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Masters Degrees (Thesis Only)

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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more

The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

View the list of subjects offered for the Master of Science (MSc) and the Master of Applied Science (MAppSc).

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned.

A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.

A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.

A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.



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The Master of Commerce (MCom) degree allows for the development of individual research. Starting with a sound background of coursework, students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields or to begin to develop new areas of research. Read more
The Master of Commerce (MCom) degree allows for the development of individual research. Starting with a sound background of coursework, students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields or to begin to develop new areas of research.

The MCom can be pursued by a combination of papers and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a good Bachelor's degree (or equivalent qualification) will complete the MCom by papers and thesis (at least two years' full-time study). The first year consists of a selection of papers worth 144 points, leading to a Postgraduate Diploma in Commerce (PGDipCom). Students who have a good Honours degree or a PGDipCom (or equivalent qualification) can complete an MCom by thesis only (minimum one year).

Further information about completing a Master's degree is available at: otago.ac.nz/study/masters/index.html

Subject areas

-Accounting
-Economics
-Finance
-Information Science
-International Business
-Management
-Marketing Management
-Tourism

Structure of the Programme

-The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Commerce) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.
-The programme of study shall consist of the preparation and submission of a thesis embodying the results of supervised research. In some cases, a candidate may also be required to take and pass approved papers, normally at 400-level, in addition to completing a thesis.
-The candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in the thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s) and the proposed course of the investigation.
-A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree.
-For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study.

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Become a sought-after employee. The Master of Information Sciences (Software Engineering) is a relevant programme that will give you the skills to be sought after for the many senior positions available around the world. Read more

Become a sought-after employee

The Master of Information Sciences (Software Engineering) is a relevant programme that will give you the skills to be sought after for the many senior positions available around the world.

Find out more about the Master of Information Sciences parent structure.

A masters is for those who want to gain a more detailed understanding of an area of study, either for interest, or to perhaps move up the hierarchy in your career. It is a satisfying and challenging postgraduate qualification. 

Massey’s Master of Information Sciences (Software Engineering) is a taught programme, which includes an in-depth professional project.

This programme will give you the skills to become a sought-after ICT professional in managerial and senior technical positions. You will be able to take on the best of the many senior positions that are available in New Zealand and around the world.

In demand

A report by Absolute IT showed that IT employers are seeking increasing numbers of staff. In Auckland alone 75% of IT employers are planning to recruit additional staff and contractors in 2016. The majority of the hiring is taking place because of increased demand and new projects.

The research showed that high demand areas are now software development, business analysis, project management and data/database. These are the key areas of information sciences you can study at Massey.

Broad-based learning

The software engineering major is a joint one - that means you will learn about both computer science and information technology. This includes the design and construction of large software applications, the technical knowledge of computer programming from computer science, combined with the design and team skills of information technology.

Application of complex systems

Undergraduate programmes focus on your technical knowledge such as programming skills. When you undertake postgraduate study, you will learn more about the application of the more complicated processes you can apply this knowledge to, such as developing complex and dependent operating and recognition systems. You will learn how to apply knowledge of ICT technologies and/or management with both a broad world-view and at a specialty level.

Giving you relevant work experience

A professional practice project is a major part of this masters. You will have the opportunity to lead real projects for real companies on real issues that they wish to solve. This experience can directly lead to roles and add substantial value to your resume when you are seeking employment.

World-leading staff

Massey has world-leading staff in our areas of expertise, teaching and researching at the leading edge of information sciences. We prepare you to take your place as leaders in this rapidly-growing industry.

Smaller classes

At Massey you’ll be part of small, interactive classes where you can have close contact with your lecturer.

Relevant to industry

Your study of software engineering at Massey is well-aligned with industry. Our lecturers have worked (and are still working) with the industry internationally. They bring their practical perspective, industry relationships and knowledge of the latest developments in this field to your study to make it more relevant to your potential employers.

Complete in a shorter time-frame

You may now complete this degree in 180-credits (previously 240 credits). This means that you can qualify in only three semesters, or one and half years.

Thesis only

You may choose to complete a Master of Information Sciences by thesis only. This is a 120 credit research qualification for students who have completed the BInfSc (Hons) or PGDipInfSc.

Set yourself apart

A masters gives you a point of difference from your peers, many of whom graduate at an undergraduate level only.

