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Masters Degrees (Trafficking)

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This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. Read more
This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. It's one of few programmes worldwide to offer you the chance to study the main characteristics of modern forms of slavery, their causes/roots, impacts, and ways (legal and others) of fighting/preventing them.

The degree is unique in examining, in an interdisciplinary manner, the intersection between human trafficking and migratory flows, and forced labour, and organised crime.

The programme combines vocational and theoretical components. You'll study the social conditions in which human trafficking occurs, including wealth, social and gender inequalities; migration due to political instability, war and poverty; and the role of criminal gangs and organised crime groups in the proliferation of this crime in recent years. The modus operandi of traffickers and their networks will be explored as will the challenges raised by the role in family members and communities in this increasingly complex issue.

You'll also engage critically with existing legal frameworks and policing in place to combat human trafficking. The degree also offers te chance to examine different discourses used to analyse the issue including debates about terminology, media representations, effectiveness of anti-trafficking policies and the efficacy of rescue and rehabilitation programmes.

Why St Mary's?

The MA programme is part of a wider commitment to addressing modern slavery and human trafficking through the work of the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, established at St Mary’s in 2015. The Centre was founded to develop an evidence based response to addressing the current intensification of human trafficking and slavery cases globally. It is part of the Santa Marta Group and has links to many external partners including Kevin Hyland, the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University, policy makers, police, other academic institutions, safe houses, campaigners, international organizations and NGOs. Students on the MA in Human Trafficking, Migration and Organised Crime will have access to the resources of the centre, including cutting edge research and lectures by high profile experts in the field.

An inaugural conference, which took place in February 2017, was the first of an annual event, organised by the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery. With the aim of using research to fill the knowledge and evidence gaps experienced by policymakers and practitioners, the conference provides a space to promote debate and encourage collaboration on addressing the subject of human trafficking and modern slavery, with contributions from UK and international experts. Discussions between policymakers, practitioners and researchers will identify evidence gaps and tailor research to these needs. All MA students will be encouraged to engage with and contribute to future conferences and may choose to evaluate the experience and learning as part of their assessed work.

Course Content

All modules are listed on the St Mary's website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/human-trafficking

Career Prospects

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development.

It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. And it will appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

The Careers Service has more information on graduate careers and part-time work available during your course.

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This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. Read more

This programme delves into the seedy grey market for looted and stolen cultural objects. By combining cutting edge research from the fields of criminology, archaeology, art history, heritage studies, and law, via discussion of compelling case studies, this programme will allow you to explore the criminal networks that function in the area of art crime and what can be done to protect our past and our culture for the future.

Why this programme

  • This is the only online art crime and illicit antiquities research programme currently available and is the first university-accredited postgraduate degree offered on this topic.
  • You will be taught by leading academics in this field, who are members of the Trafficking Culture Project, the only academic research group devoted to the study of the illicit trafficking of cultural objects.
  • This programme is taught entirely online through pre-recorded lectures and optional real-time seminars. This allows distance learners maximum flexibility while maintaining the high level of instructure and peer interaction needed to explore such challenging topics. 
  • Students who successfully complete the PgCert will have the opportunity to come to Glasgow, to top up to a full masters degree in the areas of criminology and art history.

Programme structure

You will take three courses across three semesters (includes summer teaching). During each course you will investigate and present an art or antiquities crime case study, produce a portfolio-quality ‘digital artefact’ and write an essay for assessment. Depending on your needs and goals, you can take one of the courses individually or all three to achieve the qualification.

Core courses

  • Antiquities trafficking
  • Art crime
  • Repatriation, recovery return.

Career prospects

This programme complements careers in the museums and heritage sector, in law enforcement and security, in related fields of law, in fine art and provenance research, and should qualify students to proceed to a full masters degree in archaeology, heritage studies, museums studies, art history, criminology or other related discipline.



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This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective. Read more
Every country’s approach to social work and social development is different, and this course will help you acquire the skills and knowledge you will need to give your career a global perspective.

Your studies will provide a broad level of understanding by exposing you to the variety of ways in which our subjects are approached in diverse contexts, and there will be a particular focus on the global south, and on recognising how responses to social issues have developed.

There will also be an emphasis on issues which have an international dimension, such as human rights and social justice, trafficking and other forms of exploitation.

[Why choose this course?]]

