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Masters Degrees (Transitional Justice)

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The LLM course based at the Transitional Justice Institute, with staff expertise across a range of areas offers an LLM degree which is designed to give students a unique lens on the study of human rights in the contemporary international moment. Read more
The LLM course based at the Transitional Justice Institute, with staff expertise across a range of areas offers an LLM degree which is designed to give students a unique lens on the study of human rights in the contemporary international moment. Using the local Northern Ireland political and legal context as a starting point the course will imbue students with a working knowledge of international norms and principles, while at the same time encouraging students to move beyond the local to reflect critically on present international law norms and their application to other situations and contexts. Students are encouraged to develop and transfer knowledge, experience and expertise of the transformative possibilities of human rights law both in respect of societies emerging from violent conflict and in relation to the local and global management of other particular societal problems. This dual focus – from the local to the global and back - is a core part of the course’s aim to equip you with the knowledge and skills base to contribute internationally as well as locally.

Key benefits

- Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on transitional justice - the only LLM programme of its type in the UK;

- The opportunity to gain unique insights into the legal protection of rights in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;

- Opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/human-rights-law-and-transitional-justice-9081

Course detail

- Course aims -

Typically, holders of an LLM will be able to:

- Deal with complex issues in the fields of international human rights law and transitional justice both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements and communicate their conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences

- Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level

- Continue to advance their knowledge and understanding of international and domestic human rights law and issues relating to transitional justice.

- Work placement / study abroad -

The LLM offers a range of internships with local human rights organisations.

Career options

Previous graduates have gone on to positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field. Read more
The LLM Gender, Conflict and Human Rights draws on the established research excellence of the Transitional Justice Institute to deliver a world-leading masters programme in the field.

Key benefits

• Opportunity to undertake an LLM programme with a specific focus on gender and transitional justice – the only LLM programme of its type in the UK or Ireland;

• Teaching is delivered by active researchers in the TJI, many of whom have received international recognition for their work;

• Gain unique insights into the differential legal protection of human rights of women and men in transitional contexts, while studying in a society currently in a process of transition;

• Take advantage of the opportunities to specialise in identified areas e.g. human rights, transitional justice, peace and conflict research in divided societies;

• Enhance the skills you need for working with gender and human rights in a range of sectors;

• Internship opportunities with a range of organizations including the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, Disability Action (Centre on Human Rights), Human Rights Consortium, Law Centre (NI) and Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities (NICEM), all based in Belfast;

• Extensive events programme (TJI Seminar Series, International Conferences) and distinguished Visiting Scholars programme.

• Excellent library facilities on campus. Students also have sole access to a dedicated LLM computer suite;

• Fully equipped LLM teaching rooms with integrated audio visual and video conferencing facilities.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/gender-conflict-and-human-rights-9079

Course detail

- Description -

This programme has been developed to enable students to:

• Gain a systematic understanding, in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the differential experiences of women and men of human rights norms and institutions, especially in conflict and post-conflict situations;
• Understand foundational concepts in gender theory and their application to human rights, international law and transitional justice
• Develop skills highly relevant to legal practice, and to gender policy, research and advocacy roles in the voluntary, public and private sectors in the UK, Ireland and beyond;
• Successful completion may also open up further study and research options.

- Work placement / study abroad -

The LLM offers a range of internships with local human rights organisations.

Career options

Previous graduates have gone onto positions in the local human rights sector and public sector in Northern Ireland, to legal practice in areas related to the LLM and to PhD research. Further, previous graduates have secured work in the United Nations and in international non-governmental organisations.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claim, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/

Programme Specification

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 117kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/file80043.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Knowledge:
Learning outcomes acquired in the following ways:

1. Students are required to attend all classes (lectures and seminars), study extensively on their own and prepare assessed as well as non-assessed work regularly.
2. Through core course lectures and seminars as well as through assessed work including group discussions.
3. Through teaching in core and optional courses

