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Masters Degrees (Transitional Justice)

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Summary. The LLM course based at the Transitional Justice Institute, with staff expertise across a range of areas offers an LLM degree which is designed to give students a unique lens on the study of human rights in the contemporary international moment. Read more

Summary

The LLM course based at the Transitional Justice Institute, with staff expertise across a range of areas offers an LLM degree which is designed to give students a unique lens on the study of human rights in the contemporary international moment. Using the local Northern Ireland political and legal context as a starting point the course will imbue students with a working knowledge of international norms and principles, while at the same time encouraging students to move beyond the local to reflect critically on present international law norms and their application to other situations and contexts. Students are encouraged to develop and transfer knowledge, experience and expertise of the transformative possibilities of human rights law both in respect of societies emerging from violent conflict and in relation to the local and global management of other particular societal problems. This dual focus – from the local to the global and back - is a core part of the course’s aim to equip you with the knowledge and skills base to contribute internationally as well as locally.

About

With the emphasis on human rights and transitional justice, the LLM is a flagship programme of TJI as it is the only LLM programme of its type in the UK. As such it constitutes a dynamic nexus of exchange between teaching, learning and research wherein TJI staff strive to deliver high calibre, research-based legal education. In this way LLM students both benefit from and contribute to the realisation of the Institute’s core aims to:

  • To build a theoretical and practical understanding of the role of 'transitional justice', and the underlying relationship between justice and peace.
  • To examine the role of the international and domestic legal systems and institutions in facilitating transition from conflict.
  • To make links between the experience of Northern Ireland and international experience, so as to benefit both Northern Ireland and other contexts.
  • To inform policy makers involved in peacemaking in local and international institutions.
  • To make visible and critically examine gendered experiences of transition.

Typically, holders of an LLM will be able to:

  • Deal with complex issues in the fields of international human rights law and transitional justice both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements and communicate their conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
  • Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level
  • Continue to advance their knowledge and understanding of international and domestic human rights law and issues relating to transitional justice.

Work placement / study abroad

The Transitional Justice Institute works closely with a range of human rights organisations that regularly offer internship opportunities to our LLM students – including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

Career options

Successful completion of the LLM

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.



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A master’s degree in law is a fantastic way for law graduates to develop a specialisation, or for non-lawyers working in related fields to gain a deeper understanding of legal issues. Read more

A master’s degree in law is a fantastic way for law graduates to develop a specialisation, or for non-lawyers working in related fields to gain a deeper understanding of legal issues.

This pathway connects research in law, social science and contemporary politics to provide you with a solid grounding in international human rights and international humanitarian law. You’ll focus on responses to violations of these legal regimes through transitional justice and international criminal justice. You will learn how these issues are addressed in the context of conflict-affected countries, where human rights and international law violations often arise.

You’ll also have the chance to choose from a wide range of optional modules to supplement this core teaching, and opt to either write a 15,000 word dissertation or conduct a work-based project that will give you valuable experience of dealing with a specific legal issue in detail.

The course is perfect for lawyers and law graduates looking for career development, although all of our LLM courses can be studied by students without a background in law, since you will be trained in the necessary analytical and legal skills.

As such, the programme will also provide ideal training for paralegals, journalists, NGO and charity workers, policy advisors, consultants, lawyers, those working in business and finance or anyone who will benefit from a legal education in their career.



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Summary. The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more

Summary

The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

  • Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
  • Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice;
  • Gain knowledge and skills in carrying out research projects from design to write-up;
  • Enhance skills in critically appraising published and commissioned research;
  • Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
  • Successful completion may also open up a range of further study and research options.

About

The Transitional Justice Institute in Northern Ireland is uniquely placed to deliver an effective and stimulating programme of study in this area. Key highlights of the programme include:

  • Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;
  • Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;
  • Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;
  • Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;
  • Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;
  • Internship opportunities with a range of organizations. In previous years students have secured internships with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;
  • Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.
  • Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;
  • Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Attendance

Attendance is compulsory for successful completion of the LLM. Modules are delivered through weekly half-day classes or fortnightly full-day classes.

