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War in the Modern World provides graduate students worldwide with a comprehensive understanding of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day. Read more
War in the Modern World provides graduate students worldwide with a comprehensive understanding of military conflict, international security issues and global geo-political change from 1945 to the present day.

Key benefits

• An entirely web-delivered graduate degree programme that is available twenty-four hours and can be studied anywhere in the world when connected to the internet.

• Innovative and academically rigorous, the programme is taught by King's College London staff.

• Students engage regularly and directly with their lecturers who provide support and guidance throughout the programme.

• All materials include authored content, video, audio, images, maps, and intensively used discussion forums with full access to the resources of the King's College London library's extensive electronic holdings.

• Maximum flexibility for individual students: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/war-in-the-modern-world-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our MA War in the Modern World provides an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the historical evolution of warfare and international security since the end of the Second World War. You will examine contemporary warfare and security issues in the light of the wide-ranging political, technological, economic and social changes in the world between 1945 and today. It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare, and to understand the contexts in which modern conflicts take place.

Our programme is designed to have broad-ranging appeal to those interested in pursuing postgraduate studies in the fields of war studies, international relations and international security. Those who may find this programme of particular interest include graduates in history, political science, international relations, economics, and those who have experience working with NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and the military.

- Course purpose -

Our programme is designed to offer you an engaging, well designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies.

- Course format and assessment -

Assessment for taught modules consists of:

- one short essay (1,500 words) from a choice of essay questions (25 per cent of the module assessment)

- one long essay (3,000 words) from a choice of essay questions (75 per cent of the module assessment)

- The dissertation (15,000 words) is submitted at the end of the programme. This important piece of assessed work contributes up to one third of the final programme grade.

Career prospects

Past students from this programme have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals, and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD while one teaches part time at King’s.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Staff associated with the Centre for World Christianity cover a number of different academic disciplines, including theology, history, mission studies, religious studies and anthropology. Read more

Research profile

Staff associated with the Centre for World Christianity cover a number of different academic disciplines, including theology, history, mission studies, religious studies and anthropology.

They also have geographical expertise in Africa, Asia and Latin America, allowing for a wide range of research possibilities. The Centre provides a weekly seminar programme for PhD students in World Christianity.

The School of Divinity is home to a thriving research community. All of our academic staff are engaged in individual research and writing projects and many are also involved in collaborative projects with colleagues across the globe.

The School of Divinity has consistently scored exceptionally highly in the Research Assessment Exercise, the most recent assessment putting us among the best schools in theology, philosophical theology and religious studies in the UK.

Our researchers currently boast the highest percentage of 4* scores (world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour) of any Scottish university in theology and religious studies.

We have the largest number of divinity research-active staff in Scotland, and the third largest in the UK. Overall, the RAE ranked us third in the UK with 60 per cent of our research activity judged internationally excellent or world-leading.

Training and support

Our community comprises 450 students (undergraduate and postgraduate) and nearly 30 full-time academic staff, including internationally respected scholars in a wide range of specialisms.

We welcome students from around the world, from religious and non-religious backgrounds, taking pride in our status as a renowned research centre in a broad spectrum of subject areas.

We take a personal interest in our students and offer a welcoming and friendly setting in which to pursue the exciting and demanding study of theology and religious studies.

The large graduate school and the presence of visiting academics from around the world help ensure a diverse and stimulating research environment.

All research students are assigned a primary and secondary supervisor. You are offered a training course in research methods, and are given conscientious supervision from your first weeks through to submission of your thesis.

There are also special orientation events for international students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate researcher you can draw on the outstanding library resources of New College, the University of Edinburgh and the nearby National Library of Scotland.

New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection, including the papers of Thomas Chalmers, John Baillie, JH Oldham and James S Stewart.

The strengths of the Library collections contribute greatly to the teaching and research of members of the School as well as students elsewhere in the University.

These collections are complemented by the many resources available in the University and beyond. The total holdings in all the University libraries exceed 2.25 million volumes. In addition, the National Library of Scotland holds more than five million volumes.

The New College Library boasts a magnificent reading hall, originally built as the sanctuary of the Free High Kirk.

The School provides extensive and well-equipped computing facilities for coursework and research at all levels, including dissertations. We provide all students with access to PCs, scanners and printers, across four labs.

Research opportunities

We offer two types of research-based masters degree, as well as PhD programmes.

Masters by Research (MSc by Research / MTh by Research)

These one-year masters degrees by research are designed for students with an academic training in divinity or religious studies (or other relevant subjects) who wish to focus on a particular topic. The programme may be taken as either a Master of Theology by Research or a Master of Science by Research. The difference is one of nomenclature only.

Both involve research training and orientation courses, after which you may either research and submit a dissertation of about 30,000 words, which comprises the remaining assessment for the degree, or take three further courses to provide appropriate background and preparatory study for the topic of your research, and then submit a dissertation of about 15,000 words.