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. These are fostered in all courses offered in the program where the information students receive needs to be assessed critically and conflicting interpretations arising from the same information discussed.
2. Students are encouraged not simply to summarise evidence and arguments but through application of critical questioning to develop their own assessments of the relative value of a range of arguments/sources of evidence.
3. Through the structure and content of the core course in conflict, rights and justice and other program and optional courses.
4. Students will prepare class presentations on topics selected from the core course and options reading lists.
5. They also carry out individual, independent dissertation work, including refining a broad ‘topic’ into a narrower, manageable and more precise research question/hypothesis.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Subject-based practical skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through independent work for dissertations and preparation for class presentations.
2. Through work on own, departmental dissertation guidance notes and meetings, meetings with supervisor.
3. Through required regular readings for weekly seminar discussions.
4. Through demonstration in lectures, through discussion in seminars, through questions in exams.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation..

Transferable skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through seminar presentations, discussions, group work and essays.
2. Through essays, project and dissertation
3. Through group project work.
4. Through classroom participation in seminars

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Entry requirements. Candidates should normally have a first or good second class honours degree in law OR an equivalent degree where law is a substantial element OR an equivalent degree in an appropriate discipline. Read more
Entry requirements:
Candidates should normally have a first or good second class honours degree in law OR an equivalent degree where law is a substantial element OR an equivalent degree in an appropriate discipline. Relevant professional experience post-graduation is given due credit in considering entry requirements.,

Course aims:
This stream is intended for those who are interested in working in institutions related to public international law or those who would like to gain specific knowledge of this area for governmental and non-governmental opportunities. With an additional five new modules, a more cohesive structure is offered as an introductory base for students who may not have a background in International Law especially if they do not possess a law degree.

Course structure:
You will take three 15 credit compulsory modules, two in semester one and one in semester two, which cover fundamental international law issues.

Writing Skills
General Principles in International Law
Current Trends in International Law
You must then select45 credits of modules from the list below and 30 credits of modules from the LLM General Programme. You will also be required to complete a 60 credit dissertation on a topic within the area of public international law.

Contemporary Legal Problems of World Trade
Current Trends in International Law
Diplomatic Law
Feminist Perspectives on International Law
General Principles of International Law
Genocide and the Law
Global Protection of Human Rights: Core Principles
Global Protection of Human Rights: Implementation Methods
International Boundary Disputes
International Courts and Tribunals
International Environmental Law
International Law and Development
Law and Organisation of the World Trading System
The European Convention on Human Rights: Convention Rights
The European Convention on Human Rights: Institutions, Procedures and Fundamental Rights
The Law of Armed Conflict
Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law
Teaching and assessment methods
The modules are taught by seminars which are designed to allow students to discuss and debate the subject, with guidance from the tutor. All modules are assessed by written coursework, although other forms of assessment may be used as well. Students also complete a dissertation over the summer months. This can be normally in the stream of their choice but is subject to the staffing resources being available. Students registered for the LLM in International Commercial Law have priority within that stream.

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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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The Department of Politics and International Studies offers seven linked masters programmes in politics and the international politics of Asia and Africa. Read more
The Department of Politics and International Studies offers seven linked masters programmes in politics and the international politics of Asia and Africa. The MSc African Politics is a regional specialist MSc, aiming to provide students with a detailed specialist understanding of both domestic and international politics (and of the implications of one for the other) in Africa. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write substantial papers that often require significant independent work.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscafpol/

Programme Specification

MSc African Politics Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 95kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscafpol/file80038.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Department of Politics and International Studies

The Department’s academic staff are leading and highly-regarded scholars in their fields and most have knowledge of one or more languages of their regions of interest, in addition to their disciplinary specialism.