Flexibility of focus

During your study you will learn how to apply problem-solving and analytical thinking skills to the analysis of, and solutions to, general software-based problems within the broader ICT community. You will also gain skills in evaluating policies and processes used in the design, construction, testing and maintenance of advanced technological solutions in order to make informed strategic decisions.

Why postgraduate study? 

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. This qualification will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles. 

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



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Focus on information technology. The Master of Information Sciences will give you in-depth knowledge and expertise in information technology. Read more

Focus on information technology

The Master of Information Sciences will give you in-depth knowledge and expertise in information technology.

Find out more about the Master of Information Sciences parent structure.

In the Master of Information Sciences you will learn how to apply knowledge of ICT technologies and/or management with both a broad world-view and at a specialty level.

Undergraduate programmes focus on your technical knowledge such as programming skills. When you undertake postgraduate study, you will learn more about the application of the more complicated processes you can apply this knowledge to, such as developing complex and dependent operating and recognition systems.

Studying towards your masters is a satisfying and challenging process that will give you a sought-after postgraduate qualification. If you want to gain a more detailed understanding of an area of study, either for interest, or to perhaps move up the hierarchy in your career, you should consider this qualification.

In demand

A report by Absolute IT showed that IT employers are seeking increasing numbers of staff. In Auckland alone 75% of IT employers are planning to recruit additional staff and contractors in 2016. The majority of the hiring is taking place because of increased demand and new projects.

The research showed that high demand areas are now software development, business analysis, project management and data/database. These are the key areas of information sciences you can study at Massey.

What will you learn?

During your study you will learn how to apply problem-solving and analytical thinking skills to the analysis of, and solutions to, general software-based problems within the broader ICT community.

You will gain skills in evaluating policies and processes used in the design, construction, testing and maintenance of advanced technological solutions in order to make informed strategic decisions.

Complete in under two years

If you study full-time you can complete the Masters of Information Sciences in three semesters (one and half years).

This is a taught programme, with a major component an in-depth professional project.

Flexibility of focus

Within information technology you can make the most of our lecturer’s research expertise to focus on topics that interest you such as mobile systems and security. Or you have the freedom to graduate without a major and mix and match the topics that interest you the most. Areas of expertise include:

  • Massey Auckland: artificial intelligence, compilers, computer graphics, computer vision, parallel and distributed computing, operating systems and advanced computer systems.
  • Massey Palmerston North: empirical software engineering, program verification, human-computer interaction, technology - support learning, artificial intelligence, smart environment, machine learning, scientific computing, health informatics and graph algorithms.

Giving you relevant work experience

A professional practice project is a major part of this masters. You will have the opportunity to lead real projects for real companies on real issues that they wish to solve. This experience can directly lead to roles and add substantial value to your resume when you are seeking employment.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Information Sciences will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.

120-credit Master of Information Sciences (by thesis only)

You can also complete a Master of Information Sciences (by thesis only). This is a 120 credit research qualification for those who have completed the BInfSc (Hons) or PGDipInfSc.



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To provide a higher qualification at doctorate level for established practitioners in occupational psychology based on their current or past professional work. Read more
To provide a higher qualification at doctorate level for established practitioners in occupational psychology based on their current or past professional work. You are helped to plan and conduct conceptually sound and ethically acceptable research, within the scientist-practitioner framework. You have access to the University's facilities such as the library, computers and video suites, although it is expected most research will be conducted in your own organisation or work setting.

More about this course

You are helped to plan and conduct conceptually sound and ethically acceptable research, within the scientist-practitioner framework. You have access to the University's facilities such as the library, computers and video suites, although it is expected most research will be conducted in your own organisation or work setting.

The award of Professional Doctorate in Occupational Psychology is conferred after formal submission of the complete doctoral thesis and its successful defence at the viva voce examination. The examination of the thesis is conducted by examiners that are independent of the supervisory team.

Modular structure

Whilst individuals may be directed, where appropriate, to take selected modules from the School’s relevant Masters Courses, the programme itself consists of work towards the doctoral thesis only. This is structured according to set criteria for specified thesis components, which include a case study and an intervention process analysis that are typically examples from the candidate’s own professional practice. Furthermore, the thesis consists of a substantial empirical study and a critical literature review. A Prologue and Epilogue tie the thesis components together, highlighting both the overarching theme of the thesis and the reflective process of professional development that has been undertaken by the practitioner researcher. The expected word count for each of the thesis components is as follows:
-Prologue - 1,000 to 1,500 words
-Case Study - 6,000 words (if two linked cases then 3,000 words each)
-Intervention Process Analysis - 5,000 words
-Critical Literature Review - 5,000 words
-Empirical Research Project - 25,000 words
-Epilogue - 1,000 to 1,500 words

Applicants who seek to fulfil the requirements of the doctorate based on work already completed can do so in respect of all components except the critical literature review.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas. Read more

Study your specialist subject in detail and take the opportunity to contribute to the world's knowledge in that area. Enhance your critical thinking, communication and problem-solving abilities and learn to create and assess new ideas.

