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The programme is designed for graduate students who wish to learn about the diverse strands of political thinking in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the different approaches to comparison in political thought. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is designed for graduate students who wish to learn about the diverse strands of political thinking in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the different approaches to comparison in political thought. It is highly relevant to students who wish to embark on doctoral studies in the area of non-Western political thought. It is also relevant for practitioners working in or intending to work in governments, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups who wish to acquire deeper knowledge of ideas and values that inform political practices in Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The MSc in Comparative Political Thought builds on SOAS’s wealth of regional expertise to offer a new approach to cross-regional comparison of political thinking. It reframes the study of political thought in Africa, Asia and the Middle East as a study of political ideas and political practices. The programme introduces students to the key approaches, debates, and questions in the emerging sub-discipline of comparative political thought. Covering a range of thinkers, traditions and texts, in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, it provides learning opportunities for students to compare ideas and values across regions and historical periods. The MSc in Comparative Political Thought will enable graduate students to undertake further advanced study and research in political thought, as well as enhance skills suitable for employment in multicultural and international professional contexts

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-comparative-political-thought/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification (pdf; 126kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-comparative-political-thought/file79323.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The MSc in Comparative Political Thought has two core compulsory half-unit courses that all students registered for the degree will undertake. Approaches to Comparative Political Thought is taken in Term 1, and Comparative International Political Thought in Term 2. Students then choose courses equivalent to two units from a list of optional courses (outlined below), and complete a dissertation based on independent study and research (equivalent to a further unit).

- Knowledge

1. Familiarity with the main approaches in the emerging sub-field of comparative political thought, including different understandings of ‘comparison’ and ‘thought’;

2. Advanced understanding of some of the philosophical, historical, political and linguistic issues that arise in the study of non-Western political thought;

3. In-depth knowledge of some key political concepts (eg. state, authority, individual, community), as understood by political thinkers in Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

4. An understanding of political thought not simply as articulated by elite intellectuals, but also as ideas in action, manifested in political practices at different levels of society.

- Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. To analyse and evaluate competing approaches to comparative political thought;
2. To conceptualise the main issues and problems that arise in the comparative study of political thought;
3. To develop in-depth understanding of aspects of non-Western political thought;
4. To develop intellectual initiative and skills to compare political ideas across cultural and historical boundaries, identifying and evaluating similarities and differences;
5. To formulate research questions and hypotheses.

- Subject-based practical skills

1. To identify, analyse and evaluate core arguments in theoretical materials from a variety of sources;
2. To develop skills to work creatively and flexibly across different disciplines and regional traditions;
3. To organise information in a lucid, coherent, concise, and clear form in written as well as oral presentations;
4. To develop initiative and capacity to work independently on research questions and to adjust hypotheses and approach in the light of work undertaken for the dissertation.

- Transferable skills

1. To retrieve, select, digest and analyse complex information from a variety of sources.
2. To structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. To work effectively in and contribute to meetings, by presenting, listening to and discussing ideas introduced during meetings.
4. To manage time effectively.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Cultural, Social, and Political Thought major in the Master of Arts (M.A.) program is interdisciplinary in nature and is based on a cohort learning model that fosters an environment of interdisciplinary engagement and exchange, research, peer mentoring, collaboration among a small group of students, within a team-based learning experience. Read more
The Cultural, Social, and Political Thought major in the Master of Arts (M.A.) program is interdisciplinary in nature and is based on a cohort learning model that fosters an environment of interdisciplinary engagement and exchange, research, peer mentoring, collaboration among a small group of students, within a team-based learning experience. The overall academic aims of the program are to emphasize social, cultural, and political thought and to instill the intellectual and practical tools to work successfully with community partners and agencies to facilitate social change. Students graduating from the Cultural, Social, and Political Thought major will demonstrate a range of professional skills (e.g., peer review, public presentations, critical thinking) and research competencies. Graduates are capable of producing novel, relevant, and rigorous research that make significant contributions to interdisciplinary knowledge.