Staff members conduct cutting-edge research on the politics of the Global South, with expertise in nationalism, urban politics, political violence, security, migration and diaspora mobilization, Islamic political and intellectual history, transitional justice, politics of multiculturalism, international relations theory, gender, comparative political economy, human rights, and the study of ideologies.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. Read more
Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. These issues include the rise of China and India, economic dynamism of the Asian-Pacific area, regional integration (ASEAN, SAARC, Shanghai Cooperation Organization), security hotspots (Korean Peninsula, Taiwan Straits, India-Pakistan, the ‘global war on terror’), democratic transition and consolidation, the survival of non-democratic regimes, and identity conflicts of ethnicity, religion and language. To understand these and other political processes, this MSc programme draws upon the concepts and methods of the sub-disciplines of comparative politics (political sociology and political economy) and international relations. The evidence from Asia will also reveal the relevance and limitations of the concepts and methods derived from North American/European settings and suggest ways in which they may be modified. The expertise available in the Department enables students to concentrate on one of the sub-regions of Asia, (East Asia. South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia) should they choose to do so. Alternatively, they may follow a more comparative approach by selecting a mixture of units covering different sub-regions.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscaspol/

Programme Specification

MSc Asian Politics Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 191kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscaspol/file80041.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Department of Politics and International Studies

The Department’s academic staff are leading and highly-regarded scholars in their fields and most have knowledge of one or more languages of their regions of interest, in addition to their disciplinary specialism.

Staff members conduct cutting-edge research on the politics of the Global South, with expertise in nationalism, urban politics, political violence, security, migration and diaspora mobilization, Islamic political and intellectual history, transitional justice, politics of multiculturalism, international relations theory, gender, comparative political economy, human rights, and the study of ideologies.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. Read more

Why this course?

This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels.

The programme is intended to provide invaluable training and insights for those who have either a professional or academic interest in an evolving human rights culture.

There are three potential exit points from the course, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters. Assuming satisfactory performance, it's possible to change between these exit points. For example, a student who initially registers for the certificate may opt to continue studying to the Diploma or Masters qualification. Likewise, a student originally registered for the Masters can transfer to the certificate or Diploma.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/humanrightslaw/

You’ll study

The Human Rights Law programme may be completed over two years (part-time), or over one year (full-time).

The LLM is awarded on successful completion of six modules and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

Successful completion of six modules will qualify you for the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip). A Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is awarded on completion of three modules.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is written over the summer and submitted on the last day of the academic year.

- Field dissertation
A recent innovative feature of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis and typically lasts for up to 12 weeks. It's delivered through our partnership with Challenges Worldwide, an organisation with extensive international experience in volunteer work placements.
Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law relevant to, or actually form the subject of your dissertation.
LLM students on the programme have travelled to countries such as India, Guatemala and Uganda to undertake projects in areas including right to water, law reform, developing sexual harassment policy and freedom of assembly.
The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Student competition

There is an annual LLM Human Rights Dissertation Prize sponsored by Taylor and Kelly (a leading human rights law firm in Scotland).

International students

If English is not your first language you’ll be required to provide evidence of your English language proficiency before you can begin the course.
The LLM in Human Rights entry requirements are IELTS 6.5 (with no category below 6).

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

This course is taught mainly through face-to-face teaching. Each class is delivered through two-hour weekly seminars, which students are required to attend.
Full-time students are required to take three modules per semester, with part-time students taking three modules over two semesters. The face-to-face seminars will normally be held in the evening from 6pm to 8pm. A few classes may be held during the day.
The teaching and extra-curriculum activities on the LLM are supported by the Law School’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

In addition to regular Law School staff, external staff teach on the programme including:
- Alan Miller, the current Chair of the Scottish Human Rights Commission
-Tony Kelly, a prolific human rights lawyer

Both are visiting professors in the Law School. Our faculty also includes experts in human rights and transitional justice, immigration law, equality, employment and labour law.

Assessment

Classes will be assessed by a mixture of written exams, presentations and course work comprising research essays typically of 3,500-4000 words. There will be two-hour weekly seminars for each class. Although coordinated by a tutor these will be student-led and interactive.

