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Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Microbiology deals with the interface between fundamental biological and medical sciences. Read more

Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Microbiology deals with the interface between fundamental biological and medical sciences. It focuses on molecular, medical and environmental microbiology to improve our health and environment and provides in-depth insight into present-day microbial research in general and clinical microbiology.

The major topics of the Microbiology specialisation are:

Environmental microbiology and Biotechnology

Microorganisms can be used to break down environmental pollutants and toxic chemicals. Therefore microbiology has the potential to replace common energy-intensive chemical processes with more sustainable solutions. Radboud University collaborates closely with environmental scientists and industrial partners to create energy-efficient and environmentally friendly solutions for societal waste problems.

Immunology

Unfortunately some microorganisms make us ill. A better understanding of battle between our immune system and these microorganisms will lead to the development of improved vaccines.

Molecular Microbiology

The genome of a microorganism is a key factor in research, because it determines how the organisms interact with the host cell and how they cause diseases. Molecular Microbiology acts on the interface between microbiology, molecular biology and genetics and is fundamental for the development of novel antibiotics and improvement of vaccines against microorganisms.

Top research

The department of Microbiology at Radboud University has been bestowed with the most prestigious science prizes, including two ERC Advanced Grants, a Spinoza Prize, and two Gravitation Grants. Additionally, many of out students have been awarded prizes for best thesis, poster and paper. The department works at the forefront of environmental microbiology and is specialised in the discovery of ‘impossible’, new anaerobic micro-organisms. The laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art bioreactors, electron microscopy, GC-MS, metagenomics, and metaproteomics facilities to grow and study micro-organisms that contribute to a better environment by consuming greenhouse gasses and nitrogenous pollutants.

Our approach to this field

- Research themes

The Master's specialisation Microbiology is mainly focused on research. You can choose one of the following themes as the subject of your research internship:

- Environmental Microbiology & Biotechnology

For students who are intrigued by questions like: How does life without oxygen work? How do global biogeochemical (nutrient) cycles govern the functioning of the Earth? Can we use microorganisms to create a more sustainable wastewater industry? How do microorganisms break down environmental pollutants and toxic chemicals?

You will do research at the interface between Microbiology, environmental sciences and biochemistry. The research questions cover several levels, from gaining fundamental understanding of energy metabolism of bacteria to their applications in wastewater treatment.

Societal relevance: Microbiology has the potential to replace common energy-intensive chemical processes by more sustainable solutions. Radboud University collaborates closely with environmental scientists, animal ecologists and industrial partners to create energy-efficient and environmentally friendly solutions for societal waste problems.

- Immunology

For students who are intrigued by questions like: Why do some bacteria make us ill whereas others do not? How do bacteria outsmart our immune system? What are the mechanisms of human defence against microorganisms?

You will do research at the interface between Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, and can, for example, work on how microorganisms are recognised by the host defence system

Societal relevance: A better understanding of host defence will lead to the development of improved vaccines against microorganisms.

- Molecular Microbiology

For students who are intrigued by questions like: How are microorganisms able to persist inside the human body and how do they cause diseases? What does gene regulation tell us about their pathogenic capabilities? Can microbial genomes help us determine how microorganisms interact with human host cells?

You will do research at the interface between Microbiology, molecular biology and genetics, and can, for example, work on functional gene analyses by mutagenesis studies and on the interaction between epithelial cells and pathogenic bacteria.

Societal relevance: Understanding host-pathogen interactions is fundamental for the development of novel antibiotics and improvement of vaccines. Radboudumc collaborates with public health institutes – such as the RIVM (National Institute of Public Health) – and with industrial partners.

- Personal tutor

Our top scientists are looking forward to guiding you during a challenging and inspiring scientific journey. This programme offers you many opportunities to follow your own interests under the excellent supervision of a personal tutor. This allows you to specialise in a field of personal interest.

- The Nijmegen approach

The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the people working, exploring and studying there. It is no wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, with direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personalised Master's in Biology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/microbiology

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Enhance your credentials by earning a graduate certificate in Environmental Health and Safety Management online from The University of Alabama. Read more
Enhance your credentials by earning a graduate certificate in Environmental Health and Safety Management online from The University of Alabama. The online EHSM certificate is a 15-hour program that focuses on preventing workplace injuries, illnesses and fatalities and is perfect for those who currently work in or plan to work in a technical manager’s role. The credits may also be applied toward a Master’s degree.

Designed to meet the educational and credentialing needs of staff managers who currently hold a Bachelor’s degree and are in need of specialized health and safety training, the EHSM certificate can ease the transition from a practitioner’s role to a technical manager’s role. This accredited certificate program may also allow you take the national accrediting exam administered by the Board of Certified Safety Professionals. Most EHSM students are highly specialized in their particular discipline and are employed primarily in large business or governmental organizations, including but not limited to safety engineering, industrial hygiene, health physics, ergonomics,risk management for workers compensation insurance and hazardous materials control.

