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This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. Read more
This MSc provides a broad introduction to geohazards, together with advanced courses in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeological hazards and meteorology. A key goal is to provide an essential grounding in quantitative modelling that can be widely applied to several fields, from pure research to the commercial sector.

Degree information

The programme provides an introduction to the spectrum and impact of geophysical hazards, and a focus on quantitative models for hazard forecasting and assessment. Selected case studies illustrate how these models are essential for improving decision making during emergencies, for raising the awareness of vulnerable populations, and for evaluating and implementing mitigation strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of six core modules (120 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Geological and Geotechnical Hazards
-Meteorological Hazards
-Research Methods
-Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazard
-Physical Volcanology and Volcanic Hazard
-Meteorological, Climate and Hydrogeological Hazard

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in geophysical hazards, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical exercises. There are excellent opportunities for field investigations in the UK and abroad. Assessment is through unseen written examinations, practical problem-solving exercises and essays. The independent research report is assessed through the dissertation and an oral presentation.

Careers

The MSc programme in Geophysical Hazards will provide essential training for careers in hazard assessment and risk evaluation, including: industry, from engineering to insurance; academic research; civil protection agencies and government organisations; and NGOs related to aid and development. About one-third of previous graduates have continued with further research (PhDs), one-third have entered the insurance industry, and one-third have pursued careers in other fields.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Catastrophy risk analyst, Aon Benfield
-Geographic Risk Analyst, QBE
-Senior Catastrophy Halard, Hardy Underwriting
-Environmental Risk Advisor, HelpAge International
-Policy Adviser, Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Employability
On graduation from this programme about one third of students have followed careers in global insurance and re-insurance and another third have pursued research with a PhD in hazard-related studies. The remaining third have developed careers in a wide range of sectors, from non-governmental organisations, through teaching, to the fields of emergency planning and environmental management.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Earth Sciences is engaged in world-class research into the processes at work on and within the Earth and planets.

Graduate students benefit from our lively and welcoming environment and world-class facilities. The department hosts UCL Hazard Centre, Europe's leading multidisciplinary hazard research centre, and engages in extensive collaborative work with the Royal Institution and the Natural History Museum.

This MSc aims to include a short field trip to locations that illustrate the impact of natural hazards. Previous trips have included the Neapolitan volcanic district, the Italian Alps and the Po Delta, and the Cádiz region in south-western Spain.

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The Civil Society, NGO and Non-profit Studies PDip/MA provides you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society. Read more
The Civil Society, NGO and Non-profit Studies PDip/MA provides you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society.

Strengthening the profile and capacity of civil society is now seen as a top priority by political commentators, social scientists and policy-makers all over the world. There has never been a greater need to develop a critical yet constructive understanding of the actions, behaviours and institutions that populate the space between states and markets, ranging from local voluntary associations to national social enterprises and transnational charities.

This programme draws deeply on the unique combination of scholarly and practical knowledge of the third sector, social movements and philanthropy situated in the School. You develop an in-depth understanding of the evolution of the meanings of civil society across time and space and the role its organisations and institutions play in political, social and economic life.

Teaching imparts country-specific as well as cross-national and transnational empirical and theoretical knowledge of the historical and contemporary challenges faced by these organisations.

You are also engaged in analysing how third sector organisations relate to ongoing social, political and economic transformations. In particular, your capacity to think sympathetically, but critically, about third sector contributions to policy through welfare systems and in other public policy arenas is developed.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/113/civil-society-ngo-and-nonprofit-studies

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. Current compulsory modules for this programme are: Design of Social Research; The Idea of Civil Society and Organised Civil Society and the Third Sector.

You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO833 - Design of Social research (20 credits)
SO838 - The Idea of Civil Society (20 credits)
SO876 - Organised Civil Society and the Third Sector (20 credits)
SO885 - Social Suffering (20 credits)
SO894 - The Family, Parenting Culture and Parenting Policy (20 credits)
SO938 - Governing Science, Technology and Society in the 21st Century (20 credits)
SO839 - Fundraising and Philanthropy (20 credits)
SO854 - The Sociology of Risk (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SO872 - Comparative Social Policy (20 credits)
SA803 - Politics and Sociology of the Environment (20 credits)
SO813 - Sociology of health, illness and medicine (20 credits)
SO823 - Social Change & Political Order (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, plus the dissertation (for the award of the MA).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with an advanced understanding of social science debates, theories and concepts relevant to organised civil society (OCS), where the latter includes the ‘third sector’ of NGOs, social movements and other formations between the market and the state, and refers to the institutions and practices of philanthropy, altruism and reciprocity

- impart country-specific as well as cross-national and transnational empirical and theoretical knowledge of the current challenges and processes of transformation applying to this sphere of society, and the organisations within it

- develop your understanding of, and capacity to think critically about, the key policy contributions of, and roles fulfilled by, OCS as a significant policy actor in welfare and broader public service system functioning and development

- develop your skills in research design and data collection in areas relevant to, or forming part of OCS

- familiarise you with using primary and secondary data to develop cutting-edge research in the field of OCS studies.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Our graduates obtain a range of transferable skills and report high levels of being in employment or further study within six months of graduation across all of our degree programmes.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs. Our Social Policy related programmes are ranked sixth in the UK for career prospects (2015 Complete University Guide).

