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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning. The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Read more
The joint MA degree in art history builds upon the combined resources of Alabama’s two premier institutions of higher learning: The University of Alabama and The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

One Program, Two Campuses

Students enroll on one of the two campuses and take the majority of their courses on that campus, but they also take 6 hours of art history on the other campus and have access to the library holdings (including in the visual arts) of both campuses.

An art history symposium offered each year on alternating campuses provides the students in the program with an opportunity to present a formal paper in an informal setting. A highlight of our annual symposium is the visit by a renowned art historian who participates by meeting the students and discussing the papers.

After Graduation

The MA degree in art history is an appropriate terminal degree for positions that are open in museums, galleries, libraries, and archives, and in the fields of teaching at the junior college level. Graduates of the program have secured positions in area museums, including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the Montgomery Museum of Arts and the Mobile Arts Museum, and as visual arts curators and teachers of art history in area colleges and universities, including Livingston College, Shelton State College, and Jefferson State College. Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the University level are encouraged to continue their study of art history in a doctoral program; graduates of the joint MA program in art history have been accepted into the PhD programs of Rochester University, Emory University, Kansas University, and Florida State University.

Degree Requirements

The MA in art history requires completion of 24 semester hours in art history, a comprehensive exam, and a written thesis.

Coursework

The MA requires 24 semester hours of art history coursework, of which 6 hours may be taken in a related field, such as history, religion, or anthropology. Courses are grouped into seven general areas: Early Modern (Renaissance and Baroque), 19th-century, Modern, Contemporary, American (including African American) and South Asian.* Students must identify a major area and a minor area.

A required course, ARH 550, Literature of Art, is offered once a year on alternating campuses. A maximum of 6 hours of 400-level courses may be taken for graduate credit. Students enrolled on The University of Alabama campus must take 6 hours of coursework at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

*Students may take classes in South Asian art, but it cannot be their major field.

Comprehensive Exam

A reading knowledge of French or German must be demonstrated before the student is eligible to take the comprehensive written exam. The language requirement may be satisfied either by completing both semesters of the graduate reading proficiency sequence offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Classics or by scheduling a written exam with the appropriate language area in the Department of Modern Languages and Classics.

The student who has completed 24 semester hours of graduate coursework and satisfied the language requirement is ready to be examined in a written comprehensive exam administered in the fall and spring semesters. The written comprehensive exam is divided into two parts: (1) a slide exam that tests the student’s broad knowledge of the history of Western art, and (2) an essay portion that tests for expertise in two fields of concentration.

The student must declare intent to take the exam in writing to the director of graduate studies in art history at least one month prior to the exam date. At that time an exam committee is formed that includes at least two art history professors from the Tuscaloosa campus and one art history professor from the Birmingham campus. The committee members represent the two areas of concentration declared by the student. The committee evaluates the written exam and notifies the candidate of the results. An exam must be judged to be of at least “B” quality in order to be considered a pass. A student who does not pass the exam may take it once more at the normally scheduled exam time.

Thesis

The MA degree also requires a written thesis submitted to the Graduate School. In consultation with a professor, the student identifies a thesis topic. (Often, a thesis topic originates with a written seminar paper.) The thesis proposal is a brief statement of the topic for research, a summary description of the individual thesis chapters, and a working bibliography. The thesis advisor circulates the thesis proposal among the committee members for their approval. The thesis committee is usually but not always identical to the student’s exam committee. The student writes the thesis while enrolled in thesis hours (ARH 599) for up to 6 hours. When the thesis is completed to the satisfaction of the thesis advisor it is distributed to the thesis committee for comments. The final step in the completion of the thesis is the oral defense. In the oral defense the student justifies the methodology and the conclusions of the thesis to the committee.

The student must complete all of the required revisions and corrections to the thesis to the satisfaction of the committee before submitting the finished thesis to the Graduate School. The final written thesis must conform to the requirements of the Graduate School for it to be accepted. The student must provide an electronic copy of the thesis for The University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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The Doctorate in Education (EdD) is designed to meet the needs of education professionals in teaching, management or administrative roles in all sectors from primary to higher education. Read more
The Doctorate in Education (EdD) is designed to meet the needs of education professionals in teaching, management or administrative roles in all sectors from primary to higher education.