Visit the website: http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/master-arts/majors/cultural-social-and-political-thought

Course detail

The Cultural, Social, and Political Thought major is thesis-based and requires students to complete 9.0 to 18.0 credit hours of graduate semester courses and a thesis. This program is highly theoretical and interdisciplinary in nature and intended to ground students in a body of cognate critical theories and methodologies. Across disciplinary boundaries, the Cultural, Social, and Political Thought major emphasizes the critical engagement of ideas and their manifestation in shifting cultural, social, and political contexts.

Aims of the programme

The program’s key learning outcomes are:

- Mastery of theoretical frameworks related to cultural, social and political thought such as Feminism, Poststructuralism, Postmodernism, Postcolonialism, and Critical Theory.

- Mastery of substantive knowledge in interdisciplinary area of cultural, social and political thought. Research topics are not constrained, but are likely to include such problems, issues, and concepts as gender, race, class, disability, sexuality, equality, citizenship, justice, power and resistance.

- Mastery of relevant methodological approaches pertinent to cultural, social and political thought, such as Historical Materialism, and mastery of relevant methods, such as Discourse Analysis, Ethnography, and Interviewing.

- Mastery of ability to propose, design, present, and disseminate novel and applicable research in the interdisciplinary area of cultural, social and political thought.

Why study at the University of Lethbridge?

As a graduate student at the University of Lethbridge, you’ll find yourself at the centre of a student-focused environment that nurtures innovation, critical thinking and creativity.

The University of Lethbridge is one of Canada’s top-ranked universities and leading research institutions.

At the foundation of our graduate programs is a multidisciplinary and personalized experience. A collaborative environment is encouraged between faculty and students. This means you have flexibility in decisions regarding the research and learning path you take.

At the U of L, we are committed to helping every one of our students thrive. From aiding with financial support to one-on-one mentorship to individualized career advice, you’ll find support every step of the way.

When you graduate, you will have the confidence you need to succeed in whatever you do, whether that means pursuing further education, teaching in an academic setting or establishing a professional career.

We’re here to help as you find the answers to your questions. As Alberta’s Destination University, the U of L gives you room to think, create and explore, providing a university experience unlike any other.

How to apply

In order to apply, you will need to provide the following documentation:

• Academic Transcripts
• Curriculum Vitae
• Three Letters of Reference
• Letter of Intent
• English Language Proficiency (ELP)

All applications and supporting documents must be provided through the online portal: http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/master-arts/apply

The Co-operative Education/Internship Option

The Co-operative Education/Internship Option is available to students for the Master of Arts (MA) and Master of Science (MSc) programs. Co-operative education is an educational model that formally integrates academic study at the master’s level with relevant, paid work experience in appropriate employment fields such as government, institutions, and industry. The University, the employer, and the student are in partnership to ensure an enriching experience toward the student's professional development.

Funding

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/award-opportunities

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Experience a rigorous interdisciplinary graduate program in Social and Political Thought, in a supportive and personalized environment – the only one of its kind in Atlantic Canada. Read more
Experience a rigorous interdisciplinary graduate program in Social and Political Thought, in a supportive and personalized environment – the only one of its kind in Atlantic Canada.

In Acadia's graduate program in Social and Political Thought you will dive into the study of political and social life through theoretical questions and engagements. The program is interdisciplinary in nature since social and political thought is a nexus connecting political thought, social theory, philosophy, postcolonial thought, literary criticism, media studies, cultural studies, environment studies, and gender studies. Working in close collaboration with its nationally and internationally celebrated faculty, you will take courses spanning several disciplines, increase your exposure to other areas of inquiry and approaches to theory through the core colloquium, and undertake a final interdisciplinary thesis (in year two).

Be Inspired

As a graduate student of Social and Political Thought at Acadia, you will benefit from the small school environment with small class sizes and high faculty-to-student interaction. Only MA programs without PHD programs above them can promise this kind of support, attention and engagement. While having access to professors with a diverse set of research interests, you can also expect a personalized research agenda. To ensure attention to the interdisciplinary nature of the program, you will be guided in your research by your supervisor and a second reader (selected from another discipline).

This program is designed around student engagement. The Social and Political Thought program hosts: a bi-weekly colloquium attended by students, faculty and guest lectures; a newly-founded graduate journal in social and political thought titled: To Be Decided; a community speakers forum; a film series; and a robust graduate student culture. The program also hosts a bi-annual graduate conference on social and political thought in the spring, attracting students and scholars nationally and internationally.