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Air Power in the Modern World aims to provide graduate students worldwide with a comprehensive and up-to-the-minute understanding of military theory and operations between 1945 and today, with special reference to the role of air power in integrated (joint) contexts. Read more
Air Power in the Modern World aims to provide graduate students worldwide with a comprehensive and up-to-the-minute understanding of military theory and operations between 1945 and today, with special reference to the role of air power in integrated (joint) contexts.

Key benefits

- An entirely web-delivered graduate degree programme that is available twenty-four hours and can be studied anywhere in the world when connected to the internet.

- Innovative and academically rigorous, the programme is taught by King's College London staff.

- Students engage regularly and directly with their lecturers who provide support and guidance throughout the programme.

- All materials include authored content, video, audio, images, maps, and intensively used discussion forums with full access to the resources of the King's College London library's extensive electronic holdings.

- Maximum flexibility for individual students: access content and respond to discussion postings in your own time for each study unit.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

MA Air Power in the Modern World is a flexible, modular master's programme, rich in media and reading resources, delivered entirely online viaKing's College London Virtual Learning Environment. You will interact with an engaging and lively community of fellow graduates, from a wide variety of backgrounds.

It will equip you to engage critically with scholarly debate about the conduct and nature of contemporary warfare from an air power perspective, and to understand the contexts in which modern military operations take place.

- Study -

Modules are divided into five units, each studied for two weeks. Within each unit, students read online authored content and follow links to extensive readings and other resources. Selected students then post a draft response to the unit Short Essay question, and this draft forms the basis of a lively and intensive asynchronous (message-board style) online discussion within the tutor group, continuously moderated by the tutor. At the end of this discussion, the selected students revise their Short Essays for submission.

All students also complete an individual Long Essay for each module, due after all units are complete.

After studying the required number of modules, you complete an individual dissertation, which forms the final element of your degree programme.

- Delivery and duration -

The entire MA Air Power in the Modern World programme is delivered online, via the King's College London Virtual Learning Environment (KEATS); there is no requirement for students to attend King's or even to be resident in the UK.

The programme timetable is based on three semesters per academic year (September-December, January-March and April-June), with students normally completing one taught module per term. Students usually take two years to complete the required taught modules, followed by an additional six months to complete the 15,000-word dissertation. It may be possible for you to complete the programme in a shorter time if circumstances and teaching arrangements allow.

You will need to allow 10-15 hours work per week for each 11-week semester to complete the taught modules.

- Course purpose -

MA Air Power in the Modern World aims to offer an engaging, well-designed and flexible online master's degree in war studies to qualified graduate students, both civilian and military, who share an interest in air power.

- Course format and assessment -

Assessment for taught modules consists of:

- one short essay (1,500 words) from a choice of essay questions (25% of the module assessment)
- one long essay (3,000 words) from a choice of essay questions (75% of the module assessment)
- The dissertation (15,000 words) is submitted at the end of the programme. This important piece of assessed work contributes up to one-third of the final programme grade.

Career prospects

Past students from this programme have gone on to build careers in NGOs, civil services, NATO, the UN, media and publishing, finance and investment and teaching, as well as in the armed forces. A number of our students have had articles published in peer-reviewed journals, and undertaken further academic research. Several students have gone on to complete a PhD, one teaches part-time at King’s.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

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This Programme offered in partnership with. Read more
This Programme offered in partnership with

UNESCO

aims to impart the necessary competencies and skills in the conservation and promotion of World Heritage Sites and in the conceptualization of sustainable projects designed around a wide spectrum of cultural activities in the fields of natural and cultural heritage, creative industries, museums and tourism. It explores the economic, social, institutional and legal considerations that govern the categories of UNESCO World Heritage Sites.
It also emphasis strategic management competencies for the preservation and promotion of these sites as well as monitoring the efficacy and adequacy of site management plans and associated cultural projects.

The Master has a strong international faculty including Professor Walter Santagata from University of Turin, Professor David Throsby from Macquarie University, Professor Allen Scott from UCLA, Professor Andy Pratt from Kings College, Professor
Françoise Benhamou from University Paris III, Professor Xavier Greffe from University Paris I-Sorbonne, and Professor Helmut Anheier from Heidelberg University. Officials from UNESCO, the World Bank and the ILO also teach on the Master.

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER

The Master is divided into three major learning cycles. The first cycle consists of distance learning modules supported by a tutoring service. The second cycle is a face-to-face learning period that will be held in Turin, Italy, at the International Training Centre of the ILO. The third cycle is a research and study period during which the students may attend internships and are expected to finalize their final projects.

MODULE 1- Distance learning.

The introductory distance learning phase of the course lasts 10 weeks and is tutor-assisted. It includes two foundation modules on Cultural Heritage and Economic Development and the World Heritage System and Heritage Management.

MODULE 2- Culture and Economic Development

This module will introduce the participants to the following topics:
• The value chain of cultural and natural sites;
• Cultural capital and the theory of sustainable development;
• The role of culture in local development;
• Cultural and natural districts, property rights and sustainable economic development;
• Governance and cultural policies in cultural/creative industries;
• Micro enterprises, local entrepreneurship and micro fi nance;
• Gender-related economics; International organizations and cultural projects;
• Culture and natural resources as a strategic engines for local development.

