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Transactional analysis is often associated with its pop psychology image of the hippy era – but since the ‘sixties it has continued to develop as a profession and is now practised worldwide and in many contexts. Read more
Transactional analysis is often associated with its pop psychology image of the hippy era – but since the ‘sixties it has continued to develop as a profession and is now practised worldwide and in many contexts. This programme concentrates on developmental applications, relating to individual, group and organisational contexts rather than the original focus on psychotherapy. It is suitable, therefore, for professionals such as consultants, educators, coaches, counsellors, managers – anyone with responsibility for the development of others (rather than ‘cure’).

The training is rigorous, with 4-5 years being a typical time frame to obtain international accreditation, so sits well alongside postgraduate qualifications. It is also work-based, with the requirement to demonstrate competent application of TA in the development of others, so we use a series of portfolio submissions based on your professional interventions, with no need for artificial projects to be set up.

Our modules relate to professional areas of practice, so for the first level thsese are Professional Intervention, Core Themes of TA, Individual Development, Interactions & Relationships, Group Processes and Organisations & Institutions. After that, the focus shifts to the context, to practitioner skills such as facilitating, learning, etc, process skills and research awareness. The final MSc level requires implementation of a research-based case study typical of your professional practice.

Our programmes are recognized for accreditation by the international TA associations. They can also be linked to accreditation by the European Mentoring & Coaching Council (EMCC) at Practitioner or Masters Practitioner level; and to the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and the Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM).

More details of the various TA qualifications, and how this programme fits, can be seen at http://www.pifcic.org

Faculty

Our faculty comprises internationally-accredited experts within the TA community, who have wide experience of applying TA professionally in many different contexts. Refer to our prospectus via the link above for further details.

Flexible Study to suit your Lifestyle

The programme is offered via webinars that allow interaction with tutors and with other participants, supplemented with occasional workshops arranged in various countries to suit demand. We have some national groups where students come together to attend the webinars. There are also options to attend regular workshops with our faculty in the UK, Netherlands, New Zealand and Romania, and in other countries through our non-faculty international TA colleagues.

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The LLM International Trade Transactions offers your specialist training in all aspects of international trade regulation, transactional requirements and the problems that threaten the success of trade. Read more
The LLM International Trade Transactions offers your specialist training in all aspects of international trade regulation, transactional requirements and the problems that threaten the success of trade.

There are a growing number of international trade practitioners all around the world as a result of globalisation. Developing countries require a deepening involvement in the international trade process and the legal structures which underpin it. This means more lawyers need to be educated in this area to help this their development. Globalisation also means that the same result follows in developed countries as trade becomes even more international.

This course aims to provide you with core knowledge and understanding of the background to international trade, the transactional conditions conductive to its development and the specific and general problems which threaten the success and integrity of individual transactions. It also aims to encourage you to develop research skills in these areas.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you will have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. This involves taking one core course unit (International Sale of Goods) of 30 credit value.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

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The programme is designed to provide in-depth knowledge and skills within the field of computing. The course is aimed at students who already have a first degree in computing, have some existing software engineering skills, and wish to deepen their knowledge. Read more
The programme is designed to provide in-depth knowledge and skills within the field of computing. The course is aimed at students who already have a first degree in computing, have some existing software engineering skills, and wish to deepen their knowledge. This programme will have a strong focus on how data can be exploited within an organisation and will emphasise the communication of that data to a target audience.

Graduates would undertake a range of tasks associated with IT in organisations, and develop sophisticated solutions to IT problems.

Course Overview

The main themes of the programme are:
-Web based application development
-Database development, deployment and integration
-Project and team management in the computing sector

This programme will equip students with those skills at a high academic level and also crucially enable them to practically implement their knowledge because of the ‘hands-on’ emphasis of the programme.

Each of these themed areas is itself an area of significant international strategic importance and will enable students to gain important and valuable skills.

The Web based application development theme reviews current trends and technologies. Complex challenges faced by web developers are investigated in detail.

The Database development, deployment and integration theme covers the important areas of Data Warehousing and Data Analysis both of which are cited as important skills that are in great demand by businesses.

The final theme, Project and team management will concentrate on developing the skills of project management and systems analysis, both of which are in great demand by employers.

Modules

Part 1:
-Data Warehousing (20 credits)
-Distributed Web Apps (20 credits)
-Leadership and Management (20 credits)
-Managing Information Systems and Projects (20 credits)
-Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 credits)
-Web Technologies for e-Commerce (20 credits)

Part 2:
-Major Project (60 credits)

Key Features

This MSc provides significant technical content which will inform the management decision making process. In this context major organisations such as Tesco, Sainsbury and Amazon have been making significant investment into data warehousing and data mining technologies.

To effectively use this technology requires a large number of people to apply and manage the technology. The price of the technology has reduced significantly since the inception of data warehousing with Microsoft and Oracle supplying the appropriate add-on tools to their database management system products. These factors allow smaller organisations to gain a competitive advantage by utilising the large pool of transactional data that in some cases has been stored for many years.