Research Interests

-Paul Abela: Kant; Moral theory
-Andrew Biro: Critical theory; Environmental political theory; Political ecology/economy
-Rachel Brickner: Comparative political theory; Latin American politics
-James Brittain: Critical Development Studies; Latin American Society and Politics; Political Economy; Social Change and Revolution
-Michael Dennis: The political economy of the New Deal era; social movements and political reform in the United States; globalization and the American South; American economic history of the postwar period; and the civil rights movement.
-Marc Ramsay: Ethics and philosophy of law
-Jon Saklofske: Literary studies; Media forms and functions; Narrative ideologies; Digital cultures; Virtual environments; Video game studies
-Donna Seamone: Ritual studies; Ethnographic study of religion
-Tony Thomson: Marxism; Organized labour in Canada; Critical criminology; Social theory
-Brenda Trofanenko: Public history and pedagogy; Museum anthropology; Postcolonial theory; Memory studies
-Geoffrey Whitehall: International political theory; Contemporary Political Thought; Discourses of Culture and Technology; Philosophy of Space and Time
-Ian Wilks: Medieval philosophy; Philosophy of religion; Ethics and bioethics

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The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). Read more
The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). It also welcomes students whose previous study had a more specialised historical or theoretical (or philosophical) bent, provided that while doing this course they are willing to engage themselves with both approaches to research.The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). It also welcomes students whose previous study had a more specialised historical or theoretical (or philosophical) bent, provided that while doing this course they are willing to engage themselves with both approaches to research.

This MPhil attracts students from all over the world, and its training provides an ideal foundation from which to proceed to doctoral research, not only in the United Kingdom, but in North American, European, Asian and Southern Hemisphere university systems.

Priority is given to the pursuit of the individual student’s research: all examined work derives from this research. Classes are provided in Methodology, in the reading of selected texts, and in selected concepts: these are intended to be ‘exemplary’, offering opportunities to explore different methods used in the field, different approaches to reading texts, and a variety of political concepts. Work done in classes is not examined.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimppth

Course detail

The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History offers students a rounded and flexible Masters programme that provides them with an introduction to all three of the fields contained within its scope (History of Political Thought, Political Theory, Intellectual History), while allowing them to specialise in their own area of particular interest. It offers a thorough training in the key techniques of higher-level academic study and research.

The MPhil is inter-Faculty: History, Politics, and Classics are the participating departments. The teaching staff, and examiners, have diverse disciplinary backgrounds, as do students on the course.

Learning Outcomes

After completion of the MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History, students should have:

1. acquired an enhanced understanding of the history of political thought as well as an appreciation of the broader theoretical approaches and intellectual idioms that inform its study.
2. acquired the analytical capacity to pursue independent study of primary texts in the history of political thought and to evaluate the findings of secondary commentators
3. acquired the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field of political thought and intellectual history

Format

The course comprises two kinds of work: group study and individually tailored supervised research training. Both persist simultaneously throughout the year, so that students are expected to attend the course classes, research seminar, and lectures while at the same time researching their essays. While there are no fixed course classes in Easter Term when students will be concentrating on their dissertation, they will be required to present their work at a Dissertation Seminar and encouraged to continue attending lectures and the research seminar. Postgraduate students in Cambridge are expected to work continuously throughout the year with the exception of a few days’ break at a time, so that the ‘vacation periods’ are in fact periods in which required work must be completed.

Students will receive the following feedback:

- oral supervision feedback
- writen termly CGSRS reports
- written essay feedback
- oral dissertation workshop feedback
- formal written feedback from two examiners after the submission and examination of their dissertation.