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Combining your Haskayne MBA with a graduate degree in another field enables you to develop the skills and knowledge needed to stand out in a highly competitive global market. Read more
Combining your Haskayne MBA with a graduate degree in another field enables you to develop the skills and knowledge needed to stand out in a highly competitive global market. You will gain the ability to view an issue from multiple perspectives and develop a diverse professional network, creating a unique competitive advantage.

The Haskayne School of Business offers combined degrees with the faculties of Law, Cumming School of Medicine, School of Public Policy, and Social Work. To optimize the financial investment and time commitment, students are awarded degrees by both faculties without completing the full complement of courses in both programs.

Students can choose to do a combined degree with another faculty, the options are as follows.

JD/MBA (Juris Doctor)

The combined program with law positions students to be successful in roles such as practicing law within a corporation, running a private practice or being a business advisor on the legal and regulatory environment.

JD/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the law department, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

MBT/MBA (Masters of Biomedical Technology)

The combined program with the Department of Medicine positions students to be successful in roles at the interface of science and industry such as management of health sciences, within regulatory bodies and entrepreneurship in technology.

MBT/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the Department of Medicine, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

MD/MBA (Doctor of Medicine)

The combined program with medicine positions students to be successful in roles such as entrepreneurship in health sciences, private medical practice or management of public health.

MD/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the Department of Medicine, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies. As per the Calendar - A student admitted to the MD/MBA program spends the first year in the MBA program, completing a minimum of 36 units (6.0 full-course equivalents).

MPP/MBA (Master of Public Policy)

The combined program with the School of Public Policy positions students to be successful in roles at the interface of government and industry such as corporate social responsibility officers, within regulatory bodies and entrepreneurship in non-profit.

MPP/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the School of Public Policy, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

MSW/MBA (Master of Social Work)

The combined program with School of Social Work positions students to be successful in roles at the interface of wellness and industry such as corporate wellness and human capital consulting.

MSW/MBA students typically complete their first year of studies in the School of Social Work, the second year in Haskayne and the third and fourth year combining their studies.

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The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary foundation in global health. Read more
The MSc in International Health and Tropical Medicine provides a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary foundation in global health. This exciting new course embraces the breadth and complexity of global health challenges facing resource limited contexts and equips candidates with the tools and awareness to contribute to innovative solutions. The course is embedded within the Oxford Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health [embedded link] and benefits from the Centre's reputation and expertise in Global Health research and practice.

The course aims to develop students':
• knowledge and understanding of the major global health problems in resource limited settings and their potential solutions;
• knowledge and skills in research techniques applied in the analysis of global health problems, including quantitative and qualitative research methods, health policy and systems research and public health, with opportunities for training in additional specialist fields;
• capacity to critically appraise evidence in global health;
• skills and practical experience in researching specific health problems.

Upon completion of the course, students will be equipped to continue to advance their knowledge, understanding and skills further in research or professional practice in the field of global health. In the future we anticipate our graduates will assume leadership and research positions within major international health organisations and ministries of health.

Course Content:
In the first term, the course provides an introduction to the breadth of topics in, and methods applicable to global health. The second term offers options ranging from international development to vaccinology. The third term provides students with the unique opportunity to apply their skills and gain first hand experience in a global health project in a resource limited setting. Students will then produce a 10,000 word dissertation related to their third term project.

The first term will consist of core topics on research methods, an overview of some major global health challenges, and topics related to the research and practice of global health. Core modules include:
1. Paradigms and Tools for Global Health: This module will cover epidemiology, statistics, health economics, social science for health and health policy and systems analysis. Methodological paradigms in the health and social sciences will be introduced and basic tools provided for each. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to critically review published literature covering a wide range of global health topics and can opt to further their application skills through the third term placement project.
2. Challenges and Change in International Health: This module will cover some of the key health challenges found in resource limited contexts. Topics will include: water and sanitation; land use, population and migration; climate change; nutrition; vector borne diseases; vaccine preventable diseases; neglected tropical diseases; maternal and child health; non-communicable diseases; accidents and injuries. Upon completion of this module, students will have a broad awareness of the kinds of factors affecting international health, their challenges, solutions that have worked and current efforts to affect change.
3. Global Health Research and Practice: This module highlights some of the important considerations in the research or practice of global health. Topics covered include global health governance, global health research ethics, challenges to research in global health, data management and governance, health impact evaluation, design of disease prevention and health promotion programmes, health programme evaluation, and outbreak investigation.