This program will also benefit professionals who are not health and safety specialists but hold or are seeking a position of responsibility for the health and safety function in their organization. These individuals tend to have educational backgrounds in human resource management, industrial engineering, quality control or other staff support areas.

Visit the website http://bamabydistance.ua.edu/degrees/graduate-certificate-in-environmental-health-and-safety-management-online/

Upon completion, the student will be able to:

- Apply general management concepts and principles to EHSM functions

- Demonstrate understanding of EHSM regulations and methods of compliance

- Evaluate organizational culture as it relates to safety and health performance

- Design and implement effective safety and health training

- Demonstrate creative problem solving concerning EHSM issues

- Demonstrate effective conflict resolution skills involving EHSM issues

Course Descriptions

- HES 512 - Introduction to Environmental Health & Safety Management

This course presents an overview of environmental health and safety (EH&S) management with its emphasis on preventing workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. The importance of considering relevant science and engineering in all EH&S management decisions is emphasized. Governmental regulations and insurance matters affecting EH&S performance also are identified and discussed. Qualifications for employment in the field of EH&S management are described and current career opportunities are explored.

- HES 513- Occupational Health & Safety Law

This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of issues that can impact upon private sector employers under the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act, including rule making, the duty to comply with standards, General Duty Clause, requirements at multi-employer worksites, record-keeping, employer and employee rights, refusal to work and whistle blower protection, hazard communication, voluntary safety and health audits, inspections and investigations, citations, criminal enforcement, and judicial review. This course will also provide students with an introduction to peripheral “toxic tort” law concepts that should be understood by Safety and Health Managers including theories of liability, CERCLA liability, employer liability, tort defenses, causation, injuries, damages, and mass tort actions.

- HES 514- Health & Safety Regulations & Regulatory Compliance

This course addresses regulatory compliance as an important objective of all EH & S managers and the companies they represent. Focus is directed to workplace regulations of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The purpose, history, structure, jurisdiction, and operations of the agency are presented. Major health and safety standards that have been promulgated by OSHA are considered in some detail. Students learn how their organization can prepare for and respond to OSHA inspections effectively.

- HES 516- Practical Statistics for Safety Professionals

This course provides students with an introduction to basic research methods and statistical analysis for safety managers. Students will be introduced to foundational concepts of problem statement development, variables, hypothesis testing, and research design. Additionally, relevant descriptive and inferential statistic used in the field of Occupational Health and Safety will be covered with an emphasis on the interpretation of results. Students will learn a variety of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. The inferential techniques include an emphasis on statistical inference that is commonly used in safety management (e.g., t-tests and correlation). The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the basic research methods and statistical concepts required by safety managers to identify and mitigate risks using quantitative measures.

- HES 518 - Environmental Law

This course will provide students with a framework understanding of key federal environmental statutes and regulatory requirements that are likely to impact upon the day-to-day operation of a business or industrial facility that a company's Safety and Health Manager should be familiar with, including the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA), Underground Storage Tank (UST) program, Clean Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Oil Pollution Act (OPA), Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).

- CSM 537- Developing the Leader Within

This course takes an in-depth look at leadership theories, principles, qualities, styles, and models with a focus on developing leadership skills and potential within the individual students. Designed to assist students in identifying leadership styles, traits, strengths, and opportunities for improvement, this course will use self-assessment exercises, journaling, individual case studies, group case studies, active and collaborative learning exercises, and a field experience to explore the topic of leadership in depth. Each student will create a personal and individually-tailored plan for development of leadership skills in a field experience that will be helpful in preparing for future endeavors.

- CSM 525- Consumer Conflict Resolution

CSM 425/525 is an exploration of practical conflict mediation, negotiation, and management and a survey of theory and practice of formal and informal mediation.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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This programme will give you a fundamental understanding of the issues affecting the Earth enabling you to play a vital role in devising and enacting strategies to protect and conserve the environment, both in Europe and beyond. Read more

This programme will give you a fundamental understanding of the issues affecting the Earth enabling you to play a vital role in devising and enacting strategies to protect and conserve the environment, both in Europe and beyond.

Human activities are recognised as having an increasingly significant effect on the Earth’s biosphere. Our use of natural resources, deforestation, soil erosion, the release of potentially toxic compounds and pathogens, and the increase in greenhouse gases are all examples of pressures that have potentially serious consequences for humanity and other life on Earth.

On this programme you will learn about the issues that face the Earth and gain an in-depth understanding of natural resource management and the processes that give rise to environmental degradation and pollution problems.

It will allow you to play a vital role in planning and putting into action strategies to protect and conserve the environment.

This programme is run in collaboration with Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC).

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

This programme involves two semesters of taught courses, which are a balance of lectures, seminars, workshops and visits, plus a research dissertation project of about 16,000 words.