Working alongside some of New Zealand’s leading academic staff, you'll complete a research thesis of up to 40,000 words and emerge as an expert in your subject with highly developed research skills.

Victoria's MA is offered in more than 40 subjects. Most programmes are by thesis only but some include coursework and require a shorter thesis, and others you can complete doing mainly coursework and a research project.

A Master of Arts will give your career prospects a boost and open doors to new opportunities. Be a leader in a humanities or social science field and help make New Zealand a better place.

Available subjects

Duration

If you are doing an MA by thesis you'll normally need to complete it within 12 months, or two years if you're studying part time.

If you are doing your MA by coursework and thesis you'll normally be able to complete your degree within 12 months, but you can take up to one year and six months. Part-time students can take up to four years to complete this MA.

Workload

If you are studying full time you can expect a workload of a minimum of 30 hours a week for much of the year. If you can't commit this many hours you should enrol as a part-time student.



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Overview. The MEd School Guidance Counselling degree is designed to advance the professional development of school Guidance Counsellors and builds on the Postgraduate Diploma in School Guidance Counselling (PGDSGC). Read more

Overview

The MEd School Guidance Counselling degree is designed to advance the professional development of school Guidance Counsellors and builds on the Postgraduate Diploma in School Guidance Counselling (PGDSGC). This one year programme involves participation in regular research-support seminars and consultation with supervisors towards the completion of a thesis.

Course Structure

The MEd School Guidance Counselling is assessed through the thesis only.

Duration: 1 year Part-time



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Our Urban Design MA, PGDip is aimed at built environment professionals who want to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in the field of urban design. Read more
Our Urban Design MA, PGDip is aimed at built environment professionals who want to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in the field of urban design. It equips you to contribute towards an improvement in the quality of the built environment.

The course is structured around three main design projects. Each explores key contemporary issues in urban design:
-Urban regeneration
-Housing
-Public space and engagement

These projects are underpinned by theoretical and practical lectures, seminars and workshops. The course is primarily studio based and there is an emphasis on independent learning. You are encouraged to cultivate a studio atmosphere within your year group where you will benefit from each other's diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

Building on the strengths of the multidisciplinarity of its cohort, the course complements existing skills and experience in built environment related disciplines with new skills in understanding and designing in physical, social and economic contexts.

The course can be studied as a nine month Diploma route from Town Planning. It can later be upgraded to an MA through studying the Thesis Only route, involving a dissertation or Design Thesis. The Diploma can be undertaken by students from a variety of educational and professional backgrounds, including:
-Architecture
-Planning
-Landscape architecture
-Property development
-Art
-Community engagement

Delivery

The programme is structured around three main design projects that each explore key contemporary issues in urban design, currently: urban regeneration; housing; and public space/engagement. These projects are underpinned by theoretical and practical lectures, seminars and workshops. The programme is therefore heavily studio based and there is an emphasis on independent learning. Year groups are encouraged to cultivate a studio atmosphere where students benefit from each other's diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

Accreditation

The Urban Design MA is accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) as a specialist qualification. This is a professional accreditation and allows membership to RTPI, which will enhance your career whether you are a student just starting out on your professional journey or an experienced planner at the peak of your career.

Facilities

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has excellent studio teaching facilities and our research suite provides designated space and equipment for each postgraduate researcher. Our facilities include:
-Studios
-Exhibition spaces
-Print room
-Seminar rooms
-IT suites

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The Master of Sport and Exercise is a 240 credit qualification for students, who want to pursue postgraduate study and research in a specific field. Read more

The Master of Sport and Exercise is a 240 credit qualification for students, who want to pursue postgraduate study and research in a specific field.