Assessment

A thesis of 15,000 - 20,000 words is submitted at the end of the course. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Two essays of not more than 6,000 words each, one submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term, the second at the end of Lent Term. These essays constitute Part I of the MPhil, and contribute to the final overall mark.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. Read more
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student � once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with an essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of module options that may be offered in a given year:

Democracy: Ancient and Modern Richard Bourke (Queen Mary)
Propaganda and Ideology in Rome Valentina Arena (UCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500 Serena Ferente (KCL)
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe Iain McDaniel (UCL)
Early-modern theories of the state Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)
The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476 - 1800 Jason Peacey (UCL)
Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language Avi Lifschitz (UCL)
Enlightenment and Revolution: Political Ideas in the British Isles 1688-1800 Ian McBride (KCL)
Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
From Hume to Darwin God, Man and Nature in European Thought Niall O'Flaherty (KCL)
Visions of Capitalism Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) [please note: not running 2011-12]
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1790-1890 Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism Maurizio Isabella (Queen Mary)
Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought Axel K�rner (UCL)
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, 19th�20th Centuries Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

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This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Read more
This interdisciplinary MA promotes the understanding of Europe in its political, social and philosophical dimensions. Choosing specialisms within European thought, society, history and politics you will develop discipline-specific skills and regional expertise, while the interdisciplinary programme structure encourages you to think across boundaries, gaining an expansive overview of the continent.

Degree information

From Marx to Foucault, Bakhtin to Durkheim, European thinkers have helped to influence the ways in which we understand texts and communication, individuals and societies. This pathway encourages graduates to investigate a panoply of ideas and theories, and their applications.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research.

The Taught pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), four optional inter-faculty modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), two inter-faculty optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four inter-faculty optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered.

Core modules
-Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
-Social Theory

Optional modules - students on the Taught pathway select four, and students on the Research pathway select two of the following inter-faculty optional modules:
-Relevant modules - UCL Arts & Humanities Faculty
-Relevant modules - UCL Social & Historical Sciences Faculty
-Relevant modules - UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 12,000-words, or 18,000-words for the Research pathway.

Teaching and learning
Key aspects of European theory and culture are taught through participation in lectures and seminars. Through feedback sessions on presentations and essays, students are encouraged to reflect on, and improve, their own work. Assessment is through a combination of coursework essays, unseen written examinations, and the dissertation.

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme: both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right. Outside academia, potential careers may include politics, business, commerce, teaching, public relations, or journalism.

Employability
Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, nowhere enjoys such a range of resources and such a favourable location for the study of Europe.

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The MA offers the student the opportunity to explore early Western intellectual history through philosophical, literary and cultural approaches. Read more

Overview

The MA offers the student the opportunity to explore early Western intellectual history through philosophical, literary and cultural approaches. It should appeal to students who want an overview of the foundations of modern European thought, and those who want to go on to further studies in Classics, Medieval and Renaissance studies,European studies, philosophy, or the history of ideas. The objective of this course is to provide students with a specialized knowledge in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance thought, focusing on philosophical writers, literary and historical themes, and the history of thought. Building upon the strengths of critical thinking, systematic reflection and historical awareness developed by the student in their undergraduate studies, the MA in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Thought will allow the student to explore thematic concerns of writers in the Western tradition from Ancient Greece and Rome to the 16th century and the various revivals in scholastic thought into the seventeenth century. It will also prepare those students for research degrees in either one of these areas, allowing them to pursue further studies in Classics, Philosophy or related fields.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/ma-ancient-medieval-and-renaissance-thought-0

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

Course Structure

Candidates take six modules (three in each semester) and write a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words under the supervision of a designated supervisor.
The 90 credits for the MA will be made up of 60 credits awarded for taught modules and 30 credits for the dissertation. Candidates are required to take the core module PH626, at least one taught module in Classics, and at least one in Philosophy.

Career Options

Successful completion of the MA at a high level will normally equip students to proceed to study for a PhD, a necessary qualification for an academic career (in certain subject areas further language qualifications may be required). Beyond the academic sphere, however, the skills the programme fosters (analytic skills, critical thinking, systematic research, clear argumentation, lucid writing) are indispensable to a wide variety of careers.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/ma-ancient-medieval-and-renaissance-thought-0#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The MA offers the student the opportunity to explore early Western intellectual history through philosophical, literary and cultural approaches. Read more