Compulsory courses typically will be:

  • Atmospheric Quality and Global Change
  • Analysing the Environment
  • Land Use/Environmental Interactions
  • Analysing the Environment Study Tour
  • Dissertation

Option courses:

You will also choose four optional courses^. We particularly recommend the following:

  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Waste Reduction and Recycling
  • Sustainability of Food Production
  • Participation in Policy and Planning
  • Forests and Environment
  • Foundations in Ecological Economics
  • Water Resource Management
  • Soil Protection and Management
  • Ecosystem Dynamics and Functions
  • Marine Systems and Policies
  • Carbon Capture and Transport
  • Culture, Ethics & Environment
  • Encountering Cities
  • Environmental Geochemistry
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • Principles of Environmental Sustainability
  • Principles of GIS
  • Project Appraisal
  • Understanding Environment and Development
  • Values and the Environment
  • Climate Change and Corporate Strategy
  • Passive Earth Observation
  • Introduction to Environmental Modelling
  • Political Ecology
  • Ecosystem Values and Management
  • Soil Science Concepts and Application

Courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Field trip

Part of this programme is a week-long study tour in spring. Past study tours have been held in France, Greece, Portugal, Israel and Morocco.

Learning outcomes

Students will:

  • develop a scientific understanding of some of the major processes which influence the quality of land, air and water resources
  • acquire knowledge of the most effective methods of environmental protection
  • develop expertise in the design and implementation of programmes of environmental protection
  • have the opportunity to study the integrated protection and management of particular ecosystems or resources

Career opportunities

Our graduates have a solid record in finding employment in the environmental sector while some choose to further their studies through a PhD.

There are also opportunities in consultancy positions and with environmental regulators, government and NGOs.

Student experience

Would you like to know what it’s really like to study at the School of GeoSciences?

Visit our student experience blog where you can find articles, advice, videos and ask current students your questions.



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Biochemical Engineering concerns the use of biological organisms or processes by manufacturing industries. Read more
Biochemical Engineering concerns the use of biological organisms or processes by manufacturing industries. It is a multidisciplinary subject, requiring the integration of engineering and bioscience knowledge to design and implement processes used to manufacture a wide range of products; from novel therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer, vaccines and hormones, to new environmentally-friendly biofuels. It is also essential in many other fields, such as the safe manufacture of food and drink and the removal of toxic compounds from the environment..

This course will provide you with the skills you need to start an exciting career in the bioprocess industries, or continue research in the area of bioprocessing or industrial biotechnology.

Industry involvement

As this is a highly industrially-led subject area, we have secured guest lectures from Cobra Biologics (contract manufacturing), Biocats Ltd (Enzyme manufacture) and the Centre for Process Innovation Ltd (biological process development) and are currently seeking additional industrial lectures.

Academics working at Birmingham have strong links with industry, through collaborative projects, so allow students to make contact with companies. Graduates from the MSc programme have gone on to careers in biochemical engineering world-wide, in large and small companies working in diverse areas.

There are also guest lectures from academics working at other institutions.

Practical experience

You will gain practical experience of working with industrially applicable systems, from fermentation at laboratory scale to 100 litre pilot scale, in the Biochemical Engineering laboratories. Theory learned in lectures will be applied in practical terms. In addition, theoretical aspects will be applied in design case studies in a number of modules, including the Design Project.

All MSc students complete a summer research project, working on a piece of individual, novel research within one of the research groups in the school. These projects provide an ideal experience of life as a researcher, from design of experimental work, practical generation of data, analysis and communication of findings. Many students find this experience very useful in choosing the next steps in their career.

Special Features

The lecture courses are supplemented with tutorials, seminars and experimental work. Industrial visits and talks by speakers from industrial and service organisations are also included in the course programme.

Pilot Plant

The Biochemical Engineering building houses a pilot plant with large-scale fermentation and downstream processing equipment. The newly-refurbished facility includes state-of-the-art computer-controlled bioreactors, downstream processing equipment and analytical instruments.

Course structure

The MSc is a 12-month full-time advanced course, comprising lectures, laboratory work, short experimental projects and a research project. You will take an introductory module, four core modules, and then choose 50 credits of optional themed modules. The course can also be taken on a part-time basis. The Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) lasts for 8 months from the end of September until June.

For the first eight months you have lectures, tutorials and laboratory work. Core module topics include:

Fermentation and cell culture
Bioseparations
Process monitoring and control
Systems and synthetic biology approaches
Optional module include:

Biopharmaceutical development and manufacture
Food processing
Business skills for the process industries
The programme is strongly design-orientatedand you complete a full process plant design exercise. You also have practical experience of working in the newly-refurbished pilot plant of the Biochemical Engineering building.

From June to September you gain research training on your own project attached to one of the teams working in the bioprocessing research section.