MODULE 3 - Project Management in the Cultural Field

This module is intended to upgrade participants’ competences in the disciplines of project cycle design and management. . Ample opportunity will be given to the participants to practice the development of the project logical framework and project appraisal techniques. The role of international development agencies in promoting cultural initiatives will be explored, including their respective procurement guidelines and project supervision procedures.

MODULE 4 - Cultural Sectors and Creative Industries

This module investigates the main cultural sectors that come into play in cultural policies, namely:
• Management of museums;
• monuments and archaeological sites;
• Performing arts;
• Creative and Cultural industries;
• Economics of cultural tourism;
• National Parks and Protected areas.
Particular attention will be devoted to the role of International Agencies that deal with cultural programmes including the presentation of the relevant UNESCO Conventions

MODULE 5 - Tools for Strategic Planning and Evaluation

This module explores the tools needed for planning, management and evaluation of cultural resources, focusing on:
• Management Tools.
• Strategic Assessment and Monitoring.

MODULE 6 – Home research and study

This module will allow the students to further elaborate on their projects’ plans and prepare their final dissertation

Deadline for Application: 18 August 2015



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This Master's degree in history will expand and deepen your understanding of world history through the exploration of global perspectives and the interconnections that work across geographical and national boundaries. Read more
This Master's degree in history will expand and deepen your understanding of world history through the exploration of global perspectives and the interconnections that work across geographical and national boundaries. The course will introduce you to a wide range of approaches, including comparative histories of empires, nationalism and decolonisation, migration and diaspora, world culture and global archives. You will be encouraged to think expansively about connections between historical themes in world history and you can also focus on a particular region of the world, such as South and East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the USA. Drawing on the wide spread of research and teaching expertise within the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology and other departments at Birkbeck, the programme features a wide range of comparative and interdisciplinary modules.

The core module explores specific topics and questions in world history and will equip you with the conceptual ideas and skills needed to study history at postgraduate level. You can then choose 3 option modules from a wide variety, opting, if you wish, to take a focused pathway through the degree by specialising in the history of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, or the imperial and postcolonial periods. You will be encouraged to develop both conceptual and theoretical approaches to understanding the historical development of the modern world, as well as learning research methods that will enable you to specialise in a particular topic of your choosing and undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation.

The course is designed to offer you training to continue on to PhD research in topics in comparative and global history, if you wish, but it will also equip you with the specialist knowledge and transferable skills you need to work in a wide range of intellectually challenging environments, including policy research, media, NGOs and public history.

Teaching staff

Course director: Dr Julia Lovell

Other staff who teach on this MA programme include:

Dr Fred Anscombe
Professor David Feldman
Dr Julia Lovell
Dr Jan Rueger
Dr Hilary Sapire
Professor Naoko Shimazu
Professor Frank Trentmann.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This Master's degree explores the making of the modern world from comparative, global perspectives.
The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and developing a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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Water security is a major concern facing humanity and engineers are the primary professionals tackling this issue. Read more

About the Course

Water security is a major concern facing humanity and engineers are the primary professionals tackling this issue. Annually, more than 3.4 million people die from water related diseases while 1 in 9 people world-wide do not have access to safe and clean drinking water and 1 in 3 people world-wide are affected by water scarcity. In addition, population growth, urbanisation, climate change and increasing energy demands, are placing unprecedented pressures on our finite water resources. This 1-year MSc programme aims to equip students with the skills needed to design solutions to deliver safe/clean water. The programme will also give opportunities to students to study the economics and management of large projects.

Programme Objectives

The MSc in Water resources Engineering will provide students with the technical competences to provide solutions to water security issues. Core modules will address technical aspects of water provision, water resource management and water / wastewater treatment. A primary objective of the programme is to ensure that students have a thorough understanding of modern hydrological modelling tools. The programme has a strong emphasis on the design of hydrological systems, with students working in groups to solve real-world problems. Graduates of this programme will be in a position to make significant contributions to solving water resource problems in both industry and academic roles worldwide.

Programme Structure and Content

This is a 90ECTS programme, one full year in duration, starting in September and finishing August. The programme comprises an individual research project and thesis (30 ECTS), an integrated group design project (15 ECTS) and a number of taught (core and elective) modules (55 ECTS).

The core taught modules include: Hydrology & Water Resources Engineering, Hydrological Modelling, Design of Sustainable Environmental Systems, Water Quality, Water Resources in Arid Regions, and Applied Field Hydrogeology. Sample elective modules include: Computational Methods in Engineering, Global Change, Offshore & Coastal Engineering, Environmental Economics, Project Management, and Estimates and Costing of Engineering Projects.

The Integrated Group Design Project involves the design of components of a water supply and/or treatment system and will be typical of real-world water resources engineering project. Each student will also complete an individual minor research thesis in the area of water resources engineering. This thesis accounts for one third of the overall programme mark.