In the first term, there will be a series of problem-based learning sessions to integrate the core topics covered and allow students the opportunity to engage in more depth with real global health scenarios.

During the second term, in addition to some continued core content, students can select two of the following six options for further study:
1. Advanced Topics in Tropical Medicine: This option delves deeper into the range of infectious diseases affecting resource limited settings and provides a historical account of efforts to address them, the failures and successes, as well as current developments and advances.
2. Vaccinology: This exciting option is for those with an interest in the application of more basic science. The module will examine the science of vaccine development and the challenge of its application in real world contexts. The content will cover advances at the cutting edge of vaccine development.
3. Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn and Child Health: This option addresses in more depth the persisting challenges faced by mothers, infants and young children in resource limited settings. Topics will engage with the current challenges, discuss viable solutions and address the obstacles to implementation.
4. International Development and Health: This option, offered jointly to MPhil students in Development Studies, aims to introduce students to the important linkages between processes of development (political and economic) and health. The module challenges conventional health thinking and compels a broader consideration of the inter-related factors affecting the health of populations.
5. Health, Environment and Development: This innovative option brings together students (and teachers) from Geography, Development and Global Health to engage with a series of cases illustrating the intersection between processes of development, environmental changes and human health.
6. Case Studies in Field Epidemiology: This option aims to familiarise students with the principles and practice of field epidemiology by lectures and discussions of outbreak investigation case studies.

The third term will involve a funded eight week placement with a global health project in a resource limited setting. Projects represent the range of subjects covered in the course. We have established a series of projects hosted by the Oxford Tropical Network in various geographic regions. Students, with advice from their departmental tutors, may choose from the placements available or propose their own placement (providing it meets course guidelines). The placement project will then form the basis of an independent 10,000 word dissertation to be submitted six weeks after return from placement.

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This programme develops key leadership and management skills for current managers and future leaders of organisations in the homelessness sector. Read more
This programme develops key leadership and management skills for current managers and future leaders of organisations in the homelessness sector.

The course was developed by the University's School of Business School in collaboration with the London Housing Foundation (LHF), who are sponsoring the course. LHF may consider sponsoring applicants from relevant areas of the public sector as well as the third/voluntary sector.

The course is primarily designed for appropriately experience and qualified staff in the homelessness and allied sectors. The course also enables you to make a study visit to a similar sector in another country through the support of the London Housing Foundation.

The course will run throughout 2017 on a part-time basis. There'll be an initial residential from Tuesday 24 to Thursday 26 January followed by a combination of weekly attendance (9 weeks) each Thursday afternoon and three two-day blocks (Thursdays and Fridays) during each Semester.

Modules

• Leadership and Management (20 Credits)

This module covers different concepts of leadership and management focusing on what might be considered the more appropriate styles in the homelessness and housing context. There'll be opportunities to evaluate your own individual and organisational competences and for skill development using in-depth reflections.

Assessment
100% coursework but with two elements as follows:

Element 1 (40% weighting) – two examples of high level reflections of your leadership or managerial performance
Element 2 (60% weighting) – an individual written assignment applying relevant theoretical concepts to your organisation.

• Introduction to Accounting (10 credits)

This module provides you with a knowledge of basic concepts and practices in accounting, an understanding of accounting requirements in third sector organisations and an appreciation of good practice in financial reporting.

Assessment
100% coursework based on a case study.

• Third Sector Organisational Development (20 Credits)

This module explores theories, techniques and knowledge in the area of Organisational Behaviour and People Management relevant to homelessness and housing organisations.

Assessment
100% Coursework but with two elements:

Element 1: (80% weighting) assignment based in students’ own organisation
Element 2: (20% weighting) individual presentation on recommendations from element 1.

• Governance (10 Credits)

This module enables managers, of third sector and other civil society organisations, to reflect on and understand the role of governance in ensuring accountability within their organisations.

Assessment
100% coursework: individual presentation on a governance scenario using digital story book.

The weighted pass mark across the modules 50%. Where there are multiple assessments, a 40% minimum pass on each element is a necessary condition of an overall pass. It's necessary to pass all the modules to be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

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The Diploma and the Higher Diploma in Philosophy are part-time postgraduate programmes in Philosophy and provide students who already possess a third level qualification with a qualification in Philosophy. Read more

Overview

The Diploma and the Higher Diploma in Philosophy are part-time postgraduate programmes in Philosophy and provide students who already possess a third level qualification with a qualification in Philosophy. The courses are open to any student who satisfies the entry requirements: a third-level qualification in any subject or combination. For the Diploma the programme of study will extend over one year and its modules are drawn from the first and second year of the BA Philosophy programme. For the HDip the programme of study will extend over a two-year period and students will be required to achieve a pass on the first year’s courses before being admitted to the second year. The modules for the second year of the Higher Diploma in Philosophy are drawn from the third year of the BA Philosophy programme and students will be required to write a 5000 word dissertation. The topic of the dissertation will be chosen by the student from any area of philosophy and must be approved by the by the BA dissertation co-ordinator.