About the School of Chemical Engineering

Birmingham has one of the largest concentrations of Chemical Engineering expertise in the UK, with an excellent reputation in learning, teaching and research.
Investment totalling over £3.5 million in our buildings has resulted in some of the best teaching, computing and laboratory facilities anywhere in the UK.
We have achieved an excellent performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) – the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. 87% of the research in the School was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent. It was ranked joint fourth overall in the UK for its research prowess and first nationally for research impact.
The enthusiasm that the academic staff have for their research comes through in their teaching and ensures that they and you are at the cutting edge of chemical engineering.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The Diploma is a one-year postgraduate course designed to provide civil engineers and other suitably qualified graduates with a sound knowledge of present day practice in environmental engineering. Read more
The Diploma is a one-year postgraduate course designed to provide civil engineers and other suitably qualified graduates with a sound knowledge of present day practice in environmental engineering. The course has special relevance for local authority engineers but it has also been designed for those in the private sector who have a particular interest in environmental management with a particular emphasis on measures of quantitative assessment. Topics covered in the course include air quality, noise, hydrological processes, water and wastewater treatment, solid and toxic waste management, fire safety engineering and environmental monitoring and control. Environmental Impact Studies and analysis of risk, as an inherent part of infrastructural development, are also considered. This course has been approved by Engineers Ireland as meeting its requirements for continuing professional development.

Course organisation:

Lectures are normally held on Friday evening 7 - 10 p.m. and Saturday morning 9.30 a.m. - 12.30 p.m. each week throughout the two semesters (September to April). In addition to attending lectures, participants are required to submit coursework as part of the students' assessment.

Course content:

Environmental legislation, EIA and EIS

Hydrology for environmental management

Water and wastewater engineering

Air quality and noise monitoring and management

Solid and hazardous wastes

Fire safety engineering

Renewable energy

Special topics including water borne diseases, radiation hazards

Assessment:

The award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental Engineering is based on a combination of the results of two examination papers and coursework. Each paper constitutes one third of the overall assessment. The mark for the coursework also constitutes one third of the overall grade. Students must pass each paper and the coursework element independently; there is no system of compensation. The pass mark for the examination papers is 40%. A Distinction is awarded to those who obtain an overall average mark of 70% or over in both the coursework and two papers combined at the summer examination. The Diploma awarding ceremony takes place in November.

Recommended texts:

Extensive notes are provided by individual lecturers, who may also recommend texts.

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The MSc Environmental Engineering course provides highly employable graduates who will act as managers and leaders serving the environmental needs of the process industries. Read more
The MSc Environmental Engineering course provides highly employable graduates who will act as managers and leaders serving the environmental needs of the process industries.

The scale of modern industralisation has given rise to environmental problems of unprecedented complexity. This MSc examines environmental problems like toxic waste, air pollution, waste disposal, global warming, contaminated land and water. The challenge for today’s environmental engineers is to manage these problems through a high level of resource management and technological innovation.

Today’s environmental problems require innovation in improvements to manufacturing processes and in the utilisation
of natural resources. Both the assessment and management of the effects of natural and human activity on the natural and built
environment are examined in this course. The course demands a high level of resource management and is designed to enable graduates to work across the interface between engineering and the environment.

Students will develop:
a solid understanding of existing technology and its application, and an appreciation of the economic, legal, social and ethical aspects of the problems presented
skills in research, project management, problem solving and reporting
the ability to communicate ideas effectively in written reports, verbally and by means of presentations to groups
the ability to exercise original thought
the ability to plan and undertake an individual project
the ability to understand and apply the theory, method and
practice of environmental engineering
interpersonal communication and professional skill

Previous research projects have included:
assessment of energy crops for combined heat and power systems
bio-diesel process optimisation
microbial Fuel Cells
nanobots for contaminated land remediation
metal contamination of lakes near Nottingham
starch nanoparticles for water treatment
renewable energy at point of consumption

Scholarship information can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/graduateschool/funding/index.aspx

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In the absence of subsidy, the EU poultry sector relies on highly efficient production systems, with successful companies often using sophisticated technologies. Read more
In the absence of subsidy, the EU poultry sector relies on highly efficient production systems, with successful companies often using sophisticated technologies. This is reflected in the integrated structure of most poultry companies and the number of graduates and postgraduates employed by them.

Many companies have responded to the pressure on financial margins by setting up operations world wide. There continues to be a good demand for suitably trained graduate and postgraduate level entrants into the sector.

The skills and knowledge delivered by the Applied Poultry Science programme are highly relevant to companies using intensive methods of production and those responding to retailer demand for extensive systems. This enables both new entrants and existing employees wishing to build on their expertise and aspirations, to enhance their career opportunities within the poultry sector.

The Applied Poultry Science course is offered on a part-time distance learning basis.

It is designed to suit those in continuing employment or with other commitments. Participants come from a wide range of backgrounds, including nutritionists, breeders, vets and other poultry sector workers, all of whom wish to develop their career and businesses.