The Master of Sport and Exercise (by thesis only) is a 120 credit qualification for students, who have completed a Bachelor of Sport and Exercise degree with Honours or an equivalent sport-related Honours degree or a Postgraduate Diploma in Sport and Exercise or an equivalent sport-related Postgraduate Diploma



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See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cast/packaging/ms-packaging-science. The MS degree in packaging science is designed to meet the needs of professionals who are employed in the field or students who wish to pursue a graduate program immediately upon earning a bachelor's degree. Read more
See the department website - https://www.rit.edu/cast/packaging/ms-packaging-science

The MS degree in packaging science is designed to meet the needs of professionals who are employed in the field or students who wish to pursue a graduate program immediately upon earning a bachelor's degree.

Plan of study

The program requires the completion of 36 credit hours comprised of six required core courses, elective courses, plus a thesis or project. Faculty advisers assist students in selecting the thesis or project option and the corresponding plan of study is approved by the graduate program chair.

- Elective courses

All elective courses are approved by the student’s adviser and must meet degree requirements. In certain circumstances, with pre-approval by the graduate adviser and where individual need indicates appropriateness, a limited number of upper-level undergraduate courses may be used to fulfill elective credit. Students, with adviser permission, may include independent study as part of their elective credits. However, independent study may not be used toward the required packaging core course work. Courses selected for elective credit can be combined to create special areas of focus with program chair approval.

- Thesis/Project/Comprehensive Exam

The thesis option requires 6 credit hours and develops and tests a hypothesis by scientific method and is grounded in a theoretical framework. Individuals who can capture, interpret, and apply information by this method can add value to their roles as contributors in the workplace. The thesis option is for students seeking to pursue careers that offer a greater opportunity for further research or advanced study in the field of packaging science. It is meant to provide depth of study, emphasizing the research process. The thesis option is by invitation only.

The project option is 3 credit hours and has a practical, application-oriented grounding in literature. It is considered secondary research or the compilation of existing information presented in a new way. The project option is for students who desire advanced study in packaging science, but who do not intend to pursue a research career or further studies beyond the master’s level. Students choosing the project option are required to complete one additional elective course.

The comprehensive exam option is 0 credit hours and allows students to complete an exam in place of a thesis or project. Students who choose this option take two additional elective courses.

The student’s graduate committee makes the final decision regarding the proposal idea and whether it meets the program’s requirements as a graduate project or thesis; or if a student is best served by completing the comprehensive exam.

Admission requirements

Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores are not required. However, in cases where there may be some question of the capability of an applicant to complete the program, applicants may wish to submit scores to strengthen their application.

Students who do not have an equivalent bachelor’s degree in packaging science will be evaluated and the appropriate undergraduate bridge courses will be prescribed. These courses may not be used for credit toward the MS degree.

Applicants are required to have one semester of physics (mechanics focus), one semester of calculus, one year of chemistry (including organic chemistry), statistics, and basic computer literacy.

Students who do not have an equivalent bachelor’s degree in packaging science will be evaluated and the appropriate undergraduate bridge courses will be prescribed. These courses may not be used for credit toward the MS degree.

Additional information

- Advising

Students are appointed an academic adviser who works with the program coordinator to develop a program of study. Students follow an outlined curriculum to complete their degree requirements and, with adviser approval, choose packaging electives to enhance their career objectives. Students choose a faculty adviser with approval from their program coordinator for their thesis or project. The faculty adviser guides the student on topic choice and works with the program coordinator for approval and timely completion of the thesis or project.

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This is a Master's degree by research, in which the sole requirement is a dissertation. It is suitable for those who have a strong background in this field, or who have research experience. Read more
This is a Master's degree by research, in which the sole requirement is a dissertation. It is suitable for those who have a strong background in this field, or who have research experience. It is expected that the topic of research will fall within one of the areas supported by the Division.

An MPhil in Biological Anthropological Science may be obtained after one year of research on an approved subject within the field of Biological Anthropology, and includes an oral examination of the thesis and the general field of knowledge in which it falls. The dissertation topics are decided between the student and the supervisor, and assistance is provided on elements of methodology and analysis, as well as with the written presentation.

The thesis must satisfy the examiners that the candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject. This course begins in October, with submission of the thesis by the end of August.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsbampbas

Learning Outcomes

Prepare students for research at the doctoral level and to equip students to be future leaders in Applied Biological Anthropology and allied fields around the world.

Assessment

All students will write a thesis of not more than 35,000 words in length, exclusive of tables, footnotes, bibliography, and appendices, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science. The examination shall include an oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls. The thesis shall provide evidence to satisfy the Examiners that a candidate can design and carry out investigations, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspectives of the subject. The thesis and examination form the sole assessment for the degree.