Careers

Our graduates can, and have progressed to research studies like MPhil and PhD in Human Rights Law leading to an academic career.
Students may also go on to work with international non-governmental organisations in the area of human rights advocacy, practice and promotion like Amnesty International.
Qualification from the course is also relevant to careers in international human rights organisations, like UN agencies for example.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Entry requirements. Candidates should normally have a first- or good second-class honours degree in law or an equivalent degree where law is a substantial element OR an equivalent degree in an appropriate discipline. Read more
Entry requirements:
Candidates should normally have a first- or good second-class honours degree in law or an equivalent degree where law is a substantial element OR an equivalent degree in an appropriate discipline. Relevant professional experience post-graduation is given due credit in considering entry requirements.

Course aims:
This stream is intended to give the widest possible choice from our range of modules and permit you to make up your own portfolio of topics to suit your own needs or interests. It is possible to combine one or more modules on commercial matters, human rights, European integration, public international law and legal research to meet specialist interests or the needs of niche career plans. This might be of particular help to someone planning a career in non-specialist legal practice or in widely based legal policy oriented organisations whether commercial, NGO or government based.

Course structure:
Leicester LLM students are required to complete taught modules totalling 120 credits and a dissertation weighted as 60 credits. As most of the modules on the LLM programme are 15 credits, this normally means studying four modules in both semesters (a small number of modules are 30 credits).

For the Leicester LLM there is a 15 credit compulsory module in semester 1.

LLM Modules
While every effort is made to offer the modules listed below, the availability of a particular module cannot be guaranteed. These can normally be in the stream of your choice, although this is subject to staff capacity, with students studying for the LLM in International Commercial Law having priority over places within their stream. Please see the School's web pages for more details:

Compulsory 15-credit module:
Academic Writing for Postgraduates in Law
Optional Modules:
Civil Dispute Resolution Methods
Commercial Conflict of Laws: Issues of Jurisdiction*
Commercial Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law Issues*
Comparative Law
Consumer Protection in the European Union (DL)
Contemporary Legal Problems of World Trade
Contracts for the Carriage of Goods by Sea*
Critical Perspectives in Law
Current Issues of Law in International Business*
Current Trends in International Law
Diplomatic Law
Environmental Protection in the European Union (DL)
European Social Security Law (DL)
Feminist Perspectives on International Law
Financial Services Crime*
Financing International Sales Transactions*
Freedom of Expression
General Principles of International Law
Genocide and the Law
Global Protection of Human Rights: Implementation Methods
Global Protection of Human Rights: Core Principles
Human Rights and Health Care Law
International Banking Law*
International Boundary Disputes
International Commercial Arbitration Moot I & II*
International Corporate Insolvency*
International Courts and Tribunals
International Environmental Law
International Investment Law*
International Law and Development
International Regulation of Companies
International Sales Transactions*
Issues and Procedures in European Union Competition Law
Law and Organisation of the World Trading System
Legal Argumentation and Method
Principles of European Union Competition Law
Regulation of Financial Markets
Regulation of Intellectual Property Rights in the European Union (DL)*
Socio-Legal Research
The European Convention on Human Rights: Convention Rights
The European Convention on Human Rights: Institutions, Procedures and Fundamental Rights
The Law of Armed Conflict
The State, the Law and Religious Freedoms
Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law
Theories of Rights
Key
DL = Distance Learning (Leicester LLM students may take a maximum of 60 credits of distance learning modules).

* = module available only to students with a degree in law (or in which law is a substantial element) or an appropriate legal professional qualification.

Teaching and assessment methods:
The modules are taught by seminars which are designed to allow students to discuss and debate the subject, with guidance from the tutor. Most modules are assessed by written coursework, although other forms of assessment may be used as well. Students also complete a dissertation over the summer months. This can be normally in the stream of their choice but is subject to the staffing resources being available. Students registered for the LLM in International Commercial Law have priority within that stream.