• Study, compare and evaluate different welfare regimes and indigenous responses to human need within a framework of equality and social justice
• Explore the ethical aspects of your subject including attention to power and anti-discriminatory practice
• Develop a comprehensive and critical understanding of the knowledge, theoretical and ethical underpinnings and approaches to international social work and social development in diverse global contexts
• Gain an in-depth knowledge and critical appreciation of research models and methods, and acquire a high level of skill in evaluating and undertaking research while working within a robust ethical framework
• Benefit from a programme that will give you the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings, for example working for NGOs, governments or voluntary organisations.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/international-social-work-and-social-development#about

Course detail

This course offers global perspectives, theoretical foundations, ethics and practice skills equipping social work and social development professionals to respond effectively in diverse country contexts and make global-local connections. It aims to enable students to develop cultural competence and the ability to work effectively in different global contexts.

You will develop critical thinking, enquiry and evaluation in response to human need encouraging reflectiveness, increasing self-awareness and questioning of models of practice. You will also develop team working skills as be exposed to multi-disciplinary and culturally diverse working, both through collaboration with other students and observing practice in community-based projects.

The course aims to equip students with the skills to carry out research and to understand the implications of research for practice. It also provides the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge of a specialist subject of your own choosing.

The practice skills element of the course enables students to apply theory to practice and to develop the core skills, initiative and professionalism necessary to carry out direct work with clients in a range of settings; for example working for NGOs, government or voluntary organisations.

Modules

• International Social Work and Social Development
• Comparative Social Work and Cultural Competence - Approaches, Policy and Practice
• Models and Methods of Social Investigation
• Human Rights, Advocacy and Social Justice
• Complexities of Forced Migration: Human Displacement, Trafficking and Refuge
• Humanitarian Aid, Non-governmental Organisations and Social Work in Disasters
• Gender in International Social Work and Social Development
• International Relations - Globalization
• Practice Skills Workshops – Project Management, Training and Development, Evaluation and Communication Skills
• Dissertation

Assessment

The assessment methods include:
• Case studies
• Reflective accounts of student experience
• Individual and group presentations
• Design of a training package
• Analysis of qualitative and/or quantitative data
• The dissertation allows you to undertake a research project and communicate knowledge, findings and recommendations

Careers

There is growing demand in both developed and developing countries for the skills of social work and social development professionals. A wide range of job opportunities is available in both the statutory and non-statutory sectors, these include specialist roles in NGOs and various humanitarian organisations.

Job titles for typical successful Masters students include: Social Development Worker, Child Protection Worker, Community Worker, Animateur, Project Worker, Women’s Worker, Gender based Violence Specialist, Advocacy Worker. Roles in policy and research in the public, private and NGO sector are also open to graduates.

Further study options include PhD or the Professional Doctorate for Home/EU Students.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The International and Transnational Policing MSc from LJMU looks at the implications of policing across geographical and political boundaries. Read more
The International and Transnational Policing MSc from LJMU looks at the implications of policing across geographical and political boundaries.

-Commences January 2017
-Discover how policing is carried out across geographical boundaries
-Explore policing issues arising from differing jurisdictions, policies and procedures
-Ideal for serving officers and those about to embark on their policing or academic career
-Excellent career opportunities across the criminal justice system and international policing organisations
-A valuable foundation for progression to PhD

his MSc gives you the rare opportunity to pursue academic interests in policing from an international and transnational perspective in a nurturing and multi-disciplinary environment.

​Under the guidance of specialist supervision and among a diverse community of fellow researchers, you will gain a valuable foundation, building skills in research, analysis, conceptualisation, argument and presentation – all highly prized in many areas of employment.

The programme combines supervised independent research with specialist training in research methods and academic skills, while also helping students become aware of emerging approaches currently practiced in the discipline.

Over the course of the programme you will be introduced to key developments in policing studies and given the skills necessary to produce a successful postgraduate research project. You will work individually with a supervisor throughout the year, as well as taking part in taught modules with fellow Policing Studies students and/or students from other disciplines/Faculties. In addition, you will be part of the wider research activities of the Liverpool Centre for Advanced Policing Studies.