What’s Special About CoEI/NUIG in this Area

• Water engineering has been taught at graduate level at NUI Galway for over 40 years. During this period students from over 50 countries have graduated from NUI Galway.
• The MSc in Water Resources Engineering is a re-launch of NUI Galway's International Postgraduate Hydrology Programme established by the late Prof Eamonn Nash. Many of the staff who lectured on the Hydrology Programme contribute to the current programme; so the recognised tradition of world-class teaching in water engineering at NUI Galway continues.
• Currently NUIG staff are involved in large-scale funded research projects in water resources, facilitated by the world-class research facilities at NUI Galway.

Testimonials

"It was a privilege and a pleasure to participate in the Galway MSc programme with world renowned hydrologists, excellent technicians and support staff, and Irish and international students. The comprehensive programme provided an excellent basis for my subsequent career in hydrology."
Charles Pearson, MSc Hydrology, NUIG, 1990 Graduating Class
Regional Manager, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, New Zealand

"I am fortunate enough to have completed a world-class course in Hydrology at National University of Ireland, Galway which was taught by world-leading academics and researchers. Since my course completion in 1990, I have been able to play a key role in hydrologic application and research in Bangladesh and Australia based on the knowledge I gained from my studies in Galway."
Professor Ataur Rahman, MSc Hydrology, NUIG, 1990 Graduating Class
Water and Environmental Engineering, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney

"NUI Galway gave me priceless experiences; it was my first travel outside the Philippines. Being a graduate of NUI Galway opened doors of opportunities for me. My being who I am now started with my NUI Galway experience and I will always be grateful to the institution, to my friends and to my former professors."
Dolores San Diego-Cleofas, MSc Hydrology, NUIG, 1995 Graduating Class,
Assistant Professor at University of Santo Tomas, Manila, Phillipines

How to Apply

Applications are made online via the Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC): https://www.pac.ie
Please use the following PAC application code for your programme:
M.Sc. Water Resources Engineering - PAC code GYE23

Scholarship Opportunities

There are a number of funding opportunities for International Students planning to attend NUI Galway. Information on these can be found at: http://www.nuigalway.ie/international-students/feesfinance/internationalscholarships/

The College of Engineering and Informatics will also award the Nash Scholarship in Water Resource Engineering. This is in memory of our deceased colleague, Eamonn Nash who was our Professor of Engineering Hydrology for many years, and was a well-known in the international engineering community. The “Nash cascade” and “Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient” were named after him, and these still feature in scholarly publications. Over four hundred senior hydrologists throughout the world received their post-graduate hydrological education at this University. Please visit our website for more information on scholarships: http://www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/feesandscholarships/

The MSc in Water Resources Engineering is accredited by Irish Aid as an eligible course for their International Fellowship Training Programme (IFTP). Through the IFTP, Irish Aid provides funding for students from eligible developing countries to undertake postgraduate studies on selected courses in colleges and universities in Ireland. More information on Irish Aid Fellowships can be found on the website of the Irish Council for International Students at:
http://www.icosirl.ie/eng/irish_aid_fellowships/fellowship_training_programme

Further information is available on our website:
http://www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/mscwaterresourcesengineering/

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The international dispute resolution LLM, prepares you for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. Read more
The international dispute resolution LLM, prepares you for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides you with a solid foundation in all relevant areas including both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. As technology, trade and transportation have reduced the significance of borders, trans-frontier activity has become part of our daily routine. International and European law have developed dynamically to catch up with this quickly changing world and to regulate cross-border activities that national law can rarely govern efficiently.

Key benefits

- Our modules give you practical insight and a solid foundation in the growing and challenging field of international dispute resolution
- Taught by some of the world’s leading practitioners and academics
- Taught in the world’s centre of international dispute resolution, in the heart of legal London
- Features mandatory modules to give you an overview over private and public means of international dispute resolution as well as recent developments
- Covers all major areas of international dispute resolution, such as international commercial arbitration, international investment arbitration, dispute resolution in the EU and public international law – including human rights law
- New scholarship opportunities are available for more information please see our Law Scholarship information page

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/international-dispute-resolution-llm.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The pathway features three mandatory core modules on mechanisms of international dispute resolution between private parties, mechanisms under international and EU law as well as current developments in international dispute resolution, providing students with the essential basics in international dispute resolution.

Beyond these modules students have a wide range of options of specialized fields of international dispute resolution, ranging from modules on international commercial arbitration and international investment arbitration exclusively taught by some of the world’s leading barristers, to judicial protection in the EU, human rights law and litigation, an advanced seminar on selected topics in international arbitration, international mooting, climate change, arbitration and intellectual property, international investment law as well as policy, negotiation, transnational litigation, world trade law and oral advocacy – the latter module again co-taught by a world-renowned barrister.

Students without any background in international or EU law can acquire the relevant basic knowledge in this field in the first two weeks of the pathway, in two not-for-credit optional “foundational seminars”.

- Course purpose -

This LLM prepares students for a career in the challenging and exciting field of international dispute resolution. It provides them with a solid foundation in all relevant areasincluding both private and public international means of dispute resolution and allows them to specialize in the fields of their choice. The school combines both King’s award-winning academics and some of the world’s leading practitioners.