Continuing

MPhil students are registered for one year only. Those who hope to read for a PhD at Cambridge immediately after the MPhil will need to obtain support from a potential supervisor. This need not be the same person who supervises your MPhil thesis. But you will need to work hard to let the potential PhD supervisor see substantive work that you have written, in addition to your draft thesis proposal, at an early stage in the academic year. Once you have applied for the PhD a definite decision will be taken after your performance in the MPhil can be fully assessed; the Committee wil set conditions for your related to the entry requirements of the PhD. If you do not achieve these targets it is unlikely you wil be able to continue to reads towards a PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Opportuniites for relevant funding on application.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation. The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/film-animation/graduate-film-and-animation

The MFA program in film and animation enjoys state-of-the-art facilities. Students can create live-action production, screens, 2D, 3D or stop motion animation that is unique. The program is housed in a School of Film and Animation with full production facilities, as well as the additional support of highly specialized faculty in photography, imaging science, computer science, information technology, and printing.

Goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use animation, filmmaking, and other imaging arts as a means to:

- pursue a career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- encourage a sense of community, creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

The MFA in film and animation offers four options:

1. 2D animation concentrates on traditional forms drawn by hand, a mixture of both traditional and digital, or all digital origination. Students may concentrate their studies on stop motion puppet animation.

2. 3D animation courses focus on advanced 3D modeling, lighting, texturing, and animating in a 3D space.

3. Production allows students to develop and refine their creative approach to fictional narrative, documentary, and experimental work.

4. Screenwriting is an opportunity for students to complete short films with a concentration in creating feature length screenplays.

All four options require two years of course work and a thesis project. A complete film is required of all the first year students, a complete film or script is required in the second year, and a more ambitious thesis film or feature length script is required in the third year, which is a part-time student status focused only on the thesis film.

A minimum of 63 semester credit hours of graduate work is outlined below.

Electives

SOFA elective courses are available in animation, film, video, multimedia, screenwriting, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, museum studies, crafts, bookmaking, typography, color photography, new media, studio photography, advertising photography, perception, sensitometry, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. There are also opportunities for independent studies, internships, and concentrations.

Thesis

Specific instructions pertaining to the thesis are available in the “MFA Guide for Students and Faculty: Policy Regarding Student Work.” The School of Film and Animation reserves the right to retain copies of student-produced films to be used for educational purposes, to show to prospective students, and as examples of student productions.

Admission requirements

Scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) are not required for admission. International students are required to submit English language test scores such as TOEFL. Applicants who are capable of good academic work as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences, will be favored. The graduate faculty makes recommendations based on the above interlocking criteria.

Students who are evaluated to have MFA potential but need additional study in preparation for graduate courses will be advised to take such courses either prior to entrance or during their first year of study.

All correspondence concerning applications or catalogs should be addressed to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services. Students interested in the program should have their application process completed by January 15. Applications received later than January 15 are considered on a space-available basis.

- Portfolio

The review committee is looking for work that is original in concept and content. It does not need to necessarily be motion media, but should be visual or aural. Examples include films/videos, photos, drawings, paintings, sculpture, stop motion puppets, scripts, storyboards, and original music.

Applicants must present what they consider to be the best of their work, not all of their work. Films or videos should total 12-minutes or less. A short, complete piece of work is preferable to a demo reel. If there are no short works then a 12-minute excerpt of a longer piece is acceptable.

Applicants must place their portfolios on a Web or FTP site, such as Vimeo or YouTube, which can be easily accessed by RIT faculty for review. Your application should include a URL Web or FTP address to your online portfolio. If your portfolio is placed on a shared Web or FTP site that contains other files, be sure the file name contains your full name (which must match the name used on your application materials). When applicable, please include any usernames and/or passwords necessary for access to your portfolio. Please provide an inventory sheet or table of contents with your portfolio, and if it is not obvious, clearly indicate what your combination was to group and collaborative pieces. This can be a separate description or can be included in the portfolio presentation.

Applicants are also required to produce a 2 to 3 minute video self-portrait to accompany the online portfolio. This should include information about the applicant such as why you want to attend the School of Film and Animation, which concentration you wish to pursue, and why. Please include information about one significant accomplishment you have made. Sound and picture quality should be clear. The online portfolio and self-portrait must be mounted on Slideroom.com once a Slideroom account is established.

