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Masters Degrees (Transdisciplinary Design)

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An innovative approach to postgraduate study, which pioneers collaborative practice between all the design disciplines and with graduates from business and technology who want to direct themselves towards a career in the creative industries. Read more
An innovative approach to postgraduate study, which pioneers collaborative practice between all the design disciplines and with graduates from business and technology who want to direct themselves towards a career in the creative industries.

Students working within their own area of expertise will contribute to an interdisciplinary team, working in the specific subject area of public realm.

The course is a direct response to the Cox Review, a report commissioned by the government that stated, for the UK to continue to prosper, it must place creativity, design and innovation at the top of it’s agenda in order to give industry the necessary competitive edge.

The course work featured demonstrates how being part of a supportive creative community of graduates from different design disciplines gives students the opportunity to experiment, to explore new creative territories and to produce practical ideas that in many cases have been commissioned and implemented by Preston City Council.

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This innovative programme is a collaboration between the schools of Architecture and Engineering. Leading UK industry is relying on Virtual Engineering to drive competitiveness in an increasingly tough global market. Read more
This innovative programme is a collaboration between the schools of Architecture and Engineering. Leading UK industry is relying on Virtual Engineering to drive competitiveness in an increasingly tough global market. The dramatic change in practices within organisations to be digitally driven in the future requires a wider approach to design and fresh business models. To capitalise on this, it is critical for future and existing Designers and Managers to have the skills this programme provides.

This programme brings together the best of design teaching from different professions; from Industrial and Product Design, Architecture, alongside facilities at the technological forefront of digital design including Virtual Engineering, Virtual Reality and Rapid Prototyping.

It links the knowledge and experience held by industry partners with the University’s research strengths.

This unique programme pioneers a collaborative transdisciplinary approach between Architecture and Industrial Design disciplines sharing a design ethos and methodology; exploring the similarities and differences in a collaborative studio environment.

With a history of new product development initiatives dating back to the 1990s, and drawing on its substantial developments in Virtual Engineering, the School is well placed to harness knowledge, expertise and networks that have been developed within the University over recent years.

This programme draws on the knowledge, expertise and networks that have been developed within the University as part of the Virtual Engineering Centre (VEC).

The VEC is a University of Liverpool, School of Engineering led centre of expertise in best practice for demonstration, innovation and integration of virtual design and engineering technologies across High Value Manufacturing sectors.

The VEC comprises a multi-disciplinary team of engineers, computer scientists and industry experts, underpinned by extensive access to a wide range of academic expertise from across a wide range of disciplines. The VEC delivers technology development and the latest research, training and knowledge transfer around the application and adoption of advanced modelling, simulation and 3D immersive visualisation in support of product design and manufacturing innovation.

Visiting lecturers from leading design practices and industry will contribute to the programme as guest lecturers, with current research, and demonstrating real-life case studies.

This programme offers a semester at our campus in China, Xi’an Jiaotong- Liverpool University.


Programme Structure

Semester 1

Presenting Design Research (15 credits)
Design Project 1 (30 credits)
Managing New Product Development (15 credits)
Digital Design and Simulation Technologies (15 credits)
User-centred Research and Design (15 credits)
Design Appreciation 1 (15 credits)

Semester 2

Research Methodology (15 credits)
Design Project 2 (15 credits)
Innovation and Entrepreneurship (15 credits)
Group New Product Development Project (15 credits)
Design Appreciation 2 (15 credits)

Semester 3

Thesis (Dissertation, Design by Research or Design) (60 credits)

Careers

The industry need for digitally enabled Architects, Designers and Engineers promises a number of exciting career paths for students. The multi-disciplinary focus of this programme will develop careers in creative and manufacturing industries spanning architecture, product design and development, and urban design.

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Our MA Urban Design programme is jointly delivered by the Welsh School of Architecture and the School of Geography and Planning. The goal of this programme is to enable practitioners and scholars to transform the field of urban design through critical thinking and creative practice. Read more
Our MA Urban Design programme is jointly delivered by the Welsh School of Architecture and the School of Geography and Planning. The goal of this programme is to enable practitioners and scholars to transform the field of urban design through critical thinking and creative practice.

Urban design is transdisciplinary, straddling professional fields such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning and public policy, and also disciplines such as politics, economics, sociology and cultural studies. The programme fully embraces this transdisciplinarity through the theory, research training and design teaching it offers.

You will learn from academic staff from both schools who are highly accomplished and locally engaged in Cardiff, nationally in the UK, and internationally across the world. In the context of the design studios, you will also be able to benefit from the input and expertise of leading practitioners.

Studio teaching focuses on developing critically informed as well as creative and practical proposals for real sites, addressing important contemporary issues of design and urbanism

Distinctive features

• Learn from academics in two Schools which are ranked among the top 50 in the world.

• The course is taught via lectures, workshops and design studios, by staff drawn from both the architecture and planning schools, who are leading experts in their fields. Design Tutors include leading practitioners who bring their experience of cutting edge practice to the core of design studio work.

• The course is recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute as a 'specialist' masters for those who have completed at least a three-year RTPI recognised undergraduate spatial planning degree, allowing completion of the RTPI's educational requirements for membership. For further details visit the Royal Town Planning Institute website.

• Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), allowing completion of the educational requirement for RICS membership.

Structure

This is a one-year full-time degree.

The course is structured to provide a set of three lecture-based modules and three studio-based design modules, followed by a dissertation in the form of a research-based design project. The three lecture-based modules run in parallel with studio-based design projects which enable you to continually relate theory and practice.

Your research-based design project represents the culmination of your studies. You will be required to develop proposals relating to a chosen site, demonstrating an understanding of all aspects of urban design drawings and a written, reflective commentary.

You will have between 2-3 days of contact time each week, working between the design studio and your module lectures/seminars.

Core modules:

Urban Design Thinkers
Urban Design Foundation
Research Methods and Techniques
Development Management
Autumn Studio
Spring Studio
Research Based Design Project

Teaching

Teaching takes place in new light-filled studio spaces in the centre of the City. You will also have access to the latest modelling and workshop facilities in the Architecture School.

This MA is taught via lectures, workshops and design studios, by lecturers who are all experts in their fields – in geography, urban planning, urbanism, urban design and architecture. The design tutors also include leading practitioners who bring their experience of cutting-edge practice to the core of design studio work.

Studio teaching focuses on developing critically informed as well as creative and practical proposals for real sites, addressing important contemporary issues of design and urbanism.

Assessment

Non-design modules provide the foundations for developing understandings of urban design. These are assessed through:

• Essays
• Reports
• Presentations

Most of these provide the opportunities for summative assessment. However, tutorials, and a number of essays provide the opportunities for formative assessment.

Summative assessment is conducted at the end of each module. Formative assessment elements include design reviews, usually one or two per design module, and weekly tutorials also provide an opportunity for this.

Other forms of assessment include:

• Drawings
• Sketchbooks
• Viva voce examination of the dissertation
• Reports

Career Prospects

Graduates move onto careers as urban designers, or in urban design related work. Most of these careers are to be found within the wider areas of architecture, urban planning, property or public policy. These may be within the public, private or voluntary sectors. Some of our graduates continue to higher research degrees.

Guidance and mentoring on careers are provided during the year.

Fieldwork

As part of your studies you will take a field study visit within a UK city or a city in mainland Europe, which is fully funded within the advertised fees.

Study visits are an intrinsic part of this programme. Where your experience during the visits inform assessed assignments in required core modules, the visits are compulsory.

These field study visits are compulsory since experiences of urban design ‘in the field’ are required for completing some assignments. However, modified versions of the field trips may be allowed at the discretion of the Course Director.

The trip will require you to move around the city and make observations and presentations during these journeys. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with disabilities. It is advisable to speak to the Course Director about the possibility of adjustments before enrolling.

Read less
Our MA Urban Design programme is jointly delivered by the Welsh School of Architecture and the School of Geography and Planning. The goal of this programme is to enable practitioners and scholars to transform the field of urban design through critical thinking and creative practice. Read more
Our MA Urban Design programme is jointly delivered by the Welsh School of Architecture and the School of Geography and Planning. The goal of this programme is to enable practitioners and scholars to transform the field of urban design through critical thinking and creative practice.

Urban design is transdisciplinary, straddling professional fields such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning and public policy, and also disciplines such as politics, economics, sociology and cultural studies. The programme fully embraces this transdisciplinarity through the theory, research training and design teaching it offers.

You will learn from academic staff from both schools who are highly accomplished and locally engaged in Cardiff, nationally in the UK, and internationally across the world. In the context of the design studios, you will also be able to benefit from the input and expertise of leading practitioners. 

Studio teaching focuses on developing critically informed as well as creative and practical proposals for real sites, addressing important contemporary issues of design and urbanism.

Distinctive features

• Learn from academics in two Schools which are ranked among the top 50 in the world.

• The course is taught via lectures, workshops and design studios, by staff drawn from both the architecture and planning schools, who are leading experts in their fields. Design Tutors include leading practitioners who bring their experience of cutting edge practice to the core of design studio work.

• The course is recognised by the Royal Town Planning Institute as a 'specialist' masters for those who have completed at least a three-year RTPI recognised undergraduate spatial planning degree, allowing completion of the RTPI's educational requirements for membership. For further details visit the Royal Town Planning Institute website.

• Accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), allowing completion of the educational requirement for RICS membership.

Structure

This is a one-year full-time degree.

The course is structured to provide a set of three lecture-based modules and three studio-based design modules, followed by a dissertation in the form of a research-based design project. The three lecture-based modules run in parallel with studio-based design projects which enable you to continually relate theory and practice.

Your research-based design project represents the culmination of your studies. You will be required to develop proposals relating to a chosen site, demonstrating an understanding of all aspects of urban design drawings and a written, reflective commentary.

You will have between 2-3 days of contact time each week, working between the design studio and your module lectures/seminars.

Core modules:

Urban Design Thinkers
Urban Design Foundation
Research Methods and Techniques
Development Management
Autumn Studio
Spring Studio
Research Based Design Project

Teaching

Teaching takes place in new light-filled studio spaces in the centre of the City. You will also have access to the latest modelling and workshop facilities in the Architecture School.

