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Combining your Haskayne MBA with a graduate degree in another field enables you to develop the skills and knowledge needed to stand out in a highly competitive global market. Read more
Combining your Haskayne MBA with a graduate degree in another field enables you to develop the skills and knowledge needed to stand out in a highly competitive global market. You will gain the ability to view an issue from multiple perspectives and develop a diverse professional network, creating a unique competitive advantage.

The Haskayne School of Business offers combined degrees with the faculties of Law, Cumming School of Medicine, School of Public Policy, and Social Work. To optimize the financial investment and time commitment, students are awarded degrees by both faculties without completing the full complement of courses in both programs.

Students can choose to do a combined degree with another faculty, the options are as follows.

JD/MBA (Juris Doctor)

The combined program with law positions students to be successful in roles such as practicing law within a corporation, running a private practice or being a business advisor on the legal and regulatory environment.

JD/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the law department, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

MBT/MBA (Masters of Biomedical Technology)

The combined program with the Department of Medicine positions students to be successful in roles at the interface of science and industry such as management of health sciences, within regulatory bodies and entrepreneurship in technology.

MBT/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the Department of Medicine, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

MD/MBA (Doctor of Medicine)

The combined program with medicine positions students to be successful in roles such as entrepreneurship in health sciences, private medical practice or management of public health.

MD/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the Department of Medicine, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies. As per the Calendar - A student admitted to the MD/MBA program spends the first year in the MBA program, completing a minimum of 36 units (6.0 full-course equivalents).

MPP/MBA (Master of Public Policy)

The combined program with the School of Public Policy positions students to be successful in roles at the interface of government and industry such as corporate social responsibility officers, within regulatory bodies and entrepreneurship in non-profit.

MPP/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the School of Public Policy, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

MSW/MBA (Master of Social Work)

The combined program with School of Social Work positions students to be successful in roles at the interface of wellness and industry such as corporate wellness and human capital consulting.

MSW/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the School of Social Work, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

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Overview. ScotGEM is a unique and innovative four-year graduate entry medical programme focused on enthusing graduates to become generalist practitioners (not necessarily GPs), with experience in rural health care and healthcare improvement. Read more

Overview

ScotGEM is a unique and innovative four-year graduate entry medical programme focused on enthusing graduates to become generalist practitioners (not necessarily GPs), with experience in rural health care and healthcare improvement. The programme will prepare students for any branch of medicine with appropriate further training.

ScotGEM uses the existing strengths of medical teaching in the Universities of St Andrews and Dundee and our local health boards in Fife and Tayside, in collaboration with NHS Highland, NHS Dumfries and Galloway and the University of Highlands and Islands. The first year will be based at the University of St Andrews and within Fife, components of the course in the second, third and potentially fourth years will include periods of living and studying in other regions of Scotland.

A bursary of £4,000 each year will be available to all students, those who accept the bursary will complete a return of service to NHS Scotland of one year for each year of bursary accepted. Return of service, sometimes known as bonding, will commence at the start of Foundation training.

First year

From week one, your learning will be focused around real patient scenarios using an approach known as Case Based Learning. Semester one will use cases to focus on foundational medical sciences to underpin subsequent more challenging scenarios. Consultation skills will be introduced early alongside topics such as biochemistry, pharmacology and anatomy and weekly clinical experience in the community. The course is designed as a spiral in which the complexity and challenge of the cases builds as you and your peers become more effective learners.

Semester two focuses on body systems so that related regional anatomy and examination skills can be learnt in parallel. You will be engaged in small group workplace-based learning for one day per week, supported in the community by dedicated Generalist Clinical Mentors (GCM) who are trained GP tutors.

Second year

Second year is largely structured around the lifecycle but will be delivered in different regions. You will be expected to spend some weeks away from Fife with opportunity to study in Tayside, the Highlands and Dumfries and Galloway. NHS Boards will provide accommodation when required. You will continue to work for a day each week with a GCM in their practice but also spend an additional half day in a specialist clinical environment. Second year closes by providing experience of unscheduled care (GP, Emergency department, ambulance etc.) and two periods of project work related to five underpinning Vertical Themes (Informatics, Quality Improvement, Prescribing and therapeutics, Public health and community engagement).

Throughout the course these five Vertical Themes will also develop expertise as ‘agents of change’ within the health service. For example, students might work with a group of general practices to research and analyse prescribing patterns before implementing an agreed improvement.

Third year

Third year is designed as a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship with students being immersed into a community for the duration of the year. You will be based in a general practice, seeing many patients each week and following a selection through their illness journey. This approach works especially well for graduates and has been shown to develop more patient-centred doctors with improved decision-making skills.

Fourth year

Fourth year offers you, as a now competent generalist student, the opportunity to be immersed in the hospital environment and prepare yourself for work as a junior doctor through two one-month Foundation Apprenticeships and other hospital based clinical attachments. You may choose areas of particular interest, perhaps a potential career choice, which you can experience in greater depth. You will also arrange an eight-week elective of your choice.