You will receive specialist supervision and study within a diverse community of fellow researchers. Staff are active in a wide range of fields including: Crime Prevention, GIS, People Trafficking, Public Order, Mental Health, Multi Agency and Partnership Working in the Public Sector, Computer Crime, Investigation, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism, Port Security, Risk Management and Education.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules:

Policing in Context

Gain insights into current policing, community safety and criminal justice priorities by exploring different perspectives that relate to policing, regulatory processes, professional values and ethics

Advanced Research Skills

In preparation for your dissertation, this module introduces key epistemological and methodological issues that impact upon research into crime, security, community safety and criminal justice

International and Transnational Policing

Develop your critical understanding of different policing jurisdictions and the agencies that work within them by examining International Legal Instruments and broader issues, including Human Rights

Transnational and Organised Crime

Identify the origin and development of internal and transnational policing cooperation, and examine the impacts of organised crime in areas such as human trafficking, modern slavery, drugs and corruption

Policing in Conflict and Post-Conflict Zones

Critically examine and develop an understanding of the key strategies that are current and relevant in the policing of conflict/post-conflict zones

Terrorism

Understand key concepts in relation to terrorism by exploring a number of issues including, definitions of terrorism, ideologies, typology, methods of operation, state response and impact of the media

Dissertation

Analyse and interpret an issue in your chosen field

​Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Criminal offending and the state’s response to it are constantly evolving, and this course explores the latest ideas, thinking and research into the subject. Read more
Criminal offending and the state’s response to it are constantly evolving, and this course explores the latest ideas, thinking and research into the subject. Benefiting from the practice and practical knowledge of highly experienced tutors and lecturers, you will reflect critically on the latest theories and the many explanations used to explain why crime occurs.

The department’s expertise is deep and wide ranging, and covers youth crime and justice, substance abuse, gang related crime, corporate crime and forensic mental health.

You will be taught by leading researchers from the Institute of Applied Social Research, whose studies on sexual exploitation, trafficking, and disability is internationally renowned and at the interface between research, knowledge, policy and practice.

Why study this course?

• Study the social, political and cultural contexts that inform criminology, and develop a critical in-depth knowledge and understanding of the subject
• Explore and research a particular topic of interest, and as you do this sharpen your independent study skills and become highly specialised in a particular area
• Develop the ability to apply originality in the application of knowledge that addresses problems relating to criminal justice, crime and offending
• Gain a wide range of new skills and qualities that are relevant to the workplace and will give you the opportunity to seek employment at a senior level
• Benefit from the ability to take part in critical discussions, systematic reviews and the analysis of complex, unfamiliar or unpredictable criminological problems, and work to produce an understanding that is informed by current scholarship.

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/macriaaf

Course detail

Criminology at the University of Bedfordshire is taught by subject experts who are all members of the Vauxhall Centre for the Study of Crime under the direction of Professor John Pitts - a key member of the Home Office gang strategy’s expert advisory group. This dynamic programme considers developments in the academic study and research evidence of criminology in the context of an increasingly globalised world.

You will have the opportunity to critically reflect on theory while drawing on a depth of practical knowledge, theory and professional expertise from the teaching team. In addition, the team have an interest in the personal development of Masters students through a system of seminars and personal tutorials. This allows both staff and students to get to know each other well and fosters a shared commitment to the subject.

Modules

The units you will study are a mix of core and option units critically examining issues relating to offending and the responses to a range of offending behaviours by the state and other institutions.

Semester 1
• Theories and Perspectives in Crime and Criminal Justice
• Models and Methods of Social Research

Semester 2
• Young People Group Offending and Violent Crime
• Offenders and Offending: The experience of end to end offender management
• Corporate Crime and Corporate Criminals
• Forensic Mental Health: Dealing with the mentally disordered offender
• Complexities in Forced Migration: Human displacement, trafficking and refuge

Semester 3
• The Dissertation in Criminology

Assessment

You will undertake written assignments – essays and reports – as well as participating in group conferences, poster presentations, reflective journals and presentations.

These presentations are designed to allow you to become accustomed to presenting yourself in a variety of settings. Being able to practice these skills in a supportive environment will develop this essential employability skill.

You will also have in-class tests and an examination. These assessments will allow you to demonstrate and record your ability to work under pressure. However, the weight of assessments are written assignments and these allow you to explore the subject in depth and through detailed research demonstrate your ability to apply knowledge to understand the variety of behaviours and potentially offer solutions.

Careers

The MA in Criminology will allow you to achieve a range of skills and levels of personal enquiry deemed essential in the world of work.