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The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Read more
The Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice aims to provide a stimulating and relevant postgraduate degree programme taught by internationally recognized scholars and researchers. Students have the opportunity to exit the programme with either an LLM in Criminal Justice or an LLM in Criminology and Criminal Justice, depending on optional modules undertaken.

The Institute’s particular strengths lie in the following areas: policing; transitional justice; critical criminology; sex offending; young people, crime and justice; community safety; prisoner reintegration; and restorative justice. Staff members have strong links with local criminal justice agencies and community organisations as well as extensive comparative and international expertise, providing for a unique student experience. The programme takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime and justice and draws on original staff research. Modules are rooted in relevant theoretical frameworks with a strong criminological focus and provide students with methodological training in addition to supporting the development of critical analysis and other transferable skills. Through the dissertation students can explore a wide variety of criminological and criminal justice topics.

The programme is delivered through a series of taught modules and culminates in the submission of a dissertation on an original topic.

Compulsory modules

Criminal Justice Processes
Crime, Justice and Society
Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words

Optional modules

Theoretical Criminology
Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
Justice in Transition

Methodology mini-modules

Criminology Methods 1
Criminology Methods 2
Concepts, Issues and Methods in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Approaches to Legal Research

Note:
Students who take the module Theoretical Criminology may exit the programme with the award of

LLM in Criminology and Criminal Justice



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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.

ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva.

Programme Objectives

- Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs

- Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South

- Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges

- Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations.

We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/

Duration: MA: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). PGDip: One academic year (full time). Two academic years (part time).

Structure

Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation

1. One unit (or two half units) from A
2. One unit (or two half units) from A or B
3. One unit (or two half units) from A, B or C
4. Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes

Postgraduate Diploma candidates take modules as the MA, excluding the dissertation.

A). International Studies and Diplomacy Modules
General Diplomatic Studies and Practice
International Politics of Transitional Justice
International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics
International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics
International Law 1; Foundation
International Economics
International Security
Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game"
History and Future of the United Nations
Global Advocacy

B). Additional modules available within CISD
Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific
Global Energy and Climate Policy
Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising world – Economic and Legal Perspectives

C). Electives
Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling, and the approval of the convenor of that course.

Suggested electives for International Studies and Diplomacy students
Full Unit modules (1.0):
China and International Politics
Chinese Commercial Law
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Economic Development of South East Asia
Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region
Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China
Government and Politics in Africa
Government and Politics of Modern South Asia
Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia
International Politics of East Asia
Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights
State and Society in the Chinese Political Process
Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations
Theory, Policy and Practice of Development

Half-Unit modules (0.5):
Economic Development of Modern Taiwan
International Political Communication
Japanese Modernity I
Japanese Modernity II
Power in World Politics
The Making of the Contemporary World
The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use
Topics in the Chinese Economy

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 234kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/file80889.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time (MA only), with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full-time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the modules for International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) accessible to part-time students. Where possible the majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00; however, lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some modules (between evening and daytime slots) so that part-time students will have access to as many modules as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each ISD module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:
- Wide range of modules: Diplomatic Studies and Practice, International Relations, International Economics, International Law, and International Security
- Wide choice of electives: Global Energy and Climate Policy, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages)
- Interaction with diplomats, policy makers, NGO officials and other international practitioners.
- Training in negotiation, policy analysis, policy advocacy, communication and media and other skills through practical exercises including strategy, communication and media workshops, moots courts, and negotiation and mediation workshops.

Further activities:
Included in the degree programme:

- Week long study trip to United Nations organisations in Geneva
- Media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners, and policy conferences (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
- Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/pg/research)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc examines the theoretical and empirical issues raised by globalisation and its effects on Latin American economic development. Read more
This MSc examines the theoretical and empirical issues raised by globalisation and its effects on Latin American economic development. The programme highlights the importance of Latin American countries as dynamic emerging markets and explains the ways in which Latin American economic development is bound up with social and political processes.