Upon successful completion of the ScotGEM programme, graduates will receive a primary medical qualification (PMQ), which allows them to apply for subsequent postgraduate training in any specialty through normal routes. It also entitles graduates to provisional registration with the General Medical Council.

Teaching

The ScotGEM course will be based on clinical cases from the outset. These will be supported by a set of learning objectives, lectures, practical classes, tutorials, simulated and ‘real’ clinical and consultation skills plus extensive supported independent and peer-peer learning.

Your learning will be underpinned by a sophisticated online Curriculum Management System (GEMonline), which will give access to a wide range of resources and enable progress to be monitored for all including the geographically dispersed class from second year.

Increasingly, especially in second year, learning will become more self-directed and you will be reliant upon yourself and your peers to explore, investigate and learn from the cases (guided by clear learning objectives with synchronised centrally organised teaching). This approach will set you up well for learning based on real patients in the clinical environment.

The Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship in third year will allow you to join a team and learn whilst becoming increasingly involved in patient care. You will select patients to follow through and study them, their conditions and their care in more detail. Where relevant you will attend specialist clinics, operations etc. as you follow these individuals’ journey through the healthcare system.

Finally, in fourth year, you will experience intensive hospital attachments that involve shadowing Foundation Doctors and other secondary care attachments.

Assessment

Each year will require you to pass assessments of knowledge, clinical skills and a portfolio demonstrating professional development.

  • In first and second year you will be assessed on your knowledge using a mix of online multiple choice questions and short answer written assessments. Third year will use online multiple choice questions aligned with the planned General Medical Council common exam (Medical Licencing Assessment).
  • In every year, there will be a portfolio assessment based on a mixture of engagement with learning, workplace-based performance and project work related to the Vertical Themes.
  • In every year, there will be an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.
  • The assessments will be selected specifically for the ScotGEM course but drawing heavily upon those available within both medical schools. Thus, your progress will be benchmarked against existing UK standards throughout.

Contact us

T: +44 (0)1334 463619

E:

W: http://medicine.st-andrews.ac.uk/graduate-entry-medicine/



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The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary foundation in global health. Read more
The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary foundation in global health. This exciting new course embraces the breadth and complexity of global health challenges facing resource limited contexts and equips candidates with the tools and awareness to contribute to innovative solutions. The course is embedded within the Oxford Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health [embedded link] and benefits from the Centre's reputation and expertise in Global Health research and practice.

The course aims to develop students':
• knowledge and understanding of the major global health problems in resource limited settings and their potential solutions;
• knowledge and skills in research techniques applied in the analysis of global health problems, including quantitative and qualitative research methods, health policy and systems research and public health, with opportunities for training in additional specialist fields;
• capacity to critically appraise evidence in global health;
• skills and practical experience in researching specific health problems.

Upon completion of the course, students will be equipped to continue to advance their knowledge, understanding and skills further in research or professional practice in the field of global health. In the future we anticipate our graduates will assume leadership and research positions within major international health organisations and ministries of health.

Course Content:
In the first term, the course provides an introduction to the breadth of topics in, and methods applicable to global health. The second term offers options ranging from international development to vaccinology. The third term provides students with the unique opportunity to apply their skills and gain first hand experience in a global health project in a resource limited setting. Students will then produce a 10,000 word dissertation related to their third term project.

The first term will consist of core topics on research methods, an overview of some major global health challenges, and topics related to the research and practice of global health. Core modules include:
1. Paradigms and Tools for Global Health: This module will cover epidemiology, statistics, health economics, social science for health and health policy and systems analysis. Methodological paradigms in the health and social sciences will be introduced and basic tools provided for each. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to critically review published literature covering a wide range of global health topics and can opt to further their application skills through the third term placement project.
2. Challenges and Change in International Health: This module will cover some of the key health challenges found in resource limited contexts. Topics will include: water and sanitation; land use, population and migration; climate change; nutrition; vector borne diseases; vaccine preventable diseases; neglected tropical diseases; maternal and child health; non-communicable diseases; accidents and injuries. Upon completion of this module, students will have a broad awareness of the kinds of factors affecting international health, their challenges, solutions that have worked and current efforts to affect change.
3. Global Health Research and Practice: This module highlights some of the important considerations in the research or practice of global health. Topics covered include global health governance, global health research ethics, challenges to research in global health, data management and governance, health impact evaluation, design of disease prevention and health promotion programmes, health programme evaluation, and outbreak investigation.

In the first term, there will be a series of problem-based learning sessions to integrate the core topics covered and allow students the opportunity to engage in more depth with real global health scenarios.

