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Masters Degrees (Third Class Degree)

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This a one year (academic) full time course which, upon completion of a course of study leads to an M.Med.Sci Degree in Assisted Reproduction Technology. Read more

Overview

This a one year (academic) full time course which, upon completion of a course of study leads to an M.Med.Sci Degree in Assisted Reproduction Technology. This course provides an avenue for both scientists and clinicians to enter the field of reproductive biology; and for those already familiar with this area, an opportunity to gain greater appreciation of the biological processes of mammalian reproduction that are relevant to the manipulation of fertility and the treatment of reproductive disease.

The course was established in 1993, making it the longest running taught masters in the UK providing full-time training in human ART, and aims to furnish graduates with the theoretical and practical training within this highly specialised discipline. Designed to broaden knowledge of the underlying scientific principles and to enhance appreciation of the clinical management of infertility, it aims to encourage independent thought and a research oriented approach to the practice of assisted conception.

A major feature and strength of this course is that the primary components, in terms of reproductive physiology, research methods, clinical embryology, and clinical medicine are all provided by experts who are highly active within their own areas of expertise, giving the information provided to the students an immediacy and relevance that it would be impossible to achieve using a more static and established teaching base.

The course is studied over a period of one year, full time, and has three basic components:
1) Theoretical and Practical Training modules (95 Credits)
2) Development of Research and Presentation skills and Observation (25 Credits)
3) Research project & dissertation (60 Credits)

Delivery method

The taught component of the course is delivered in the Autumn and Spring semesters through a combination of lectures, practicals, seminars, tutorials and other associated activities, such as journal club and guest speakers.

Approximately one third of the total course duration is dedicated to the construction, preparation and investigation of a laboratory-based research project of up to 15,000 words. This is written up in thesis presentation form.

IMPORTANT NOTE

ALL applicants, especially those from a predominantly clinical background, please note:

• This is a laboratory-based, science degree course and not a clinically based infertility treatment course.
• There is no direct contact with patients or tuition in gynaecological/surgical procedures.
• That although training is given in all laboratory aspects of assisted conception (including semen evaluation, IVF, IVM, ICSI and cryopreservation) in the time available, this training can only represent an introduction to these techniques and those graduates wishing to become clinical embryologists will need further training to become competent in those highly specialised techniques.

Course aims

• To encourage independent thought and a research oriented approach to the practice of assisted conception
• To provide theoretical and practical training in Assisted Reproduction Technology
• To broaden the students knowledge of the underlying scientific basis of ART and clinical management of infertility
• To equip graduates with the ability to pursue a career in assisted conception (e.g. clinical embryology, infertility treatment) and/or research in reproductive biology

Course objectives

• To provide successful candidates with a career path within one of the many disciplines that encompass modern assisted reproduction technology and to this end, students are taught by and given the opportunity to interact with, both full-time reproductive biologists and the consultants, clinical embryologists, andrologists and counsellors.

Requirements

Candidates must normally be graduates of an approved university, or other institution of higher education in medicine, nursing or the biological sciences. Normally the minimum requirement for entry is a 2(ii) degree or equivalent, although candidates with a third class degree may be considered at the Course Directors discretion in special circumstances. If you are not sure if you qualify, please do not hesitate to contact the Course Administrator

Candidates will be required to follow a prescribed course of study for one academic year (two 15-week semesters and summer period)

All candidates will be required to undertake a theoretical and practical training programme. Candidates will also be required to submit a dissertation of not more that 15,000 words on a topic relating to an aspect of Assisted Reproduction agreed by the Director of the Course.

English Language Requirements

International students whose first language is not English must achieve an appropriate level in an approved test in English before they can register.

The requirements for this course are above the University minimum standards and are as follows:

• IELTS minimum score of 6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in any element)
or
• TOEFL iBT 87 (minimum 19 in listening, 20 in speaking and 21 in reading and writing)

Examinations should be taken within two years of registering to study at Nottingham. Completion of a previous degree studied in the English language does not exempt applicants from requiring one of the above English qualifications, unless the degree was taken in a country where the first language is English.

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This masters degree course consists of a curriculum specialising in cool-climate wine production, climate change effects on viticulture, terroir and sparkling wine. Read more

Viticulture & Oenology: the science of grapegrowing and winemaking

This masters degree course consists of a curriculum specialising in cool-climate wine production, climate change effects on viticulture, terroir and sparkling wine. It also includes opportunities to visit other wine-producing areas in Europe. The Wine Department staff have considerable international expertise and research experience, and a brand new Wine Research Centre was completed in March 2014. This combination of experienced staff and modern research facilities will enable students to access an outstanding Masters-level education.

Course structure:

The programme aims to enable students to develop a deep and systematic understanding of wine science (oenology) and related disciplines, and then apply this knowledge to make viticultural and oenological decisions in complex circumstances.

Areas of study:

Students will be required to attend a two-week intensive course in vinegrowing and winemaking at the start of the programme.

The first semester comprises of three modules which enable students to gain and apply knowledge and understanding of current research in grapevine physiology, wine chemistry, biochemistry, and microbiology.

The second semester focuses on climate & terroir and sparkling wine. Students wishing to complete with the Post-Graduate Diploma in Viticulture & Oenology may elect to complete a dissertation and end their studies at this point. Students who intend to study for the full Masters degree will normally take an in-depth research methods module prior to commencing their Masters project.