The depth of knowledge you will acquire at Masters level together with the ability to apply knowledge in a range of offending settings will offer you a transformative experience and equip you with the qualities and skills necessary for employment at a high level across the sector.

In addition, the MA offers the potential to progress to further study at PhD or Professional Doctorate level.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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There has never been a more important time to study international affairs. Our MSc in International Relations helps you make sense of complex developments in an uncertain political world. Read more

There has never been a more important time to study international affairs. Our MSc in International Relations helps you make sense of complex developments in an uncertain political world.

Why study International Relations?

We live in a time of uncertainty; everywhere we look there are huge challenges to the established international order:

  • As well as the serious ongoing conflicts in Ukraine and Syria, there is a host of small-scale wars and insurgencies taking place around the world.
  • Population displacement, forced migration and human trafficking are tragic effects of current conflicts.
  • Terrorism continues to pose a major threat in many countries.
  • Growing calls for independence by minority communities in many countries.
  • Global challenges, such as climate change and regional economic inequality.

Understanding and navigating this complex international environment is a huge challenge for governments, non-governmental organisations, and businesses.

This degree programme will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to make sense of international affairs. The course also has a very strong focus on practical skills, ensuring that you leave St Mary’s with excellent analytical and communication skills.

Why St Mary's?

St Mary’s University has exceptional expertise within the international relations sphere, including recognised scholars in the fields of conflict and diplomatic studies.

Prof James Ker-Lindsay, who has written extensively on foreign policy and conflict resolution, is a leading authority on secession and recognition in international politics. He has a practical background in international affairs, having worked at the Foreign Office and at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI). Prof John Charmley is one of Britain’s leading diplomatic historians.

We are home to the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, one of Britain’s leading research units in the fields of organised crime and human trafficking. It has links to a range of external partners, including policy-makers, academic institutions, campaigners, international organisations and NGOs.

Our outstanding team of visiting professors include:

  • Field Marshal Lord Guthrie: the former Chief of Defence Staff.
  • Ambassador Noel Fahey: Ireland’s former Ambassador to the United States and Germany
  • Sir Ivor Roberts: a former British Ambassador to Yugoslavia and editor of the world’s leading handbook of diplomatic practice

Find out more about our MSc in International Relations...

Please note: this programme is subject to validation.



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This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime. Read more
This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime.

Why this programme

◾You will gain access to a wide range of potential careers and further academic pathways related to understanding international crime and developing strategies and policy for its prevention.
◾You will benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the University's Scottish Centre for Crime & Justice Research. The breadth and diversity of expertise represented within the teaching team is a key strength of the programme.
◾There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars throughout, with high-calibre speakers from the UK and abroad.
◾You will have the opportunity to link up with a criminal justice organisation for your dissertation work.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses
◾Criminological perspectives on security and globalisation
◾Criminological theory in context
◾Research design
◾The global criminal economy.

Optional courses
◾Antiquities trafficking
◾Crime, media and popular culture
◾Gender, crime and criminal Justice
◾Punishment and in/justice
◾Rehabilitation and desistance from crime.

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with crime prevention policy and strategy, especially with international and cross-border agencies.

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Do you want to understand the role of Mexico in the cocaine trade, why a Dutch multinational dumps waste on an African country, or how young Dutch Muslims are recruited for fighting in Syria? Are you curious about phenomena such as Internet fraud, food criminality or mobile banditry? Old and new forms of global crime are rapidly expanding, as are the means to control it. Read more

Do you want to understand the role of Mexico in the cocaine trade, why a Dutch multinational dumps waste on an African country, or how young Dutch Muslims are recruited for fighting in Syria? Are you curious about phenomena such as Internet fraud, food criminality or mobile banditry? Old and new forms of global crime are rapidly expanding, as are the means to control it. The Netherlands serves both as a major crossroad in the illegal flow of goods, people and services and as a key host for international organisations such as Europol, Greenpeace and the International Criminal Court. Drug trafficking, human trafficking, international terrorism, corruption, environmental harm, financial and corporate crime and conflicts over natural resources all have global dimensions. Tackling these issues requires modern instruments that transcend national boundaries.