- Course format and assessment -

In the first and second semester you study your selection of taught modules (half and full). These are in most cases assessed in the third semester (May/June) by written examination, or in some cases by the submission of an assessed essay. Please see further details for each individual module in the module list below.

Dissertation or research essays must be submitted in September, after the May/June examinations.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?. Read more
Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?

For 13 years, our MA Creative Writing has been enabling students to achieve some, if not all, of these goals. In 2016 alone, 11 of our graduates published novels with major publishing houses (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/news/creative-writing-alumni-success).

The course is taught through small, dynamic seminars and one-to-one tuition. We offer modules in fiction writing and options in playwriting, poetry, screenwriting and creative non-fiction.

All teaching is done by regularly published and produced award-winning writers, who will help you strengthen and professionalise your identity as a writer. Students have opportunities to interact with publishers and agents to broaden their understanding of the market and will be eligible to submit work for publication in the annual Birkbeck Creative Writing journal, The Mechanics' Institute Review and MIROnline.

To find out more, read our programme handbook (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/current-students/postgraduate/).

You will taught by successful, published authors and practitioners, including:

- Julia Bell
- David Eldridge
- Richard Hamblyn
- Russell Celyn Jones
- Toby Litt
- Luke Williams
- Benjamin Wood
- Jonathan Kemp.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/TMACWRIT_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Read about Birkbeck research that enriches our experience and understanding of our shared history, culture and art (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- Aims to develop the craft of fiction at a professional level and includes practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

- In addition to working with the established writers who teach the degree, you will have contact with industry professionals, such as publishers and literary agents, who offer a series of platform discussions in the summer term.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Our Department of English and Humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english) is a lively centre of world-class research and teaching.

- We offer a range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/study-here/world-class-research-resources).

- Our annual creative writing magazine, The Mechanics' Institute Review, is edited by Birkbeck MA Creative Writing students and features writing from the course as a showcase for the degree, with wide distribution beyond Birkbeck to literary agents, publishers, etc.

- Read an account of how our students created the most recent issue of The Mechanics' Institute Review (http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/george/2014/10/07/editing-the-mechanics-institute-review-11/).

- MIROnline is an interactive website, edited by PhD students and volunteers, with all the latest news and writing from this programme and beyond.

- Find out more about our range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research).

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Teaching and assessment

- Teaching
Teaching is seminar-based. Each session is generally 2 hours, and there are further regular one-to-one tutorials throughout the year.

- Assessment
4 short creative pieces with critical essays (50%). A dissertation (15,000 words) in one of the following genres: a novella, novel or collection of short stories, with a preface of 3000 words (50%).

Careers and employability

Birkbeck Creative Writing graduates include:

Sally Hinchcliffe
Niki Aguirre
Heidi James
Matthew Loukes
Iphgenia Baal
Nii Parkes
Emma Henderson
Liz Fremantle
Anna Hope
Karin Salvalaggio
Olya Knezevic
Phoebe Blatton
Melissa De Villiers
Nik Korpon
Louise Lee
Tray Butler
Helen Pike
David Savill
Laura Allsop
Sarah Alexander
Nadim Safdar
A. J. Grainger
Julia Gray
Nicole Burstein
Jules Grant
Amy Bird
Stefanie Seddon
Fiona Melrose.

Graduates go in to careers in editing, teaching, and writing professionally. Possible professions include creative writer, magazine or newspaper journalist, or editorial assistant. This degree can also be useful in becoming an academic librarian, English as a second language (ESOL) teacher, or information officer.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-english-and-humanities).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply

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This programme takes a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable solutions for future energy needs, with an in-depth knowledge of the new emerging alternative technologies. Read more
This programme takes a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable solutions for future energy needs, with an in-depth knowledge of the new emerging alternative technologies. It will prepare you for immediate contribution to the renewable energy sector, entering public, environmental, industry and commercial industries.

Why Renewable Energy and Environmental Modelling at Dundee?

Climate change is possibly the most significant threat that humanity has ever faced. A new generation of scientists, engineers and policy-makers will need to be equipped with skills to enable them to make informed decisions on all aspects of this important and rapidly developing subject.

Our Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Environmental Modelling is designed to produce graduates with a broad and balanced skills base.

We provide the opportunity for you to go on field trips and external conferences as a part of your coursework, and you will have the option of undertaking either an industry-based or research-related project.

What's great about this course at Dundee?

The Dundee MSc is intended to interact with the renewables industry on many levels, enabling frequent networking opportunities during the year. The conference-style modules also allow delegates from industry to attend and enhance their skills in an informal and friendly setting. Graduates from this degree will be able to make an immediate contribution to the renewable energy sector.

Dundee University Centre for Renewable Energy (DUCRE)

DUCRE brings together a wide range of scientists with strong interests in renewable energy and evironmental issues. Staff and students in the Centre are engaged in a wide range of diverse renewable energy and environmental research. Projects range from electric vehicle technologies, to wind, solar, and hydro technologies, and from energy policy issues to Third World environmental development analysis.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Renewable Energy and Environmental Modelling suits students and professionals from diverse backgrounds, including scientists, engineers, environmentalists, and policy-makers.