The third semester is designed to allow students to complete their Masters project, which can be undertaken in the newly opened UK Wine Research Centre, or in another suitable location.

Career and progression opportunities:

This programme enables students to gain advanced skills and knowledge in vinegrowing and winemaking. It therefore prepares them for careers which require the application of a high level of technical knowledge and the exercise of a considerable degree of responsibility. These positions include Vineyard Manager, Viticultural

Consultant, Winemaker and Wine Quality Controller for the wine trade, and will also give the opportunity to continue post-graduate education. Students can also progress towards the achievement of a Doctor in Philosophy (PhD) qualification in related subjects. There is a high demand for these skills, not just in the UK, but also in emerging wine-producing countries who are seeking staff with a truly international approach to the subject and a strong understanding of the requirements of international markets like the UK.

Modules

Semester 1:

The Science & Application of Grapevine Biology
Grape Berry & Wine Composition & Analysis
The Science & Application of Winemaking

Semester 2:

The Science of Sparkling Wine
Climate & Sustainability
Independent Study
Research Methods for Viticulture & Oenology

Semester 3:

Masters Wine Project

Awards

- Post-graduate Certificate in Wine Science: completion of 60 credits selected from semesters 1 and 2.
- Post-graduate Certificate in Viticulture & Oenology: completion of the three 20-credit modules from semester 1.
- Post-graduate Diploma in Viticulture & Oenology: completion of the 120-credit modules from semesters 1 and 2.
- Masters Degree in Viticulture & Oenology: completion of 180 credits and successfully conducting the Master project

This course is validated by the University of Brighton and delivered by Plumpton College

Wine Research

http://www.plumpton.ac.uk/department/wine-and-wine-research/page/wine-research/166

Wine Careers

http://www.plumpton.ac.uk/department/wine-and-wine-research/page/wine-careers/168

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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Your programme of study. Real Estate is now a worldwide profession for many specialists in the field, investors and property developers, international travellers and businesses. Read more

Your programme of study

Real Estate is now a worldwide profession for many specialists in the field, investors and property developers, international travellers and businesses. Globalisation has meant that real estate is now visible to each of us in most countries in the world. This presents both huge opportunities and managed risks in countries offering different types of regulation, rules of conduct, registration and assessment methods. Risks are many and varied but include managing fraud, money laundering, protecting money and more. You also have to understand valuation methods inside and out for buying, selling, renting, letting, understanding disputes, issues affecting homes and businesses, auctions, planning issues affecting your property and more. There are now new ways of buying and selling property complete online or by auction models.

Real Estate if a very vocational Master's degree which is open to students from any degree background who want to start a chartered surveying profession in valuation, property investment and development with RICSs accreditation which is recognised globally. The programme is very employable and previous graduates are employed in senior positions in the profession.

The Degree is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) allowing graduates to proceed to the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (APC) following appropriate work experience

The Degree has been running for over 20 years and has established a strong reputation among employers with many past graduates employed in senior positions in the profession.

Employers like the combination of first degree coupled with a postgraduate Masters degree in the specialist area

Average cohort size of 15 to 25 students ensures an interactive, friendly learning environment

International Real Estate module includes a week long European field trip

Courses listed for the programme

Semester One

  • Real Estate Research
  • Property Law & Institutions
  • Valuation and Finance
  • Real Estate and Economics

Semester Two

  • International Real Estate
  • Advanced Valuation and Development
  • Strategic Marketing
  • Real Estate Finance

Third Semester

  • International Options
  • Real Estate Dissertation
  • Asian Cities - Hong Kong
  • Asian Cities - Seoul/Tokyo
  • Asian Cities- Singapore
  • Asian Cities - Shanghai/Beijing

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • The degree is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) - recognised internationally
  • The programme has been running for over twenty years - an established and renowned programme in the UK
  • International modules include a week long European field trip
  • International students can also elect to travel to Asia and visit five cities

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

 Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

You may be also interested in:

Real Estate (Commercial Option)



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This programme allows students to 'Upgrade to Success'. In other words, you can upgrade a non-standard qualification, or a third class honours degree, to a level equivalent to that of a first or second class honours degree. Read more
This programme allows students to 'Upgrade to Success'. In other words, you can upgrade a non-standard qualification, or a third class honours degree, to a level equivalent to that of a first or second class honours degree.

Why study Mathematics at Dundee?

The qualification that you gain from this course is a marketable addition to your CV. The skills gained through this course are highly transferable; maths is the backbone of many disciplines along a broad range of categories such as sciences and economics.

The material that is currently in the Mathematics programme covers a wide range of topics including mathematical biology, fluid dynamics, magneto hydrodynamics and numerical analysis and scientific computing as well as core subjects such as analysis and mathematical methods.

Please note that this course does not provide a direct entry route to Masters or PhD programmes at Dundee: applications for these programmes are considered separately.

The Graduate Diploma in Mathematics is made up by selecting eight Level 3 or Level 4 modules available in the Division of Mathematics. Each of these consists of 22 lectures and 11 tutorials. The standard of presentation is equivalent to that of an honours degree, and if you have a degree without honours or similar attainment, you may find a Graduate Diploma is a useful way of upgrading your qualifications.