This MA is taught via lectures, workshops and design studios, by lecturers who are all experts in their fields – in geography, urban planning, urbanism, urban design and architecture. The design tutors also include leading practitioners who bring their experience of cutting-edge practice to the core of design studio work.

Studio teaching focuses on developing critically informed as well as creative and practical proposals for real sites, addressing important contemporary issues of design and urbanism.

Assessment

Non-design modules provide the foundations for developing understandings of urban design. These are assessed through:

• Essays
• Reports
• Presentations

Most of these provide the opportunities for summative assessment. However, tutorials, and a number of essays provide the opportunities for formative assessment.

Summative assessment is conducted at the end of each module. Formative assessment elements include design reviews, usually one or two per design module, and weekly tutorials also provide an opportunity for this.

Other forms of assessment include:

• Drawings
• Sketchbooks
• Viva voce examination of the dissertation
• Reports

Career Prospects

Graduates move onto careers as urban designers, or in urban design related work. Most of these careers are to be found within the wider areas of architecture, urban planning, property or public policy. These may be within the public, private or voluntary sectors. Some of our graduates continue to higher research degrees.

Guidance and mentoring on careers are provided during the year.

Fieldwork

As part of your studies you will take a field study visit within a UK city or a city in mainland Europe, which is fully funded within the advertised fees.

Study visits are an intrinsic part of this programme. Where your experience during the visits inform assessed assignments in required core modules, the visits are compulsory.

These field study visits are compulsory since experiences of urban design ‘in the field’ are required for completing some assignments.
However, modified versions of the field trips may be allowed at the discretion of the Course Director.

The trip will require you to move around the city and make observations and presentations during these journeys. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with disabilities. It is advisable to speak to the Course Director about the possibility of adjustments before enrolling.

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The MSc Digital Architecture and Robotic Construction focuses on digital design methods and construction technologies in Architecture, Engineering and Design. Read more
The MSc Digital Architecture and Robotic Construction focuses on digital design methods and construction technologies in Architecture, Engineering and Design. It provides a scientific and practical foundation and gives an overview of latest developments in Advanced Modelling, Computational Design and Robotic Construction.

Digital technologies have altered the field of architecture and the architectural profession significantly – from design to production. In this context, the course combines the professional quality of an architectural qualification with the theory and practice behind the latest digital developments in the field.

You'll use computer-aided methods for design and study the construction and fabrication process in-depth. As part of the School of the Built Environment and Architecture, you'll work in a transdisciplinary environment where knowledge is shared. Architecture students are also able to work in our Architecture Design Studio, a dedicated studio space with views across the London landscape.

You'll be able to exploit LSBU's extensive industry connections during the course and your dissertation will be closely linked to practice. You'll be encouraged to work together with partners; an engineering company or another academic School within LSBU.

Visit the Digital Architecture and Robotics lab (DARLAB) website, where you can find more information about the facilities and the latest projects taking place

http://www.dar-lab.net/

Modules

Integrative technologies and robotic manufacturing
Advanced digital design techniques
Design project material behaviour
Design project adaptive systems and structures
Technology for building systems
Design research architectural project
Dissertation

Modules will be assessed by a mix of coursework and examinations.

Teaching and learning

The academic team are qualified experts from all over the world, with experience in working with avant-garde technologies to gain the best results in architecture and design. In addition, all are actively involved in research and consultancy, which enables staff to draw on the latest industry developments in both lectures and practical work. You'll enjoy guest lectures from world experts.

The course makes extensive use of DARLAB (Digital Architectural Robotics lab), a research platform in architectural education that advances experimentation and cross-discipline collaboration among professors, students and industry partners to expand the boundaries of architectural practice. The modules' contents are oriented toward integrated learning assignments. The course is delivered through lectures, seminars, projects and internships.

You'll be supported throughout your final project by your tutors and will have access to a range of e-learning materials.

Currently 50% of our full-time student cohort is from overseas. This allows our students to network across America, India, the Middle-East, Australia and Europe.

Placements

Staff use their professional connections to help students find work experience and job opportunities on graduation. All students will be involved in the construction of a large-scale pavilion in central London.

Professional links

The Digital Architecture and Robotics laboratory (DARLAB) partners with industry to provide solutions to their business problems and challenges that they currently face or expect to arise in the near future. We offer businesses a number of avenues for accessing our research expertise. We also undertake research projects for small and big businesses alike at competitive rates and where speed and confidentially are key requirements.

Partners Include:

• Hiteco: designers and manufacturers of high-tech machine components for machining wood, light alloys, plastic and composite materials.
• QDesign: a team of experts in engineering sciences. Their solutions offer a wide range of robotics plants applications and continuous software development.
• SCM Group: company world leader in the production of woodworking machinery and systems.
• CIMsystem: a leading provider of CAD/CAM technology and technological solutions with a worldwide technical and sales partner network.
• HAL: a Grasshopper plugin for industrial robots programming supporting ABB, KUKA and Universal Robots machines. Allows to simulate, program, control and monitor robotic cells.
• KUKA: pioneer in robotics and automation technology, one of the leading manufacturers of robotic systems worldwide.