The programme has been designed to appeal to graduates with first degrees in the physical sciences, engineering, environmental science and related subjects. However, all applications will be assessed on their merits, regardless of background, and any relevant experience will also be taken into consideration.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

This course utilizes conference-style teaching - delivered in one week intensive bursts.

The taught element will be delivered using a lively mix of lectures, seminars, peer-based problem-solving, practical sessions and site visits.

What you will study

Modules cover environmental physics, law and policy, renewable energy technologies, environmental monitoring, and the hydrogen economy.

You will study/take part in:

Foundation in renewable energy
Energy regulation law and security of supply
Hydrogen economy (incorporating fuel cells)
Physical concepts: A primer in energy, electromagnetism & electronic materials
Renewables technologies: In depth investigation of existing & emerging technologies, supply & demand issues, conservation & architectural issues
Environmental modelling: hydrology, carbon cycling, wind, wave & solar modelling
Field trips
Project

How you will be assessed

Students are assessed on written and practical work, formal presentations and a project dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from this programme will be able to make an immediate contribution to the renewable energy sector and make informed decisions that will have an impact on the development of national programmes to meet future targets.

Each graduate will have a firm grasp of the predominant and emerging technologies, and will be able to set these in context using a range of environmental monitoring techniques.

"The MSc provided a good base to research renewable technologies and understand how they fit into the energy mix and government policy. After graduation, I am now employed as Chief Technical Officer at Scottish Renewables."
David Cameron, class of 2008

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This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. Read more
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. By bringing together Community Development and Youth Work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of Anthropology, it offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-youth-work/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines. The MA fits the spirit of the academic profile of Goldsmiths both in its interdisciplinary and multi-cultural character, and by bringing together academic and practical fields of study.

This Master’s degree is aimed at graduates interested in working in Community Development and Youth Work. We offer two alternative pathways:

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work (this programme) results in a qualification in the fields of Community and Youth Work and Anthropology that is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community Development is aimed at applicants who don't have the required level of work experience to apply for the professionally validated programme, and offers students an opportunity to develop community-based theoretical interests and practice

What you study

The MA reflects the common concerns of Social Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, and offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. It consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience. Modules are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students). Please note that all modules are compulsory.

The Research Methods in Anthropology module covers the research methods of anthropology, the collection of different types of data including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research, its uses by subjects, and conflicts of interest. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

Contemporary Social Issues consists of four themes:

* First World/Third World Anthropological Perspectives
* Gender, Race and Class
* Community
* Youth Cultures

It is taught through lectures/seminars, and assessment is by one three-hour examination paper.

Two supervised community and youth work fieldwork placements (totaling 47 days). These are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials. Both fieldwork assignments are assessed by your 5,000 word report on each and your agency supervisor's reports. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

Block fieldwork. For all students there is a six-week block fieldwork assignment (30 working days) focused on any aspect of management in a community and youth work agency, negotiable with your tutor. Assessment is based on your agency supervisor's report and a 5,000 word report on the placement submitted by you.

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10.00am to 4.00pm and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies. Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Assessment: Essay; individual project; take-home paper; fieldwork evaluation and reports; dissertation.

Careers:

Our graduates have gone on to develop their professional careers in community and youth work - for example as Connexions personal advisors, youth officers, community development workers, substance misuse workers, youth workers in a range of settings, and some have gone on to work with people who have disabilities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

This programme develops your understanding of the politics of culture in relation to both the imperialist world’s interpretation of the colonial, and postcolonial assertions of autonomy. In this context, while ‘postcolonial’ refers primarily to societies of the so-called ‘Third World’, it also includes questions relevant to cultures such as those of Ireland and Australia.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

In Paris, you participate in the Paris-focused modules, taught in English. Then, in the the final term, you complete your MA by writing a 12,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

Course structure

During the autumn term your core module, Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses, provides an introduction to the analysis of colonial discourse and to the most significant strands of postcolonial theory. Topics covered also include the role that culture plays in anti-colonial struggles and the role of the postcolonial intellectual in the contemporary world. Recommended reading for the module includes works by Frantz Fanon, Edward Said and Gayatri Spivak.

During the Spring term, spent in Paris, you develop your studies to include the cultural production of exiles, with particular focus on the role of Paris as a place of refuge and as a focus for multi-cultural encounters and creativity. Works studied may include texts by North American, Latin American and North African writers living in Paris, with focus on their diverse representations of the city and how the experiences of diaspora and exile inform and shape their writing.

You then complete your one-year MA by writing a dissertation on an aspect of postcolonial studies that you will defined in consultation with an appropriate tutor. All texts and teaching materials are in English, so this programme offers you a rare opportunity to spend part of your MA year living and studying in Paris without necessarily knowing any French.

Modules

You take two compulsory Postcolonial modules and two further optional modules (four in total) during the autumn and spring terms. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes. You then write the dissertation or editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

In 2015/16 the following core specialist modules are available: EN852 – Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (Canterbury) and CP807 – Diaspora and Exile (Paris). These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/index.html?tab=taught-masters

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Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Read more

MSc Food Technology

Wageningen University is one of the leading centres in Food Science and Technology in Europe and the world. The history of the Food Technology programme at Wageningen University goes back more than 50 years; it is considered to be one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. The programme focuses on aspects of production, composition and design of food products.