Work placement / study abroad

The Transitional Justice Institute works closely with a range of human rights organisations that regularly offer internship opportunities to our LLM students – including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM).

Career options

Successful completion of the LLM

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.



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The Criminology & Criminal Justice MA/LLM is distinct in covering a range of criminal justice and criminological debates. It enables you to engage in more specialised socio-legal studies and offers the opportunity to explore discourse on international human rights, criminal law and transitional justice. Read more

The Criminology & Criminal Justice MA/LLM is distinct in covering a range of criminal justice and criminological debates. It enables you to engage in more specialised socio-legal studies and offers the opportunity to explore discourse on international human rights, criminal law and transitional justice. It opens doors to a wide range of careers.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed. You will be taught by lecturers who are nationally and internationally renowned researchers.

The course of study is the same for the MA and the LLM apart from the final dissertation. Core modules are Crime & Criminal Justice in the 21st Century, Criminological Theory, and Criminological Research in Practice. You’ll also choose three from: International Criminal Law; International Human Right Law; International Terrorism and the Law; Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights; and Transitional Justice, Human Rights and Peace Building. You’ll complete your degree with either a Criminology or Criminal Justice Dissertation (MA), or a Law Dissertation (LLM).

Your postgraduate degree leads to research jobs in the Home Office, Probation Service, and Social Services, and to work with non-profit-making organisations, including the NHS, educational institutions and charities working with young offenders or victims of crime. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate criminological research, which are highly prized by employers in both the public and private sectors. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost if you opt for a career outside of the criminal justice sector.

LLM

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

MA

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claim, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/

Programme Specification

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 117kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/file80043.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Knowledge:
Learning outcomes acquired in the following ways:

1. Students are required to attend all classes (lectures and seminars), study extensively on their own and prepare assessed as well as non-assessed work regularly.
2. Through core course lectures and seminars as well as through assessed work including group discussions.
3. Through teaching in core and optional courses

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. These are fostered in all courses offered in the program where the information students receive needs to be assessed critically and conflicting interpretations arising from the same information discussed.
2. Students are encouraged not simply to summarise evidence and arguments but through application of critical questioning to develop their own assessments of the relative value of a range of arguments/sources of evidence.
3. Through the structure and content of the core course in conflict, rights and justice and other program and optional courses.
4. Students will prepare class presentations on topics selected from the core course and options reading lists.
5. They also carry out individual, independent dissertation work, including refining a broad ‘topic’ into a narrower, manageable and more precise research question/hypothesis.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Subject-based practical skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through independent work for dissertations and preparation for class presentations.
2. Through work on own, departmental dissertation guidance notes and meetings, meetings with supervisor.
3. Through required regular readings for weekly seminar discussions.
4. Through demonstration in lectures, through discussion in seminars, through questions in exams.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation..

Transferable skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through seminar presentations, discussions, group work and essays.
2. Through essays, project and dissertation
3. Through group project work.
4. Through classroom participation in seminars

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Read more

The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Students have the opportunity to exit the programme with either an LLM in Criminal Justice or an LLM in Criminology and Criminal Justice, depending on optional modules undertaken.

The Institute’s particular strengths lie in the following areas: policing; transitional justice; critical criminology; sex offending; young people, crime and justice; community safety; prisoner reintegration; and restorative justice. Staff members have strong links with local criminal justice agencies and community organisations as well as extensive comparative and international expertise, providing for a unique student experience. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime and justice and draws on original staff research. Modules are rooted in relevant theoretical frameworks with a strong criminological focus and provide students with methodological training in addition to supporting the development of critical analysis and other transferable skills. Through the dissertation students can explore a wide variety of criminological and criminal justice topics.