In an industrial context, students may be required to manage teams of developers in small to large scale projects. To efficiently manage such projects, they will require a significant technical understanding of the issues arising to be able to appreciate the complexity of the tasks to be undertaken.

Indeed, in an SME this role is often fulfilled by a senior member of the development staff with both development and management duties. As either a developer or manager, the graduate would be expected to demonstrate their initiative and be able to use their research skills to rapidly adapt to the demands of new technology.

Assessment

Student works are assessed through combination of course works, lab based practical exams and written exam. The final mark for some modules may include one or more pieces of course work set and completed during the module. Project work is assessed by a written report and oral presentation. Part 2 of the MSc programme requires the student to research and prepare an individual project/dissertation of a substantial nature.

University students who are unable to successfully complete all aspects of the Part 1 may be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits).

Career Opportunities

Students on this programme develop a broad range of technical skills and will study a number of topics related to information systems. The programme covers the three themes of Web based application development, Database development, deployment and integration, and Project and Team management in the computing sector.

A significant emphasis is placed on database management and the implementation of applications for manipulating information including both database systems and web applications. Additionally, graduates would be able to lead teams and manage projects.

It is expected that graduates would seek positions such as:
-Project manager (within the Computing field)
-Data analyst
-Database administrator
-Application developer
-Web developer

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Are you a psychology graduate planning to work as an occupational psychologist? This advanced course gives you a route into occupational psychology accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). Read more
Are you a psychology graduate planning to work as an occupational psychologist? This advanced course gives you a route into occupational psychology accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). It is offered on a full and part-time basis.

The MSc Organisational Psychology takes the psychological principles and theories you learned in your first degree and helps you apply them to the world of work.

As well as increasing your knowledge, the course arms you with the theoretical understanding and research skills required by the Division of Occupational Psychology of the BPS in the following eight areas: training, organisational development, employee relations and motivation, design of environments/health and safety, human/machine interaction, counselling and personal development, performance appraisal and career development, and selection in organisations.

We include BPS Occupational Test User (Level A and B) training in the tuition fees.

The majority of graduates subsequently undertake the practical experience required to become Chartered Occupational Psychologists. This is usually carried out within consultancy firms or within specialist sections of large organisations.

Graduates are employed as internal consultants in large commercial and industrial organisations, in HR departments, in the Police, the NHS and as management consultants.

Visit http://www.mbs.ac.uk/masters/courses for more details.

Course recognition
The course is accredited by The British Psychological Society (BPS). The majority of graduates go on to undertake the practical experience required to become Chartered Occupational Psychologists. This is usually carried out within consultancy firms or within specialist sections of large organisations.

Career opportunities
Recent recruiters include: Aldi, Artic Shores, CAPP & Co, Carter Corson, Bentley Motors Ltd, Civil Service College, NHS, Nestlé, Occupational Psychology Group, ORC International, Robertson Cooper Ltd, Saville Consulting, Stonewall, Work Psychology Group.

Course structure (All taught units are 15 credits)

Semester 1
– Research Methods 1
– Selection and Assessment in Organisations
– Test User: Occupational - Ability and Personality (Level A and B)
– Training, Support and Development

Semester 2
– Managing People and Organisations
– Relationships at Work
– Research Methods 2
– Work Design, Performance and Well-being

On the part-time two-year route you will study the units as follows:
Year one - Semester 1
– Research Methods 1
– Selection and Assessment in Organisations

Year one - Semester 2
– Managing People and Organisations
– Work Design, Performance and Well-being

Year two - Semester 1
– Test User: Occupational - Ability and Personality (Level A and B)
– Training, Support and Development

Year two - Semester 2
– Relationships at Work
– Research Methods 2

Summer period
Dissertation (60 credits)
– Apply what you have learned in the taught part of the course
– Normally consists of a literature review followed by a piece of work based on qualitative or quantitative research.

Examples of recent dissertation topics:
– Customers pay our wages: a diary study examining how to optimise customer interaction and employee well-being in the service sector
– Client verbal aggression: an examination of emotional labour and associated outcomes for employees in the legal sector
– Effects of job stressors, organisational commitment and individual attributes on Malaysian Chinese primary school teachers’ burnout
– Corporate psychopathy: the truth behind the hype
– Improving safety using a combination of transformational and transactional leadership: a longitudinal study
– Creativity in the workplace: a self-report measure and unanticipated costs

Open Days

Psychology Taster Session
Wednesday 22 February 2017, 5.00 - 7.00pm

We are holding a taster session specifically for those students interested in studying MSc Organisational Psychology or MSc Business Psychology. During the session, the course tutor will present a taster lecture, an alumnus will talk about their experience and what they've done since graduating and there will be a chance to network with them, current students and admissions staff.

Register here: http://www.mbs.ac.uk/masters/meet-us.aspx

Masters information sessions

We are hosting a series of informal information sessions for undergraduates who are thinking about pursuing a Master’s course at Alliance Manchester Business School.

Our Masters courses aren't just for business graduates - from business analytics to operations, and marketing to finance, we have 17 courses to choose from. Join us to meet a careers advisor, admissions staff and current students and discover how our courses can boost your career prospects.