Programme summary

The Food Technology programme at Wageningen University has been in place for more than 50 years and is considered one of the best and most innovative programmes in its field in Europe. Wageningen University offers high-level courses and research in all areas of food science; ranging from advanced technical fields, such as Process Engineering or Chemistry, to fields with a more economic or sociological focus, such as Marketing and Gastronomy.

The Wageningen Food Science faculty is larger than that of any other European university. It includes professors and lecturers from a wide range of departments: Food Chemistry, Food Physics, Food Microbiology, Food Quality and Design, and Food Process Engineering. Food Technology covers nearly all aspects of food science and technology. As a result of being a very broad field, students are required to choose one of the specialisations offered.

Specialisations

Within the programme Food Technology you can choose your own specialisation that meets your personal interests.

Ingredient Functionality
This specialisation focuses on the composition of food, especially, on the role of various components, ingredients or structures in the quality and functionality of the final product. It deals with sensory, nutritive and textural aspects of foods in relation to their components. You major in Food Chemistry or Food Physics.

Product Design
While many new products are launched, not all succeed. This specialisation deals with the design and development of new or improved products. The focus is on the processes used in Food Technology, the design of new products from a consumer perspective and on modelling new product concepts/processes and predictive quality control. You major in Food Process Engineering or Food Quality and Design.

Food Innovation and Management
This specialisation combines courses in Food Technology with courses in Management Studies. It is intended for students who wish to work on product development in small businesses or who plan to start their own business. You will do a thesis in Management Studies and an internship in one of the Food Technology groups.

Food Biotechnology and Biorefining
This specialisation focuses on using micro-organisms or enzymes in food production. During this specialisation, you will learn about processes that can be used for biorefinery or agricultural raw materials. The focus is on biotechnological food production. You major in Food Microbiology, Food Chemistry, Food Process Engineering.

Dairy Science and Technology
This specialisation focuses on the dairy production chain. Its core programme consists of dairy-related courses and several additional courses, such as Food Components and Health, Advanced Fermentation Science and Predicting Food Quality. During the second year, you complete a dairy-related thesis research project and internship.

Sustainable Food Process Engineering
This specialisation focuses on the development of processes that are more efficient in their use of resources. Thesis can be carried out under the supervision of one of the following groups: Food Process Engineering; Operations Research and Logistics; Biobased Chemistry and Technology; or Food Quality and Design.

European Masters Degree in Food Studies
This international specialisation is developed in cooperation with the universities of Cork (Ireland), Lund (Sweden) and Agro-Paris Tech (Paris, France) as well as with ten large industrial partners. For more information see: http://www.eurmscfood.nl.

Gastronomy
This specialisation focuses on the molecular science behind products and dishes used in small scale settings. Scientific insights are used to develop improved food preparation techniques. The cultural aspects of food will also receive attention. You major in Food Chemistry, Food Physics or Rural Sociology.

Sensory Science
This specialisation combines Food Technology with Nutrition and Health. You will work with products and humans in different contexts and study how sensory systems function, how this relates to products and how to analyse these aspects.

Your future career

Graduates find jobs with relative ease, especially in the Netherlands and Western Europe. Recent graduates found positions in the private sector (from small- and medium-sized companies to large multinationals), at Wageningen University or other universities as PhD students, and at research institutes domestically and abroad. Graduates also work in the field of process technology at innovation centres, innovative food companies or government agencies. Most achieve management positions.

Student Harmke Klunder
“It is rich in proteins, unsaturated fats, vitamins and is available in large quantities all over the world. You may conclude, ‘The ideal food ingredient.’ However, would you still think it was ideal if you knew it was made from insects? With three other students, we added insects to a third world food product, thereby winning an international competition from the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists). Malnutrition in Africa could be fought by enriching their daily porridge, sorghumpap, with protein-enhanced termites. As food ingredients technologist, it is possible to look beyond the products found on the shelves of the local supermarkets.”

Related programmes:
MSc Food Quality Management
MSc Food Safety
MSc Biotechnology
MSc Nutrition and Health

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This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. Read more
This MA is the first of its kind in the country, combining academic and professional qualifications. By bringing together Community Development and Youth Work practice with the research methods and theoretical preoccupations of Anthropology, it offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-applied-anthropology-community-development/

Taught jointly by the Departments of Anthropology, and Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies, the programme reflects the common concerns of lecturers in both disciplines. The MA fits the spirit of the academic profile of Goldsmiths both in its interdisciplinary and multi-cultural character, and by bringing together academic and practical fields of study.