Specific course objectives are to provide graduates with:
- A sound knowledge of the underlying science of poultry production.
- A good understanding of the issues underpinning poultry production systems.
- A wide range of specialist skills appropriate to poultry science professionals.
- The ability to critically evaluate developments in poultry science, including nutritional, genetic,
- Welfare, quality assurance and environmental issues.
- The ability to produce professional level recommendations and reports.
- Research skills.

The MSc Applied Poultry Science degree is awarded by the University of Glasgow.

Course Content

The programme is a mix of technical, scientific, environmental and management skills development modules. It is taught largely by staff from the SRUC Avian Science Research Centre who are involved in poultry research studies on a daily basis and who aim to provide up to the minute, highly relevant knowledge transfer into the Applied Poultry Science programme.

The Avian Science Research Centre has a full range of facilities for those wishing to study or carry out research with SRUC ranging from a hatchery to a processing plant and a good range of different poultry production systems.

Poultry Production Systems

This module studies the poultry meat and poultry egg industry in terms of its structure and sectors including intensive and non-intensive systems. It includes global export and import markets for the major poultry meat and egg products and evaluates their quality assurance systems. It will examine the requirements for optimal performance within the various systems and investigate factors affecting performance.

Poultry Nutrition and Growth

Poultry nutrition and growth examines the principles of poultry nutrition, particularly the importance of different nutrients in terms of growth and production and how they are processed in the avian body. It includes a study of the major anatomical and physiological systems in poultry and describes the role of nutrition in poultry health in different production environments, with particular regard to nutrient deficiencies. The partitioning of energy and nutrients into the growth and development of the whole body and different components of the body will also be examined, as will methods of describing different growth patterns.

Incubation and Hatchery Practice

This module develops knowledge and an understanding of the science and technology that underpins the production of day-old stock. Students study embryo-genesis in poultry and how this is exploited by the poultry sector to maximise the production of viable hatchlings. At the conclusion of the module students will be able to critically evaluate poultry hatchery practices, where appropriate, from an international prospective.

Housing and the Environment

Large scale poultry production seeks to manage the birds’ environment to optimise the competing demands of welfare, productivity, quality and environmental protection in an economically viable way. Recognising the impacts of different housing alternatives, the relationship to environmental emissions, and the sustainability of systems are therefore essential skills for those engaged in the industry that this module addresses. The approach will initially be one of directed study in order that the full range of issues are covered; but later in the module, students will be asked to do a case study on a real poultry enterprise with the coursework being centred on the completion of the IPPC application form for an intensive poultry enterprise. Even though some students may not be familiar with large scale poultry enterprises, the structured approach required to carry out the IPPC assessment process, and the wealth of information available in the relevant technical document will give a sound basis for understanding the range of housing and environmental issues involved.

Poultry Behaviour and Welfare

This module explains the general principles of poultry behaviour and welfare and studies sensory perception, motivation and learning in poultry. It evaluates the behavioural and physiological indicators that are used to assess welfare in given circumstances. It examines current practice with respect to welfare and current welfare legislation.

Poultry Health and Hygiene

A range of different infectious and non-infectious diseases will be covered in depth, mostly affecting chickens and turkeys but with specific sessions on diseases of game birds and diseases of pigeons. The importance of notifiable diseases such as Newcastle Disease and highly pathogenic avian influenza will be emphasised, and the significance of other potentially zoonotic organisms such as Salmonella, Campylobacter, Chlamydophila Psittaci and West Nile Virus will be discussed.

Advanced Poultry Nutrition

Advanced poultry nutrition builds on the poultry nutrition and growth module and examines theoretical and practical poultry nutrition in greater depth. It links current nutritional theories, (eg. amino acid balance and requirements or the anti-nutrient and toxic properties of feedstuffs) with methods of alleviation. These are integrated with classical nutrition-balance studies and proximate analyses, exposing students to all aspects of a nutritional study. It also involves a detailed study of nutrition with respect to bird growth and health and the environmental constraints imposed on the system.

Experimental Design

This module aims to develop statistical skills to aid the technical, scientific and management decisions. It explores a range of statistical processes from the collection of data and its interpretation to the production of information charts, diagrams and tables and the analysis of data looking at differences, significance and trends.

Management Skills

With the labour market becoming more competitive there is a real need for today's graduates to develop skills beyond academic knowledge in order to thrive. This module introduces various management skills which include communication, teamworking, leadership, time management, decision-making, empowerment and motivation. It aims therefore to improve the student’s knowledge and ability to manage. A range of practical methods and approaches will be used to enable the students to better organise and motivate themselves and others.

The study weekends and short study tour are an integral part of teaching delivery and students are strongly recommended to attend these if they are to succeed in this course.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/art/graduate-fine-arts-studio. The MFA in fine arts studio is a rigorous two-year program comprised of major studio courses chosen from painting, sculpture, non-toxic printmaking, and expanded forms. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/art/graduate-fine-arts-studio

The MFA in fine arts studio is a rigorous two-year program comprised of major studio courses chosen from painting, sculpture, non-toxic printmaking, and expanded forms. The program also includes studio electives in areas such as film, ceramics, photography, industrial design, and glass in addition to theory, and contemporary art history, A thesis is required.