Candidates may take any modules from the pool available, subject to timetable constraints. A total SCOTCAT credit count of 120 credits must be achieved, and since most of the relevant modules are 15 credits each, the normal program of study would consist of eight modules, four taken in each semester.

What's so good about Mathematics at Dundee?

The Mathematics division at the University of Dundee boasts an enviable staff to student ratio. Teachers are able to get to know students on a personal level, enhancing the support they can provide and improving our students' learning experience.

We also provide 24/7 access to computers dedicated to students studying mathematics to further support you throughout your studies.

How you will be taught

You will learn by a combination of lectures, tutorials, workshops and computer practical classes.

What you will study

The Graduate Diploma in Mathematics is made up by selecting eight Level 3 or Level 4 modules available in the Division of Mathematics. Each of these consists of 22 lectures and 11 tutorials. The standard of presentation is equivalent to that of an honours degree, and if you have a degree without honours or similar attainment, you may find a Graduate Diploma is a useful way of upgrading your qualifications.

Candidates may take any modules from the pool available, subject to timetable constraints. A total SCOTCAT credit count of 120 credits must be achieved, and since most of the relevant modules are 15 credits each, the normal program of study would consist of eight modules, four taken in each semester.

How you will be assessed

Coursework (20%) and a written examination (80%).

Careers

Mathematics is central to the sciences, and to the development of a prosperous, modern society. The demand for people with mathematical qualifications is considerable, and a degree in mathematics is a highly marketable asset.

Mathematics graduates are consistently amongst those attracting the highest graduate salaries and can choose from an ever-widening range of careers in research, industry, science, engineering, commerce, finance and education.

Many of our graduates enter the financial sector following career paths in accountancy, banking, the stock market and insurance.

Even if you do not take your mathematics any further than university, employers know that mathematics graduates are intelligent, logical problem solvers. With this training behind you, the career options become almost limitless.

Find out more from our Careers Service website.

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The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. Read more

About the programme

The ERASMUS MUNDUS M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration is a specialised academic training programme. The objective is to develop competences in the core subjects of the Programme for European and third country economists with career aspirations in universities, government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and economic research departments of large industrial or commercial corporations. Third country students will especially profit from an increased awareness of the place of the EU in the world economy in general, and with respect to worldwide globalisation and international trade in particular.

Content

in the field of economics of globalisation, international trade and European economic integration. It provides a profound insight into the current scientific knowledge in this field and is supported by scientific research at the partner universities, both at these universities individually and in a network context. The Programme leads to an in-depth understanding in the following core fields: Advanced Microeconomics, Advanced Macroeconomics, Open Economy Macroeconomics and International Finance, Economics of Globalisation, Economics of European Integration, and International Trade: Theory and Policy. As a master degree in economics should also include a strong quantitative component, Applied Econometrics is taught as an additional core discipline.

Added value

The M.A. focuses on conveying the new insights that come from recent economic research with respect to the impact on the relations with the emerging economies in East Asia and Latin America of social evolutionary processes like trade globalisation, globalisation on international financial markets, globalised governance and the ‘knowledge economy’. In doing so, the M.A. programme adds to university excellence and yields European added value, thereby, at least indirectly, contributing to European competitiveness.

The M.A. programme also creates specific European added value and is completely in line with the Bologna declaration, the Berlin Communiqué and with EUA Joint Master Recommendations through 6 specific features:
- European integration is one of the two core subjects of the Master Programme Economics of Globalisation and European Integration;
- a joint European degree: 7 European universities from 6 EU countries, together with 2 universities from BRICS countries, jointly award a consortium diploma;
- ECTS: the joint degree programme in entirely conceived within the philosophy and practice of the ECTS grading system;
internal and external quality control is in place in accordance with ENIC-NARIC recommendations;
- mobility: students move during the academic year as a group over three locations to three different countries, at least two of which are European; there is also teacher mobility;
- language: students stay during the year in three different language environments and they are offered the possibility to receive free and credited language courses in the corresponding countries.

Structure

The study-programme is full-time and runs over one year. The language of instruction is English. Courses are taught by professors from all partner universities. Professors from all partner universities act as supervisors and evaluators of the final dissertation.
The Programme consists of 60 ECTS credits, the taught part of the programme consisting of 45 credits and the dissertation having a weight of 15 credits. One credit is roughly equivalent to 25 working hours (lectures, assignments and study time).
Optional, but credited, language courses are offered in each of the languages of the countries involved in the Consortium (English excepted).

More details on http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=96030

Degree awarded

The programme leads to a master degree called M.A. Economics of Globalisation and European Integration.
The diplomas are certified jointly by the partners and are signed by the Rector, President or Vice-chancellor of each partner university.

Student profile

The programme is aimed at students with career aspirations in research, in government and international organisations, and in research departments of large banks and industrial and commercial corporations.

Admission requirements

The programme is open to students who have earned 240 ECTS credits in an economics or applied economics university study programme or have a bachelor degree in these areas that is considered by the Joint Studies Board to be equivalent.
Applicants who are enrolled in the final year of their academic programme should submit an official letter in English from their university confirming that they are expected to finalise their course at the end of the current academic year, and submit up-to-date authenticated transcripts with the results of the previous years.

The proficiency in English of the students of the participating universities is checked by the local academic co-ordinators. Students from other universities should submit proof of an internet-based TOEFL level of minimum 90 (or its equivalent in another TOEFL score system), or a IELTS grade of at least 6.5, or should submit proof of having studied at least one academic year in an English-language programme.