This Master’s degree is aimed at graduates interested in working in Community Development and Youth Work. We offer two alternative pathways:

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community and Youth Work results in a qualification in the fields of Community and Youth Work and Anthropology that is fully endorsed by the National Youth Agency and the Joint Negotiating Committee for Youth and Community Workers for pay and qualification purposes

* The MA in Applied Anthropology & Community Development  (this programme) is aimed at applicants who don't have the required level of work experience to apply for the professionally validated programme, and offers students an opportunity to develop community-based theoretical interests and practice

What you study

The MA reflects the common concerns of Social Anthropology and Community and Youth Work, and offers a stimulating synthesis of theory and practice. It consists of an academic programme of lectures, seminars and tutorial assignments, and practical experience. Courses are taken over one academic year if you are studying full-time, and two years if you are studying part-time (part-time study only available to home/EU students). Please note that all modules are compulsory.

The Research Methods in Anthropology module covers the research methods of anthropology, the collection of different types of data including surveys, in-depth interviews, participant observation and participatory research, its uses by subjects, and conflicts of interest. It combines weekly lectures and seminar-based work with the completion of a small individual project in the second term. Assessment is by essay, combining project material with theoretical literature.

Contemporary Social Issues consists of four themes:

* First World/Third World Anthropological Perspectives
* Gender, Race and Class
* Community
* Youth Cultures

It is taught through lectures/seminars, and assessment is by one three-hour examination paper.

Two supervised community and youth work fieldwork placements (totaling 47 days). These are supported by seminars, lectures, workshops and tutorials. Both fieldwork assignments are assessed by your 5,000 word report on each and your agency supervisor's reports. Overall, at least 50% of all fieldwork must be face-to-face with the 13-19 year age group.

Block fieldwork. For all students there is a six-week block fieldwork assignment (30 working days) focused on any aspect of management in a community and youth work agency, negotiable with your tutor. Assessment is based on your agency supervisor's report and a 5,000 word report on the placement submitted by you.

Full-time students attend on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10.00am to 4.00pm and spend the rest of the week on fieldwork placements and library studies. Part-time students attend on Thursdays in one year and Tuesdays in the other.

Assessment: Essay; individual project; take-home paper; fieldwork evaluation and reports; dissertation.

Careers:

Our graduates have gone on to develop their professional careers in community and youth work - for example as Connexions personal advisors, youth officers, community development workers, substance misuse workers, youth workers in a range of settings, and some have gone on to work with people who have disabilities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA Postcolonial Studies Programme offers a focus on the historical relationships of power, domination and practices of imperialism and colonialism in the modern period (late nineteenth-century to the present) through the study of literature and culture. Read more
The MA Postcolonial Studies Programme offers a focus on the historical relationships of power, domination and practices of imperialism and colonialism in the modern period (late nineteenth-century to the present) through the study of literature and culture.

The core module will introduce a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches to the literature, film and media of these areas. A range of literary, filmic and theoretical texts from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and the Near and Middle East will normally be included in the reading list. These will address representations of colonialism and decolonisation, neo-colonialism, nationalism in postcolonial societies and diasporic experiences, allowing us to explore the heterogeneous meanings, intersections and strategies of analysis that have emerged with reference to postcolonial studies.

Attention will be paid to colonial and postcolonial constructs such as: the Oriental, the Global, the Cosmopolitan, the Third World and the multicultural. The core module of the programme introduces and analyses interdisciplinary theories and ideological practices around a set of historical and current issues from various regions of Asia and Africa. The range of minors offers students more opportunities to explore interdisciplinarity and regional specificities.

Why this programme is special at SOAS

Postcolonial MA Programmes offered in London and other UK institutions are located within the field of English Studies or the Social Sciences. The Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) is uniquely positioned to offer an inter-disciplinary Postcolonial Studies MA programme which gives students an opportunity to understand and negotiate the field of postcolonial studies with recourse to interdisciplinarity and to theoretical explications from the regions of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. SOAS offers a unique range of regional expertise available amongst the CCLPS’s faculty membership. The Programme also offers a timely intervention at a time when there is a national and international crisis in the understanding of multiculturalism, race relations and religious and national affiliations.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/mapostcolstud/

Programme Specification

MA Postcolonial Studies Programme Specifications 2012-13 (pdf; 39kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/degrees/mapostcolstud/file68679.pdf

Employment

MA Post Colonial Studies graduates gain competency in intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the subject wiill be developed through the study of literature, film and media of these areas. Graduates leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and management careers, both in business and in the public sector. These include:written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem-solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA develops your understanding of the politics of culture in relation to both the imperialist world's interpretation of the colonial, and postcolonial assertions of autonomy. Read more
This MA develops your understanding of the politics of culture in relation to both the imperialist world's interpretation of the colonial, and postcolonial assertions of autonomy. In this context, while ‘postcolonial' refers primarily to societies of the so-called ‘Third World', it also includes questions relevant to cultures such as those of Ireland and Australia.

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/225/postcolonial-studies

Course detail

The University of Kent was one of the first universities to establish postcolonial literary studies and has continued to play a significant part in the development of the field.

This programme can also be studied in Canterbury and Paris. This option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term to study in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Course format and assessment

You take a compulsory module, at least one more specialist Postcolonial module and two other modules (four in total) during the autumn and spring terms. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write the dissertation or editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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