The program is committed to collaboration and interdisciplinary approaches both within the four major fine arts areas of study and the entire College of Imaging Arts and Sciences. The program's structure allows for personal growth, experimentation, collaboration, and unique, non-discipline specific results to occur in the thesis. Courses are meant to concentrate on creative visual work while also thinking about making and sustaining a dialogue.

Curriculum

- First Year

Fine Art Studio Major Courses
Thinking About Making
Fine Art Research
Art History (Contemporary) Course
Business Practices
CIAS Studio Elective
Free Elective

- Second Year

Fine Art Studio Major Courses
Research and Thesis
CIAS Studio Elective
Free Electives

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Habitat loss, global climate change, water and air pollution, ozone depletion, species invasions, loss of biodiversity, and the accumulation of toxic wastes are among the many environmental dilemmas our society faces. Read more

Program overview

Habitat loss, global climate change, water and air pollution, ozone depletion, species invasions, loss of biodiversity, and the accumulation of toxic wastes are among the many environmental dilemmas our society faces. These complex problems pit environmental limits against economic development, diverse cultures, ethics, values, and social stability and therefore require an understanding of science, policy, society, history, and economics. Environmental scientists must use integrated and holistic approaches to understand and find sustainable solutions to these problems. Graduates of the environmental science program are well prepared for a variety of environmental careers including consulting, research, policy, and outreach, or further graduate work towards a doctoral degree.

Plan of study

Built on the concept that environmental issues are inherently interdisciplinary, the program is offered in collaboration with the College of Liberal Arts. The curriculum provides students with a deep understanding of the science behind our environmental problems, the complex set of circumstances that impact environmental issues, and how environmental decisions and policies must attempt to find a balance between environmental conservation, human well-being, and economic development. Students augment their hands-on classroom work with in-depth experiential learning through an individual thesis or project that provides students with the chance to work on real-world environmental problems under the guidance of skilled environmental scientists. The program includes a core curriculum and electives chosen to reflect the student’s background and career goals. A minimum of 34 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required. All students must propose, conduct, and report on an original research thesis or project.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to thesis/project option, see website for a particular option's modules
http://www.rit.edu/programs/environmental-science-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have a minimum GPA of 3.0 (overall and in science/math).
-Submit a statement outlining the candidate's research/project interests, career goals, and suitability to the program.
-Submit three letters of recommendation, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 600 (paper-based) is required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.
-The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended but not required for applicants with an undergraduate degree from a US institution.The GRE is required for International applicants.
-Students are strongly encouraged to contact program faculty before applying to discuss thesis topics and research projects. Students will be matched with a potential thesis advisor at the time of admission.

Additional information

Facilities and equipment:
The program provides a wide range of research opportunities. Many faculty members are engaged in field-based projects and the college boasts excellent laboratory facilities that support field research, including wet laboratories and computer facilities (traditional and geographic information systems). For a list of past and present projects, and faculty research interests, please visit the program website.

Monitoring, mapping, and field equipment:
ArcGIS and IDRISI GIS software, ENVS and ERDAS Remote Sensing software, Garmin and Trimble GPS receivers, soil sampling and analysis equipment, water sampling devices, multisonde water quality probes and dissolved oxygen meters, SCT meter, ponar dredges, Li-Cor light meter, plankton samplers, macroinvertebrate nets/samplers, and a library of field reference texts.

Other equipment:
Fluorimeter, Raman Spectrometer, UV-Vis-IR, GC-MS, ICP, atomic absorption, polarimeter, centrifuge, electrochemical equipment, gas chromatographs, HPLC, viscometer, ESR (built in-house), confocal microscope, infrared carbon dioxide analyzer, Unisense microelectrode system, Lachat autoanalyzer, incubators, capillary electrophoresis, DSCs, DMA, NMR, drying oven, Wiley mill.

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Chemistry is a fundamental science that underpins a vast array of topics. At Lincoln, the School of Chemistry is focused on advancing the chemical sciences to address real-world problems in society and industry. Read more
Chemistry is a fundamental science that underpins a vast array of topics. At Lincoln, the School of Chemistry is focused on advancing the chemical sciences to address real-world problems in society and industry.

Research students in Chemistry can benefit from an interdisciplinary environment and may have the opportunity to work with colleagues from across the University’s College of Science, national and international academic collaborators, and an array of industry partners. You will have full access to a range of facilities including high-throughput preparative methods, bespoke molecular and nanomaterials laboratories, and analytical and structural instrumentation.

The chemistry team is currently involved in studies including collaborative projects with the pharmaceutical, environmental, fine chemicals and instrumentation sectors. You will have the opportunity to engage with the team on projects that have real-world impact using fundamental chemistry research.

