educational research, benefiting from their practical experience and theoretical knowledge.

We provide ongoing training for all newly qualified teachers. On successful completion of your course, you will be able to enrol on our Newly Qualified Teacher module, giving you another valuable means of support as you start your teaching career.

There's lots of support available to help you fund your teaching training. Depending on your degree class, the subject you want to teach and the training programme you follow, you could be eligible for a bursary, scholarship or even a salary.

For more information, visit the National College for Teaching & Leadership website (https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding).

Dr Tom Dobson

Senior Lecturer

"Training to teach at Leeds Beckett University gives you the best of both worlds. On campus, you will benefit from the expertise of our published academics; in schools and settings, you will learn from outstanding partner teachers."

Having taught English in secondary schools as well as undertaking writing projects in local primary schools, Tom completed his PhD which focused on boys' writing during the transition stage from primary to secondary school. His thesis was recently published by Sense Academic Publishers.

Facilities

- School Practice Collection
Our School Practice Collection offers a wide range of journals, electronic resources and equipment selected specifically to help you prepare for your teaching practice.

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in nearly 100 acres of parkland and offers easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The NFTS has a tradition of enabling documentary filmmakers to find a distinctive voice that both prepares them for the Industry and makes their work a force for changing it. Read more
The NFTS has a tradition of enabling documentary filmmakers to find a distinctive voice that both prepares them for the Industry and makes their work a force for changing it.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/directing-documentary

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

COURSE OVERVIEW

- Develop a personal voice.
- Put storytelling at the centre of your process.
- Study in a multi-disciplinary filmmaking environment.
- Shoot on digital formats.
- Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

This course commences in January each year. The goal of the course is to give our graduates the tools and the confidence to become successful members of the international documentary community. Our students have won the Grierson and Sheffield Student Awards two years running, IDFA and the Royal Television Society last year, and win prizes at the most prestigious festivals round the world: Sundance, IDFA, Hot Docs, Berlin, Sheffield and many others. The most important thing, however, is to prepare them for life as committed documentary storytellers, wherever that may lead.

In the UK, getting a first commission can be a daunting task but last year, for example, Marc Williamson, made a First Cut for Channel 4 from his Sheffield student award winning graduation film which this year won him the Grierson Prize for Best Newcomer. Some use the contacts they make in the last phase of the course, to put together deals with TV production companies and non-TV source as Sam Blair did with Adidas for his brilliant feature debut about sprinters, Personal Best. Since students direct and shoot five films in different genres during the course, many progress swiftly by using their unique skills to contribute to productions throughout the industry, like James Newton who won a Grierson last year as one of the directors of The Year the Town Hall Shrank .

TUTORS

Some of the UK's leading Documentary makers teach at the School, including internationally acclaimed directors Kim Longinotto, Sean McAllister, Asher Tlalim, Nick Broomfield, vastly experienced producer/directors Riete Oord, Ros Franey, award-winning cinematographer Roger Chapman, Rory Peck award winner Rodrigo Vazquez, the founder of Dochouse, Elizabeth Wood, Exec Producer of The Act of Killing, Andre Singer, and successful younger alumni like Lara Agnew, Sandhya Suri, Simon Chambers and Dan Vernon .

The department is led by Dick Fontaine who has directed over forty films for television and the independent media, has recently had retrospectives in New York, Paris, Barcelona and Sao Paulo and was nominated last year for a Grierson Award for his latest film.

ALUMNI

Graduates include Nick Broomfield who pioneered a powerful new genre in documentary: the filmmaker-as- provocateur (The Leader, the Driver and the Driver’s Wife, Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer,and, most recently, Tales from the Grim Sleeper), Grierson Lifetime Achievement Award winner, Molly Dineen (Home from the Hill, The Lie of the Land), Kim Longinotto, whose inspirational films about women are celebrated at festivals around the world (Divorce Iranian–Style, Sisters in Law, and her new film Dreamcatcher), and Sundance winner Sean McAllister (The Liberace of Baghdad, The Reluctant Revolutionary) and many others who are making striking contributions in documentary on many different platforms.