Employability

The Master's program opens up various possibilities for professional development. You could go on to work in the area of architecture, building construction, engineering, interior or product design. You could also work as a specialist or consultant in the field of computational design and robotic construction.

The course could also lead on to a PhD or employment in engineering research.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The design/art MFA is the College of Creative Arts' premier postgraduate qualification for practising designers and artists. The MFA emphasises the production of original creative work that is research-driven, critically engaged, expertly realised and highly innovative. . Read more

The design/art MFA is the College of Creative Arts' premier postgraduate qualification for practising designers and artists. The MFA emphasises the production of original creative work that is research-driven, critically engaged, expertly realised and highly innovative. 

How do I benefit?

An MFA from the College of Creative Arts offers:

  • fresh Pacific perspectives within a globally-connected programme
  • the only MFA outside North America to follow the internationally-recognised US model
  • study in Wellington, the coolest little capital in the world
  • unique creative retreats to regional New Zealand
  • self-directed research where transdisciplinary conversations and highly focused subject-specific investigations are open to you
  • easy access to art and design researchers on staff for supervision and mentoring
  • a warm, friendly, high-achieving peer learning community
  • a strong programme of visiting designers, artists and critics (international and local, eg Pasifika artists in residence)
  • international study tours
  • individual studio space configured to suit your needs
  • comprehensive technical expertise and facilities, including an industry-scale green screen studio and Australasia’s first Fab Lab
  • extensive opportunities to exhibit or present work across a diverse range of galleries, spaces and media.

Schedule and application deadlines

Massey offers two ways to do the MFA:

  • Full-time: on campus in Wellington, including postgraduate studio space on site. This takes two years.
  • Low residency: come to Wellington for four intensive one-week blocks per year, with mentoring and supervision in your creative practice by distance. This will take three to four years. The blocks coincide with school holidays. 

The MFA starts with the “Grad Camp” intensive block in the last week of January.

Application deadline for all MFA candidates: November 15 (January start). Late applications will be considered on a case by case basis.

Where can I go from here?

The Massey MFA is based on the US model and is the only MFA outside North America to be officially recognised by the US National Association of Schools of Art and Design. It is widely recognised - not only in North America but also in Asia, South and Central America and parts of Europe. MFA graduates go on to diverse careers in the private and public sectors, including design, technology, business, fine art, writing and education.



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Situated practice is a key development in arts and humanities, where expertise comes not from a focus on a pre-defined discipline or subject (for example art, architecture or design) but from a creative and critical position that operates beyond these categories. Read more

Situated practice is a key development in arts and humanities, where expertise comes not from a focus on a pre-defined discipline or subject (for example art, architecture or design) but from a creative and critical position that operates beyond these categories. This pioneering programme will lead students into making work that is situated physically and engages with contemporary social, cultural and political conditions.

About this degree

This MA programme has broadly two goals:

  • to provide a high-quality stand-alone qualification which trains critical, innovative and transdisciplinary practitioners in the making of projects which address the specific concerns of particular sites, and develop modes of research response and propositional transformation appropriate for those sites
  • to provide high-quality practice-led research training to enable students to carry out future doctoral and action research in the field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and the 'Major Project' exhibition module (90 credits). 

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is available as an alternative qualification.

Core modules

  • Situated Practice: Research Methods (15 credits)
  • Mediated Environments (30 credits)
  • Critical Spatial Practice: Site Writing (30 credits)

Optional modules

  • Open Work module (15 Credits)

Alternatively students may choose one optional module from across UCL, with agreement of the Programme Director and relevant department.

Exhibition

This module is based around the preparation of an original piece of situated practice, first in the form of a live intervention on site, then documented through an artist’s book, and finally remade in an exhibition format. 

Teaching and learning

Tutorials and seminars are the leading teaching methods, together with lectures, group-working, writing workshops, research seminars, film screenings, and reviews of student work by Bartlett School of Architecture staff and visiting researchers. There are building and gallery visits in London and further afield, and an annual field trip (optional). Modules use these advanced-level teaching approaches to encourage innovative student-led work. 

Fieldwork

There will be one field trip (optional) annually as part of the programme. Students will also conduct their own original spatial research into a specific site of their own choosing for their Major Project.

The maximum fieldwork cost to the student is £500.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Situated Practice MA

Funding

Information on funding opportunities may be found on UCL's main Scholarships and Funding page

The Bartlett has offered some funding to Master's students in recent years. Please see The Bartlett Masters Scholarships for current funding and scholarship details. 

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

Situated practice is internationally understood as encompassing activity and research in curatorship, public engagement, event design, creative regeneration, participation design and activism, site-writing, situated film and video-making, information design and new media work, communication design and publishing, online environment design and civic media, and management of associated institutes.

Employability

The combination of networks, knowledge and technical expertise makes graduates of The Bartlett some of the most sought after in the world. Graduates of this programme will leave with the skills and expertise that relate to a rapidly expanding and evolving sector in industry, including a strong understanding of appropriate methodologies in art and design practice-led research. In addition, students will develop site-related ‘situated practice’ projects. These may vary from physical installations, to digital interventions and to site writings and will establish the foundation for their final thesis in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Situated practice is a rapidly growing and highly active post-disciplinary domain; a popular example would be the 2016 winner of the Turner Prize, a street regeneration project in Liverpool by the artist and architect collective Assemble in collaboration with local residents.