The programme is delivered through a series of taught modules and culminates in the submission of a dissertation on an original topic.

http://www.law.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofLaw/Study/PostgraduateTaught/llm-criminal-justice/

Compulsory modules

Criminal Justice Processes

Theoretical Criminology

Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words

Optional modules

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

Transitional Justice

Crime, Justice and Society

Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights

Methodology mini-modules

Criminology Methods 1

Criminology Methods 2

Approaches to Legal Research



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The MSc Criminal Justice & Social Research Methods offers excellent postgraduate training. You will engage with the ethical issues concerning criminology and criminal justice research and with the policies informing the design of research into crime, deviance and punishment. Read more

The MSc Criminal Justice & Social Research Methods offers excellent postgraduate training. You will engage with the ethical issues concerning criminology and criminal justice research and with the policies informing the design of research into crime, deviance and punishment. It opens doors to research careers in both the public and private sectors.

This degree, which is eligible for ESRC 1+3 funding, guides you through the theory of criminological and criminal justice research and develops your skills in the collection, analysis and reporting of qualitative and quantitative data. The integration of criminal justice and criminological modules gives you a broader overview of current research and allows you to engage in more specialised criminological and socio-legal studies.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed. You will be taught by lecturers who are nationally and internationally renowned researchers.

Your core modules are Research Projects in Practice, Qualitative Methods in the Social Sciences, Quantitative Research Methods, Crime and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century, and Criminological Theory. You will choose one module from: Criminological Research in Practice; International Criminal Law; International Human Rights Law; International Terrorism and the Law; Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights; and Transitional Justice, Human Rights and Peace Building. A research-based Criminal Justice dissertation completes your degree.

Your postgraduate degree prepares you for research jobs in the Home Office, Probation Service, Social Services, and other government departments or voluntary organisations. You will develop the skills to undertake and critically evaluate criminological research, which are highly prized by employers. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies also enhance your employability.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation



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This LLM programme is an exciting and rewarding degree course which attracts a diverse student body. students who are qualified legal practitioners and students with extensive experience in the statutory, community or voluntary sectors nationally and internationally. Read more

This LLM programme is an exciting and rewarding degree course which attracts a diverse student body: students who are qualified legal practitioners and students with extensive experience in the statutory, community or voluntary sectors nationally and internationally. The diversity among both staff and students allows the students and teachers on the course to learn from each other and makes for a vibrant academic experience.

From a human rights’ perspective, the focus will be on international human rights law (including at regional levels in Europe, Africa and the Americas) but there will be concentration as well on the practice of human rights, especially in the contexts of discrimination, armed conflicts, terrorism and migration.

The criminal justice component of the programme allows students to explore the inter-relationships between crime, justice and society in comparative context. Modules assess criminal justice policies and institutions from an interdisciplinary perspective and allow for in-depth analyses of topical issues in criminal justice and criminology at local, national, regional and international levels.

The programme is delivered through a series of taught modules and culminates in the submission of a dissertation on an original topic.

Compulsory modules

International Human Rights

Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words

Plus Choice of

Criminal Justice Processes or

Crime, Justice and Society

Optional modules

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

Equality and Discrimination

Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights

Transitional Justice

Protecting Human Rights in Europe, Africa and the Americas

Theoretical Criminology

Comparative Human Rights

Compulsory Methodology modules

Concepts of Human Rights

Criminal Justice and Criminology Methods 1

Criminal Justice and Criminology Methods 2

Business and Human Rights

Theories and Methods of Human Rights

Approaches to Legal Research



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The LLM/MA Diplomacy and International Law is a flexible and engaging degree that provides a strong introduction to diplomacy, foreign policy and international law. Read more

The LLM/MA Diplomacy and International Law is a flexible and engaging degree that provides a strong introduction to diplomacy, foreign policy and international law. Jointly delivered by our prestigious Law School and the highly ranked and regarded Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion (PPR), it enables you to deepen your understanding of the social, legal, economic and political issues playing out on the world’s stage.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice. These influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching and you will have access to the much sought-after expertise of academics working at the forefront of research into politics, international relations, legal and socio-legal issues.