For more information about portfolio guidelines as well as assistance in uploading an online portfolio, contact Graduate Enrollment Services.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work taken prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester credit hours of graduate work with a grade of B or better is transferable and may be counted toward the MFA degree, with the approval of the graduate faculty.

- Grades

Students must maintain a B (3.0) average GPA to meet graduation requirements for the MFA. Thesis hours are usually completed over several semesters. Acceptance or rejection of the thesis is made by the candidate’s thesis board and the graduate faculty.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

- Screenings

Screenings are required for all student-produced films and are coordinated through the professor or the thesis chair.

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Why American Studies in Nijmegen?. The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Read more

Why American Studies in Nijmegen?

The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Our Master's program gives students the opportunity to become experts in the concept of ‘America' in a variety of fields: US history, literature, culture (including popular culture, film, theatre, political history, foreign policy, constitutional law, religion and social science. Radboud University's programme distinguishes itself from other's by emphasizing the cultural and political relations between the United States, its neighbours and Europe.

The open classroom experience is what teachers and researches of the Master`s program “North American Studies” want to create for their students. For an example of the experience, in the project “Politics & Culture of Liberation” students and teachers worked closely with the National Liberation Museum in Groesbeek, the Regional Archive in Nijmegen and the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The project resulted in an exhibition on the impact of American culture on Europe and the Transatlantic World. This is only one example of the many creative seminar projects that students realize in the Master`s program.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Specializations

Specialisations in the Master's in North American Studies. The Master's programme in North American Studies offers two specialisations:

1. Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

2. Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

America's cultural icons are the world's cultural icons. From Walt Disney to the Statue of Liberty, from Hollywood to Time magazine, and from Jack Kerouac to Philip Roth, the influence of American culture and literature around the world is huge. Our program allows students to critically explore the significance of American culture in countries around the globe. Aside from studying the variety of meanings assigned to American cultural products abroad, students will explore the diversity of the American cultural expressions themselves.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks beyond national borders. In this program you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States within, outside and at its borders. Central themes are the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe, and related issues in the field of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

Study American issues with an interdisciplinary view

True to the tradition of American Studies, our program teaches students to approach issues from different angles and to think in multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary ways. We also offer excellent internships, thanks to our global network. Furthermore, we are the only university in the Netherlands to teach oral communication skills in the American language throughout our Bachelor's program, so that students who go on to study for a Master's degree have near-native language abilities.

High level of communication in American English

In Nijmegen, you will find yourself in a dynamic learning environment where the level of scholarship and communication in (American) English is extremely high. This is one of the reasons why our program is so popular. Another reason is the choice the University offers between two fascinating fields within which you can create your own custom-made program: ‘Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective' and ‘Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society.'

Program outline

Within the program in North America Studies, you can choose from the following two specialisations. Each specialisation comprises of a one-year, 60 EC program including a 20 EC Master's thesis project. For more information about program outline, structure, and courses, please click on the links below.

Literature and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

All students enrolled in this Master's specialisation take compulsory foundational courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is an elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include courses on Native Americans, African-American literature and the American borderlands.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

If you follow this specialisation, you will take several obligatory foundation courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is a small elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include a special course on the Beat Generation, one of America's most influential avant-garde movements; Native Americans; African-American Literature and Culture; American Borders: Contact Conflict and Exchange; or American Constitutional Law (taught in Dutch).

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The M.A. Read more

Program Overview

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at the American Graduate School in Paris is a two-year program qualifying you for a broad range of careers in international affairs, from local governance to foreign affairs, to international development, human rights advocacy, global communications, international business, and many other areas involving interaction with different countries and cultures.


:A US-accredited Program in France:

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS combines the wide recognition of an American degree with the unique experience of a Paris-based program. It is accredited in the US as an affiliated program of Arcadia University (Pennsylvania) and taught at the American Graduate School in Paris, a private nonprofit institution of higher education recognized by the French Ministry of Higher Education.

Classes are taught in the heart of Paris. The French capital – which is also one of Europe’s capitals and an international hub – is an ideal location for the study of international affairs. The program takes full advantage of this through guest speakers, site visits, and networking events. These all represent opportunities to get exposed to the international scene and make connections with the many diplomatic missions, intergovernmental organizations, and NGOs that the city hosts.

The language of instruction is English; no knowledge of French is required to enroll. You have the opportunity to learn French through AGS’s partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France.