Overview

The MA offers the student the opportunity to explore early Western intellectual history through philosophical, literary and cultural approaches. It should appeal to students who want an overview of the foundations of modern European thought, and those who want to go on to further studies in Classics, Medieval and Renaissance studies,European studies, philosophy, or the history of ideas. The objective of this course is to provide students with a specialized knowledge in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance thought, focusing on philosophical writers, literary and historical themes, and the history of thought. Building upon the strengths of critical thinking, systematic reflection and historical awareness developed by the student in their undergraduate studies, the MA in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Thought will allow the student to explore thematic concerns of writers in the Western tradition from Ancient Greece and Rome to the 16th century and the various revivals in scholastic thought into the seventeenth century. It will also prepare those students for research degrees in either one of these areas, allowing them to pursue further studies in Classics, Philosophy or related fields.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/ma-ancient-medieval-and-renaissance-thought

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

Course Structure

Candidates take six modules (three in each semester) and write a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words under the supervision of a designated supervisor. The 90 credits for the MA will be made up of 60 credits awarded for taught modules and 30 credits for the dissertation. Candidates are required to take the core module PH626, at least one taught module in Classics and at least one in Philosophy, and either GC698 (dissertation in Classics) or PH699 (dissertation in Philosophy).

Career Options

Successful completion of the MA at a high level will normally equip students to proceed to study for a PhD, a necessary qualification for an academic career (in certain subject areas further language qualifications may be required). Beyond the academic sphere, however, the skills the programme fosters (analytic skills, critical thinking, systematic research, clear argumentation, lucid writing) are indispensable to a wide variety of careers.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/ma-ancient-medieval-and-renaissance-thought#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The MA offers the student the opportunity to explore early Western intellectual history through philosophical, literary and cultural approaches. Read more
The MA offers the student the opportunity to explore early Western intellectual history through philosophical, literary and cultural approaches. It should appeal to students who want an overview of the foundations of modern European thought, and those who want to go on to further studies in Classics, Medieval and Renaissance studies,European studies, philosophy, or the history of ideas. The objective of this course is to provide students with a specialized knowledge in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance thought, focusing on philosophical writers, literary and historical themes, and the history of thought. Building upon the strengths of critical thinking, systematic reflection and historical awareness developed by the student in their undergraduate studies, the MA in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Thought will allow the student to explore thematic concerns of writers in the Western tradition from Ancient Greece and Rome to the 16th century and the various revivals in scholastic thought into the seventeenth century. It will also prepare those students for research degrees in either one of these areas, allowing them to pursue further studies in Classics, Philosophy or related fields.

Candidates take six modules (three in each semester) and write a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words under the supervision of a designated supervisor. The 90 credits for the MA will be made up of 60 credits awarded for taught modules and 30 credits for the dissertation. Candidates are required to take the core module PH626, at least one taught module in Classics and at least one in Philosophy, and either GC698 (dissertation in Classics) or PH699 (dissertation in Philosophy).

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The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline. Read more
The School has a long tradition of high-quality research among its staff and students. The School’s vibrant research culture attracts students from all over the world who conduct research at the forefront of our discipline.

Our research programmes provide a combination of formal research training and individual supervision within a supportive environment, with regular interaction between staff and students. For example, the School runs a weekly Graduate Research Training Seminar, where students are encouraged to present their work and receive feedback from peers and staff. Students enjoy regular meetings with a supervisor and supervisory team, and are also given opportunities to collaborate with other members of staff through the staff research seminar and the activities of the Centre for Critical Thought (http://www.kent.ac.uk/cct/).

Students are encouraged to participate in the annual postgraduate research conference, during which various staff members discuss the work of research students, and outside speakers offer plenary lectures. Research students will also be able to benefit from the skills training offered by the University’s Graduate School (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/61/political-and-social-thought

Course structure

The breadth of expertise (http://www.kent.ac.uk/politics/research/about.html) within the School enables us to provide research supervision on a very wide range of topics across the area of Political and Social Thought.