Also, a number of graduates have the opportunity to progress directly onto the Full-time MBA programme as a Young Potential Leader - could you be one of them?

Choose from the following dates:
Wednesday 15 February 2017, 12.00 - 1.30pm
Wednesday 15 March 2017, 12.00 - 1.30pm
Wednesday 26 April 2017, 12.00 - 1.30pm
Wednesday 10 May 2017, 12.00 - 1.30pm

All events are held in the Atrium, Alliance MBS East building (on the corner of Oxford Road and Booth Street East) - number 26 on the campus map.

For further information and to register your interest in attending, please see the Alliance MBS website: http://www.mbs.ac.uk/masters/meet-us.aspx

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The LLM in Banking and Finance Law provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of international finance and financial services law, covering local and international developments from practical, regulatory and policy perspectives. Read more
The LLM in Banking and Finance Law provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of international finance and financial services law, covering local and international developments from practical, regulatory and policy perspectives. A wide range of regulatory and transactional areas are covered including, monetary law, banking law, financial regulation, central banking, securities law, secured transactions, corporate finance and M&As, insolvency cross-border insolvency, electronic banking, financing of developing economies, EU financial law and business ethics. You can choose from a wide selection of modules to design a programme of study that best facilitates your interests.

Our academics are engaged in current banking and finance policy making and legal regulatory reforms. In light of the recent economic global crisis and the ensuing new regulations, modules have been developed to reflect these changes, for example ‘Islamic Finance and Commercial Law’ and ‘Ethics in Business and in Finance’. This has led to the creation of a seminar series, featuring prominent figures from both industry and academia.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM Law and Economics programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Networking opportunities

On many of our modules, you will have the opportunity to hear from and discuss with prominent figures from leading institutions, including the Bank of England, the World Bank, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the European Central Bank, the Bank for International Settlements, the International Monetary Fund, as well as partners in law firms from across the world.

Taught modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the same field of law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.
QLLM007 Banking Law


◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM084 Secured Financing in Commercial Transactions (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM156 Introduction to Insurance Regulation (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM195 Transfer Pricing (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM310 Compliance in Global Contexts (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM357 Chinese Banking and Finance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM364 Law and Finance in Emerging Economies (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM374 Law and Ethics in Finance (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM375 Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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Knowledge of corporate finance law is essential for lawyers, bankers and financiers who are keen to develop professional skills in corporate fundraising, deal structures and transactional management. Read more
Knowledge of corporate finance law is essential for lawyers, bankers and financiers who are keen to develop professional skills in corporate fundraising, deal structures and transactional management. This course offers an enhanced qualification for professionals working or planning to work in a technically demanding and dynamic global industry. It will appeal to both recent graduates and practitioners considering various fields of work, including law, investment banking, corporate finance, private equity, securities, investments, financial regulation, government agencies and international financial authorities.

You will focus on learning how the financial markets work, from the primary markets involving the issuance of equity, debt and derivatives, to the secondary markets involving trading and investments, as well as very large financial transactions in the international capital markets. Importantly, you will also learn how to take account of legal and regulatory risks facing financiers and bankers, and structure financial instruments to suit commercial priorities and social welfare policies.

Course content

This course aims to give you a comprehensive understanding of the practical processes and innovative products of the international corporate finance market, including equity and debt capital, derivatives, structured finance, risk management and investment portfolio products. It also develops the soft skills you will need in this area of practice, including negotiations and network building, with meetings with senior lawyers and directors of major companies.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-DISSERTATION OR PROJECT
-INVESTMENT BANKING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
-LEGAL ASPECTS OF CORPORATE FINANCE

Option modules - These modules are recommended if you are looking to specialise in the financial industry. If you opt for the Dissertation you must select four option modules. If you opt for the Project you must choose five option modules.
-DERIVATIVES AND STRUCTURED FINANCE: LAW AND PRACTICE
-INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
-INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, MANAGING GLOBAL RISKS AND ETHICS
-INTERNATIONAL ENERGY FINANCE LAW
-INTERNATIONAL PROJECT FINANCE LAW
-ISLAMIC FINANCE AND SECURITISATION LAW
-LEGAL ASPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL FINANCE
-MONEY LAUNDERING AND CORPORATE FRAUD

Associated careers

This course will be of benefit if you are seeking to work in any of the range of disciplines involved in corporate finance law, including accountancy, corporate banking, corporate finance, corporate law, investment banking, private equity and venture capital, as well as in related fields.

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An increasingly globalised economy requires commercial law to meet a wide variety of exciting challenges, from the transactional to the regulatory, from shipping to finance, from access to markets to dispute resolution. Read more
An increasingly globalised economy requires commercial law to meet a wide variety of exciting challenges, from the transactional to the regulatory, from shipping to finance, from access to markets to dispute resolution. The LLM in International Commercial Law at the University of Nottingham reflects international business in its diversity, innovation, and contemporary relevance.
You will take 120 credits’ worth of full and/or part-time subject options during the taught components of this course.