Degree information

Students will gain a broad understanding of different theories of globalisation, key academic debates on economic growth and development, and current policy challenges to sustained and equitable economic growth in Latin America. Our programme prepares students for independent research, rigorous analysis of primary and secondary sources, and advanced level writing; and to foster students’ intellectual development and independent learning abilities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits).

Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core modules
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
-Globalisation and Latin American Development: Latin America in the 21st Century

Optional modules - students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Democratization in Latin America
-Latin American Political Economy
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-From Silver to Cocaine: The History of Commodities in Latin America
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a research topic of their choice related to globalisation and economic development in Latin America.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, independent reading and research, seminar discussions and research skills training. Assessment is through essays, term papers, presentations, analytical exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.
There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Some graduates from the MSc have gone on to PhD studies, while others have put their research skills to good use working in the policy sector. In terms of commercial opportunities, the alternative energy sector has provided employment for our graduates in recent years. Journalism is also a popular career path and the MSc has been used as a stepping stone into positions with global news agencies, broadcasting corporations and media groups. Many students find employment with NGOs and charitable organisations - working to improve the prospects of marginalised social groups in the region.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Partnership Officer, Imperial College London
-Economist Editor, The Economist
-Research and Policy Analyst, UK Collaborative on Development Sciences (UKCDS)
-Analysis Intern, AKE

Employability
Globalisation and Latin American Development MSc graduates will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. Numerous programme graduates have found employment in industry, state agencies and the third sector via these routes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of the Americas has the largest programme of teaching, research and events on the Americas in the UK, covering Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada and the United States.

In addition to tuition by world-leading scholars, students benefit from access to a wide range of events, seminars, and conferences on the Americas delivered by scholars, policy makers, diplomats, activists and other experts on the region.

The institute provides a unique environment in which to study the Americas and excellent networking opportunities are available through our strong links with academic, cultural, diplomatic, policy and business institutions with interests in the region.

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The Latin American Politics MSc provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. Read more
The Latin American Politics MSc provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the political histories of major Latin American countries, key public policy issues, the challenges of democratisation and democratic consolidation, and the domestic and international influences on political developments in the region. They will gain the key research and analysis skills necessary for professional development in the field of Latin American politics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (15 credits each), four optional modules (60 credits in total), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All option modules are subject to availability

Core modules
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
-Democratisation in Latin America

Optional modules - students choose four option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
-Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice (linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules), provided that as it contains a substantial politics focus.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. Assessment is through essays, group and individual presentations, analytical exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects. There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Risk Consultancy Intern, Control Risks
-Conference Producer, Euromoney Institutional Investor
-Project Manager, World Energy Council (WEC)

Employability
Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (the Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position in the academic study of the region in promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and it provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the social sciences and the humanities.

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This MA provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs. Read more
This MA provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme’s graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

Degree information

Depending on their chosen areas of specialisation, students will develop analytical and critical perspectives in multidisciplinary aspects of Latin American anthropology, cultural studies, literature, economics, geography and environmental issues, as well as history, politics and international relations. They will gain key research skills, together with in-depth knowledge of current debates in the field of Latin American Studies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core module
-Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules - students choose five option modules from a selection that includes the following:
-Confronting the Colossus: US Anti-imperialism, 1945-present
-Democratization in Latin America
-Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
-Social and Economic Development of Contemporary Brazil
-The International Politics of Latin America
-Latin American Economies: Beyond Neoliberalism
-State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
-The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
-Money and Politics in Latin America
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
-Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
-The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
-Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
-Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report
All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. Assessment is through essays, group and individual presentations, analytical exercises, and the dissertation.

Fieldwork
Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects. There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The Institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Global Events Director, FC Business Intelligence
-Administrative Assistant, NHS (National Health Service)
-Production Manager, Red Bee Media
-International Observer, Declined to say

Employability
Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through meeting those interested professionals who participate in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a core position in the academic study of the region in promoting, coordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

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