TRACKS 

You can choose from two distinctive tracks within the Global Criminology programme. Find out more about the following tracks:

  • Global Crime
  • Crime, Punishment and Security 
  • There is a growing demand for qualified researchers, legal practitioners and policy makers who can address these and comparable issues. Are you a multidisciplinary expert or criminologist who wants to make a significant contribution to the field? Are you someone who wants to work in the field of law and social reform – or any sector dealing with growing forms of local and global crime control? Do you want to be part of a Master’s programme with students from different continents? Then the MA in Global Criminology at Utrecht University is the right choice for you!

The MA in Global Criminology is a one-year Master’s programme that equips students with the knowledge, skills, and understanding required to work with local and global crime issues, crime policies and crime control strategies.

The programme offers a multidisciplinary, critical and comparative perspective in criminology, open for students with a BA degree in law, criminology, social sciences, or any other related social discipline such as economy, history or media studies, to name a few.

DEVELOPING ESSENTIAL SKILLS

During this programme, you’ll study key issues such as organised and corporate crime, prison systems, security policies or the relation between ethnicity and crime. You will also develop essential skills that will benefit you in both your professional and personal life. You will be able, among other things, to:

  • Develop good insight into the causes and consequences of local and global crime.
  • Analyse the behaviour of offenders from different disciplines and perspectives.
  • Critically assess and evaluate criminal policies and the criminal justice system;
  • Understand the cultural aspects of criminal phenomena;
  • Conduct independent criminological research using qualitative research methods and connect the results with criminological theories.
  • Present research results to an audience of both specialists and non-specialists.


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This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration. Read more
This masters will develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understand and explain the causes and consequences of forced migration.

Taught by internationally recognised members of staff with a range of innovative research experiences, the course is interdisciplinary. It requires the use of theoretical and methodological insights, knowledge and perspectives of different disciplines. This provides opportunities for in-depth understanding and explanation of the problem of Forced Migration and its interface with other social science disciplines, such as development studies, law, sociology, anthropology, political science and psychology.

Starting in both in September and January, this programme aims to develop your critical engagement with the theories and practices of forced migration and development studies. In-depth knowledge of both disciplines is critical to understanding and explaining the causes and consequences of forced migration, analysing, critiquing and evaluating host governments’, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ (UNCHR) and NGOs’ policies on protection, assistance, reception and settlement strategies, as well as the short and long-term responses of inter -governmental organisations, such as the World Bank and others.

Throughout the course, you’ll also engage in volunteering. Students have volunteered in different organisations , including the UK Refugee Council, British Red Cross, UNHCR, Chance UK, Naz Project London and Eaves in South London. These organisations provide support, advice and advocacy to asylum-seekers, including women who’ve experienced violence, such as trafficking, prostitution, domestic and sexual violence.

MSc Refugee Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab, an internationally recognised expert on forced migration, resettlement, repatriation and development, conflict, environment, water resources governance, post-conflict reconstruction, gender and development, livelihoods, governance and civil society.

Modules

International Refugee Law
Asylum policy in the EU and Member States
Forced Migration and Human Rights
Forced Migration and Development
Contemporary Issues in Development
Research methods for development
Dissertation (triple module)

Study hours

Year 1 class contact time is typically 16 hours per week plus individual tutorial time and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days and two evenings a week.

Assessment

All modules apart from the dissertation are assessed by 5,000 word pieces of coursework.

Employability

The aims and outcomes of this course are designed to develop your knowledge and skills that are relevant to working with forced migrants, including asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and other categories of forced migrants and also for working in refugee-producing and hosting countries world-wide, inter-governmental organisations, such as the UNHCR, non-governmental orgisations, immigration lawyers, lobbying and advocacy groups. The Home Office and immigration authorities in the EU and member states are potential employers of our graduates.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations. Through our pool of visiting lecturers and practitioners, the MSc Refugee Studies networks with activists, academics and practitioners. These networks provide students an opportunity not only to learn about job opportunities but also establish contacts that may prove to be useful in search of employment opportunities. Students’ employability is enhanced by developing their transferable and problem-solving analytical and evaluative skills. Some graduates of the MSc Refugee Studies have established their own NGOs and are serving asylum-seekers, refugees and internally displaced persons in their countries of origin.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Understand crime and policy in a global context. The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. Read more
Understand crime and policy in a global context.

Overview

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. You'll study an increasingly important feature of society: transnational crime and the responses taken by states and non-state actors.

You'll engage with the reality of global crime and criminal and related social policies from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will explore global policy analysis and criminal justice with an international approach. You'll also be trained in research methods.