The pathway for the LLM/MA ensures a duality in the nature of your studies. Core and elective modules from the Law School and PPR and a 20,000 word dissertation enable you to pursue your own interests whilst becoming practiced at looking at issues from different perspectives.

Your core modules are: Theory and Concepts in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy; International Law; Issues and Practice in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy; and a Dissertation. You will choose further elective modules from Law and Politics - the breadth of choice allows you to tailor your interests and develop particular specialisms. Elective modules include (amongst many others): Law and Global Health; International Criminal Law; International Human Rights Law; European Union Law; Conflict Management and Contemporary Conflicts; Theorising Security and War; Transitional Justice, Human Rights and Peace Building; and Major Approaches to the Study of International Relations.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal or political question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant material and research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

The supervising department for your dissertation, and the balance of modules studied, dictate which award you will receive: LLM or MA.

Our teaching approach draws upon leading scholars and distinguished practitioners with experience in the field.

Your postgraduate LLM/MA degree opens doors to a huge range of careers and provides high-level training for those pursuing careers in areas such as foreign and international affairs, national and international non-governmental organisations, journalism and international business.

You will develop: the skills required to critically evaluate cutting-edge research; inter-disciplinary skills; and, analytical and communications skills. All of which are a real boost in any sector and highly prized by employers.

The LLM/MA is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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Course Overview. This course offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is both academically rigorous but will also provide you with skills to help you pursue a career in the growing fields of justice, financial crime and cybercrime. . Read more

Course Overview

This course offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is both academically rigorous but will also provide you with skills to help you pursue a career in the growing fields of justice, financial crime and cybercrime. 

It encompasses both the transferable skills of a postgraduate degree with the specialist knowledge in the field of global crime.

The MA International Criminal Justice caters for those who wish to graduate with a specialist MA in a growing sector. 

N.B Students will be able to choose whether they wish to graduate with an LLM or an MA in consultation with the Course Leader. Generally, students with a background in Law will graduate with an LLM and those with a background in Criminology will graduate with an MA.

Why choose this course?

As well as providing you with subject specific knowledge and understanding, we aim to produce graduates with strong transferable skills in:

  • research
  • communication
  • analysis
  • creative problem solving

This ensures you are well-placed to seek employment with in relevant sectors.

You will benefit from teaching delivered by highly qualified and supportive staff with backgrounds in both Criminology research and practice. 

Learning and teaching methods in the School are innovative and varied, and you'll benefit from the use of the latest learning technology to enhance interactive learning.

Modules

Semester 1:

  • Criminological Theory
  • Research Methods
  • International and European Criminal Law.

Semester 2:

  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Dissertation
  • Transitional Justice/

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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What does this master’s programme entail?. In this advanced master’s programme, you will gain a thorough understanding of the legislation that governs international relations in an increasingly complex global society. Read more

What does this master’s programme entail?

In this advanced master’s programme, you will gain a thorough understanding of the legislation that governs international relations in an increasingly complex global society. You will learn in-depth about a wide range of aspects that affect our world, in addition to getting the opportunity to specialise your area of study. Through focused seminars and workshops, you will be challenged to develop your own views on the role and functioning of public international law.

For this programme, you will choose one of the following specialisations:

To view the full programme outline, please choose the link to one of the specialisations.

Professional skills

During the programme, you will develop the skills to:

  • thoroughly analyse and interpret legal sources, literature and cases
  • research and formulate an independent opinion on international legal questions
  • clearly present your findings both orally and in writing to legal specialists as well as non-lawyers
  • actively participate in academic debate
  • apply this advanced academic knowledge of public international law in a professional context

Is Public International Law the right programme for you?

The Public International Law programme is a good fit for you if you have a sincere interest in the field and:

  • you are a qualified lawyer who would like to enhance your career prospects
  • you are an excellent student who has completed your legal studies in your home country with sufficient knowledge of Public International Law or
  • you have professional experience in the field

The programme caters to those who are working in or would like to pursue a career in international organisations, governmental institutions, international non-governmental organisations or in academia. You can follow the programme full-time for one year or part-time for two years.