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/philosophy/our-courses/higher-diploma-philosophy

Course Structure

The programme will involve 8 hours of lectures and one tutorial per week in year one and seven hours of lectures and one tutorial hour per week in year two. Module themes include theories of knowledge, extended essay assignment, philosophy of God, reason, science and religion, logical reasoning and critical thinking.

Career Options

Increasingly, philosophy graduates are being hired by large corporations, e.g. in roles such as management consultancy, as people who can approach problems from a new perspective. Philosophy graduates are valued for their quick intelligence, their ability to reason clearly and independently and their ability to take an overview on the problem or situation confronting them.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHV52

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. Read more

Introduction

The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. The course combines training in psychological theory with practical skills development, preparing our students for a future career in psychology. Individual modules provide a thorough introduction to quantitative and qualitative research, the analysis and interpretation of data, and a critical skeptical approach to psychological science.

Opportunities for practical hands-on skills development are built in, ranging from low-tech observational assessment to high-tech eye-tracking, and including training on giving oral presentations. A self-reflective approach to personal development is encouraged, and students on this course are an integral part of Stirling Psychology's research community, housed within a dedicated MSc office. The course will appeal to students wishing to develop a career in psychological research, either working towards a PhD in Psychology, or working in the wider public, private or third sector.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Professor David Donaldson

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

The primary aim of the course is to provide advanced training as a preparation for a research career in Psychology. The course develops the theoretical understanding and practical and interpersonal skills required for carrying out research. Postgraduates are an integral part of our research community. Students are based in a dedicated MSc office, or within an appropriate research group, and allocated a peer mentor. Students have an academic supervisor in Psychology who supports and guides their development - including the research dissertation project. Our aim is to encourage students to make the complex transition to become a fully independent research scientist.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based.

Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).

The individual module components provide 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.

Why Stirling?

- REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) course is designed as a springboard for a career in psychological research and is ideal for students wishing to pursue a PhD in psychology. The course incorporates training in a wide range of skills that are required to conduct high-quality research in psychology, and students are encouraged to develop applications for PhD funding through the course.

One essential part of the course is the requirement to carry out a Placement (typically in an external company, charity or third sector organisation). This provides a fantastic opportunity to develop relevant work-based employment skills, and to develop a network of contacts relevant to future career goals. Students benefit hugely from the Placement experience, combining skills and experience with personal and professional development.

Psychological Research Methods (Cognition and Neuropsychology) graduates are well placed for careers in clinical and health psychology, educational psychology and teaching, human resources management and personnel, etc. The skills gained are also readily transferable to other careers: the course positions students for the growing expectation that graduates have a good understanding of human behaviour, are able to interpret and analyise complex forms of data, and to communicate ideas clearly to others.

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Why you should choose this course. -You want to explore emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice and theory. -You would like to undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in or around Manchester. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You want to explore emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice and theory
-You would like to undertake a work placement in a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in or around Manchester
-You are interested in the rich museum and cultural scene of Manchester and the opportunities for case studies, fieldwork and networking on offer

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Course unit details

The AGMS MA is a modular degree with core and optional elements totalling to 180 credits. Core and options courses combine to make 120 credits with the remaining 60 credits allocated to the dissertation.

Semester one
Full-time students take two core course units: 'Introduction to Museum Studies' and 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' (each 30 credits). Part-time students take 'Introduction to Museum Studies' in Year 1 and 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' in Year 2. These core units are designed to introduce you to key issues and ideas in museum practice, and also to different approaches to the study and analysis of museums. All elements in Semester One are compulsory. Unit details are below.

Semester two
Semester two option courses build on the knowledge and understanding you have gained in semester one, and enable you to develop expertise in a particular disciplinary area of curating (e.g. art or archaeology) or sphere of museum practice (e.g. museum learning or exhibition development). Full-time students take 60 credits of option course units (option courses are offered as 15 or 30 credits). Part-time students take 30 credits of option course units each year. Unit details are below. Please note that not all option courses may be available every year. Students may choose to take one option course in a related subject area, e.g. Archaeology, History, or Social Anthropology.