You will conclude the LLM International Commercial Law by undertaking a 60-credit dissertation; this is an extensive piece of independent research in a subject of your choice. You will benefit from the support of a dedicated project supervisor, the School of Law’s Skills Programme, as well as the generic research skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School.

The LLM (Master of Laws) in International Commercial Law can be taken on a full-time basis over 1 year or part-time over 2 to 4 years.

In order to qualify for the LLM, you must take four full-year options (120 credits in total), or the equivalent number of full and half options in the taught element of the programme. Full options comprise eighteen two-hour seminars, held during the Autumn and Spring Terms. Half-options comprise nine two-hour seminars, held in either the Autumn or Spring Terms.

All seminars offer dedicated teaching, open only to postgraduate students, including postgraduate research students, where an option is relevant to a student’s doctoral research.

The precise availability of individual options differs from year to year, depending on the availability of staff to teach them, but in a typical session LLM students are able to choose from around a dozen full-year options (30 credits) and up to 50 half-year options (15 credits) over the programmes. In addition, LLM students may elect to take up to two half-year options in relevant modules offered by the School of Politics as part of its MA in International Relations.

To qualify for a particular specialist degree, candidates must choose at least three full options (or their equivalent in full and half options) from the list of qualifying options within the relevant specialisation. Students may choose any full module (or equivalent half modules) within the LLM programme as their fourth, “free” option.

In addition, the candidate must choose a dissertation topic within the relevant area of specialism. The dissertation is worth 60 credits and taken over the summer period towards the end of the course for submission in September.

Assessment for options is by essay, examination or a combination of bot

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This course takes an immersive approach to learning both the principles and practices of computer systems with much of the material based around examples and practical exercises. Read more
This course takes an immersive approach to learning both the principles and practices of computer systems with much of the material based around examples and practical exercises. Students completing this course will have a firm grasp of the current practices and directions in computer systems and will be able to design and build for example, distributed systems for the Web using Internet, Intranet and other technologies.

Programme Objectives
To provide the foundations for understanding of core ideas, methods and technologies in computer science.
To provide the technical skills and background material so that the postgraduate will be able to conduct a near state-of-the-art research or development project;
To provide the graduate with a range of specialist and transferable skills;
To provide the educational base for further professional development and lifelong learning.
Course Topics
Data networks and communications, project foundations and management tools, broadband communication systems, technologies for Internet systems, agent technologies and Artificial Intelligence, introduction to distributed systems and mobile systems, project and dissertation.

Taught Modules:

Java programming: This module provides students with an in-depth understanding of current and emerging Java programming concepts and programming variations. The module teaches the basic and advanced structures of Java and makes use of the object-oriented approach to software implementation. It also gives an in-depth understanding of advanced Java concepts in the area of user interfaces and will enable students to apply the theoretical knowledge of the Java language onto a test-case software development scenario.

Introduction to distributed systems: This module will introduce key ideas in distributed Systems and its role and application in operating systems and middleware. On completion of this module students will have an understanding of the key issues for distributed systems at OS level or as middleware, they will understand core concepts of concurrency, be able to program multithreaded and distributed applications and understand the issues and use of algorithms for transactional systems.

Data networks and communications: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of how real communication networks are structured and the protocols that make them work. It will give the students an ability to understand in detail the process required to provide an end-to-end connection.

Technologies for Internet Systems: In this module, students will be introduced to state of the art technologies and tools for Internet Systems and in particular e-commerce systems.

Agent Technologies: This module provides an in-depth understanding of technologies from Artificial Intelligence research such as machine learning, data mining, information retrieval, natural language processing, and evolutionary programming. It will look at the application of agent-oriented technologies for Artificial Life, for building Web search engines, for use in computer games and in film (such as the MASSIVE software developed for the Lord of the Rings movies), and for robotics. It will also provide an introduction to agent-oriented programming using the NetLogo programming language.

Foundations of computer graphics: This module will teach techniques, algorithms and representations for modelling computer graphics and enable students to code 2D and 3D objects and animations.

Database systems: Students completing this module will gain an in depth understanding of DBMS/Distributed DBMS architecture, functionality, recovery and data storage techniques. Students will also have a full understanding of how queries are processed and the importance of database maintenance. This module is designed to enable students to perform research into one or two areas of databases; for example, object oriented databases and deductive databases.

Project foundations and management tools: This module prepares students for their MSc research project, including reference search and survey preparation and familiarisation with project management tools.

MSc Research project: After the successful completion of the taught component of the MSc programme, students will spend the remainder of the time undertaking a research project and producing an MSc Dissertation. During this process, students will conduct project work at state-of-the-art research level and to present this work as a written dissertation. Completing a project and dissertation at this level will train students in: problem solving; researching new topics; organizing knowledge; exercising elementary time and project management skills; reporting and writing skills.

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Summary. Read more
Summary

The programme offers opportunities for part-time study, caters for the needs of education professionals and aims to enhance personal knowledge and professional practice through a variety of approaches to study, reflection and critical analysis; it's success rests with the blend of tuition, recommended reading, directed school/centre-based activities, shared group discussions and supervised module assignments.