During the second term, in addition to some continued core content, students can select two of the following six options for further study:
1. Advanced Topics in Tropical Medicine: This option delves deeper into the range of infectious diseases affecting resource limited settings and provides a historical account of efforts to address them, the failures and successes, as well as current developments and advances.
2. Vaccinology: This exciting option is for those with an interest in the application of more basic science. The module will examine the science of vaccine development and the challenge of its application in real world contexts. The content will cover advances at the cutting edge of vaccine development.
3. Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health: This option addresses in more depth the persisting challenges faced by mothers, infants and young children in resource limited settings. Topics will engage with the current challenges, discuss viable solutions and address the obstacles to implementation.
4. International Development and Health: This option, offered jointly to MPhil students in Development Studies, aims to introduce students to the important linkages between processes of development (political and economic) and health. The module challenges conventional health thinking and compels a broader consideration of the inter-related factors affecting the health of populations.
5. Health, Environment and Development: This innovative option brings together students (and teachers) from Geography, Development and Global Health to engage with a series of cases illustrating the intersection between processes of development, environmental changes and human health.
6. Case Studies in Field Epidemiology: This option aims to familiarise students with the principles and practice of field epidemiology by lectures and discussions of outbreak investigation case studies.

The third term will involve a funded eight week placement with a global health project in a resource limited setting. Projects represent the range of subjects covered in the course. We have established a series of projects hosted by the Oxford Tropical Network in various geographic regions. Students, with advice from their departmental tutors, may choose from the placements available or propose their own placement (providing it meets course guidelines). The placement project will then form the basis of an independent 10,000 word dissertation to be submitted six weeks after return from placement.

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This programme develops key leadership and management skills for current managers and future leaders of organisations in the homelessness sector. Read more
This programme develops key leadership and management skills for current managers and future leaders of organisations in the homelessness sector.

The course was developed by the University's School of Business School in collaboration with the London Housing Foundation (LHF), who are sponsoring the course. LHF may consider sponsoring applicants from relevant areas of the public sector as well as the third/voluntary sector.

The course is primarily designed for appropriately experience and qualified staff in the homelessness and allied sectors. The course also enables you to make a study visit to a similar sector in another country through the support of the London Housing Foundation.

The course will run throughout 2017 on a part-time basis. There'll be an initial residential from Tuesday 24 to Thursday 26 January followed by a combination of weekly attendance (9 weeks) each Thursday afternoon and three two-day blocks (Thursdays and Fridays) during each Semester.

Modules

• Leadership and Management (20 Credits)

This module covers different concepts of leadership and management focusing on what might be considered the more appropriate styles in the homelessness and housing context. There'll be opportunities to evaluate your own individual and organisational competences and for skill development using in-depth reflections.

Assessment
100% coursework but with two elements as follows:

Element 1 (40% weighting) – two examples of high level reflections of your leadership or managerial performance
Element 2 (60% weighting) – an individual written assignment applying relevant theoretical concepts to your organisation.

• Introduction to Accounting (10 credits)

This module provides you with a knowledge of basic concepts and practices in accounting, an understanding of accounting requirements in third sector organisations and an appreciation of good practice in financial reporting.

Assessment
100% coursework based on a case study.

• Third Sector Organisational Development (20 Credits)

This module explores theories, techniques and knowledge in the area of Organisational Behaviour and People Management relevant to homelessness and housing organisations.

Assessment
100% Coursework but with two elements:

Element 1: (80% weighting) assignment based in students’ own organisation
Element 2: (20% weighting) individual presentation on recommendations from element 1.

• Governance (10 Credits)

This module enables managers, of third sector and other civil society organisations, to reflect on and understand the role of governance in ensuring accountability within their organisations.

Assessment
100% coursework: individual presentation on a governance scenario using digital story book.

The weighted pass mark across the modules 50%. Where there are multiple assessments, a 40% minimum pass on each element is a necessary condition of an overall pass. It's necessary to pass all the modules to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

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The Diploma and the Higher Diploma in Philosophy are part-time postgraduate programmes in Philosophy and provide students who already possess a third level qualification with a qualification in Philosophy. Read more

Overview

The Diploma and the Higher Diploma in Philosophy are part-time postgraduate programmes in Philosophy and provide students who already possess a third level qualification with a qualification in Philosophy. The courses are open to any student who satisfies the entry requirements: a third-level qualification in any subject or combination. For the Diploma the programme of study will extend over one year and its modules are drawn from the first and second year of the BA Philosophy programme. For the HDip the programme of study will extend over a two-year period and students will be required to achieve a pass on the first year’s courses before being admitted to the second year. The modules for the second year of the Higher Diploma in Philosophy are drawn from the third year of the BA Philosophy programme and students will be required to write a 5000 word dissertation. The topic of the dissertation will be chosen by the student from any area of philosophy and must be approved by the by the BA dissertation co-ordinator.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/higher-diploma-philosophy

Course Structure

The programme will involve 8 hours of lectures and one tutorial per week in year one and seven hours of lectures and one tutorial hour per week in year two. Module themes include theories of knowledge, extended essay assignment, philosophy of God, reason, science and religion, logical reasoning and critical thinking.