Course content

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is based around a combination of crime, social policy and research training modules. You'll start with an introduction to major theories, institutions and debates in global policy analysis and criminal justice. You'll also get a solid grounding in the core methods of social research. You'll progress to more advanced analysis of global crime and justice, exploring diverse global crimes ranging from drug and human trafficking to corporate and state crimes. You'll also spend time in workshops designed to help you gain the communication and presentation skills you need to disseminate your research in your own research project.

Most people study for full-time for 12 months, but part-time study over 24 months is also available.

Modules
In the autumn term you'll take two compulsory modules:
-Policy Analysis - Crime and Justice
-Introduction to Social Research Methods

In the spring term you'll take another compulsory module that builds upon your earlier study:
-Global Crime and Justice

In the spring term you'll also choose one optional module from:
-Global Social Policy and Global Social Problems
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Globalisation and Social Policy

In the summer term and summer months you'll take part in the Graduate Dissertation Workshop. This will give you the chance to develop your research interests and participate in a group project with other students who have similar interests. You will also use this time to work on your individual research project.

Careers

The MA in Global Crime and Justice develops the skills that employers need in a number of areas, especially criminal justice, crime policy analysis and research methods from a global perspective. You'll also find you develop transferable skills that will allow you to progress to different career areas or to continue your studies at PhD level.

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The number of industries requiring highly skilled graduates in the biological and biomolecular sciences is rapidly expanding and remains based on the principle that employable graduates should possess a range of key skills. Read more
The number of industries requiring highly skilled graduates in the biological and biomolecular sciences is rapidly expanding and remains based on the principle that employable graduates should possess a range of key skills. The MSc in Biological and Biomolecular Science by Negotiated Learning will afford students the flexibility to broaden their understanding of biological and biomolecular science against a backdrop of learning core technical, methodological and innovation skills relevant to the industry and academia.
Several innovative specialisations are available from a carefully chosen range of modules from the relevant disciplines within the UCD School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science and the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science. These provide students with an exciting prospect of studying and researching in the interdisciplinary fields of genetics, cell biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology and biodata analysis. This diverse offering aims to enhance and develop a student’s current knowledge and skill base using a wide range of taught components and applied research skills. Guidance from expert faculty is provided to tailor a programme that will meet the anticipated requirements of the student’s objectives and career goals.

Key Fact

This MSc in Biological and Biomolecular Science is the first of its kind offered in Ireland by Negotiated Learning. This offers students a unique opportunity to combine skills and learning from several related disciplines with guidance from expert faculty staff, and to deepen their knowledge in one of our specialisations.

Course Content and Structure

The course is divided into the following:
•Core Laboratory Research Skills (30 credits) – including techniques such as RT-PCR, western blotting and imaging studies.
•Core Professional Taught Skills Modules (20 credits) – including career development, quantitative tools, science writing and communication skills.
•Optional Taught modules (40 credits) – involves selecting one of the following specialisations and selecting specific modules within
these that meet the student’s learning objectives.

The Specialisations Available:
• Genetics and Cell Biology: investigates cellular signalling, architecture, imaging, trafficking and transport, genetic basis of disease, model organisms, epigenetics, etc.
• Microbiology and Infection Biology: investigates mechanisms of pathogenic micro-organisms, host response to infection, immunopathologies, host-pathogen interactions, development of diagnostics, applied microbiology, etc.
• Biochemistry and Synthetic Biology: investigates metabolism and disease, protein-protein interactions, cell signalling, protein structure and analysis.

Career Opportunities

This programme will enable you to choose from a wide range of careers and areas of postgraduate study. This multi-disciplinary course provides a solid grounding for careers in industry, health and research, such as Quality Assurance, Quality Control, Microbiology, Process control, Technical Transfer, Research and Development, and Regulatory Affairs, Scientific Editor or Writer, Lab Technician or Analyst roles.

An academic staff member will advise you on a specialisation and module choices based on the opportunities you hope to unlock.

Facilities and Resources

Students on this programme will benefit from the use of a research skills laboratory in the prestigious UCD Conway Institute, as well as state-of-the-art teaching and laboratory facilities in the new O'Brien Centre for Science.