The selection procedure of all students (with and without an EM scholarship) is a common one. After having passed the eligibility check (see above) the candidates are first ranked according to their study results (GPA and/or class of degree). The weights used to differentiate those applicants who passed the eligibility tests, are the following: 30% for the type of diploma, 30% for the GPA average, 20% for fluency in English and 20% for the reputation of the home university based on the Shanghai ranking. This ‘reputation’ criterion is applied in conjunction with the requirement to strive for regional balance in the student population. The global intake of new students (with and without a scholarship) is limited to 45.

Application form: http://www.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.EGEI&n=93777

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Whether you want to get ahead in your career faster, or improve your knowledge, a Monash postgraduate degree can give you a distinct advantage. Read more
Whether you want to get ahead in your career faster, or improve your knowledge, a Monash postgraduate degree can give you a distinct advantage.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/biomedical-science-preliminary-2970?domestic=true

The Master of Biomedical Science Preliminary is designed for students interested in undertaking postgraduate research in biomedical sciences. A candidate is required to carry out a prescribed program of research for a specified period under the direct supervision of a member of the academic staff. The supervisor, in consultation with the candidate, is responsible for developing the research program to be followed by the candidate, and for reporting at regular intervals on the candidates progress.

The MBiomedSci Preliminary is designed for students who do not have the equivalent of a class 1 or class 2A honours degree in a relevant discipline. For graduates with only a Bachelor degree in a relevant field and who have not attempted honours in that field, admission to MBiomedSci Preliminary will normally require at least a credit grade average in 24 points of relevant third-year units, or appropriate additional training and experience.

Candidates must complete the MBiomedSci Preliminary program and obtain results equivalent to class 2A honours (H2A) or better for admission into Master of Biomedical Science. The MBiomedSci Preliminary is not an awardable degree. Candidates should complete their program of study within 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time. Students who pass MBiomedSci Preliminary of the program but who do not wish to continue or do not achieve class 2A honours or above will be offered the exit award of the Postgraduate Diploma in Biomedical Sciences.

Candidates will be required to undertake a major research thesis of 75% of the entire course. The thesis should embody the results of the candidates investigation, which demonstrates independence of thought and the candidates ability to carry out research in that discipline. The remaining 25% of the course will comprise coursework such as a literature review and/or statistics classes, and is specified by the enrolling department.

Career opportunities

Students who have completed the course will demonstrate an understanding of relevant research techniques in their field through a review of the relevant literature. They will demonstrate their ability, under supervision to apply relevant research techniques to their chosen field of study. Students will be able to present high-quality written work suitable for publication in appropriate scholarly journals, and be able to critically evaluate both their own and others' written work in their chosen field.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/medicine

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Faculty is also home to a number of leading medical and biomedical research institutes and groups, and has contributed to advances in many crucial areas: in vitro fertilisation, obesity research, drug design, cardiovascular physiology, functional genomics, infectious diseases, inflammation, psychology, neurosciences and mental health.

Notwithstanding the relatively short history of our University, the Faculty is ranked in the top 50 in the world for its expertise in life sciences and biomedicine by the Times Higher Education and QS World University 2012 benchmarks.

Courses offered by the Faculty include medicine, nursing, radiography and medical imaging, nutrition and dietetics,emergency health studies, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and social work. A range of research and coursework postgraduate programs is also offered.

The Faculty takes pride in delivering outstanding education in all courses, in opening students to the possibilities offered by newly discovered knowledge, and in providing a nurturing and caring environment.

Further details may be found at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/about.html

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/biomedical-science-preliminary-2970?domestic=true#making-the-application

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This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. Read more

This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. A key goal is to provide an essential grounding in quantitative modelling that can be widely applied to several fields, from pure research to the commercial sector.

About this degree

The programme provides an introduction to the spectrum and impact of geophysical hazards, and a focus on quantitative models for hazard forecasting and assessment. Selected case studies illustrate how these models are essential for improving decision-making during emergencies, for raising the awareness of vulnerable populations, and for evaluating and implementing mitigation strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Geological and Geotechnical Hazards
  • Meteorological Hazards
  • Research Methods
  • Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazard
  • Physical Volcanology and Volcanic Hazard
  • Meteorological, Climate and Hydrogeological Hazard

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in geophysical hazards, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical exercises. There are excellent opportunities for field investigations in the UK and abroad. Assessment is through unseen written examinations, practical problem-solving exercises and essays. The independent research report is assessed through the dissertation and an oral presentation.

Fieldwork

Field sites for field trips are normally in Italy. The department pays for accommodation and transport in the field. Students pay to get to the field and subsistence.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Geophysical Hazards MSc

Careers

On graduation from this programme about one-third of students have followed careers in global insurance and re-insurance and another third have pursued research with a PhD in hazard-related studies. The remaining third have developed careers in a wide range of sectors, from non-governmental organisations, through teaching, to the fields of emergency planning and environmental management.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Aggregate and Catastrophe Modeller, Advent
  • Catastrophe Analyst, Talbot Underwriting
  • Graduate Trainee Reinsurance Broker, Aon
  • Catastrophe Model Analyst, Aon Benfield
  • Policy Adviser, Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Employability

The MSc in Geophysical Hazards will provide essential training for careers in hazard assessment and risk evaluation, including: industry, from engineering to insurance; academic research; civil protection agencies and government organisations; and NGOs related to aid and development. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Earth Sciences is engaged in world-class research into the processes at work on and within the Earth and planets.