Modules

Choice of over 80 modules, key areas include: adult education; art education; design and technology; education management and leadership; early years education; further education; geography education; history education; information and communications education; language and literacy; mathematics education; physical education; science education; special educational needs; transactional analysis.
Assessment Methods
Each module assignment will be between 4,000-5,000 words in length; a final dissertation.

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Our Legal Practice Course (LPC) at Manchester Law School gives you the essential training you need to prepare for life as a solicitor. Read more

The course

Our Legal Practice Course (LPC) at Manchester Law School gives you the essential training you need to prepare for life as a solicitor. Our client focused LPC will give you the legal knowledge, skills and commercial understanding to thrive in today's market, placing an emphasis on simulating real-life legal scenarios.

The course is both practical and interactive, using workshops and effective teaching methods supported by online materials, to help you develop the practical and theoretical skills required for legal practice. You will learn how to think and behave like a legal professional from the outset.

Stage 1: Compulsory units

• Business Law and Practice
• Property Law and Practice
• Civil and Criminal Litigation
• Professional Conduct and Regulation
• Solicitors’ Accounts
• Wills and Administration of Estates
• Writing
• Drafting
• Practical Legal Research
• Interviewing and Advising
• Advocacy
• Taxation

Stage 2: Elective units

There are a number of elective units available to choose from so you can tailor your learning to reflect your career ambitions and legal interests. You will need to study three elective units. The content of each elective unit is designed to ensure practical relevance.

• Advanced Criminal Litigation
• Commercial Law
• Commercial Litigation
• Commercial Property
• Corporate Practice
• Employment Law and Practice
• Family Law and Practice
• Immigration Law
• Media Entertainment Law
• Personal Injury Litigation
• Wills, Probate and Estate Planning

PLEASE NOTE: The delivery of each elective is subject to the requirement that there must be sufficient students choosing to study it.

Study pattern

The courses are delivered in our purpose-built Law School by a highly experienced academic team from a variety of legal professional backgrounds. Your tuition will be delivered through a combination of methods, mainly workshops and electronic learning.

A full-time student can expect to receive 2 days of face-to-face teaching per week. A part-time student can expect to receive 1 day of teaching per week. In addition to the face to face sessions, students will also undertake supplementary online and preparatory work.

You will receive the opportunity to hone your legal skills through involvement in one of our voluntary legal work schemes that offer pro bono legal services to those in need. Manchester Law School also offers outstanding candidates with the opportunity to gain competitive work placements in a number of electives, providing successful candidates with vital work experience.

Career prospects

Manchester Law School places great emphasis on helping you establish your career. 90% of LPC students find legally related employment after graduating, despite many of our students starting the course without a training contract in place prior to arriving. Careers advice is available from our Careers and Employability Service and our highly experienced tutors, alongside a well developed practitioner mentor scheme, guest lecture programme, and several events offering the opportunity to network with employers.

For more detailed information on this course visit law.mmu.ac.uk/lpc

Features & benefits:

• Practical advice and links with the legal profession through our outstanding mentor scheme.
• Opportunity to gain valuable work experience and boost your CV with pro bono work.
• Exclusive work placement opportunities related to many elective options.
• Learning conducted through transactional case studies and law firm identity which simulates challenges realistic to the profession.
• Scholarships available (find out more at law.mmu.ac.uk/scholarships)

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The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor. This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. Read more
The course is an excellent preparation for practice giving you a realistic experience of life as a trainee solicitor.

Who is it for?

This course is well suited for anyone who wants to become a solicitor whatever area of law they are interested in. There is a rich blend of students on the course with a variety of backgrounds and interests.

There are students from a number of jurisdictions many of whom will have experience of working in practice. Most students will have a upper second class honours degree or have performed well on the Graduate Diploma in Law. A high standard of work is therefore expected and achieved.

Objectives

This postgraduate Legal Practice Course is a practical course which will give you a strong foundation for a future career in the law. This is reflected in the skills based, transactional nature of the course.

You will work on a series of client files which will be similar to the cases dealt with in a solicitor’s office. The law school’s experienced staff will guide you through the different tasks that would have to be undertaken to advance the client’s case. Your approach to the course will therefore be very different to the one experienced in an academic law course. You will have to apply knowledge in a way that best serves the client’s interests.

The course is very interactive. You will learn by performing tasks relating to the case studies that you are given. These include drafting legal documents, preparing letters of advice or delivering a submission at court. At the end of the course you will therefore be well prepared for your career in the law.

Academic facilities

The course is delivered at the Gray’s Inn Place campus in the heart of legal London. The campus has a specific professional programmes library and all the classrooms have been designed to meet the requirements of the professional law courses.

There is a dedicated LPC suite of classrooms which also includes lockers and a resources room specifically for LPC students. The building which houses the LPC suite also has 10 video rooms where students can practice performances in the oral skills.

Placements

There are no placements as part of the course. However, students will be able to take advantage of the many pro bono opportunities that the law school offers. These include advice clinics, court based projects and schemes which offer the opportunity to work abroad. The City Law School also has links with a wide variety of organisations who can offer opportunities to volunteer with them.