CURRICULUM

YEAR ONE

Built around a series of four practical exercises, increasing in length and complexity, informed and inspired by relevant traditions. Each exercise isolates and focuses on the techniques and content of a specific documentary genre: observation, character–led narrative, image/sound poetry and investigation. Students collaborate in various combinations with editors, cinematographers, sound designers and composers and also work alone using digital video equipment.

YEAR TWO

Includes three projects: a graduation film in which students synthesise what they have discovered in the first year, and use it to confidently challenge conventional approaches to documentary: an MA dissertation in which they reflect on a practical question that has intrigued them during the course so far and a proposal/taster tape for a project to take into the professional arena.

The final stage consists of visits to film festivals, broadcasters, independent producers and other relevant institutions, together with seminars dealing with the commissioning process, legal requirements, finance and festival potential.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School including an above-the-line cash production budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Students come from a wide variety of backgrounds and have usually had some previous experience of filmmaking, though this may not be at a professional level. All have a strong social awareness and a keen desire to translate that awareness into stories told with a personal voice.

APPLY WITH

- A 20-minute film, conceived and directed by the applicant (on DVD). Please note: if you wish to submit a longer film, only the first 20 minutes will be viewed. If the dialogue is not in English, you should enclose a dialogue transcript in English.

OR

- A narrative photo essay consisting of 10 20cm x 25cm stills.

AND

- A written proposal for a different film of any specified length (on no more than 4 sides of A4, typed and double-spaced) which should include the basic premise, a description of the characters and locations and, most importantly, the developing narrative.

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The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. Read more

Introduction

The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills.
Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks.
You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques.

Accreditation

The BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, is the foremost professional and learned society in the field of computers and information systems in the UK. The Division of Computing Science and Mathematics is an Educational Affiliate of the BCS.
The MSc in Information Technology course is accredited by the BCS as partially meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Information Technology Professional (CITP) registration. CITP is the professional member level of the BCS ('partially meeting' is the normal level of accreditation for such MSc courses, and does not indicate a shortcoming! Additional training/experience is required for full registration.)

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Simon Jones

Course objectives

This is an intensive 12-month course which provides an opportunity for non-computing graduates to develop key specialist skills suitable for a career in Computing. It is ideal for those who wish to complement their knowledge and expertise with core computing skills in order to apply them to a new career. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry.
The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course.
By studying this course students will study in depth key topics including:
- software development
- enterprise database systems
- web technologies
- benefit from research-led teaching
- demonstrate acquired research and development skills by undertaking a substantial piece of software project work
- prepare for positions in the IT industry

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

The MSc in Information Technology will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Information Technology, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including health, IT software organisations, service enterprises, engineering and construction firms as well as in the retail sector.
Previous students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the Information Technology field in aconsiderable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major UK organisations, with Local Authority and Government bodies as well as in the field of Higher Education.
Here are some recent posts that IT students have taken up:
- IBM, Perth: Junior IT Specialist
- CAP-GEMINI, Glasgow
- AIT, Henley-on-Thames: Graduate Trainee Database Administrator
- Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh: MVS Team (Mainframe Support)
- British Airways, Hounslow: Programmer
- Ark Computing Solutions Ltd, Perth: Programmer/Developer
- Lancaster University, English Dept: Java programmer
- Rothes Infographics, Livingston: Trainee Software Developer

More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are:
- As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team.

- IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management.

- Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application.

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If you are a numerate graduate who wants a smart track to employment in the rapidly expanding field of environmental transport studies, or a practitioner who wants insight into best-practice research to accelerate your career, this Masters is for you. Read more

Overview

If you are a numerate graduate who wants a smart track to employment in the rapidly expanding field of environmental transport studies, or a practitioner who wants insight into best-practice research to accelerate your career, this Masters is for you.

Learn the cutting edge data collection and analytical skills to translate your passion for improving the air quality of our cities and the wellbeing of your fellow citizens into a reality.

Be taught by researchers who are shaping the national and international environmental transport agenda – members of our team advise European and national governments on emissions control.