Current projects of students studying in this area include: Europe’s New Violence: Multiculturalism and the Politics of Externalisation, Federalism as a Discursive System, Federalism as a Discursive System, A Critique of Post-Industrial Subjectivity.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Students have access to an excellent library and extensive computing facilities. You also have access to online resources; inter-library loans; video library; online book renewals and reservations; laptop and netbook loan facilities; more than 1,300 study spaces/seats; more than 27,500 books and 10,500 bound periodicals catalogued under politics and international relations and related class marks plus British Government Publications and 50,000 online journals also available off-campus. The School’s resources include a European Documentation Centre, with all official publications of the EU institutions, and a specialised collection on international conflict and federal studies as well as the University’s collection of political cartoons. In addition, postgraduate research students have their own designated room with 12 computer terminals.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Recent contributions include: Contemporary Political Theory; International Political Sociology; Journal of Human Rights; New Political Economy; Political Studies; Telos.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Placements and Internships Officer who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our MA brings together social theory, political theory and philosophy. You learn about the history of social and political thought, and study political and social movements. Read more
Our MA brings together social theory, political theory and philosophy. You learn about the history of social and political thought, and study political and social movements. Our course covers both historical traditions and contemporary developments.

Our research strengths include:
-Social theory (especially Marxism, Hegel, hermeneutics and critical theory)
-Recent democratic, socialist and environmentalist thought and practice
-The history of political, social and economic thought
-The philosophy of social science and the sociology of knowledge
-Contemporary political philosophy
-Cosmopolitanism

How will I study?

There are core modules taught in the autumn term, and in the spring term you choose from a list of options.

The largest assessed element in the MA is the 15,000-word dissertation. In addition, the core modules and options are assessed by 5,000-word term papers.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Careers

Many of our graduates have gone on to have successful careers in:
-Law
-The media
-Non-governmental organisations
-Government and administration
-Teaching

Others have gone on to research degrees. Over the last 30 years, a substantial number of leading academics in the UK and elsewhere have graduated from the course. Among our alumni we count professors of sociology, philosophy and politics, working at universities in the UK and beyond.

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in European Philosophy offers one of the few Masters-level programmes in the country to specialise in the 'European' tradition in philosophy. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in European Philosophy offers one of the few Masters-level programmes in the country to specialise in the 'European' tradition in philosophy.

Drawing on core research and teaching strengths in 19th and 20th-century French and German thought, the MA gives students the opportunity to study the development of European philosophy from Kant’s critical philosophy onwards, with a focus on German Idealism, the German phenomenologists and the Frankfurt School on one side, and the French philosophical movements in the 20th Century from Bergson and the existentialist movement through to poststructuralism and psychoanalysis.

Options focus a variety of topics and thinkers, focusing on the Continental tradition in political philosophy, the Frankfurt School, the role of aesthetics in the development of European thought, and more.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/maeuropeanphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- you will be able to explore key issues, thinkers and texts from the European tradition on one of the few programmes in the country to specialise in European philosophy

- academic staff have a broad range of interests including German Idealism, the Frankfurt School, French and German phenomenology, poststructuralism, and modern European political theory

- the flexible structure of the course allows students to concentrate on European philosophy, or to also engage with a broader range of options

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- you will have access to the vibrant intellectual community provided by being a part of the University of London.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood

Course content and structure

- Programme structure
Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two courses from among:
Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit); The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit); and Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)
The unit will involve ten two-hour seminars on key figures in European Philosophy. The course will run through a number of central figures and problems from Immanuel Kant to the work of Jacques Derrida and Theodor Adorno. Texts will not necessarily be read in their entirety.

- Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)
This course will trace the development of French philosophical thought from its early assimilation of Husserl’s phenomenology to later post-modern and post-structuralist thinkers. The course is research-led, and so specific philosophers covered on the course are subject to change, but indicative philosophers would include Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, and Alain Badiou.

- Dissertation on European Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
- Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)
- Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)
- The Frankfurt School (½ unit)
- The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)
- Human Rights (½ unit)
- Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)
- Legacies of Wittgenstein (½ unit)
- Neo-Platonism (½ unit)
- Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)
- Political Concepts (½ unit)
- Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of philosophical approaches adopted in the European tradition, such as phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, and transcendental empiricism

- detailed understanding of some of the key philosophers in the European tradition

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of European philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme aims to investigate the origins, nature and evolution of the main European intellectual movements. From the modern to the post-modern, the course will familiarise students with the main schools of thought which have shaped the European traditions and to explore their relevance to contemporary issues. Read more
This programme aims to investigate the origins, nature and evolution of the main European intellectual movements. From the modern to the post-modern, the course will familiarise students with the main schools of thought which have shaped the European traditions and to explore their relevance to contemporary issues.