Courses

Core courses

Specialisation courses: International Criminal Law 

Specialisation courses: Peace, Justice and Development 

Please select one of the specialisations to view the full prospectus and a more detailed programme description.

Specialisations



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The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond. Read more

The Master of Criminology programme is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime, public response to crime and, specifically, criminal justice in Europe and beyond.

What is the Master of Criminology all about?

The programme is characterised by a strong link between education and research, an explicitly international orientation, and a comparative approach, with special attention to the cross-border character of criminality. 

General subjects include criminological theories and models of law enforcement, psychology, law and criminal justice, youth criminology and juvenile justice, and research methods. The programme also offers cutting-edge courses on international police and judicial cooperation, political crimes and transitional justice, restorative justice, terrorism, and organised and corporate crime – research fields in which our Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) professors are internationally renowned experts.

LINC is the most recent institutional incarnation (2007) of the criminological tradition in Leuven, which began with the establishment of the School for Criminology in 1929. Excellence in criminology continues today, combining solid research with a deep commitment to society structured within ten research lines. LINC is composed of 11 professors and more than 70 assistants and fellows involved in criminological research and education. 

Is this the right programme for me?

 Prospective students should possess:

  • a critical-reflective attitude towards law (as a normative behavioural regulating framework), community and crime;
  • genuine interest in (inter)personal and social interactions;
  • theoretical knowledge of applied psychology, sociology and anthropology within the field of crime and the treatment of crime;
  • extensive knowledge of basic research methodology
  • familiarity with specific criminological sources as well as legal, psychological and sociological sources
  • the ability to formulate research questions from existing literature
  • basic knowledge concerning (quantitative and qualitative) data collection
  • the ability to independently carry out analysis and report results
  • basic skills of oral and written reporting, especially in a criminology context;
  • an ability to apply criminological theory in practice (for instance, in an internship, case study, etc.);
  • basic knowledge of English, that is, the ability to read and understand English texts and comprehend seminars and lectures taught in English

Objectives

Goals

  • the criminological program provides an appealing specialized, European and internationally oriented and research-based study of crime and the way of dealing with it as well as the study of the processes of (de)criminalization
  • to optimize methodological skills and attitudes in order to make autonomous constructive and high standing contributions to the field as well as further research possible
  • an international and comparative approach has been highlighted in the Master program, bearing in mind however the characteristic Belgian situation

Final terms

Knowledge: The graduates need 1) to obtain specialized and more in-depth theoretical insights into the criminology; 2) to know facts concerning the developments and (the possible solutions for) problems in policy and practice of institutions that are involved in dealing with criminality. 3) to have specialized knowledge of recent developments in the field of methodology that allows to examine the problems from a point of legal and empirical-criminological view.

Skills: The graduates must be able to make an autonomous contribution in the development in the search to solutions for complex social and individual questions on the field of crime and the treatment of crime. More specifically: to be able to formulate relevant challenges for further criminological research; to observe, detect and analyze the large variables and indicators; to collect information independently; to comment and report in a methodically founded statement; can possibly function in (multidisciplinary) surroundings with eye for its own input and the guarantee of its quality.

Attitude: the graduates need to develop a discerning mind and recognize the importance of theoretical, methodological and moral reflection, both to guarantee the quality of policymaking as the quality of the own vocational practice. From an ethical notion the students develop further sensitivity for the tensions which occur at the treatment of crime and (in)security, at the individual, institutional and social level on the one hand and between these levels on the other hand.

Career perspectives

The programme is intended to prepare students for research and professional employment in national and international policy and operational agencies in the fields of criminal justice and victim assistance.