Study on a course that is designed in collaboration with industry, and covers transport and urban pollution; transport and public health; road safety management; green logistics; traffic network modelling; system dynamics: modelling policy; and global transferability in policy-making. In particular gain:
• Inside knowledge of how diverse data sources can be used to improve government policy making
• Hands on experience, using state-of-the-art monitoring tools:
• Measuring vehicle emissions and evaluating the data
• Measuring, analysing and shaping policies to reduce air pollution
• Fluency in the design of sophisticated models to design traffic systems and pollution controls to reduce harm to people and the environment.

And experience what it is like to be part of a project team working across numerous subject boundaries relevant to the transport sector. Through this, gain insights into how transport planning, social science, economics, environmental science, modelling and engineering can work together to design transport solutions to global challenges. This industry-inspired initiative will enable you to apply your knowledge to real world transport issues in the field.

Your colleagues will be among the best and brightest from Latin America to the Far East, from Africa to Europe and the UK. Together you will learn environmental research techniques that will help you develop transport networks that are founded on robust evidence, sustainable and equitable principles, state-of-the-art modeling, accurate data analysis, and a profound understanding of human psychology.

You can also study this subject at Postgraduate Diploma level, part time or full time.

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International commerce is a part of everyday life in today’s business world but few individuals are specifically prepared to lead the growth in international management. Read more
International commerce is a part of everyday life in today’s business world but few individuals are specifically prepared to lead the growth in international management. The PgDip/MSc in International Business offers an ideal opportunity for progressive employees in a supervisory / managerial position within an international organisation or entrepreneurs, to further develop their career. This programme will enable students to acquire a mastery of the political, economic and cultural aspects of different trade blocs, particularly the European Union, Asia and the North America. Mastery of the international business domain will include the ability to integrate and extend knowledge to contexts outside the developed materials, and to effectively translate theory into practice. It is designed to provide a coherent academic progression for students who will explore the overall environment in which international business takes place before focusing on management issues in international firms.

The programme is aimed at students who are currently in junior to middle management within large corporations with the view that they will develop the necessary skills and knowledge to advance to senior management positions in international companies. Additionally, the programme is open to students who have not yet aggregated extensive practical work experience, but have aspirations to secure senior management positions.

Module Listing
International Business Environment; International Management; Leadership and HRM in the Global Context; Business Research Methods; International Marketing; Electronic Business; Global Policy and Strategy; International Entrepreneurship; Dissertation/Research Project.

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Students chose the Master's programme Science and Business Management at Utrecht University as the best programme in the field in the yearly review 'Beste studies' by Elsevier. Read more

Science and Business Management chosen Best in the Field

Students chose the Master's programme Science and Business Management at Utrecht University as the best programme in the field in the yearly review 'Beste studies' by Elsevier

The Master's programme in Science and Business Management is designed to acquire scientific knowledge and skills, together with the ability to translate a scientific idea into a successful product.

The MSc programme in Science and Business Management seeks to bridge the gap between industry and science. It is designed for BSc graduates who are interested in business. The courses are aimed at helping you to further develop your academic and scientific knowledge and skills, while you also acquire expertise on product and process development. Students will learn to identify and manage problems that arise in each phase of the innovation process.

This two-year taught programme teaches you not only to undertake scientific research, but also to make a translation to the market. In the first year you undertake an applied research project with a participating research group from the Faculty of Science, and theoretical courses determined by your research topic.

In the second year you study fundamentals of business such as financial management, entrepreneurship, managerial ICT matters and environmental issues. You'll engage in an obligatory traineeship with a company or institute combining business with your science background. Graduates of the programme are highly qualified for research and management positions in innovative companies, consultancies, or government organisations.

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This Masters in Cancer Sciences will prepare you for a career in cancer science, whether you aim to pursue a PhD or further medical studies, or seek a career in the health services sector, in the life sciences, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries. Read more
This Masters in Cancer Sciences will prepare you for a career in cancer science, whether you aim to pursue a PhD or further medical studies, or seek a career in the health services sector, in the life sciences, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries. Our programme takes a “bench to bedside” approach, enabling graduates to work within a multidisciplinary environment of world-leading scientists and cancer-specialists to address the latest challenges in cancer research.