Graduate students benefit from our lively and welcoming environment and world-class facilities. The department hosts UCL Hazard Centre, Europe's leading multidisciplinary hazard research centre, and engages in extensive collaborative work with the Royal Institution and the Natural History Museum.

This MSc aims to include a short field trip to locations that illustrate the impact of natural hazards. Previous trips have included the Neapolitan volcanic district, the Italian Alps and the Po Delta, and the Cádiz region in south-western Spain.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Earth Sciences

92% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This programme offers you the unique opportunity to combine a year of study in Glasgow with a year studying overseas (in English) at one of our renowned partner institutions and leads to the award of a double degree or a single degree. Read more
This programme offers you the unique opportunity to combine a year of study in Glasgow with a year studying overseas (in English) at one of our renowned partner institutions and leads to the award of a double degree or a single degree.

Key facts

• International Master (Double degree/single degree): 24 months full-time;
• Contact:

Why Glasgow

• If you are interested in the challenges faced by the states and societies of Central and Eastern Europe and their place within the new global security order, this two-year programme is for you.
• The programme has been recognised by the European Commission as an Erasmus Mundus Masters Programme of ‘outstanding academic quality’.
• The Erasmus Mundus label allows the programme to annually grant a substantial number of scholarships (including several full scholarships to non-European students).
• Language and other study trips to the region are available. You will be offered the opportunity to spend a month in Russian. Some financial support is available to help you fund these trips.

Programme Structure

Year 1

You will take two core courses and two optional courses at the University of Glasgow.

Core courses
• Language - Czech, Estonian (tbc), Hungarian, Polish, Russian
• Issues in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
• Research methods for studying Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

Optional courses
• Developments in Czech society since 1989
• Gender and identity in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia
• Media and democratisation in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union
• Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local identities
• Rethinking Central Asian security
• Russian foreign policy
• Statehood and nationality in Central and Eastern Europe
• A maximum of one outside option from an approved subject.

Note: Some courses might not be available every year.

Year 2: study abroad & dissertation

In semester 1 you will attend lectures/seminars at an international partner university and may choose your study programme from a wide range of options. Dissertation topic will have a strong influence on the selection of Year 2 double degree partner. Relevant language options to a maximum of 6 ECTS may also be selected. In semester 2 you will complete a 20,000-25,000 word dissertation.

Erasmus Mundus graduates will receive the official degree of International Masters in Russian, Central & East European Studies and an official degree from one of our partner universities.

Background and Aims

This challenging and innovative programme enables you to understand the history of communism and why it collapsed. You gain an informed knowledge of the process of economic and political transformation in the former communist states.

We want to develop world class researchers specialising in one or more of the following critical geopolitical areas: Central Asia; the Caucasus & Caspian Sea Basin; Russia; Central and Eastern Europe, including the Baltic Sea Region. This should support bodies like the European Union to address the myriad of socio-economic, political and security challenges of the 21st century. Flexible and high quality language training is an essential part of the programme.

You will get international experience in at least two countries, develop your skills in area research and acquire a range of key employability skills through our well-developed placements with associate partners from the business, public policy and third sector communities. You will also participate in conferences, workshops and other socio-cultural events, making the experience truly rewarding.

Career Prospects

You will be prepared for careers in policy-making in government, foreign ministries, the EU, Intergovernmental organisations and non-governmental organisations. Other career opportunities include higher education and business.

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Sustainability has emerged as a defining issues of the 21st century. Achieving enduring and fairer societies requires viable economies, sound science and good governance. Read more
Sustainability has emerged as a defining issues of the 21st century. Achieving enduring and fairer societies requires viable economies, sound science and good governance. This course provides training in theory and critical analysis along with the practical skills to facilitate the transformation needed to deliver low carbon futures.

Why study Sustainability at Dundee?

The MSc in Sustainability is being introduced in recognition of the challenges of water, food, energy and health security facing the planet. The portfolio of environmental disciplines is exceptionally strong in the University as are its traditions of cross-disciplinary collaboration and cooperation.
Along with the flagship MSc in Sustainability, there are four specialised pathways:

MSc in Sustainability and Water Security
MSc in Sustainability and Climate Change
MSc in Sustainability and Low Carbon Living
MSc in Sustainability and the Green Economy

What's so good about Sustainability at Dundee?

There is a strong postgraduate culture which Sustainability students can enjoy.
The Graduate School of Natural Resources Law, Policy and Management includes both the Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law Policy and the Centre for Water Law, Policy and Science (under the auspices of UNESCO) both of which have long standing international reputations. Specialist high-level speakers sourced from international organisations are invited to present throughout the year, these sessions provide a vital opportunity for students to become connected with industry so continued communication is encouraged after the events.