Dissertation (Semester 2 and summer)
On successful completion of the coursework, you proceed to write a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic of your choice, agreed in conjunction with your dissertation supervisor. Dissertations, like articles (depending on the journal), may be strongly based on original primary source research, they might aim to re-interpret an already well-trawled area of the subject, or they might take up an approach somewhere between these two extremes. In all cases, however, the authors will have chosen and elaborated a body of relevant material which they bring to bear on a clearly defined issue. Dissertation planning and supervision takes place in Semester 2 (February - end of June) and you continue with your independent writing in July and August. You can either undertake a standard dissertation or a practice-based dissertation:
-Standard : 12-15,000 words
-Practice-based A : Exhibition. An exhibition, show or plan thereof. Outcome - exhibition and/or plan plus 8-10,000 words reflection
-Practice-based B : Policy. Student to develop a piece of museum policy. Outcome - policy or report plus max 8-10,000 words reflection.
-Practice-based C : Digital/Online (building on skills developed in Digital Curating). Outcome - digital media application plus max 8-10,000 words reflection.

Career opportunities

How will the AGMS support my career goals?
The AGMS is an important entry-level qualification for anyone seeking to pursue a career in museums or galleries. It is also a valuable resource for continuing professional development for mid-career professionals. In addition, the MA provides a thorough training in the skills needed to do further postgraduate research. These skills in research design and planning are transferable to jobs in the museum sector, as well as being a vital first step to PhD research.

What are the career destinations of AGMS graduates?
Of course, job destinations vary according to the interests, ambitions and skills of each individual, but most of our students are successful in obtaining professional posts in collections, exhibitions, education, interpretation, or some aspect of museum/arts management soon after completing the MA.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. Read more
This is a one year advanced taught course. The aim of this course is to bring students in twelve months to the frontier of elementary particle theory. This course is intended for students who have already obtained a good first degree in either physics or mathematics, including in the latter case courses in quantum mechanics and relativity.

The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses, which are assessed by examinations in January and March. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics. The dissertation must be submitted by September 15th, the end of the twelve month course period.

Course Structure

The main group of lectures are given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of four weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either eight lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term.

Core Modules

-Introductory Field Theory
-Group Theory
-Standard Model
-General Relativity
-Quantum Electrodynamics
-Quantum Field Theory
-Conformal Field Theory
-Supersymmetry
-Anomalies
-Strong Interaction Physics
-Cosmology
-Superstrings and D-branes
-Non-Perturbative Physics
-Euclidean Field Theory
-Flavour Physics and Effective Field Theory
-Neutrinos and Astroparticle Physics
-2d Quantum Field Theory

Optional Modules available in previous years included:

-Differential Geometry for Physicists
-Boundaries and Defects in Integrable Field Theory
-Computing for Physicists

Learning and Teaching

This is a full-year degree course, starting early October and finishing in the middle of the subsequent September. The aim of the course is to bring students to the frontier of research in elementary particle theory. The course consists of three modules: the first two are the Michaelmas and Epiphany graduate lecture courses. The third module is a dissertation on a topic of current research, prepared under the guidance of a supervisor with expertise in the area. We offer a wide variety of possible dissertation topics.

The lectures begin with a general survey of particle physics and introductory courses on quantum field theory and group theory. These lead on to more specialised topics, amongst others in string theory, cosmology, supersymmetry and more detailed aspects of the standard model.

The main group of lectures is given in the first two terms of the academic year (Michaelmas and Epiphany). This part of the lecture course is assessed by examinations. In each term there are two teaching periods of 4 weeks, with a week's break in the middle of the term in which students will be able to revise the material. Most courses are either 8 lectures or 16 lectures in length. There are 14 lectures/week in the Michaelmas term and 14 lectures/week in Epiphany term they are supported by weekly tutorials. In addition lecturers also set a number of homework assignments which give the student a chance to test his or her understanding of the material.

There are additional optional lectures in the third term. These introduce advanced topics and are intended as preparation for research in these areas.

The dissertation must be submitted by mid-September, the end of the twelve month course period.

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The MA in Research Methods (Developmental Psychology) is designed for students who plan to continue their graduate studies at PhD level in an area of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, or social psychology. Read more
The MA in Research Methods (Developmental Psychology) is designed for students who plan to continue their graduate studies at PhD level in an area of developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, or social psychology. It is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing suitable training for this purpose, and the course is one of the named routes on the MA in Research Methods. It is a Social Sciences faculty degree that involves other departments within the University.

Students intending to have a career as a research psychologist need to acquire a high level of research skills at postgraduate level. Research methods training therefore forms a central part of the MA programme, including both quantitative and qualitative research methods. One third of the course is also devoted to the dissertation which may be carried out in any area of psychology related to development. The taught course modules include both generic and subject level components, providing an introduction to broad issues and methodological approaches in developmental psychology and the social sciences.

Course Structure

Teaching is generally organised into a number of 10 week course units involving 2 to 3 hours of lectures, seminars and workshops. Each 10 week unit is assessed by means of formative and summative assessments. The summative assessments count towards the final degree outcome. For the programme as a whole, the assessments include examinations, written assignments, oral presentations and the dissertation.