Situated Practice MA graduates will be uniquely educated and highly equipped to pioneer new forms of hybrid practice between art and architecture in domains of urban design, spatial design, event design, critical and theoretical writing, performance, and craft. 



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Digital Direction is a new 240-credit, 15-month Master’s programme starting in September 2017. Read more

Digital Direction is a new 240-credit, 15-month Master’s programme starting in September 2017.

Digital Direction addresses media and storytelling in the digital era, assessing emerging issues associated with contemporary digital communication and the creative economy, training new creative leaders who are responsive to continually changing contexts, infrastructures and technologies and engendering a new wave of creative leadership. Graduates will develop a deep understanding of critical and experimental communication/media production, creation and design practices, and through applied innovation will address current and future contexts.

The programme prepares students to evolve and lead new approaches to media and storytelling through predictive innovation, enabled by rapidly changing cultural and industrial practices, plus uses of, and developments in, digital technologies. Centring on the interrelated domains of broadcasting, film and experience/brand, the programme addresses knowledge and skills gaps in four key areas of practice: production, direction, content development/making/writing and communication/digital media design.

The programme proposes new imperatives for storytelling in an age of alternative facts and fictions; challenges associated with multiple media forms and systems; and methods for engaging publics as audiences, users, consumers, (co-)creators, stakeholders and participants.

Established approaches to production, direction, content creation and communication/digital media design are transforming at an exponential rate, employing innovative forms of storytelling and narrative experience to engage audiences in new ways. The programme is informed by associated transformations in digital technologies, including the prevalence of post-broadcast models of On Demand media; the proliferation of networked forms of production and distribution; source- and platform-agnostic, multi-cast, multi-access and multi-layered, multi-linear media; cultures of openness and control; and the primacy of interactivity.

The programme acknowledges human adaptations to living with digital technologies. Contemporary media platforms are mobile, embedded in multiple types of environments, infrastructures and products, and user-controlled with an engagement in more democratic forms of content generation and curation. In parallel, core discrete professions within the media and communication design industries are being challenged and broadened by increasingly transdisciplinary requirements. .

The programme equips students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to engage productively with the creative, design and commercial demands of this emerging and rapidly evolving multi-platform and multi-layered world. To match, a transdisciplinary approach is demanded with a strong narrative sense and a honed instinct for communication. Our contemporary uses of new digital technologies have prompted a reconsideration of communication borders and different types of responsive modes; and content developers and distributors are, in turn, converging within an increasingly fluid space.

Traditional skill sets involving narration, scriptwriting, production design, direction, set design, casting, photography, filming, lighting, and sound recording, for example, are now increasingly accompanied and informed by hitherto unrelated practices such as coding and programming, interactive design, AI, cross-platform and cross-media integration (e.g. transmedia), data visualisation and analytics, visual design, gamification, virtual/augmented reality and social media. Digital Direction addresses the demands of this new world – for example, by enabling designer-directors to produce and create content for social videos with an accompanying strategy for ensuring delivery to their target audiences, including deployment of mechanisms for openness and input.

The programme draws on six key principles from the School of Communication – conceptualisation, experimentation, expression, information, contextualisation and interdisciplinarity – which are in turn supported and developed through strategic research clusters based on the broader themes of identity, experience and publishing.



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Growth in China will re-define patterns of consumption, production, and cultural appropriation domestically and globally for generations to come. Read more
Growth in China will re-define patterns of consumption, production, and cultural appropriation domestically and globally for generations to come. As China-based companies shift to a designed-in-China strategy and international companies seek to design for the Chinese market, career opportunities for graduates of this programme will be numerous.

This programme is for graduates or professionals with design or engineering backgrounds, who want to broaden and deepen their design and design research thinking. You will appreciate and practice cross-cultural approaches towards design and product, service, and systems development. Options are available for part-time study for working professionals.

Following this programme, you will develop individual specialism skills, while maintaining a generalist, transdisciplinary outlook towards design. During the first semester of this programme you will advance your competencies in design research methods, transdisciplinary design tools, innovation processes, and design visualisation and communication. In the following two semesters you will be supervised by academic staff to develop and carry out your own design research project.

You are encouraged to take advantage of the transdisciplinary nature of this programme, while the development and evaluation of new investigative methods and approaches is emphasised. Your projects can have an academic emphasis to prepare for doctoral study, or be based on a more applied, industry-focussed agenda.

What are my career prospects?

The programme offers you a solid preparation for careers such as design practitioners, design managers, as well as for further studies in design-related PhD programmes.

Part-time study option also available.