The law school is often approached by firms offering internships to students.

Teaching and learning

One of the strong features of the LPC at City is the level of support students receive. All of the tutors on the course are solicitors, some of whom have worked as partners in their previous firms. They are supported by occasional sessions delivered by practitioners or visiting academics who are experts in their particular fields.

The course is structured in a way that allows you to gain maximum benefit from the experience that tutors have. Students therefore get a high level of face to face contact time with tutors.

This is reinforced by the size of the groups. For the workshops students will be in a group which has a maximum of 16 students. This group will then split into two for the skills sessions which have a maximum of eight students. This allows more time for students to get guidance from tutors.

These smaller sessions are underpinned by the large groups. All students will attend these sessions which give an overview of the area being studied.

Assessment

The assessment regime for the course has to meet the SRA’s requirements. This means that the Core Practice Areas, Electives and Professional Conduct and Regulation (including Solicitors Accounts) are assessed by means of a written examination.

The Course Skills are assessed in the context of the Core Practice Areas and Wills in a manner that is appropriate to the individual skill. For example, you will have to conduct a filmed interview with an actor as your client, make a filmed court submission, draft a legal document or prepare a letter of advice for a client.

Our assessments are open book and therefore test your application of the law rather than your memory.

Modules

The course begins with a two week Foundation when you will have classes every day. This will introduce you the Course Skills and the more practical approach that we take to studying the law. The course is then divided into two stages.

In stage one you will study the core modules. During this stage you will attend four days a week. You will normally have three one and half hour sessions a day amounting to 16 – 18 hours a week.

In stage two, you will study three elective modules. Your timetable will depend on the electives that you choose. You will have around 13.5 – 15 hours of classes a week during this stage.

Stage one - in Stage one you have to complete nine compulsory modules as follows:
-Core Practice Areas
-Course Skills
-Professional Conduct and Regulation
-Wills and the Administration of Estates

Stage two - during Stage two of the course you will study your electives. In order to complete the LPC you must pass three electives. You can take your electives at more than one provider and you can take your electives at providers other than City. You should, however, be aware that it might be more expensive for you to do this. You will choose your electives in November/December after having received guidance from the tutors about your choice. You will have to opt for either a commercial or general practice route although the bulk of the electives are open to all students. All students can choose from the following electives:
-Advanced civil litigation (10 credits)
-Commercial dispute resolution
-Commercial law (10 credits)
-Employment law (10 credits)
-Media law (10 credits)

If you take the commercial route you can also opt for Equity Finance and Mergers and Acquisitions. You will not be able to choose options on the general practice route. On the general practice route you can opt for Family or Private Client but will not be able to take options from the commercial route.

Career prospects

This course is designed to prepare you for life as a trainee solicitor.

Many applicants will not have a training contract when they start the course. The law school offers the bespoke Training Contract Advisory Service (TCAS). This is run by members of the team who were partners in their firms and so know what employers are looking for.

TCAS offers assistance with CV’s, covering letters, selection days and other matters relating to a search for a traineeship. In particular, students can arrange a mock interview with a member of the team. The support offered has allowed graduates to go into a wide variety of firms. These include commercial and high street firms both within and outside London.

We do retain links with our alumni some of whom assist us with the course in a variety of ways. In particular, we have a mentor scheme which involves previous students and members of the profession more generally. The mentors are able to give you guidance on your career.

Some graduates will also go on to further study or use the skills and knowledge acquired in areas outside of the law.

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The Legal Practice Course (LPC) aims to prepare you for employment as a trainee solicitor and to provide you with a solid foundation for subsequent practice as a solicitor. Read more
The Legal Practice Course (LPC) aims to prepare you for employment as a trainee solicitor and to provide you with a solid foundation for subsequent practice as a solicitor. This course can be studied full-time or part-time (day or evening). In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 98.2% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This course provides graduates who have completed the academic stage of legal training with the professional stage of training required to qualify as a solicitor. We have a long-standing reputation for training solicitors and were one of the first universities to be validated to run the Legal Practice Course.

The course emulates the nature of the work encountered in practice and is transactional, following clients through various legal transactions and court hearings. It builds on the substantive law that you will have already learnt and includes the study of both law, and procedure in the major areas of practice. It also teaches the 'lawyerly' skills of practical legal research, interviewing and advising, writing, drafting and advocacy to prepare you for your subsequent professional training and for practice as a solicitor.

The LPC is entirely taught in a modern building with a mock court room, audio visual recording facilities, IT resources and library. Materials and case studies are provided.
-The LPC at London Met provides you with the required knowledge and skills that you will need to qualify as a solicitor.
-We offer work placements and pro bono opportunities to enhance your employment prospects.
-It is the most competitively priced LPC provided by a London university with flexible study options to suit you.
-All teaching is undertaken by qualified lawyers with extensive practice experience and students benefit from personal feedback.
-There is an option to top up the LPC on completion of the course to an LLM in Legal Practice by completion of dissertation.