Why this programme

-University of Glasgow is rated in the UK top five and best in Scotland for Cancer Studies. You will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of world leading cancer scientists and clinicians within the Cancer Research UK Glasgow Centre.
-This MSc in Cancer Science programme is unique in the UK as it delivers integrated teaching in molecular biology, pathology and clinical service.
-The Cancer Research UK Glasgow Centre brings together scientists and clinicians from research centres, universities and hospitals around Glasgow to deliver the very best in cancer research, drug discovery and patient care. The Centre’s world leading teams have made major advances in the understanding and treatment of many cancers. For more information, please visit: http://www.wecancentre.org/
-In the first semester, each week is focused around one of the new Hallmarks of Cancer, with the focus on the molecular/cellular biology of this hallmark. A tutorial session will enable you to discuss and integrate your learning from the week. This will enable you to understand how research into the fundamental principles of cancer cell biology can translate to advances in cancer treatment.
-The aim of this MSc in Cancer Science is to train cancer researchers who can break down the barriers that currently prevent discoveries at the bench from being translated into treatments at the bedside. By understanding the science, methodology and terminology used by scientists and clinicians from different disciplines, you will learn to communicate effectively in a multidisciplinary environment, critically evaluate a wide range of scientific data and research strategies and learn how to make a significant contribution to cancer research.

Programme structure

Semester 1: Hallmarks of Cancer

This 13 week core course aims to:
 provide you with a critical understanding of the molecular and cellular events that drive cancer development and progression
 demonstrate how an understanding of these events underpins current and future approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment
 integrate the teaching of molecular biology, cell biology, diagnosis and treatment of cancer
 describe how all these disciplines communicate and work together in the fight against cancer
 provide you with theoretical training in fundamental molecular and cell biology techniques used in cancer research
One week of practical training is provided at the start of the course. This course is assessed through a lab notebook, group assessment, critical essay and an exam that focuses on data analysis and interpretation.

Semester 2

In the second semester, you can choose from a range of 3 week optional courses, before taking the core course “Designing a Research Project”.
• Drug Discovery
• Drug Development and Clinical trials
• Viruses and Cancer
• Diagnostic technologies and devices
• Technology transfer and commercialisation of bioscience research
• Current trends and challenges in biomedical research and health
or
• Frontiers in Cancer Sciences – 5 week optional course
• Omic technologies for the biomedical sciences: from genomics to metabolomics - – 5 week optional course
or
• Designing a research project: biomedical research methodology - 6 week optional course

Semester 3

Bioscience Research Project

In this 14 week core course you will:
 have an opportunity to perform a piece of original research to investigate a hypothesis or research questions within the area of cancer research. The project may be “wet” or “dry”, depending what projects are available
 develop practical and/or technical skills, analyse data critically and draw conclusions, and suggest avenues for future research to expand your research findings
Note: students must have a minimum of grade C in semesters 1 and 2 in order to proceed to the research project.

[[Career prospects ]]
The knowledge and transferable skills developed in this programme will be suitable for those contemplating a PhD or further medical studies; those wishing to work in the health services sector; and those interested in working in the life sciences, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries, including contract research organisations (CROs). This programme is designed for students with undergraduate degrees in the life sciences, scientists working in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, and clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

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The taught Masters programme combines the theoretical, technological and practical training necessary to effectively translate between English and Chinese and also offers students training and practice in bi-lateral interpreting between the two languages. Read more
The taught Masters programme combines the theoretical, technological and practical training necessary to effectively translate between English and Chinese and also offers students training and practice in bi-lateral interpreting between the two languages.

You will take modules in English Language, which offer preparation for the Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English or the Cambridge Advanced Certificate of English. Optional modules are also available and allow you acquire or develop your knowledge of a language other than Chinese or English, or you can progress your existing expertise for technical translation purposes. For more information please go to http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/chinese.

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