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The Cambridge Institute for Medical Research (CIMR) is one of the leading research institutions in the UK and provides a unique interface between clinical and basic biomedical science. Read more

Overview

The Cambridge Institute for Medical Research (CIMR) is one of the leading research institutions in the UK and provides a unique interface between clinical and basic biomedical science. Its major goal is to determine and understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease. The strength of the institute is that members work on a variety of diseases using a wide range of methodologies which makes it a superb place for graduate training in biological and medical sciences. CIMR has ~30 group leaders working in a range of disease mechanisms, including misfolded proteins and disease, intracellular membrane trafficking and cell biology, immunity and haematopoietic biology.

The Cambridge Institute offers a one-year full-time MPhil programme of research under individual supervision of Principal Investigators based in CIMR. This course can also be taken as part-time option over two years. During their MPhil the students are based in a research group, supported by their primary supervisor and the CIMR Graduate Education Committee.

There is no taught and examined course work, but students are encouraged to attend research seminars at the Addenbrooke's Biomedical Research Campus and elsewhere in the University, as well as graduate student seminars dealing with generic skills such as intellectual property rights, writing a thesis or paper, and entrepreneurship. Students write a dissertation, which is examined via an oral examination.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvimmpmsc

Continuing

Continuation from MPhil to PhD is possible although it is not automatic. All cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and the Degree Committee.

Teaching

- One to one supervision
Students are supervised by the PI and senior post docs. Discussions are provided on a daily basis at the bench and weekly during lab meetings and journal clubs. The supervisor on average will meet with the student every two weeks to discuss progress.

- Seminars & classes
This is a research based MPhil.

- Practicals
There are no practicals outside the laboratory-based work

- Small group teaching
Regular lab meetings within the research group

- Feedback
The supervisor on average will meet with the student on a one-to-one basis every two weeks to discuss progress with the student.

Assessment

- Thesis
The MPhil in Medical Science is examined by dissertation and viva. The dissertation must be no longer than 20,000 words and must satisfy the examiners that the candidate can design and carry out an original investigation, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject.

Funding Opportunities

This is not a core funded MPhil program. Funding may be arranged on an individual basis with the Principal Investigator or the student may apply for outside fellowships and funding.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvimmpmsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvimmpmsc

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Why study at Roehampton. Explore current criminological issues and debates from around the world and examine their impact at global, regional and local levels. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Explore current criminological issues and debates from around the world and examine their impact at global, regional and local levels.
  • Become part of our international research-led community of scholars and students who will challenge and develop your thinking about key global issues in crime and justice. 
  • Collaborate with our team of criminologists who will help develop your critical thinking skills, research techniques, and capacity to communicate complex intellectual ideas.

Course summary

Open your mind to a global perspective on crime and justice and the impact it has on society today.

University of Roehampton's MA Global Criminology will help you gain the skills required to explore and develop your own research. The course content draws on a diverse range of Social Science disciplines such as criminology, law and socio-legal studies, psychology, sociology and human rights. 

Our programme comprises three core modules and three optional modules. The core modules include: Introduction to Global Criminology, which introduces you to key criminological theories and their application to global problems of crime and justice; Researching Global Criminology, an advanced research methods module that teaches you the core skills required in conducting criminological fieldwork; and Dissertation (MA only), where you will lead your own empirical research project with the support of an expert supervisor. Optional modules offer a range of specialisms drawn from our experts’ research fields.

Content

This dynamic and outward-looking syllabus encourages fresh thinking in the study of global crime and justice. Our range of exciting new option modules will enable you to specialise in key criminological topics such as global policing, genocide, gender and violence, and media and popular culture. 

You will gain a strong foundation of knowledge and be introduced to criminology within its historical and cultural context. You will also examine a range of contemporary global issues such as drug trafficking, violence against women and girls, mass incarceration, policing, organised crime, urban crime, political resistance and transitional justice.

The programme also offers a step-by-step theoretical and practical grounding in criminological research. You will gain key skills for your own research process, including research design, data collection, and data analysis. You will have the opportunity to specialise in a research project in which includes independently designing and analysing the project with the support of a supervisor.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules on this programme some of which are compulsory and others optional:

Compulsory modules

  • Introduction to Global Criminology
  • Researching Global Criminology
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

  • Gender, Hate and Violence
  • Crime, Media and Popular Culture
  • Global Policing
  • Understanding Genocide
  • International Human Rights and Criminal Law
  • Global Drug Issues

Career options

You will be equipped with the knowledge, competencies and skills to prepare you for further study at PhD level or for careers both within and outside of the criminal justice sector.

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