English Language Requirements

• If English is not your first language, but you are following a full-time degree level programme delivered wholly in English, you will normally be exempt from the English language requirements.
• If you have not studied at degree level in English, you will need to provide evidence of your level of proficiency in the English language. You should normally possess (or be planning to complete) one of the following qualifications:
---- IELTS: 6.5 with minimum of 6.0 in each of the 4 language skills
---- TOEFL iBT: 94
• If you miss the English language requirements by 0.5 to 1.0 of an IELTS band, or similar number for other English exams, you can apply to take our 4- or 6-week intensive English Presessional. For further information please click here.
• Individual cases will be considered on their own merits. You may be required to attend interviews or tests to further demonstrate English proficiency. As a condition of your admission or after admission, you may be required to complete English language modules as part of your additional learning activity requirement during your studies at XJTLU, on a pass/fail basis, depending on your proficiency in English.

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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Read more
The Master of Arts in Contemporary Arts Practice is a multidisciplinary degree course for artists from the visual arts, the Performance arts, music and literature. Its starting point is the student’s individual approach and choice of emphases; together with interdisciplinary projects it enables multidisciplinary exchanges with students and teaching staff from other disciplines.

The course aims to foster an independent artistic outlook within a framework of collective and interdisciplinary working interrelationships. The course of study sharpens students’ individual artistic practices through direct engagement with other artistic strategies. A knowledge of current discourse in other art forms causes their view of their own work to change.

Degree Structure

The Master’s degree comprises 120 ECTS credit points and is usually completed in four semesters. The degree is structured into three degree modules.

The degree places independent study and teaching, disciplinary foundations and transdisciplinary expansion in a balanced relationship. At the heart of the Master’s degree is artistic production, which includes an MA project in one of the specialisations. The didactic combination of one-to-one lessons with a high proportion of independent study, the targeted consolidation of technical and theoretical knowledge of the subject and context in elective courses, and the exchange between peers and professionals in various networks and in the joint Master’s fora support artistic production. Since in today’s artworld there is almost no generally binding canon of knowledge and skills, perfecting one’s art rests on individual decisions based on a wide-ranging knowledge of the dynamic state of the art.

Module Groups

Artistic Production/Master's Thesis (70 ECTS)
At the core of the programme, is the students' independent work on their own projects. This individual work is supervised by a personal mentor in one-to-one tuition. Students develop a deep understanding of their own authorship. They learn to present their work and to confront their own creativity with the strategies and approaches of other artists. In this endeavour, they are supported by numerous artistic personalities from the different departments of the BUA, as well as from the Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz in Basel and from further partner institutions in an international network.

Transdisciplinarity: Individuality in Context (30 ECTS)
The transdisciplinary aspect of the studies is largely based on the study of other genres' strategies of artistic authorship and by the search for common parameters for content and structure.
In lectures and seminars on contemporary art theory and media studies, common terminology is developed to facilitate communication about artistic strategies and production procedures beyond the limits of each discipline's specific vocabulary. The exchange among the different specialisations of the CAP occurs within the framework of tuition as well as in the interdisciplinary projects, but primarily in the common theory blocks, in the encounters with mentors from other disciplines and in the thematic project weeks that take place once per semester. Here, there are talks and practical workshops, transdisciplinary meetings, discussions, project and work presentations as well as courses on research strategies and scientific work. These block events not only heighten the understanding of one's own and unfamiliar working processes, they also prepare students for their professional future, when large projects will be realised in specialised artistic collectives and networks, which must be able to communicate across their fields' boundaries.

There is also tuition beyond the subject's artistic boundaries - on professional skills in economic terms. Students gain a basic understanding of how to set up a company and how to conduct self-promotion. This includes tuition about management, administration, law and copyright, marketing, project management etc.

Subject-related Theory and Practice (20 ECTS)
The third module group addresses the theory and practice of the respective specialisations. This includes courses on technical specialisation and perfection (for instance: composition, musical strategies, specific software knowledge, lighting, curating, exhibiting) and on the subject-related theory (for instance: lectures and guest seminars on contemporary art/music; graduate societies) as well as excursions and encounters with artists, institutions, clients, teachers etc. The various courses are open to all students of the MA CAP and the partner institutions, if they meet the individual course's requirements.

The degree programme culminates in the Master thesis. This consists of the public presentation of an independent artistic creation and the written reflection on the student's own practice. The written part can be conducted as a research project. Content and form of the artistic presentation, reflectiveness and relevance are evaluated by external experts.

Specialisations

Fine Arts
In the Fine Arts specialisation current developments in art and the historical foundations of art are the reference for students’ work. Static and moving pictures in analogue or digital form, sculpture and installation techniques are options as much as conceptual and performative approaches or the treatment of social processes and documentary strategies. The course is notable for its strong engagement with the professional demands of sound, words and performative production. The Fine Arts specialisation collaborates closely with the Master of Fine Arts at the Academy of Art and Design Basel (HGK Basel). Students have a broad range of options from which to assemble the content of their studies according to their own needs. These are extended by the BUA’s membership in the Swiss Master of Fine Arts Network. The discipline-related foundations for the Fine Arts specialisation are generally laid by a Bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts.