Graduates find employment in the domains of:

  • safety, police, justice
  • youth care
  • execution of sentences and penal measures
  • forensic mental healthcare
  • private security and safety
  • the civil service
  • the non-profit sectors at the national, European and international level


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Why study at Roehampton. Explore current criminological issues and debates from around the world and examine their impact at global, regional and local levels. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Explore current criminological issues and debates from around the world and examine their impact at global, regional and local levels.
  • Become part of our international research-led community of scholars and students who will challenge and develop your thinking about key global issues in crime and justice. 
  • Collaborate with our team of criminologists who will help develop your critical thinking skills, research techniques, and capacity to communicate complex intellectual ideas.

Course summary

Open your mind to a global perspective on crime and justice and the impact it has on society today.

University of Roehampton's MA Global Criminology will help you gain the skills required to explore and develop your own research. The course content draws on a diverse range of Social Science disciplines such as criminology, law and socio-legal studies, psychology, sociology and human rights. 

Our programme comprises three core modules and three optional modules. The core modules include: Introduction to Global Criminology, which introduces you to key criminological theories and their application to global problems of crime and justice; Researching Global Criminology, an advanced research methods module that teaches you the core skills required in conducting criminological fieldwork; and Dissertation (MA only), where you will lead your own empirical research project with the support of an expert supervisor. Optional modules offer a range of specialisms drawn from our experts’ research fields.

Content

This dynamic and outward-looking syllabus encourages fresh thinking in the study of global crime and justice. Our range of exciting new option modules will enable you to specialise in key criminological topics such as global policing, genocide, gender and violence, and media and popular culture. 

You will gain a strong foundation of knowledge and be introduced to criminology within its historical and cultural context. You will also examine a range of contemporary global issues such as drug trafficking, violence against women and girls, mass incarceration, policing, organised crime, urban crime, political resistance and transitional justice.

The programme also offers a step-by-step theoretical and practical grounding in criminological research. You will gain key skills for your own research process, including research design, data collection, and data analysis. You will have the opportunity to specialise in a research project in which includes independently designing and analysing the project with the support of a supervisor.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules on this programme some of which are compulsory and others optional:

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Global Criminology
  • Researching Global Criminology
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

  • Gender, Hate and Violence
  • Crime, Media and Popular Culture
  • Global Policing
  • Understanding Genocide
  • International Human Rights and Criminal Law
  • Global Drug Issues

Career options

You will be equipped with the knowledge, competencies and skills to prepare you for further study at PhD level or for careers both within and outside of the criminal justice sector.

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Course overview. The MA in Criminology offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is academically rigorous and gives you the skills to pursue a career in the growing fields of justice and security. . Read more

Course overview

The MA in Criminology offers you the opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in a field which is academically rigorous and gives you the skills to pursue a career in the growing fields of justice and security. 

Global security, organised crime, terrorism and online security are emerging as the key issues in the 21st century justice system and the University of West London is one of very few universities in the UK to offer a specialised suite of courses in this area. 

Why choose this course?

This course is for you if you want to graduate with a general MA in Criminology and you would like a more flexible choice of modules than those offered on our three specialist pathways.

The course includes the following core modules to give you an excellent grounding in criminological issues at Masters level:

  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation
  • Theories of Criminal Behaviour
  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice

A choice of optional modules is also available (see 'course details' for more information).

As well as providing students with subject specific knowledge and understanding, we aim to produce graduates with strong transferable skills in:

  • research
  • communication
  • analysis
  • creative problem solving

This ensures you are well-placed to seek employment with in relevant sectors.

Modules

Semester 1:

  • Criminological Theory (core)
  • Research Methods (core)
  • One option from the following: Cybercrime and Internet Policing, International and European Criminal Law, Transnational Organised Crime

Semester 2:

  • Contemporary Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice (core)
  • Dissertation (core) 
  • One option from the following: Financial Crime, Transitional Justice, Counter-terrorism

Career and Study Progression

This course will particularly suit students who are interested in careers in the following areas:

  • Policing and police research
  • National Offender Management Service
  • Crown Prosecution Service
  • Home Office
  • Intelligence Services
  • Policy development
  • Digital / global security
  • Further study on an MPhil / PhD programme

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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