Core Modules:
-Applied Statistics (30 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-Qualitative Methods on Social Science (15 credits)
-Advanced Developmental Psychopathology Review (15 credits)
-Research Design in Child and Clinical Psychology (15 credits)
-Current Issues in Developmental Psychology and Psychopathology (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits).

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Lectures provide key information on a particular topic, such as social and emotional development. Seminars are held in order that smaller group teaching can take place, with focused discussion on specific topics. Finally, practical and workshop classes allow students to gain direct experience, particularly in Applied Statistics and in how to use statistical tools.

The balance of this type of activity varies as a function of the module. This is a one year course, with students having the summer term to work on dissertation related activities. Students typically attend approximately 12 hours a week comprising lectures, tutorials and seminars. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge, as well as conduct their dissertation. Independent study is a key element to the course, with complex factors raised in lectures that do assume some prior knowledge of the topic area.

The programme is divided into three parts. One third, comprising three modules, is of subject specific topics related to developmental psychology and developmental psychopathology, including issues relevant to clinical work throughout development. Across these modules the material is delivered via a combination of lectures, seminars, practical workshops and discussions. A further three modules focus on placing psychology in the larger framework of social science research and providing generic research skills. For example, skills such as qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The final third of the programme is the dissertation module, which reflects the culmination of learning and practical endeavours from throughout the course via the production of an independent and original body of research material. This is performed under one to one supervision with a member of staff, with meetings varying in duration and frequency throughout the year as a function of the needs of the research project and student.

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Management development is a term used to cover a wide range of learning activity in organisations, driven by global competition and the increased pace of change in the environment. Read more
Management development is a term used to cover a wide range of learning activity in organisations, driven by global competition and the increased pace of change in the environment. Essentially, its purpose is to enhance the capacity of organisations, and the people within them, to successfully execute tasks and achieve specific work outcomes through effective leadership.

This MSc is for experienced graduates in management, or related areas, who are looking to enhance their subject knowledge and develop advanced research skills. The programme is particularly suitable if you are aspiring to a career with a significant focus on management and/or organisational development.

The programme will help you to develop and enhance your skills in management, reflect on your own practice and gain an excellent understanding of how creating direction and vision through communication, motivation and inspiration can aid the growth, success and sustainability of an organisation.

What will I study?

A number of pathways are available on this MSc, allowing you to specialise in leadership and management development, third sector management or international management.

Modules common to all pathways cover topics such as business planning and financial resource allocation, the nature of leadership and management roles, the impact and influence of development interventions on the individual and organisation, and the relationship between strategy, organisational and national cultures.

You can tailor the MSc to explore the economic and social challenges facing modern organisations and consider the trends and development in management across different sectors. Alternatively, you can assess the impact of international politics and the need for a global perspective on management, or analyse the decision-making process within third sector governance and undertake a period of work-based learning.

Whichever pathway you choose, you will be introduced to a wide range of research methods and the methodologies applicable to management research as well as being supervised and supported through both conducting research and writing a dissertation.

How will I study?

The programme will be delivered through a hybrid approach that makes use of group sessions and one-to-one meetings. The modules may be delivered weekly, in block sessions, or by some other appropriate arrangements such as audio/video conferencing or online discussions as appropriate.

How will I be assessed?

Most modules are assessed through essays and other written research projects. The dissertation/research project is predominately assessed based on a 25,000-word written thesis.

Who will be teaching me?

This MSc is taught by highly motivated and experienced academics specialising in different areas of management research. All members of the programme team are active researchers engaged with projects at national and international level.

Some seminars will be delivered by external guest speakers from academia and industry. You will also be invited to attend a series of research seminars organised by the department and have the opportunity to present your own work within a supportive and nurturing environment.

What are my career prospects?

Commercial, third sector and public sector management require professionals with in-depth knowledge of their subject area.

An MSc in Leadership and Management Development qualification could be a crucial step towards a career in areas such as general management, organisational development or consultancy.

The skills and experience acquired throughout the programme also provide essential preparation for progressing onto higher research qualifications, such as MPhil and PhD.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC) is a Master's-level graduate programme from the University of Cambridge. It equips senior and mid-career professionals and managers with the relevant skills required to establish resilient and sustainable value chains / supply chains that are fit for the future.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16062

About the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)

The University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL), an institute within the School of Technology, has run executive development programmes in sustainability for 25 years, with open programmes in the UK, Europe, North America, South America, South Africa and Australia, and customised programmes for many leading organisations.

Who is the course designed for?

The course has been designed for current and future leaders working in organisations that recognise the importance of sustainable development, and are committed to sharing their knowledge, experience and learning from others. It is an award of the University of Cambridge, and equivalent to one third of a Master’s degree.

It is assumed that participants will have a reasonably good general knowledge of some of the issues dealt with during the programme. However, it is not essential to have specialised knowledge, and it is not assumed that participants have direct responsibility for sustainability or related areas, such as CSR or environmental affairs.