Music and Media Art
In this programme the main focus is on sound art, experimental and electronic music. Students develop compositions, sound installations or other sound-based art forms. In seminars and lectures exemplary works of sound art from the past and present are discussed and analyzed. We teach compositional strategies and approach the subject matter from a contemporary and historical-theoretical point of view. Reference to one's own work is a key focus. The aim is not to solely work on the development of one's own artistic practices, but also to acquire a comprehensive knowledge of contemporary compositions and art forms. In addition to the MA CAP program students can attend other courses, which teach practical skills in programming with Max MSP,hardware hacking, audio technology or interface handling. The integration of sound and musical aspects into areas like performance art, literature and fine arts has increasingly gained importance over the last decades. Hence, this study program intensively deals with the musical-sound aspects of different art forms. In the MA CAP the interaction between the visual, performative, literary and sound aspects, brings students from different artistic areas together, encourages exchange and enables collaborative working.

Literary Writing/Translation
Literature reacts to other arts, just as much as it influences them. Students hoping to practice their literary art in the field of tension of contemporary art production and its advanced reflection, find in the CAP a wide range of teachers and students with diverse backgrounds. Alongside this vibrant exchange and proximity, they work on their own texts of all genres, under the supervision of mentors. This constitutes the core of the students` individual study profiles. Something unique about the CAP is, that the work of the literary translators (with the source languages German, French, Spanish, Italian, English and Russian and the target languages German or French) is regarded as artistic production. The offers for translators are expanded thanks to a cooperation with the "Centre de la Traduction Littéraire" at the University of Lausanne.

Performance
In the sense of physical presence, real or conceptual action, performance occurs in various artistic fields. It addresses certain issues relating to body, space and time. Considering the transdisciplinary history of performance, we understand it as a varied and open field of general performativity.
Performance is regarded as part of all the different artistic disciplines united under the umbrella of the CAP.
As an active form and physical action, it resides within music, fine arts and also literary writing and occurs in close connection with these separate forms. In addition, the focus on performativity opens up new forms of representation, viewing and listening, participating, which the studies are supposed to explore in the practical work as well as in the theoretical reflection.

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The design/art MFA is the College of Creative Arts' premier postgraduate qualification for practising designers and artists. The MFA emphasises the production of original creative work that is research-driven, critically engaged, expertly realised and highly innovative. . Read more

The design/art MFA is the College of Creative Arts' premier postgraduate qualification for practising designers and artists. The MFA emphasises the production of original creative work that is research-driven, critically engaged, expertly realised and highly innovative. 

How do I benefit?

An MFA from the College of Creative Arts offers:

  • fresh Pacific perspectives within a globally-connected programme
  • the only MFA outside North America to follow the internationally-recognised US model
  • study in Wellington, the coolest little capital in the world
  • unique creative retreats to regional New Zealand
  • self-directed research where transdisciplinary conversations and highly focused subject-specific investigations are open to you
  • easy access to art and design researchers on staff for supervision and mentoring
  • a warm, friendly, high-achieving peer learning community
  • a strong programme of visiting designers, artists and critics (international and local, eg Pasifika artists in residence)
  • international study tours
  • individual studio space configured to suit your needs
  • comprehensive technical expertise and facilities, including an industry-scale green screen studio and Australasia’s first Fab Lab
  • extensive opportunities to exhibit or present work across a diverse range of galleries, spaces and media.

Schedule and application deadlines

Massey offers two ways to do the MFA:

  • Full-time: on campus in Wellington, including postgraduate studio space on site. This takes two years.
  • Low residency: come to Wellington for four intensive one-week blocks per year, with mentoring and supervision in your creative practice by distance. This will take three to four years. The blocks coincide with school holidays. 

The MFA starts with the “Grad Camp” intensive block in the last week of January.

Application deadline for all MFA candidates: November 15 (January start). Late applications will be considered on a case by case basis.

Where can I go from here?

The Massey MFA is based on the US model and is the only MFA outside North America to be officially recognised by the US National Association of Schools of Art and Design. It is widely recognised - not only in North America but also in Asia, South and Central America and parts of Europe. MFA graduates go on to diverse careers in the private and public sectors, including design, technology, business, fine art, writing and education.



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Do you want to change the world? Our innovation programmes will set you on your way. The innovators of the 21st century will bring together arts, science, engineering, humanities and enterprise to deliver innovative products, services and ways of living. Read more
Do you want to change the world? Our innovation programmes will set you on your way.

The innovators of the 21st century will bring together arts, science, engineering, humanities and enterprise to deliver innovative products, services and ways of living. They will be team players, with a breadth of skills enabling them to work across specialisms and cultures. They will be designers and entrepreneurs, and have a passion for style, efficiency and sustainability. Bristol’s innovation programmes are for people who want to pursue their subject specialism in a way that enables them to apply it: to become innovators who can change the world.

Our aim is to educate a new generation to create and grow innovative companies and social enterprises. The MSc Innovation and Entrepreneurship programme aims to develop the high-level skills and critical competencies needed for successful innovation and entrepreneurship, through a practice-orientated approach based on collaborative teamwork across disciplines and cultures. It teaches students how to apply their subject-specific knowledge to real-world challenges through a range of transdisciplinary units focusing on innovation-led entrepreneurial skills, design and systems thinking, making and testing. Students will be equipped to apply their knowledge and skills to address key issues such as health, education and the environment. Their final project will be their launchpad, when they will create an enterprise, put together a detailed plan and work out how take it forward and raise investment.