Teaching is highly interactive and you will be taught in a small groups in three-hour sessions. The tutors are accessible and friendly and classes are supplemented with online tests and revision lectures and materials. The emphasis is on face to face teaching although some lectures, covering more complex subjects, are available online,. The overwhelming response from student feedback is that they prefer live contact with tutors and fellow students. You learn by “doing” on this LPC.

Students attending on either the one year full-time or the two year part-time LPC are required to attend an intensive foundation course for the first week of term in September from Monday to Friday, 10am until 5pm. Compulsory attendance is required for all students, irrespective of whether you are studying full-time or part-time. Please take this into consideration when arranging work, family and holiday commitments.

You can choose to have all your face-to-face tuition and workshops for the core practice areas concentrated into two set days a week on our one year course. This is usually Tuesday and Thursday from September until June. It enables you to reduce your travelling costs and plan your week. You attend an average of 12 hours face to face contact per week with the remaining time devoted to private study. Please note however, you may have to come into the university on additional days for assessments. Also Stage 2 elective subjects may run on different days.

Students who wish to complete the Legal Practice Course over two years can attend either in the evenings or during the day. The part time evening classes are taught from 6pm until 9pm on Tuesday and Thursday in the first year and Monday and Wednesday in the second year. The part-time day classes are taught from 10am until 5pm on Friday in the first year and on Monday in the second year.

Assessment methods are designed to reflect how solicitors work today, and include skills assessments and open book examinations.

Professional accreditation

London Metropolitan University is an SRA (Solicitor Regulation Authority) approved LPC provider.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advocacy Skills (core, 0 credits)
-Business Law and Practice (core, 24 credits)
-Drafting Skills (core, 2.25 credits)
-Interviewing Skills (core, 5.5 credits)
-Legal Writing Skills (core, 2.25 credits)
-Litigation (core, 39.5 credits)
-Professional Conduct and Regulation (core, 1.5 credits)
-Property Law and Practice (core, 24 credits)
-Research Skills (core, 2.75 credits)
-Solicitors Accounts (core, 6 credits)
-Wills and Administration of Estates (core, 2 credits)
-Advanced Business Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Child Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Civil and Commercial Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (option, 13.5 credits)
-Commercial Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Corporate Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Employment Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Family Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Housing Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Immigration Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Intellectual Property Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Private Client Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)

After the course

Helping LPC students to get a training contract and legal work experience is central to what we do. Each student is designated a professional mentor to provide individual advice and guidance. We offer a number of work placements within solicitor’s firms, at court or within not-for-profit organisations to enhance your CV, provide contacts and networking opportunities. We also offer pro bono work for students who need to enhance their links with the solicitors’ profession. In March each year we run a career development week to help focus on your career prospects. We offer mock interviews, CV surgeries and networking workshops. Our excellent careers service can also help you in obtaining training contracts and valuable work experience.

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Energy is the largest and one of the most dynamic industry sectors. It raises many challenges both politically and technically, from traditional exploration and production of fossil fuels to more recent mining extraction methods (hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking'), renewables and environmental protection. Read more
Energy is the largest and one of the most dynamic industry sectors. It raises many challenges both politically and technically, from traditional exploration and production of fossil fuels to more recent mining extraction methods (hydraulic fracturing or 'fracking'), renewables and environmental protection. Queen Mary is only one of a few universities in the world to offer an LLM in Energy and Natural Resources Law and this programme builds upon well-established areas at Queen Mary, such as Commercial Law, Dispute Resolution, Environmental Law and Regulation.

All these constituent elements of Energy and Natural Resources law are approached through a comparative and international lens and prepare students to enter practice as regulators, lawyers in private practice of public sector lawyers. You will also benefit from the current research, consultancy work and events undertaken and held by the Energy and Natural Resources Law Institute (ENRLI) at Queen Mary.

Many of the modules will be co-taught by practitioners and leading industry figures so you will benefit from practical real life insights into the industry. You will also be able to attend a series of General Counsel lectures, giving you a chance to network with speakers from organisations such as Exxon, British Gas, Shell and EDF.

This programme will:

Examine the area from a comparative, international and inter-disciplinary perspective.
Focus on both regulatory and transactional matters but also issues of policy.
Give you access to leading experts in the field who provide an accurate and measured assessment of key pervasive and emerging issues.
Approach the energy and natural resources law academically, from policy and a problem-solving perspective.
Provide you with unique internship and networking opportunities within the industry.

Taught Modules

Modules:

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Energy and Natural Resources Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM098 European Environmental Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM152 International Energy Transactions (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM153 International Arbitration and Energy (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM154 International Regulation and Governance of Energy (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM304 Mining and Natural Resources (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM379 Energy Law: Renewable and Nuclear (sem 2)
◦ QLLM380 Energy Economics: A Legal Perspective (sem 1)
◦ QLLM381 Energy Economics: Applied Analysis (sem 2)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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This programme aims to develop a high level understanding of quantitative and computational geographical methods. This includes skills in GIS software and statistical programming languages, such as R or Python. Read more
This programme aims to develop a high level understanding of quantitative and computational geographical methods. This includes skills in GIS software and statistical programming languages, such as R or Python.