Career Options

Increasingly, philosophy graduates are being hired by large corporations, e.g. in roles such as management consultancy, as people who can approach problems from a new perspective. Philosophy graduates are valued for their quick intelligence, their ability to reason clearly and independently and their ability to take an overview on the problem or situation confronting them.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHV52

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. Read more

Introduction

The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. The course combines training in psychological theory with practical skills development, preparing our students for a future career in psychology. Individual modules provide a thorough introduction to quantitative and qualitative research, the analysis and interpretation of data, and a critical skeptical approach to psychological science.

Opportunities for practical hands-on skills development are built in, ranging from low-tech observational assessment to high-tech eye-tracking, and including training on giving oral presentations. A self-reflective approach to personal development is encouraged, and students on this course are an integral part of Stirling Psychology's research community, housed within a dedicated MSc office. The course will appeal to students wishing to develop a career in psychological research, either working towards a PhD in Psychology, or working in the wider public, private or third sector.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor David Donaldson

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

The primary aim of the course is to provide advanced training as a preparation for a research career in Psychology. The course develops the theoretical understanding and practical and interpersonal skills required for carrying out research. Postgraduates are an integral part of our research community. Students are based in a dedicated MSc office, or within an appropriate research group, and allocated a peer mentor. Students have an academic supervisor in Psychology who supports and guides their development - including the research dissertation project. Our aim is to encourage students to make the complex transition to become a fully independent research scientist.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based.

Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).

The individual module components provide 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course is designed as a springboard for a career in psychological research and is ideal for students wishing to pursue a PhD in psychology. The course incorporates training in a wide range of skills that are required to conduct high-quality research in psychology, and students are encouraged to develop applications for PhD funding through the course.

One essential part of the course is the requirement to carry out a Placement (typically in an external company, charity or third sector organisation). This provides a fantastic opportunity to develop relevant work-based employment skills, and to develop a network of contacts relevant to future career goals. Students benefit hugely from the Placement experience, combining skills and experience with personal and professional development.

Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) graduates are well placed for careers in clinical and health psychology, educational psychology and teaching, human resources management and personnel, etc. The skills gained are also readily transferable to other careers: the course positions students for the growing expectation that graduates have a good understanding of human behaviour, are able to interpret and analyise complex forms of data, and to communicate ideas clearly to others.

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Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas. Read more

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Special features

Work Placement (Semesters 1 and 2)

One of the most popular aspects of the AGMS is the work placement that you undertake in a museum or gallery. Each placement involves a minimum of 20 days work on a specific project, such as exhibition development, collections management, or education programme. Many students find this such a positive experience that they carry on working in their museum when the work placement has finished, and each year a few students are offered jobs by their placement hosts. Work placements start in Semester 1 (November/December) and finish in Semester 2 (June).

You can take the work placement either as 15-credit or 30-credit course.

During the MA, students have opportunities to design and participate in live projects with cultural organisations in Manchester. These include curating a collection, developing exhibitions, producing cultural events and working on creative collaborative projects.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Postgraduate life in the Centre for Museology

Both the Centre for Museology and the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures host a varied programme of activities and events for postgraduate students, including occasional master classes and workshops, as well as our regular calendar of:

  • Museology research seminars
  • 'Showcase' seminars at the Manchester Museum
  • Institute for Cultural Practices events
  • Research forum for PhD students

Full-time or part-time?

The AGMS MA is available as a 1 year Full-time or a 2 year Part-time course. We particularly welcome part-time students and there are many advantages in combining study with work practice, whether you already have a museum post, or are just setting out on your career. Each year, a number of mid-career professionals take the MA degree on a part-time basis and find that the University provides a valuable space for reflection as well as for further learning. Part time students have classes one day per week (usually Tuesday or Thursday; although in Semester 2 it might be a different day depending on the option course you choose). On this one should also add our Thursday 5pm research, professional practice and academic skills workshops. You should also count time for library work/fieldwork that may require you coming to Manchester and although sometimes this can be done on the day of teaching, often one needs to come in a second day (and if you do this on Thursdays then you can combine it with the 5pm workshops). When the work placement kicks off (about November/December in Year 1 or Year 2) you should also count one more day/week (on average) at the Work Placement institution (which, if appropriate or relevant, can be the organisation where you currently work; but undertaking a project different to your day-to-day work) - this is of course if you decide to take the Work Placement module.



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The MSc International Management and Leadership is designed to be a vibrant and innovative course that focuses on best practice in  management and leadership while developing an international focus.  It covers contemporary management practice and also community engagement and service. Read more

The MSc International Management and Leadership is designed to be a vibrant and innovative course that focuses on best practice in  management and leadership while developing an international focus.  It covers contemporary management practice and also community engagement and service. In a fast changing, global economy, the MSc will equip you to assess the wider interconnections between organisations and their local, national and international contexts. You will build up a solid understanding of key management practice and develop your critical insight.

This MSc is specifically designed for anyone who may be looking to complement their non-business degree and has little or no prior business background. Alternatively, you may have completed to ordinary degree level and be aiming to enhance your qualifications. You will study a range of modules and complete a community based project where you will work with either a commercial business, community, voluntary or social enterprise. You can study for the general MSc International Management and Leadership or tailor your studies with our routes in Events, Family and Smaller Enterprise, Hospitality and Tourism (as follows).