Programme Structure

This programme will run over three 12 week semesters. Typically, Semesters 1 and 2 will each have three taught modules (lectures and course work) from at least two academic disciplines, depending on availability, plus the additional Research Methodology module in either semester 1 or 2. Semester 3 will be dedicated to the writing of a dissertation in consultation with a designated supervisor. Part-time options are also available. Each module will involve ongoing assessment, such as essays and oral presentations.

Students take three modules from at least two academic disciplines per semester, depending on availability, plus the additional Research Methodology module in either semester 1 or 2.

• Students can choose from a range of modules on the programme, including the following:
• Understanding, Dialogue, and Interpretation
• Philosophy and the Subject: From the Modern to the Postmodern
• Literary Aesthetics
• Contemporary European Thought and the Critique of Modernity
• Diversity and Tolerance in Early Modern Europe
• Power, Violence and Freedom
• French Thinkers and the Concept of Justice
• From reasoning on human nature to post-modernist instability: Great German writers and their images of humanity against the backdrop of the history of ideas
• Europe as a Transnational Space: Theory and Textual Practice
• From reasoning on human nature to post-modernist instability

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The MA in Philosophy and Religion. Eastern and Western Thought is a distance-learning programme designed for students who want to explore important philosophical and religious issues about life and the nature of our existence, but don’t want to be limited in their study to one particular pathway or tradition. Read more
The MA in Philosophy and Religion: Eastern and Western Thought is a distance-learning programme designed for students who want to explore important philosophical and religious issues about life and the nature of our existence, but don’t want to be limited in their study to one particular pathway or tradition.

Course Overview

The MA in Philosophy and Religion: Eastern and Western Thought will explore key topics in philosophy and religion, such as the nature of the self, the nature of reality, and the nature of religious experiences, from various philosophical and religious perspectives, from both eastern and western traditions. It includes the study of Buddhist Philosophy, the Daoist and Confucian traditions of China, Analytic and Continental Philosophy, and theories and practices of Western Religions.

Modules

The MA consists of taking six taught modules and a writing 15,000 word dissertation. The choice of taught modules available are:
-The Self: East and West
-Buddhist Philosophy
-Chinese Conceptions of the Self
-Philosophy of Religion
-Mind & Body: Descartes and Wittgenstein
-Religion, Spirituality and Secularisation
-Religious Experience Today

Key Features

-The course is delivered via distance-learning and its structure allows students the flexibility to arrange their study around their other commitments.
-Students have access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that provides them with a wide range of electronic resources.
-Coursework assessment, with no exams.
-Students receive support from subject specialists in Philosophy, Religious Studies and Chinese Studies.

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The MA Political Thought gives you the opportunity to study the thinkers who have shaped the modern world – Locke, Hegel, Marx and others – as well as more recent debates in social and political theory. Read more
The MA Political Thought gives you the opportunity to study the thinkers who have shaped the modern world – Locke, Hegel, Marx and others – as well as more recent debates in social and political theory. It draws upon the diverse interests of our lecturers; refers to both Anglo-American and ‘Continental’ literatures; and employs analytic and institutional approaches.

As a graduate of this programme you will have a broad knowledge of classic debates in the history of political ideas and of changing perceptions of money, work and commerce. You will also have the opportunity to take a wide range of options in subjects including philosophy of social science, science and technology studies, and theories of revolution.

The Centre of Political Thought ( http://socialsciences.exeter.ac.uk/politics/research/centres/cpt/) is an active research community distinguished by its diversity, collegiality and engagement between different approaches. Exeter has one of the largest and most diverse groups of political theorists of any Politics department in the UK.

Careers

You will develop a number of skills that are valued in professional and managerial careers: the ability to research and analyse information from a variety of sources along with written and verbal skills needed to present and discuss your opinions. The understanding you will gain of complex political and cultural issues, often in continually changing environments, can also be relevant to both business and public sector appointments.

For further information on this programme please visit our website: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/politics/polthoughtma

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