:Expertise in International Affairs:

The program draws on AGS’s specific expertise in the field of international relations, in which the school has specialized since it was founded in 1994. At the core of this expertise, the faculty of the program is comprised of both accomplished scholars conducting research at the forefront of their discipline, and practitioners sharing their knowledge and professional experience, such as retired Ambassadors or government officials.

See AGS faculty - http://www.ags.edu/about-ags/faculty

The curriculum strikes a careful balance between academic thoroughness and practice-oriented approaches to fully prepare you for the professional arena. It examines the interaction between State and non-State actors at an international level through a multi-disciplinary scope covering political as well as cultural, historical, economic, geographical, social, legal, and humanitarian aspects, all updated to include the most current international issues.

Required courses cover the core subjects of international relations theory, economic policy, international public law, foreign policy formulation, and methodology. A broad rage of electives is available to explore other areas of international affairs such as NGO management, environment policy, gender issues, geopolitics, conflict resolution, and area studies.

See course catalog - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/graduate-course-catalog


:A Multicultural Learning Environment:

A unique aspect of the program is the diversity of perspectives infused in the classroom, with students as well as faculty coming from many different national origins. This combined with the American-style interactive teaching methods, makes for an enriching and mind-opening class experience.


:Master’s thesis:

The program culminates in the completion of a Master’s thesis. Through the in-depth research and writing involved in the thesis process you will form a specialization in an area of your interest, as well as strengthen your ability to plan and complete a substantial project.

The thesis topic is elaborated in coordination with the Academic Committee and faculty advisors based on your area of interest and professional objectives.


:Foreign Policy component:

You may choose to include a foreign policy component in your thesis. This exercise will offer you the opportunity to apply the international relation theories and methods learned to construct new solutions to current international problems, thus leading to concrete solutions supported by solid academic research.

Degree Requirements

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy, you must meet the following conditions:

- Successful completion of the curriculum (42 credits) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 (See curriculum details - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/curriculum)
- Pre-intermediate level of French language by graduation (1 on the ALTE scale, A2 on the CEF scale French Language Proficiency Level Scale - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations/798-french-language-proficiency-level-scale).
- Note : to help you meet this requirement, AGS offers optional French language courses with its partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France (more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses).
- Research and writing of a 25,000 to 35,000-word thesis complying with the academic standards set forth by the school.

Program options

A range of options allows you to tailor the program around your particular interests and career objectives.


:Internship:

While in the Master’s program, you have the opportunity to perform an internship in a Paris-based organization: diplomatic/consular mission, intergovernmental organization, NGO, multinational corporation news media outlet or another type of relevant international institution.

Internships are optional and can be pursued either for credit (then counting as a an elective course in the curriculum) or not-for-credit. In all cases, you may benefit from AGS’s guidance and support for internship placement. (Note that in all cases, the student is ultimately responsible for finding his/her internship.)


:Area concentrations:

You may specialize in a particular sector of international affairs and obtain, in addition to your M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, a Certificate of Concentration in your area of specialization. The requirements for this option consist of elective courses in the said area, directed readings, comprehensive exams, and an area-focused thesis.

Area Concentrations Available include:

- African Studies
- Asian Studies
- Middle Eastern Studies


:Dual degree options:

A number of dual program options with partner universities allow you to earn a second degree in a complementary discipline in addition to your US-accredited M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy:

- European accredited Master in Diplomacy and Strategic Negotiation (with Université Paris-Sud, Sceaux, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-diplomacy-and-strategic-negotiation

- European accredited LL.M. in French and European Union Law and Business Ethics (with Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-and-international-law

US-accredited M.A. in Peace and Conflict Resolution (with Arcadia University, USA): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/dual-programs/international-relations-and-diplomacy-international-peace-and-conflict-resolution


:International opportunities:

You may spend one of the semesters of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy program abroad, studying at one of AGS's partner institutions while earning credits toward your AGS degree. Options include the United States (Arcadia University) and Italy (University of Siena). You may also spend the summer at UC Berkeley Extension, completing an additional module in leadership and management.

See more information - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/international-opportunities


:Combined M.A.-Ph.D. program:

AGS offers a combined M.A.-Ph.D. program per the American model. The combined M.A.-Ph.D. program allows you to credit the required courses toward both degrees simultaneously. Ph.D. candidates having successfully completed their M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS would therefore be exempt from taking the required courses, and would only have to take seven elective courses for the Ph.D. program. Note that admission into the Ph.D. program is not automatic after obtaining the M.A.