Within an applied setting, emphasis is placed on developing skills in the visualisation, modelling and statistical analysis of spatial data using both web-based and traditional techniques.

Human activity are increasingly associated with the generation of large volumes of data. For example, transactional data are collated by retailers for marketing and store location purposes, administrative data are assembled to help with the efficient running of public services, data shadows are created through social media use, and an increased prevalence of smart-card linked transport systems record our travel behaviours.

Many grand human challenges concern problems of a geographical nature; be this how we can mitigate the human impact of climate change; ensure global food and water security; design energy systems that are resilient within the context of future population dynamics; or, how to design future cities where spatial inequities in health and wellbeing might be eradicated? The growing volumes of big data about the form, function and dynamics of human activities and their contexts are providing new opportunities to advance such debates within a framework of Geographic Data Science.

Why Geography?

We’ve exceptional academic staff with expertise in a range of areas:

Geographies of Population and the Lifecourse
Globalisation, Development and Place
Advanced Environmental Analytical Techniques
The study of Environmental and Climate Change.

Career prospects

Our degrees provide pathways into rewarding careers and our graduates have found employment in a wide range of industries and organisations, both in the UK and abroad. Graduates of the Environment and Climate Change MSc have gone on to continue their studies towards a PhD, or are employed in a wide range of positions, including environmental, energy and engineering consultancies, multinational companies (energy), local government, environmental bodies, research positions and teaching.

PhD graduates are now working in academic life as lecturers in Geography, Environmental Science, Economic History, Development Studies and Statistics at universities in the UK and overseas. Others are employed in applied fields, working in Europe, Africa and across the world, for example as professional statisticians (one is now Director of Statistics in Zambia, another working in the Health Service in the UK), development professionals (including a member of staff on the WHO malaria programme in East Africa), and scientists at climate and environmental research centres around the world.

Students will be well placed to undertake a career in social science research at the end of their studies, both in an academic and a non-academic environment.

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Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) enables disagreeing parties to resolve disputes through a wide spectrum of avenues such as arbitration, mediation and conciliation, without having to resort to litigation. Read more

Why take this course?

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) enables disagreeing parties to resolve disputes through a wide spectrum of avenues such as arbitration, mediation and conciliation, without having to resort to litigation. ADR is a fast-growing area which will offer you a challenging and satisfying career through an array of emerging professional roles. It will appeal to graduates, lawyers, business managers and professionals who are interested in exploring this fascinating and diverse subject.

This part-time Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) ADR comprises two taught modules and has been designed for those who are unable to commit to the full LLM ADR programme. It gives you an introduction to the theory and practice of a variety of dispute resulotion mechanisms as well as a grounding in the relevant law. At a later date, you have the option to take two further taught units and a dissertation or professional practitioner project to top up to the full LLM qualification.

Find out more about the School of Law, our facilities and generous scholarships by attending one of our regular open evenings where you can meet teaching staff and current LLM students.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Examine recent ADR examples across a broad range of sectors
Explore the techniques of resolving conflict in small and large scale disputes
Take part in simulated arbitration and mediation proceedings using our state-of-the-art replica court room
Develop effective and practical skills for negotiation and dispute resolution

What opportunities might it lead to?

Undertaking this new programme will enable you to understand the theory and practice of negotiation and conciliation from mediation of small scale personnel disputes to large scale international commercial arbitrations. It is a step on the route to becoming an accredited mediator or chartered arbitrator which offers a wealth of opportunities for career progression in this rapidly developing area of professional practice.

We are a recognised course provider for the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb) and law graduates will have the option of qualifying as a Member of the CIArb if appropriate options are selected. This will allow you to use the letters MCIArb after your name and offers an accelerated route to qualification as a chartered arbitrator.

Module Details

You will study two mandatory units from list the list below:

Legal Approach to Business (core if you do not already hold a Law degree or equivalent qualification/experience)
Commercial and Consumer Law (for students with a qualifying Law degree)
Theory and Practice of ADR

Programme Assessment

The course offers a balanced structure of lectures and seminars together with practical exercises such as simulations and case studies. Teaching is in small groups providing an informal, friendly and supportive atmosphere.

Your learning will be assessed through a combination of:

Case studies
Preparation and negotiation exercises
Independent research and reflection
Examinations

Student Destinations

There are currently thousands of roles being advertised by employers in the private and public sectors looking for the skills and knowledge required to successfully handle dispute resolution. Career prospects could be unlimited for those with a passion and ambition to aim for top roles in large and diverse organisations or to become a consultant in this arena.

Courts increasingly require parties in dispute to under go ADR before resorting to litigation and the EU ADR Directive 2013 is likely to increase demand for professionals holding a specialist qualification. Mediation and conciliation are regularly used across sectors such as HR, construction and corporate transactional disputes, where parties are keen to avoid the costs and publicity of litigation.

Here are some routes our graduates might pursue:

Accredited mediator
Chartered arbitrator
Expert adviser
Dispute resolution consultancies
Industry specific roles in construction, HR and related sectors

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