The School of the Environment and CECHR similarly have an extended programme of guest lectures and speakers and through xcechr there are multiple events bringing Masters and PhD students together by a common interest in environmental change research. Examples of the activities that result include Student-Supervisor-Seminar-Series, ‘change-maker workshops’ and a national show-case ‘Facing the Future’ Symposium.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for a wide range of graduates from;
Environmental backgrounds (e.g. geography, planning, environmental studies) looking to upskill and achieve a deeper understanding
Natural science graduates (e.g. chemistry, maths) and engineers looking to develop a more rounded understanding of environmental issues, especially in relation to regulation and policy.
Arts and social science students wishing to use their social, economic and political perspectives to take on the challenges associated with complex environmental systems and their management.

How you will be taught

The course is taught as a collection of 20 credit modules amounting to a total of 180 Masters (SHE M, SCQF 11) credits. The delivery style and assessment requirements for each module varies as we believe a diversity of practice provides strength. Nevertheless all modules combine a mixture of formal lecture, small group seminar, practical/field classes and individual tutorials depending on need and the particular learning objectives of each module. The study load corresponds to one third in each of the first two teaching semesters and one third for independent study for the dissertation the summer recess.

What you will study

There are a choice of four specialist pathways in addition to the MSc in Sustainability: See above.

Each of the five MSc pathways contains a common core comprising ‘Principles of Sustainability’ and ‘Transformation for Sustainability’, along with the ‘Research Training’ module. Each named pathway then comprises a specialised core module and then options drawn from a wide range of electives (c. 30 available from contributing academic Schools). All five MSc pathways feature a 60 credit individual research project, the weighting of which reflects the importance of independent investigation and permitting students to develop expertise in their chosen area through effectively four months of dedicated research.

Each of the MSc in Sustainability pathways is geared around the following learning outcomes:

Knowledge and Understanding:
Achieve a critical understanding of key sustainability principles and perspectives informing actions in pursuit of sustainable development, inclusive of environment, economy and equity considerations;
Demonstrate knowledge of approaches to evaluating and measuring sustainability;
Apply different concepts of transformation and change to enable individual and societal shifts towards more sustainable practices;

Skills:
Ability to analyse, evaluate and critically review theory and policy debates relating to sustainability;
Ability to draw on international perspectives and examples of best practice in relation to methods of evaluation and assessment of sustainability;
Ability to design and plan interventions for creating change to promote greater sustainability across different scales;
Design and undertake a substantial independent research project to address significant areas of theory and/or practice.

Capabilities:
Critique and synthesis theory and evidence drawing on a variety of sources;
Ability to communicate evidenced based reports relevant to a range of stakeholders, including policy makers;
Ability to work independently and as part of a team tackling complex environmental problems to tight deadlines;
Ability to design and evaluate transformative change leading to improved sustainability strategies, processes and plans

Transferrable skills, including building arguments, synthesis, reflexivity and making presentations.

How you will be assessed

Assessment follows a variety of styles including individual essays and practical assignments along with formal written examinations; to group exercises and peer group assessment – this is particularly important where oral presentations are involved. The independent research project (dissertation) is an excellent opportunity for a candidate to achieve deep insight into a topic of their own choice. Masters level dissertations can be very diverse, and include formal hypothesis-led research projects; theory or literature-based projects; case-study assessment and advanced professional practice evaluations. Choice of dissertations is negotiated between the student and his or her academic supervisor.

Careers

The environmental sector is one of the key growth areas in the global economy and in UK terms is comparable in size to the pharmaceutical and aerospace sectors combined. An MSc in Sustainability is designed to equip our graduates to take up a wide range of careers in policy, practical management, training and research across a spectrum of organisations from local to international and within the public and private sectors.

International Agencies and NGOs
Civil Service
Governmental environmental and conservation agencies (e.g. SNH, SEPA, EA)
Environmental management and policy sectors (private and public sector)
Environmental consultancy
Management consultancy
Public affairs
Built environment sustainability
Local planning authorities
Research and development
Preparation for PhD research

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Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?. Read more

Have you been writing creatively for a while and feel the need for some professional support? Do you wish to be read by like-minded people? Do you sense that you can write but struggle with the mechanics of form and structure? Do you harbour a desire to see how far your writing can get you? Do you dream of being a published author?

For 13 years, our MA Creative Writing has been enabling students to achieve some, if not all, of these goals. In 2016 alone, 11 of our graduates published novels with major publishing houses.

The course is taught through small, dynamic seminars and one-to-one tuition. We offer modules in fiction writing and options in playwriting, poetry, screenwriting and creative non-fiction, and practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

To find out more, read our programme handbook (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/current-students/postgraduate/).

You will taught by successful, published authors and practitioners, including:

- Julia Bell

- David Eldridge

- Richard Hamblyn

- Russell Celyn Jones

- Toby Litt

- Luke Williams

- Benjamin Wood

- Jonathan Kemp.

Visit the website http://www.bbk.ac.uk/study/2016/postgraduate/programmes/TMACWRIT_C/

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/news/ref-results/), which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Read about Birkbeck research that enriches our experience and understanding of our shared history, culture and art (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/arts/research).

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

- Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

- Aims to develop the craft of fiction at a professional level and includes practical courses on publishing, producing and editing creative work.

- In addition to working with the established writers who teach the degree, you will have contact with industry professionals, such as publishers and literary agents, who offer a series of platform discussions in the summer term.

- In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), English Language and Literature at Birkbeck achieved 100% for a research environment conducive to producing research of the highest quality, while 91% of eligible staff submitted research, of which 75% was recognised as world-leading or internationally excellent.