Teaching learning and assessment

You will attend lectures and seminars, work in groups and carry out independent learning. You will be expected to participate in discussions, develop ideas and engage with experiential learning. Assessment methods will include management reports, essays, web-based discussions, reflections on practice and group work with presentations. A central part of the course experience is the regular involvement with industry, through specific visits, guest speakers and events all of which provide valuable insights into practice, contemporary trends and thinking. Class sizes are normally 10-30.

Teaching hours and attendance

Modules studied on campus require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Attendance requirements at QMU will depend on which module you are studying and whether you are full or part-time. In most instances the taught elements of the full-time course occur on Tuesday, Wednesday (AM) and Thursday. Part-time students have the option to select different modules each year.

Links with industry/professional bodies

We work continually with a wide range of business organisations and public services, as well as the third sector, individual business leaders and industry experts to develop our courses. This ensures that along with in-depth theoretical underpinnings, the courses are rooted in relevance and industry practice. As your course progresses you will hear from guest lecturers, participate in visits to a wide range of industries and organisations, and engage in a range of other networking opportunities with staff and industry experts. In recent years we have engaged with: Diageo; New Lanark Heritage Centre and Hotel; Nairns; AG Barr (Irn-Bru); Waldorff Astoria, Edinburgh; Glenkinchie Distillery; Henderson’s restaurants; Isle of Eriska Hotel; Scottish Ambulance Service; Turcan Connell; and Dakota hotels, to name but a few.

Modules

Contemporary Issues in International Management/ Strategic Thinking/ International Marketing/ Introduction to Management Accounting and Finance/ Organisational Behaviour All MSc students will then take three further modules in their specific area, for example: Events Leadership in Action (Events)/ Family Business Governance (FASE)/ International Leadership Power and Policy (General)/ Critical Issues in Hospitality and Tourism Leadership (Hospitality/ Tourism)

You will also complete a 60 credit project (Community Impact and Practice) focused towards your specialism in partnership with an external organisation. The project is designed to have a positive community outcome and could be based within the commercial, public or third sector. This is your opportunity to discover, propose, plan, lead and deliver an externally driven project. whilst developing your skills of reflective  practice and personal development planning.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses are designed to enhance your career prospects by opening up a wide range of global opportunities. Our graduates take with them enhanced employability and confidence whether they obtain a position with a multinational organisation, work within the public sector, create their own business, gain employment in the third sector or go on to further studies.

Quick Facts

There is a practical project instead of a dissertation. Students are challenged to research, plan, manage and evaluate a project in conjunction with an external business or organisation, allowing them to develop career-enhancing skills, confidence and opportunities.

Reflecting contemporary working practice, our teaching and assessment takes a strong group and team focus.

Class sizes are beneficially small: this enables students to work closely with fellow students from diverse backgrounds and allows lecturers to develop strong relationships with the students. The smaller cohort of students also allows for participation in regular visits and events.




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This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. Read more

This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. A key goal is to provide an essential grounding in quantitative modelling that can be widely applied to several fields, from pure research to the commercial sector.

About this degree

The programme provides an introduction to the spectrum and impact of geophysical hazards, and a focus on quantitative models for hazard forecasting and assessment. Selected case studies illustrate how these models are essential for improving decision-making during emergencies, for raising the awareness of vulnerable populations, and for evaluating and implementing mitigation strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Geological and Geotechnical Hazards
  • Meteorological Hazards
  • Research Methods
  • Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazard
  • Physical Volcanology and Volcanic Hazard
  • Meteorological, Climate and Hydrogeological Hazard

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project in geophysical hazards, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical exercises. There are excellent opportunities for field investigations in the UK and abroad. Assessment is through unseen written examinations, practical problem-solving exercises and essays. The independent research report is assessed through the dissertation and an oral presentation.

Fieldwork

Field sites for field trips are normally in Italy. The department pays for accommodation and transport in the field. Students pay to get to the field and subsistence.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Geophysical Hazards MSc

Careers

On graduation from this programme about one-third of students have followed careers in global insurance and re-insurance and another third have pursued research with a PhD in hazard-related studies. The remaining third have developed careers in a wide range of sectors, from non-governmental organisations, through teaching, to the fields of emergency planning and environmental management.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Aggregate and Catastrophe Modeller, Advent
  • Catastrophe Analyst, Talbot Underwriting
  • Graduate Trainee Reinsurance Broker, Aon
  • Catastrophe Model Analyst, Aon Benfield
  • Policy Adviser, Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Employability

The MSc in Geophysical Hazards will provide essential training for careers in hazard assessment and risk evaluation, including: industry, from engineering to insurance; academic research; civil protection agencies and government organisations; and NGOs related to aid and development. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Earth Sciences is engaged in world-class research into the processes at work on and within the Earth and planets.