How You Study

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisors, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

Special Features

Ongoing research projects in the School include novel molecular imprinted polymers for precious metal recovery, design of organic crystals for nanoelectronic applications, nanometals for spectroscopic enhancement, materials degradation and preservation of precious artefacts, and pharmaceutical materials discovery. The bespoke design of our postgraduate programmes aims to address real-world challenges using fundamental chemistry research.

The environment for chemical research at the University of Lincoln recently benefited from a £6.8m grant from the Higher Education Funding Council for England Catalyst Fund. Systematic investment includes specialist instrumentation in the University’s Analytical Centre and specialist facilities for molecular synthesis, nano and materials synthesis and crystal engineering that uses automated synthesis tools.

Researchers in the School of Chemistry are working to develop new methods to rapidly profile ‘legal high’ preparations with novel chromatographic methods. Other projects include work to design new materials for remediation of precious and toxic metals from industrial waste.

Career and Personal Development

You have the opportunity to develop the in-depth knowledge and expertise necessary for careers in and across the broad spectrum of chemistry-related industries. This programme aims to provide foundation for further research or a career in teaching or academia.

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Tralee is currently seeking to recruit a high calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master of Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Read more

Tralee is currently seeking to recruit a high calibre and suitably qualified science graduate to undertake this Master of Research programme in the Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences at IT Tralee. Graduates holding a relevant Level 8 Honours Degree (second class honours or higher) are invited to submit an application. The successful applicants will be awarded a stipend of €700 per month for a maximum period of 18 months and the Institute will waive full fees for this funding period. Postgraduate students are expected to complete their studies full-time at the Institute.

Biography of Principle Supervisor

Dr Oscar Goñi received his Degree in Chemistry from the University of Navarra (Spain), an MSc in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Complutense University of Madrid (Spain) and completed his PhD in Plant Protein Biochemistry at ICTAN-CSIC (Spain) and Complutense University of Madrid (Spain). Dr Goñi has previously worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Max Planck Institute of Plant Breeding Research (Cologne). He is a protein biochemist with experience in the purification and characterization of functional proteins, enzymology and development of protein biomarkers. Dr. Goñi currently holds the position of Postdoctoral Researcher with Shannon ABC / Brandon Bioscience and specialises in the development of enzyme activities for the production of macro-algae derived oligosaccharides and chitin/chitosan derived oligosaccharides for crop protection and yield enhancement. 

Research Project Abstract

The United Nations’ and Agriculture Organization predicts that by 2050 the world will need to produce 70 percent more food than it does currently. Along with improving food storage and transport, increasing crop yields is seen as a primary solution. Salinity is one the major environmental stresses affecting crop production, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas. Most of the vegetable crops are salt sensitive, growing poorly in salinized soils due to the accumulation of toxic ions from prolonged irrigation regimes. A meaningful approach to increase crop yield and counteract salt stress would be the use of protein hydrolysate-based biostimulants, which are gaining interest worldwide. Nowadays, more than 90% of the protein hydrolysates market in agriculture is based on products obtained through chemical hydrolysis of proteins from animal origin. The production and use of new vegetable derived-protein hydrolysates with high plant biostimulant activity has become the focus of much research interest due to their lack of plant phytotoxicity, absence of degraded or biologically inactive amino acids or compatibility in the production of food for vegetarians. The commercial partner, Deltagen UK, aims to commercialise protein hydrolysate biostimulants with superior salinity inducing tolerance. The aim of this research is the development of an innovative system to produce protein hydrolysates from the defatted by product meals of flax, lentil and sesame seeds with the ability to biostimulate plant tolerance to salt stress. Novel protein hydrolysates will be produced using a cocktail of suitable proteases, they will be applied to tomato plants (cv. Micro-Tom) in a controlled growth room under salt stress conditions. Treatments will be assessed by comparing classic phenotypical parameters. Plant tissue will also be saved in order to assess other biochemical and molecular parameters such as stress related proteins and osmoprotectant metabolites.

Research Context (Technical Merit & Impact)

The beginning of 21st century is marked by global scarcity of water resources, environmental pollution and increased salinization of soil and water. An increasing human population and reduction in land available for cultivation are two threats for agricultural sustainability. It has been estimated that worldwide 20% of total cultivated and 33% of irrigated agricultural lands are afflicted by high salinity. It has been projected that more than 50% of the arable land would be salinized by the year 2050. Use of optimized farm management practices such as shifting crop rotation or better irrigation systems can ameliorate yield reduction under salinity stress. However, its implementation is often limited because of cost and availability of good water quality. Several salt-tolerant varieties have been released, the overall progress of traditional breeding has been slow and has not been successful, as only few major determinant genetic traits of salt tolerance have been identified. The utilisation of agro-food processing wastes to generate value added products is an extremely convincing argument as it makes commercial and environmental sense. In addition, it is an excellent, demonstrable example of the European circular economy in action, a key objective of the H2020 research programme, turning waste into value and ultimately food for a growing population.