- Our Department of English and Humanities (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english) is a lively centre of world-class research and teaching.

- We offer a range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/study-here/world-class-research-resources).

- Our annual creative writing magazine, The Mechanics' Institute Review, is edited by Birkbeck MA Creative Writing students and features writing from the course as a showcase for the degree, with wide distribution beyond Birkbeck to literary agents, publishers, etc.

- Read an account of how our students created the most recent issue of The Mechanics' Institute Review (http://blogs.bbk.ac.uk/george/2014/10/07/editing-the-mechanics-institute-review-11/).

- MIROnline is an interactive website, edited by PhD students and volunteers, with all the latest news and writing from this programme and beyond.

- Find out more about our range of world-class research resources (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/english/our-research).

- Watch videos of our postgraduate students discussing their experience of studying at Birkbeck (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/get-ahead-stay-ahead/student-experience-videos).

Teaching and assessment

- Teaching

Teaching is seminar-based. Each session is generally 2 hours, and there are further regular one-to-one tutorials throughout the year.

- Assessment

4 short creative pieces with critical essays (50%). A dissertation (15,000 words) in one of the following genres: a novella, novel or collection of short stories, with a preface of 3000 words (50%).

Careers and employability

Birkbeck Creative Writing graduates include:

Sally Hinchcliffe

Niki Aguirre

Heidi James

Matthew Loukes

Iphgenia Baal

Nii Parkes

Emma Henderson

Liz Fremantle

Anna Hope

Karin Salvalaggio

Olya Knezevic

Phoebe Blatton

Melissa De Villiers

Nik Korpon

Louise Lee

Tray Butler

Helen Pike

David Savill

Laura Allsop

Sarah Alexander

Nadim Safdar

A. J. Grainger

Julia Gray

Nicole Burstein

Jules Grant

Amy Bird

Stefanie Seddon

Fiona Melrose.

Graduates go in to careers in editing, teaching, and writing professionally. Possible professions include creative writer, magazine or newspaper journalist, or editorial assistant. This degree can also be useful in becoming an academic librarian, English as a second language (ESOL) teacher, or information officer.

Find out more about these professions (http://www.prospects.ac.uk/options_with_your_subject.htm).

Find out more about the destinations of graduates in this subject (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/careers-and-employability/department-of-english-and-humanities).

We offer a comprehensive Careers and Employability Service to help you advance your career, while our in-house, professional recruitment consultancy, Birkbeck Talent, works with London’s top employers to help you gain work experience that fits in with your evening studies.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bbk.ac.uk/prospective/postgraduate/apply



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This flexible MA allows you to enhance your knowledge of the language of your choice (Dutch, French, German, Italian, a Scandinavian option, Spanish and Portuguese) while offering you the opportunity to take courses in history, literature and culture across the range of areas offered in the School of European Languages, Culture and Society (SELCS). Read more
This flexible MA allows you to enhance your knowledge of the language of your choice (Dutch, French, German, Italian, a Scandinavian option, Spanish and Portuguese) while offering you the opportunity to take courses in history, literature and culture across the range of areas offered in the School of European Languages, Culture and Society (SELCS).

Degree information

Students will research cultural issues of major contemporary importance in the language of their choice.The degree will also help you develop your knowledge of one or more of the languages taught in SELCS (Dutch, French, German, Italian, a Scandinavian option, Spanish and Portuguese).

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules from a range of graduate modules (90 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core modules - The core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - optional modules may include:
-Advanced Translation (Dutch, French, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Spanish)
-Advanced Language Modules (Dutch, French, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Spanish)
-Early Modern Exchanges Modules
-Medieval and Renaissance Studies Modules
-Organised Crime: Gangsters in Life and Art
-Material Encounters with Medieval Texts
-Comparative Syntax
-Witches in History, Fiction and Scholarship

Dissertation/report
All students are required to write a dissertation of 12,000 words on an approved research topic for the taught pathway and 18,000 words for the research pathway.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Teaching is concentrated in the first two terms, with the third term devoted to revision sessions, examinations and a dissertation project. Student performance is assessed by various methods, including coursework essays, a dissertation, and unseen written examinations.

Careers

The degree offers a graduate qualification in its own right, as well as serving as a pathway towards doctoral research in European literature, language, history, film and other areas. Many students progress from one of our MA programmes to an MPhil or PhD research degree.

Why study this degree at UCL?

SELCS at UCL is recognised as a world-class department for the study of European languages, culture and history.

Our central location offers students easy access to excellent resources for a range of European cultures, such as the British Library, the Institute for Modern Languages Research, the Warburg Institute, the Institute of Historical Research, along with access to numerous cultural and social events relating to the degree.

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This Master's of Public Administration degree prepares future leaders and decision makers across the public, private and third sectors to synthesise political and technical factors in order to effectively address issues like cyber security, the digital economy and online human rights. Read more

This Master's of Public Administration degree prepares future leaders and decision makers across the public, private and third sectors to synthesise political and technical factors in order to effectively address issues like cyber security, the digital economy and online human rights.

About this degree

The MPA will tackle a series of pressing topics for policymakers, such as:

  • are global agreements on cyber security realistic or necessary?
  • how do we balance protection of human rights against the security of the Internet of Things?
  • how can we reconsider approaches to policy-making in the rapidly evolving information age?