Graduate students benefit from our lively and welcoming environment and world-class facilities. The department hosts UCL Hazard Centre, Europe's leading multidisciplinary hazard research centre, and engages in extensive collaborative work with the Royal Institution and the Natural History Museum.

This MSc aims to include a short field trip to locations that illustrate the impact of natural hazards. Previous trips have included the Neapolitan volcanic district, the Italian Alps and the Po Delta, and the Cádiz region in south-western Spain.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Earth Sciences

92% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in 12 months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more

This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in 12 months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure

The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of four weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either eight lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules

  • Introductory Field Theory
  • Group Theory
  • Standard Model
  • General Relativity
  • Quantum Electrodynamics
  • Quantum Field Theory
  • Conformal Field Theory
  • Supersymmetry
  • Anomalies
  • Strong Interaction Physics
  • Cosmology
  • Superstrings and D-branes
  • Non-Perturbative Physics
  • Euclidean Field Theory
  • Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
  • Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
  • 2d Quantum Field Theory.

Optional Modules available in previous years included:

  • Differential Geometry for Physicists
  • Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
  • Computing for Physicists.

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a full-year degree course, starting early October and finishing in the middle of the subsequent September. The aim of the course is to bring students to the frontier of research in elementary particle theory.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics.

The lectures begin with a general survey of particle physics and introductory courses on quantum field theory and group theory. These lead on to more specialised topics, amongst others in string theory, cosmology, supersymmetry and more detailed aspects of the standard model.

The main group of lectures is given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term they are supported by weekly tutorials. In addition lecturers also set a number of homework assignments which give the student a chance to test his or her understanding of the material.

There are additional optional lectures in the third term. These introduce advanced topics and are intended as preparation for research in these areas.

The dissertation must be submitted by mid-September, the end of the twelve month course period.



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The MA in Research Methods (Developmental Psychology) is designed for students who plan to continue their graduate studies at PhD level in an area of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, or social psychology. Read more

The MA in Research Methods (Developmental Psychology) is designed for students who plan to continue their graduate studies at PhD level in an area of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, or social psychology. It is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing suitable training for this purpose, and the course is one of the named routes on the MA in Research Methods. It is a Social Sciences faculty degree that involves other departments within the University.

Students intending to have a career as a research psychologist need to acquire a high level of research skills at postgraduate level. Research methods training therefore forms a central part of the MA programme, including both quantitative and qualitative research methods. One third of the course is also devoted to the dissertation which may be carried out in any area of psychology related to development. The taught course modules include both generic and subject level components, providing an introduction to broad issues and methodological approaches in developmental psychology and the social sciences.

Course Structure

Teaching is generally organised into a number of 10 week course units involving 2 to 3 hours of lectures, seminars and workshops. Each 10 week unit is assessed by means of formative and summative assessments. The summative assessments count towards the final degree outcome. For the programme as a whole, the assessments include examinations, written assignments, oral presentations and the dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Applied Statistics (30 credits)
  • Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
  • Qualitative Methods on Social Science (15 credits)
  • Advanced Developmental Psychology Review (15 credits)
  • Research Design in Child and Clinical Psychology (15 credits)
  • Current Issues in Developmental Psychology and Psychopathology (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits).

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Lectures provide key information on a particular topic, such as social and emotional development. Seminars are held in order that smaller group teaching can take place, with focused discussion on specific topics. Finally, practical and workshop classes allow students to gain direct experience, particularly in Applied Statistics and in how to use statistical tools.

The balance of this type of activity varies as a function of the module. This is a one year course, with students having the summer term to work on dissertation related activities. Students typically attend approximately 12 hours a week comprising lectures, tutorials and seminars. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge, as well as conduct their dissertation. Independent study is a key element to the course, with complex factors raised in lectures that do assume some prior knowledge of the topic area.

The programme is divided into three parts. One third, comprising three modules, is of subject specific topics related to developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology, including issues relevant to clinical work throughout development. Across these modules the material is delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and discussions. A further three modules focus on placing psychology in the larger framework of social science research and providing generic research skills. For example, skills such as qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The final third of the programme is the dissertation module, which reflects the culmination of learning and practical endeavours from throughout the course via the production of an independent and original body of research material. This is performed under supervision with a member of staff, with meetings varying in duration and frequency throughout the year as a function of the needs of the research project and student.



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Management development is a term used to cover a wide range of learning activity in organisations, driven by global competition and the increased pace of change in the environment. Read more
Management development is a term used to cover a wide range of learning activity in organisations, driven by global competition and the increased pace of change in the environment. Essentially, its purpose is to enhance the capacity of organisations, and the people within them, to successfully execute tasks and achieve specific work outcomes through effective leadership.

This MSc is for experienced graduates in management, or related areas, who are looking to enhance their subject knowledge and develop advanced research skills. The programme is particularly suitable if you are aspiring to a career with a significant focus on management and/or organisational development.

The programme will help you to develop and enhance your skills in management, reflect on your own practice and gain an excellent understanding of how creating direction and vision through communication, motivation and inspiration can aid the growth, success and sustainability of an organisation.