Research Methodology

Three process variables will be studied in order to obtain the maximum degradation of seed proteins: incubation time, temperature and the initial concentration of meal protein. The Response Surface Methodology (RSM) will be used to reduce the cost and duration of experiments and allow for the observation of any interacting factors in the final process response. Amino acid and monosaccharide composition will be determined by sensitive high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) according previous bibliography. Molecular weight distribution of protein hydrolysates will be characterized by protein electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The plant trials will involve 2 separate sets of experiments under unstressed and salt-stressed conditions respectively. Experiments will be carried out in a growth room with different concentration rates of different protein hydrolysates and the tomato variety Micro-Tom will be used. This extensive factorial experiment will be assessed by fruit yield, fruit quality, chlorophyll (SPAD measurement), MDH content (cell membrane integrity) and levels of protective compounds (proline and soluble carbohydrates). The presence of stress proteins such as HSPs will be determined using immunoblotting techniques (Western blot). RT-qPCR is another advanced laboratory technique that will be emp



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Labelled by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), AMIS is a Master program in Advanced Materials for Innovation and Sustainability which explores the theme of “Substitution of critical or toxic materials in products for optimized performance”. Read more

Labelled by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), AMIS is a Master program in Advanced Materials for Innovation and Sustainability which explores the theme of “Substitution of critical or toxic materials in products for optimized performance”. It also covers the topics of “Material chain optimization for end-of-life products” and “Product and services design for the circular economy” - all of which are central themes of the AMIS. The primary focus of the AMIS program is metal and mineral raw materials. Bio-based and polymer materials are studied in view of their substitution potential. Other materials are also analyzed in the context of multimaterial product recycling. In addition, the AMIS program includes a solid package of courses and project work in innovation and entrepreneurship.

Program structure

Mobility is integrated within the two-year program, during which students study at two of the consortium partner universities. Upon completion of the program, graduates are awarded 120 ECTS and a double degree delivered by two of the five partner institutions where they studied. Students begin the Master program at Grenoble INP, Aalto University or T.U. Darmstadt. In their second year, students specialize in another partner university:

  • To attend the specialization year offered at the University of Bordeaux, prospective students must attend the first year at either Aalto University or the Technical University of Darmstadt.

Year 2 specializations are the following:

  • University of Bordeaux: Advanced Hybrid Materials: Composites and Ceramics by Design
  • T.U. Darmstadt: Functional Ceramics: Processing, Characterization and Properties
  • Aalto University: Nanomaterials and interfaces: Advanced Characterization and Modeling
  • University of Liège: Nanomaterials and Modeling
  • Grenoble INP: Materials Interfaces: Surfaces, Films & Coatings

SEMESTER 1 TO 4 CONTENT

Master 1: Basic level competencies.

Mandatory courses in:

  • Fundamentals of materials science
  • Applied materials
  • Modelling tools and materials
  • Innovation, business and entrepreneurship.

Joint collaboration courses with AMIS partners:

  • Inno project I: business model development and the commercialization process of new technologies.
  • Summer camp: a week intensive course working in teams on industry case studies to create and produce new ideas, innovative technologies, improved products or services.
  • Internship: work experience in a company or research organization to develop a solution-focused approach by translating innovations into feasible business solutions and commercializing new technologies.

Master 2: Specialization year.

Mandatory courses in:

  • Advanced functional materials with a specialization in material interfaces, nanomaterials, ceramics or hybrids.

Joint collaboration course with AMIS partners:

  • Practical work on various industrial projects integrated with innovation and entrepreneurship contents.
  • Inno project II: a specialized approach on business model development and commercialization process of new technologies.

Master thesis:

  • A research and development experience in material science jointly supervized by the home university professors and the host partners. The results of the Master thesis will be defended during a presentation. Certain subjets may lead to setting up a business or a spin-off.

Strengths of this Master program

  • Develop expertise in the field of innovative and sustainable advanced materials.
  • Meet, study and work with relevant academic and non-academic contacts in the innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem.
  • Gain a holistic view on value and process chains.
  • Acquire transferable skills through modern teaching methods. These transferable skills include: entrepreneurship, negotiation techniques, intellectual property, problem solving, working cooperatively and creatively, co-designing, and life cycle approaches.

After this Master program?

As a resource engineer, students may continue in the following fields:

Freelance and entrepreneurship:

  • Create a business or become a consultant

Resource industry:

  • SMEs in chemistry, exploration, green energy, machinery and plant construction, metal working industry, ceramics, environmental economy (R&D, product development, management, production, marketing and sales)

Research:

  • Universities, research institutions, lecturer or managerial position
  • Circular economy
  • Production, analytics, management, marketing and sales

And also:

  • Science journalism, consulting, project development and management, advisor to policy makers, administration, specialist agencies and media.


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