Students also gain deep understanding of conceptual frameworks, policy tools and analytical methods to implement, evaluate and revise public policies through a series of core modules.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a Major Group Project module (45 credits).

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Digital Technology and Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the Group Project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Technologies and Policy MPA

Careers

This MPA degree prepares graduates to step into leadership and decision-making roles in government, technology companies, think tanks, and consultancies that engage with issues like cyber security, the digital economy, the Internet of Things, Internet governance and online human rights.

Employability

Throughout the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in digital technology
  • develop an understanding of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and technology experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise public policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address societal challenges.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Policymakers and those in the private sector often feel they lack the appropriate background to take the lead on developing strategies, policies and guidelines that can account for the wide range of diverse (and sometimes competing) interests that characterise today's era of rapid technological change. Graduates of this Master's of Public Administration will be able to develop informed policy and tackle the challenges and opportunities of the digital age.

Students are taught how to bridge gaps within government and in the public and private sector, gather evidence to support decision-making and engage with issues like cyber security and Internet governance. They also gain practical insights through a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process and an extended policy project with a real-world client on a relevant topic.

Students will gain access to UCL STEaPP's network of international partners, expert staff and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas. Read more

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Special features

Work Placement (Semesters 1 and 2)

One of the most popular aspects of the AGMS is the work placement that you undertake in a museum or gallery. Each placement involves a minimum of 20 days work on a specific project, such as exhibition development, collections management, or education programme. Many students find this such a positive experience that they carry on working in their museum when the work placement has finished, and each year a few students are offered jobs by their placement hosts. Work placements start in Semester 1 (November/December) and finish in Semester 2 (June).

You can take the work placement either as 15-credit or 30-credit course.

During the MA, students have opportunities to design and participate in live projects with cultural organisations in Manchester. These include curating a collection, developing exhibitions, producing cultural events and working on creative collaborative projects.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Postgraduate life in the Centre for Museology

Both the Centre for Museology and the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures host a varied programme of activities and events for postgraduate students, including occasional master classes and workshops, as well as our regular calendar of:

  • Museology research seminars
  • 'Showcase' seminars at the Manchester Museum
  • Institute for Cultural Practices events
  • Research forum for PhD students

Full-time or part-time?

The AGMS MA is available as a 1 year Full-time or a 2 year Part-time course. We particularly welcome part-time students and there are many advantages in combining study with work practice, whether you already have a museum post, or are just setting out on your career. Each year, a number of mid-career professionals take the MA degree on a part-time basis and find that the University provides a valuable space for reflection as well as for further learning. Part time students have classes one day per week (usually Tuesday or Thursday; although in Semester 2 it might be a different day depending on the option course you choose). On this one should also add our Thursday 5pm research, professional practice and academic skills workshops. You should also count time for library work/fieldwork that may require you coming to Manchester and although sometimes this can be done on the day of teaching, often one needs to come in a second day (and if you do this on Thursdays then you can combine it with the 5pm workshops). When the work placement kicks off (about November/December in Year 1 or Year 2) you should also count one more day/week (on average) at the Work Placement institution (which, if appropriate or relevant, can be the organisation where you currently work; but undertaking a project different to your day-to-day work) - this is of course if you decide to take the Work Placement module.



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The MA in Peace and Conflict Studies is an exciting international and interdisciplinary two-year programme focusing on violent conflict as well as its prevention and management. Read more

The MA in Peace and Conflict Studies is an exciting international and interdisciplinary two-year programme focusing on violent conflict as well as its prevention and management. It is a unique programme which is jointly offered by the University of Kent and the Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany and is taught in English.

You gain advanced knowledge in peace and conflict research, designed to help you understand the causes of violent conflict and to explain its effects and dynamics. As befits the complexity of violent conflict, the programme is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing on insights from politics and international relations, sociology and psychology. It examines the major theories and leading practices of conflict and conflict resolution, supplementing theory with detailed case studies. Topics typically covered within the programme include risk analysis, negotiation, mediation, conference diplomacy, twin-track diplomacy, third-party intervention, peace-keeping, peace-making, and coercive diplomacy.

The programme draws on the large pool of expertise in the field of conflict analysis at Kent and Marburg, concentrated in the Centre for Conflict Studies at Marburg (https://www.uni-marburg.de/konfliktforschung/startseite-englisch?language_sync=1) and the Conflict Analysis Research Centre at Kent, both leading research centres in the field.

You develop your high-end analytical skills, along with more practical capabilities in areas such as mediation. Valuable skills are gained from dedicated research exercises such as conflict simulations, while you learn additional practical skills from an internship that is usually undertaken between the first and second years of study. Overall, the programme provides you with an outstanding basis from which to pursue a variety of careers, including in government, international organisations, NGOs, media, business, and consultancy and research. 

About the School of Politics and International Relations

The School of Politics and International Relations is one of the most dynamic places to study Politics and International Relations. We combine high-quality teaching with cutting-edge research in a supportive environment that welcomes students from all over the world.

All lectures and seminars on postgraduate modules are informed by the latest research and scholarship, and are delivered by full-time academic staff who have internationally recognised expertise in their field.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Internships, Placements and Alumni Manager who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.

Our graduates have gone on to careers in academia, local and national government and public relations.

We are currently ranked 8th in the UK for Graduate Prospects in the Complete University Guide 2018.



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