Timeframe options

Full-time two-year track: the program is designed to be completed in two years on a full-time basis, involving nine to twelve hours of classes per week in addition to readings, assignments, and the research and writing of the thesis.

Accelerated 18-month intensive track: You have the option to complete the program in three semesters instead of four. You would then be required to take twelve to fifteen hours of classes per week.

Part-time track: EU students and other students who do not need to be enrolled on a full-time basis for visa purposes may undertake the program over a longer period of time on a part-time basis. This allows working professionals and other interested candidates to combine the program with other activities.

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The Cambridge LLM (Master of Law) is a nine-month taught programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. Read more
The Cambridge LLM (Master of Law) is a nine-month taught programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. The LLM, as a masters degree, is intended for those who wish to pursue further legal studies after completing their first degree in law, including those who are considering an academic career or intend to practise law. The advanced nature of the LLM is reflected in the fact that the programme is organised and taught separately from the undergraduate law degree at Cambridge. All of the LLM courses are specifically tailored for the LLM programme.

LLM students take four courses of their choice from a list of over 30 options, each most commonly assessed by means of a three-hour written examination at the end of the LLM year although students may elect to write an 18,000 word thesis in lieu of the written examination for one course only subject to prior formal approval of their dissertation topic.

Students may opt to specialise in commercial, European, international or intellectual property law by choosing at least three of their courses from those designated as being in one of these areas of specialism. Alternatively they may select from the entire range of LLM courses and obtain a non-specialised LLM degree.

See the website http://www.llm.law.cam.ac.uk/

Course detail

At the end of this postgraduate programme students can be expected to have greatly enhanced knowledge of their chosen specialist subjects areas, an increased ability to apply sophisticated and rigorous analytical techniques to primary and secondary legal materials, and a better facility in advancing robust evaluations of doctrinal and policy arguments in the fields of their studies and more generally.

Format

The LLM is a nine-month taught programme which begins in October and ends in the following June. Students must take four courses, but have a free choice as to which four they choose from a list of over 30 course offerings. In most courses student numbers do not exceed 35.

One-to-one supervisions are unlikely, except for those students who choose to write a thesis in lieu of examination for one their four courses. These students receive a number of one-to-one sessions with their thesis supervisors.

Teaching typically comprises a minimum of 16 two-hour seminars and lectures for each of their four courses, supplemented by teaching in small groups where course numbers are greater than 20.

There are no formal 'practicals', but all LLM students are expected to undertake substantial amounts of reading arising from seminars and lectures and to produce written work for some sessions.

In addition to the seminars and lectures for each course, provision is also made for discussion in smaller groups where the number taking a course exceed 20.

LLM students are encouraged to contribute to the student law review, the Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law. In addition many LLM students are involved in the Faculty's Graduate Law Society.

This style of presentation is reserved for PhD students, but LLM students are welcome to attend.

Placements

Placements are not organised through the Faculty, and are not part of the LLM programme, but many LLM students successfully organise placements for the period immediately following completion of their studies.

Assessment

LLM students have the option of writing a thesis of 18,000 words in lieu of examination for one of their four courses.

Certain LLM subjects may be assessed by an essay of 7,000 words plus a two-hour examination, rather than the more typical three-hour examination or 18,000-word thesis.

LLM students sit a three-hour written examination at the end of the LLM year for each of their four courses, unless they have already submitted a thesis in lieu of examination for one of their courses.

Formative assessment (ie assessment not contributing to final grades) is delivered by way of individual feedback on students' essays or partial thesis drafts (for those electing to write a thesis). Students may submit up to three essays for each course they are taking. Course convenors and lecturers will advise on topics, but the aim is to produce a short piece of writing which provides a concise, rigorous argument or analysis of the issues in question.

Continuing

A number of students wish to remain in Cambridge after completing their masters degree in order to pursue a further research degree. Cambridge offers research degrees of varying length: the Diploma in International Law, the Diploma in Legal Studies, the MLitt degree and the PhD degree.

Students wishing to continue their studies at Cambridge by undertaking a research degree in law should apply for their chosen course through the Graduate Admissions Office by completing a GRADSAF application form and submitting it by the relavant deadline.

The Faculty of Law website contains information about the options available at:
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-research

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Information about sources of funding is available from the Faculty of Law's LLM website at: http://www.llm.law.cam.ac.uk/scholarship_information.html

and from the University's Graduate Admissions Office website at:
http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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