Santander Innovation Scholarships

We have five Santander Innovation Scholarships worth £3,000 each, which will be awarded as a one-off payment to the top five students on the MSc Innovation and Entrepreneurship programme at the beginning of their course. These scholarships will be open to both home and overseas students and will be offered based on academic merit for the best innovation pitches (text or video) submitted, as judged by the innovations academic team. Representatives from Santander will meet the student award recipients at an event in September/October, near the start of term, when these scholarships will be awarded.

Programme structure

You will start by learning to work in teams and find out about both design thinking and systems thinking. This combination can deliver a holistic understanding of a genuine problem or need, generate ideas that will transform both the system and lives of users, while ensuring the new system is sustainable. You will work in multidisciplinary teams to take on a series of innovation and entrepreneurial challenges. You will also learn to create innovations to meet real human needs through the In the Wild unit, understanding your target audience and the issues facing them and developing ideas for possible solutions. You will gain insight into the technological, social and political influences on design and innovation, drawing on case studies of success and failure to help you think about future opportunities.

In the second teaching block you will explore solutions for a real-world client, iterating to develop an unexpected range of possibilities and creating prototypes to test with real customers or users. You will learn about different kinds of enterprise and learn how to explore your ideas from a business or social perspective and how to place them in the appropriate context. You will find out how to assess the feasibility, sustainability and desirability of a proposed venture, how to create business plans and how to assess whether your ideas will work, are viable, or whether anyone will want them.

In your final project over the summer, you will work in teams to pull together all you have learned - to create and trial a prototype for an innovative product or service, or a social innovation. Your team may contain staff and external partners, as well as students. You will put together a detailed enterprise plan to accompany your prototype, including market analysis, intellectual property searches, resource profiles, financial plans, user testing and clear opportunities for investment.

Careers

You will still be an expert in your chosen subject specialism and you will still be able to proceed into careers requiring an honours course in that specialism. However you will also be equipped to do much more: to take your subject knowledge and apply it to real-world challenges, to innovate, to work in teams with people from different specialisms, backgrounds and cultures, and to create and implement entrepreneurial plans to take ideas forward. These skills are highly valued by all organisations, large or small, local or global.

You may graduate as a member of a new venture that you and your fellow students have created. Or you may decide you want to create your own enterprise or join an existing one. Whatever you decide, you will be able to hit the ground running, building on your entrepreneurial and innovation experience. You will soon have the satisfaction of seeing your work starting to make an impact – and ultimately changing the world.

You will graduate with a portfolio of work to show what you have been able to do and will have a network of professional contacts to draw on. You will also be able to go on to further study, either in the UK or internationally.

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The M.Sc. programme Computer Science for Digital Media at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is an internationally oriented 2-years degree programme. Read more
The M.Sc. programme Computer Science for Digital Media at the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is an internationally oriented 2-years degree programme. It aims at creative and innovative thinking graduates of Computer Science or related subjects with the desire of deepening their knowledge in applied Computer Science, with a focus on applications relevant to the media.

Programme Features

In accordance with the »Weimar Model«, research-oriented projects are a large and defining part of the Master’s programme. Additional elective modules allow students to select courses from other degree programmes such as Computational Engineering, Arts and Design, Architecture, as well as courses from the Computer Science for Digital Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included. The fourth and final semester is dedicated entirely to the Master’s thesis.

The degree programme offers students to focus on different fields. Core components of the programme and areas of specialisation include:
• Web Technologies
• Information Retrieval and Data Mining
• Big Data Analytics
• Intelligent Software Systems
• Computer Graphics and Visualization
• Computer Vision
• Virtual Reality, 3D Interfaces
• Human Computer Interfaces
• Usability
• Secure Protocols and Cryptographic Algorithms

Key skills and competences are acquired through a project-based teaching approach: on a semester basis, students work in teams to solve assigned research tasks in the labs of the faculty. This approach provides our graduates with soft- and hard- skills which are very welcome in research and development institutions. Within the recently built »Digital Bauhaus Lab«, the faculty of media has excellent research facilities equipped with the latest advanced hardware.

Visit the Computer Science for Digital Media on the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar website for more details on the programme.

Career Options

Our graduates find employment in the R&D departments of companies in the automotive, telecommunication, software, gaming and animation industry, as well as at academic institutions in Germany and overseas. A specialisation in Computer Science with focus on media opens the door for employment and research in innovative areas such as system development, algorithm development, data analysis, data mining, scientific visualisation, image processing, physical simulation, interface development and testing and security protocols development.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe should apply online on http://www.uni-assist.de/index_en.html. Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa can apply online at: https://movein-uni-weimar.moveonnet.eu/movein/portal/studyportal.php?_language=en

Please find further information for your application on http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-csm/

We also maintain a FAQ page: http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-csm/

Studying in Weimar

The »Bauhaus « was the most influential design school in the 20th century and was founded in 1919 in Weimar. The Bauhaus-Universität Weimar is the living continuation of this tradition. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum! Experimentation and excellence are our mission throughout our university faculties Media, Architecture and Urbanism, Civil Engineering and Art and Design. Across our Faculties, transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are an important part of this mission.

Find out more about student life in Weimar on http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/university/studies/einblickbauhaus/university-town-of-weimar/

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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