What will I study?

A number of pathways are available on this MSc, allowing you to specialise in leadership and management development, third sector management or international management.

Modules common to all pathways cover topics such as business planning and financial resource allocation, the nature of leadership and management roles, the impact and influence of development interventions on the individual and organisation, and the relationship between strategy, organisational and national cultures.

You can tailor the MSc to explore the economic and social challenges facing modern organisations and consider the trends and development in management across different sectors. Alternatively, you can assess the impact of international politics and the need for a global perspective on management, or analyse the decision-making process within third sector governance and undertake a period of work-based learning.

Whichever pathway you choose, you will be introduced to a wide range of research methods and the methodologies applicable to management research as well as being supervised and supported through both conducting research and writing a dissertation.

How will I study?

The programme will be delivered through a hybrid approach that makes use of group sessions and one-to-one meetings. The modules may be delivered weekly, in block sessions, or by some other appropriate arrangements such as audio/video conferencing or online discussions as appropriate.

How will I be assessed?

Most modules are assessed through essays and other written research projects. The dissertation/research project is predominately assessed based on a 25,000-word written thesis.

Who will be teaching me?

This MSc is taught by highly motivated and experienced academics specialising in different areas of management research. All members of the programme team are active researchers engaged with projects at national and international level.

Some seminars will be delivered by external guest speakers from academia and industry. You will also be invited to attend a series of research seminars organised by the department and have the opportunity to present your own work within a supportive and nurturing environment.

What are my career prospects?

Commercial, third sector and public sector management require professionals with in-depth knowledge of their subject area.

An MSc in Leadership and Management Development qualification could be a crucial step towards a career in areas such as general management, organisational development or consultancy.

The skills and experience acquired throughout the programme also provide essential preparation for progressing onto higher research qualifications, such as MPhil and PhD.

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What's the Master of Mechanical Engineering all about? . The Master of Science in Engineering. Mechanical Engineering is a general training programme integrating all disciplines of basic sciences, engineering and technology. Read more

What's the Master of Mechanical Engineering all about? 

The Master of Science in Engineering: Mechanical Engineering is a general training programme integrating all disciplines of basic sciences, engineering and technology. An essential element of the mechanical engineering curriculum at KU Leuven is the direct training of each student in a real-life industrial or research setting. Following up on the design assignment in the Bachelor's programme, the Master's programme brings the student in close contact with the industrial reality.

Structure 

Three versions

The Master's programme in Mechanical Engineering has three versions:

  • A Dutch-language version for students who have already obtained a Master's degree of Engineering Technology: Electromechanical Engineering
  • A Dutch-language version for students who have completed their Bachelor's training at our Faculty or at another university with Mechanical Engineering either as a major or as minor.
  • An English-language version which mainly addresses foreign students, and to which admission is granted after evaluation of the application file.

Five modules 

The programme consists of five modules.

  • The first major component is the core module in mechanical engineering.
  • The second major component is one out of five options, which have been put together in a complementary way.

Three generic options 

  • Manufacturing and Management: modern techniques for the design and production of discrete components, CAD and computer integration in production, management techniques, maintenance and logistics of a production company.
  • Mechatronics and Robotics: mechatronics is the discipline in which the synergy of construction, sensing, actuation and control of machinery are concurrently defined and tuned for optimum integration
  • Thermo-technical Sciences: physical principles and analysis, design, construction and operation of combustion engines and thermal and flow machines, cooling machines, power plants, etc.

Two application oriented options

  • Aerospace technology: physical principles, analysis, design, construction, exploitation and operation of aircraft and space systems;
  • Vehicle technology: physical principles, design, analysis and production of cars and ground vehicles and of systems for ground transportation.

Elective courses 

The third and fourth components in the programme structure concern a set of elective courses, to be chosen from a list of technical coursesand from a list of general interest courses.

Master's thesis

The final component is the Master's thesis, which represents 20% of the credits of the entire curriculum.

Strengths

  • The department has a large experimental research laboratory with advanced equipment, to which Master's students have access. FabLab (a "Fabrication Laboratory") is also directly accessible for students.
  • The department has built up an extensive network of companies which recruit a large number of our alumni since many years already, from whom we receive lots of informal feedback on the programme.
  • In addition to their academic teaching and research assignments, several members of the teaching staff also have other responsibilities in advisory boards, in external companies, science & technology committees, etc. and they share that expertise with students.
  • The programme attracts a large number of students.
  • The programme offers students the choice between application oriented options and generic methodology oriented options.
  • Many courses are dealing with contents in which the R&D of the Department has created spin-off companies, and hence can offer very relevant and innovation driven contents.
  • The programme has a clearly structured, extensive and transparent evaluation procedure for Master's theses, involving several complementary assessment views on every single thesis.
  • Several courses are closely linked to top-level research of the lecturers, and they can hence offer up-to-date and advanced contents to the students.

International experience

The Erasmus+ programme gives students the opportunity to complete one or two semesters of their degree at a participating European university. Student exchange agreements are also in place with Japanese and American universities.