Format

In recognition of the practical challenges of participants undertaking study whilst holding down a full-time job, the programme does not require prolonged periods away from the workplace. Besides the short residential workshops, the core of the programme is an individual piece of work-related research and the development of a strategic action plan that is relevant to the participant's organisation.

A group project helps to ensure that as much inter-organisational learning takes place as possible. An online Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) facilitates communication and collaboration between the short, intensive workshops.

The course runs for nine months and encompasses the following key elements:

- A three-week preparatory phase;
- Two residential workshops, one held in the summer and the other in the autumn, with academic and practitioner inputs on key issues;
- Ongoing virtual and non-residential learning activities, including preparatory materials (readings / videos / audios) in advance of the residential workshops;
- Two individual assignments and a collaborative research project;
- Support and facilitation from a team of programme tutors;
- Informal and formal collaboration with fellow participants via email, teleconferences, face-to-face meetings, and the VLE.

In addition to attending the workshops, it is estimated that participants need to undertake at least 3–4 hours of work every week to complete the programme successfully.

Lectures: 40 hours
Seminars and classes: 4 hours
Small-group teaching: 6 hours
Supervision: 6 hours

Structure

Workshop 1: Understanding the challenges and opportunities and the business case for responding

- Systems, pressures and trends
- Sustainability risks and opportunities
- Understanding value chains
- Business case for sustainable value chains
- Critique of existing tools and techniques
- Taking a systems approach
- Leadership for sustainability

Workshop 2: Catalysing change within and beyond the organisation

- Sustainable value creation
- Business model innovation
- Internal engagement and influence
- External engagement, communication and partnerships
- Sustainable consumption and influencing the consumer
- Leadership for sustainability

Assessment

Analysis paper, 3000 words
Strategic action plan, 3000 words
Group project, 7,000 words

Each assignment contributes one third to the final overall grade.

Continuation

PCSVC is the equivalent to the first third of the Master of Studies in Sustainability Leadership programme. The topics covered correspond with those taught during the first Master's workshop and the assignments undertaken are similar to those completed in the first year of the Master's programme.

Alumni of PCSVC who are admitted on to the Master's may be exempt from attending the first Master's workshop (although they are welcome to join for the week), and undertaking the first-year assignments. If exemption is granted, the fee payable is reduced.

It is not necessary to complete the Postgraduate Certificate prior to applying for the Master’s. Furthermore, while completing the PCSVC successfully may strengthen applications to the Master’s, it does not result in preferential access or negate the need to satisfy the Master’s-specific admissions requirements.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Bursary funding is available for deserving candidates who are currently prevented from applying due to financial reasons. These will offer financial support of 25-30% of the programme fee, and in some exceptional cases up to 50% of the programme fee, to assist selected applicants

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The Strathclyde LLM in Climate Change Law & Policy will provide you with a timely qualification and highly specialised knowledge in an ever-growing field of law and policy. Read more
The Strathclyde LLM in Climate Change Law & Policy will provide you with a timely qualification and highly specialised knowledge in an ever-growing field of law and policy.

The course is taught through a combination of two residential sessions at New Lanark Mill Hotel and at the University campus in Glasgow city centre.

The flexibility of the course allows you to undertake this exciting programme within one to three years while continuing with your current professional role.

It's a useful qualification for anyone working in areas such as government, international organisations, law firms and consultancies, the banking and insurance sector, electric utilities, and research, educational and advocacy organisations. It also provides an excellent opportunity for recent graduates in law and other relevant disciplines to start out your career in an exciting growth area.

Study mode and duration:
- LLM: 12 months full-time; up to 36 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; up to 36 months part-time
- PgCert: 4 months full-time; up to 36 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/climatechangelawpolicy/

Expert teaching staff

The LLM is delivered by leading experts in the field of climate change law and policy coming from a wide range of academic and professional backgrounds. They'll provide you with practical insights and inside knowledge.

Venues

The first residential session will take place at the New Lanark Mill Hotel in New Lanark, a UNESCO World Heritage Site located not far from Glasgow and Edinburgh. The second residential session will take place in Glasgow in the University's Technology and Innovation Centre. LLM candidates will be hosted in a nearby hotel, within walking distance of the Centre.

We believe that these venues will provide the perfect mix. A secluded environment during the first residential session will enable the group on the programme to get to know each oher. During the second session, participants will have the chance to experience the University and get to know the city.

Our students

The current cohort is made up of professionals from across the globe currently working in roles such as an administrative law judge, research associates and senior partner in law firms.

Learning & teaching

The LLM is delivered through a combination of distance learning using the University’s virtual learning environment and two compulsory weeks of seminar-based learning.

Each module can also be taken as a specialised course.