Students are also encouraged to learn more about industrial and research internships abroad by contacting our Internship Coordinator. Internships are scheduled in between two course phases of the Master’s programme (in the summer period after the second semester and before the third semester).

These studying abroad opportunities and internships are complemented by the short summer courses offered via the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST) network. This student organisation allows students to follow short courses in the summer period between the second and the third semester. The Faculty of Engineering Science is also member of the international networks CESAER, CLUSTER and T.I.M.E.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty

Career perspectives

The field of mechanical engineering is very wide. Mechanical engineers find employment in many industrial sectors thanks to our broad training programme. Demand for this engineering degree on the labour market is very strong and constant. A study by the Royal Flemish Engineers Association, identifies the specific sectors in which graduated mechanical engineers are employed.

  • mechanical engineering: e.g. production machinery, compressed air systems, agricultural machinery
  • metal and non-metal products: a very wide range of products e.g. pressure vessels, piping, suit cases,...
  • off-shore and maritime engineering
  • automation industry
  • vehicle components, such as exhaust systems, drivetrain components and windshield wipers,...
  • development and production of bicycles
  • aircraft components, such as high lift devices, aircraft engines and cockpit display systems
  • building, textile, plastic, paper sector
  • electrical industry
  • chemical industry
  • environmental engineering and waste management
  • energy sector
  • financial, banking and insurance sector
  • communications sector
  • transportation sector: infrastructure and exploitation and maintenance of rolling stock
  • software development and vendors
  • technical and management consulting: large companies and small offices
  • education and research
  • technical and management functions in the public sector


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This MSc focuses on best practice in management, leadership and hospitality while developing a reflective international focus. It underpins the management challenges and critical issues in contemporary hospitality leadership. Read more

This MSc focuses on best practice in management, leadership and hospitality while developing a reflective international focus. It underpins the management challenges and critical issues in contemporary hospitality leadership.

You may choose to develop a hospitality business plan or investigate the dynamics of consumer behaviour via the behavioural finance module. You will study a range of business and hospitality modules and complete a hospitality focused project designed to provide benefits to a wider community.

Teaching learning and assessment

You will attend lectures and seminars, work in groups and also carry out independent learning. You will be expected to participate in discussions, prepare and develop ideas and engage with experiential learning. Assessment methods will include management reports, essays, web based discussions, reflections on practice, live case studies and group work with presentations. A central part of the course experience is the regular involvement with industry, through specific visits, events, and guest speakers. Class sizes are normally 10-30.

Teaching hours and attendance

Attendance requirements at QMU depend on the modules studied and if you are full or part-time. In most instances the taught elements of the full-time course occur on Tuesday, Wednesday (AM) and Thursday. Part-time students have the option to select different modules each year.

Links with industry/professional bodies

We work continually with a wide range of business organisations and public services, as well as the third sector, individual business leaders and industry experts to develop our courses. This ensures that along with in-depth theoretical underpinnings, the courses are rooted in relevance and industry practice. As your course progresses you will hear from guest lecturers, participate in visits to a wide range of industries and organisations, and engage in a range of other networking opportunities with staff and industry experts. In recent years we have engaged with: Diageo; New Lanark Heritage Centre and Hotel; Nairns; AG Barr (Irn-Bru); Waldorff Astoria, Edinburgh; Glenkinchie Distillery; Henderson’s restaurants; Isle of Eriska Hotel; Scottish Ambulance Service; Turcan Connell; and Dakota hotels, to name but a few.

Modules

Contemporary Issues in International Management/ Strategic Thinking/ International Marketing/ Introduction to Management Accounting and Finance/ Organisational Behaviour All MSc students will then take three further modules in their specific area, for example: Events Leadership in Action (Events)/ Family Business Governance (FASE)/ International Leadership Power and Policy (General)/ Critical Issues in Hospitality and Tourism Leadership (Hospitality/ Tourism)

You will also complete a 60 credit project (Community Impact and Practice) focused towards your specialism in partnership with an external organisation. The project is designed to have a positive community outcome and could be based within the commercial, public or third sector.

This is your opportunity to discover, propose, plan, lead and deliver an externally driven project. whilst developing your skills of reflective practice and personal development planning.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses are designed to enhance your career prospects by opening up a wide range of global opportunities. Our graduates take with them enhanced employability and confidence whether they obtain a position with a multinational organisation, work within the public sector, create their own business, gain employment in the third sector or go on to further studies.

Quick Facts

There is a practical project instead of a dissertation. Students are challenged to research, plan, manage and evaluate a project in conjunction with an external business or organisation, allowing them to develop career-enhancing skills, confidence and opportunities.

Reflecting contemporary working practice, our teaching and assessment takes a strong group and team focus.

Class sizes are beneficially small: this enables students to work closely with fellow students from diverse backgrounds and allows lecturers to develop strong relationships with the students. The smaller cohort of students also allows for participation in regular visits and events.



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