- September
You’ll attend an intensive one-week long (Monday to Saturday) residential session where you’ll follow two core modules:
- Climate Change & International Law
- Comparative Climate Change Law

- September to December
You’ll work from home on the assignments for the two above-mentioned modules and on a third core module - Research Methods & Skills.

- January
You’ll attend a second intensive one-week long residential session where you’ll follow two elective modules from:
- Equity & Adaptation or Carbon Markets & Climate Finance
- Forests, Land Use & Climate Change or Sustainable Energy Governance

- January to May
You’ll follow a third module chosen between Climate Change & Litigation and Climate Law & the Global Economy. Both are delivered entirely online. You’ll also work from home on the assignments for the two above-mentioned elective modules and the third online elective module.

- May to September
You’ll work on a dissertation, provided you’ve passed the necessary credits.

- October
If you’ve accrued the necessary amount of credits, you’ll be awarded the LLM in Climate Change Law & Policy.

Assessment

The course will be assessed mainly by written assignments.

Entry requirements

For the Strathclyde LLM in Climate Change Law and Policy we're in a position to waiver the official University post-graduate English language proficiency requirements. If you do not have a IELTS certificate, we will gauge your level of English on an ad-hoc basis in order to determine whether your level of English is sufficient. Since participating on the Strathclyde LLM in Climate Change Law and Policy does not require students to stay in the UK permanently, participants will be required to gain a visitor’s Visa, and not a student Visa (Tier 4).

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Careers

The skills that you’ll acquire through the LLM in Climate Change Law & Policy will allow you to confidently move into the ever-growing field of climate change law and policy.

The course may be of interest to:
- professionals within the public sector already working in or interested to move into the energy/climate change field in national governments
- professionals within the private sector already working in or interested to move into the energy/climate change field within electricity utilities, in specialised law firms, in consultancy firms or in the banking and insurance sector
- professionals already working in or interested to move into the energy/climate change field within non-governmental organisations, research centres and academia
- recent graduates from relevant subjects keen to move into the climate change/energy legal and policy field

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The Postgraduate Diploma course is designed to prepare nurses and midwives to become Specialist Community Public Health Nurses. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma course is designed to prepare nurses and midwives to become Specialist Community Public Health Nurses.

It leads to the professional award of Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (Health Visitor) with subsequent registration on the Specialist Community Public Health Nurse part of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register.

Half the course takes place on a clinical placement, and Welsh Government funding may be available.

Only by completing the Postgraduate Diploma (Pg Dip) programme will practitioners be eligible to have their names recorded on the third part of the NMC register.

This MSc course offers the opportunity for nurses and midwives who have completed the PG Diploma Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (SCPHN) to gain a Masters level qualification.

The MSc programme involves a taught element (one year full-time or two years part-time), leading to the professional award of Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (Health Visitor) with subsequent registration on the Specialist Community Public Health Nurse part of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register (Please refer to the Postgraduate diploma description). On completion of the taught stage (52 weeks / 104 weeks), students shall be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma (exit award) OR to progress to the dissertation stage of the programme and complete the full MSc route in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing. The dissertation module has to be completed within three years of completing the PGDiploma. Students will need to seek funding for this element of the program.

Distinctive features

• Enables registration as a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse, annotated as a health visitor on the third part of the professional register.

• You will spend 50% of the course on placement (this placement may not be in their local area and you will be expected to travel).

• Funding available via the Welsh Government for students undertaking the Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) programme

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma course is divided into four modules that are credit rated. Each taught module offers 30 credits and all must be successfully completed in order for students to have their name included on the third part of the professional register as a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse.

Note: A clinical practice element will account for 50% of the taught programme, which is in accordance with NMC (2004) regulations. Students are required to pass assessment in both their clinical and theoretical work in order to achieve their qualification as a Specialist Community Public Health nurse.

Each student will be allocated a practice teacher (PT) who will take accountability and responsibility for assessing the student's clinical progress, which is evidenced through a clinical portfolio.

Students who complete the programme successfully will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing and may proceed to Part 2 to obtain a Master’s Degree in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing.

The course offers includes a dissertation for those who wish to move to Masters level. The MSc in SCPHN is optional and self-funded. The dissertation involves the completion of a 20,000 word dissertation. You have three years following completion of the Postgraduate Diploma to submit the dissertation.

For a list of the modules for the PGDip PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/specialist-community-public-health-nursing-pgdip-part-time

For a list of the modules for the PGDip FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/specialist-community-public-health-nursing-pgdip

For a list of modules for the MSc, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/specialist-community-public-health-nursing-msc-part-time

Assessment

You will be assessed by various means, including written work, classroom tests, and presentations, as well as a clinical portfolio for the practice element.

Career prospects

This course is designed to prepare nurses and midwives to become Specialist Community Public Health Nurses.

It leads to the professional award of Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (Health Visitor), with subsequent registration on the Specialist Community Public Health Nurse part of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register.

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