The EdD differs from a PhD in that it is primarily focused on professional rather than theoretical issues and is aimed at those who have already been employed in the education sector for a number of years, either as lecturers, teachers administrators, advisers or inspectors. For some, the established PhD route comprising in-depth study of a single specialised topic does not satisfy their needs. To meet the requirement for a new approach the EdD was instituted and this programme provides students with a broad-based knowledge of a number of areas through a system of taught modules that develop a basis for the thesis and the opportunity to research a specific issue of professional concern in depth.

Programme Structure

The EdD is structured to offer maximum flexibility and, as such, we provide three modes of study for applicants to choose from:

-Full-time study
-Part-time study
-ISPI (International Summer Postgraduate Programme).

Each route offers a different pattern of teaching but all follow the same basic structure:

-Six taught modules during the taught phase
-One thesis (60,000 words max.) during the research phase.
-Learning Outcomes

The taught phase of the programme enables students to address these broad learning outcomes:

Learning Outcome

Group A: Critical understanding of issues relating to teaching & learning

Group B: Critical understanding of the organisation of education

Group C: Ability to analyse and evaluate educational research

The structure is designed to provide a focus towards the thesis. Students are introduced to the requirements of the thesis early on in their programme, so that they can develop and refine their ideas with support from colleagues. The taught modules provide a wide platform in the obligatory modules that can then be extended in the other modules in order to be responsive to students' needs.

As the thesis requires a high level of independent thinking in order to produce a piece of research that makes a contribution to the field, the Analysing, Interpreting and Using Educational Research, Understanding Qualitative Educational Research and the Thesis Proposal modules are compulsory.

In the final phase students work as individuals with two supervisors to produce a thesis, which is often but not always related to a specific aspect of their work and position in the education service. It is expected that the research topic should complement the current staff research areas.

Thus, the EdD moves from a broad base to a specific thesis which, though shorter and more focused than a doctoral dissertation, has to reach the same level and is judged by the same criteria. The EdD and PhD have exact parity of degree status.

Taught Modules

Students need to successfully complete six modules in order to advance to the thesis phase of the programme.

Students take 3 compulsory modules:

Engaging with Interpretive Research Design (30 credits)
Analysis and Evaluation of Educational Research (30 credits)
Thesis Proposal (30 credits)

They then have a choice from all other PGT modules. So they must chose three modules from the domains of

Technology in Education,
Mathematics Education,
Science Education,
Arts Education,
Educational Assessment,
Curriculum & Policy,
Special Educational Needs and Inclusion,
Intercultural & International Education, and
Management.

(NB. The modules available each academic year do vary depending on staff availability so please check at the time of registration).

A student wishing to progress to the research phase of the EdD must obtain an overall average mark of at least 60% in the assessment of their taught modules. Any student who does not obtain an overall mark of at least 50% will be required to withdraw from the programme.

Thesis

Students may already have a proposal for a thesis upon starting the programme, but many begin to formulate their proposal while taking modules. For example, an assignment for one of the units may provide the opportunity to explore a theme prior to commitment for the thesis.

Students work individually under the supervision of one or more members of staff on a topic chosen in consultation with their supervisor. This is often related to the work these students have undertaken in their institution and involves an independent investigation demonstrating their ability to test ideas and to understand the relationship between the theme of their investigation and the wider field of knowledge.

The thesis should represent an original contribution and include matter worth of publication. The thesis should be a maximum of 60,000 words.

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The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. Read more
The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. The MPhil comprises a Core Course and two taught modules of your choice. Assessment takes the form of three assessed essays of 5,000 words and a 15,000-word thesis. A background in literature, anthropology, modern languages, area studies, history or the social sciences is useful but not essential. Evidence of interest in or commitment to Latin America is expected. Students already at Cambridge applying to continue from the MPhil to the PhD should have attained, or be expecting to obtain, an overall mark of 73% with at least 75% in the thesis or the coursework.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hslamplas

Course detail

By the end of the course students will have:

- developed a critical view of the contribution made by the academic study of Latin America and of some of its specific disciplines to the humanities and the social sciences;
- become familiar with some of the main themes of contemporary debate;
- presented their own ideas in a public forum;
- developed intellectual and practical research skills;
- tested their ability to produce a piece of advanced scholarship in conformity with the research techniques, standards of argument and accepted style of presentation of an academic discipline.

Format

The MPhil course of study includes lectures, seminars and individual supervision, with teaching provided by University and College Lecturers. The MPhil comprises a Core Course and two taught modules of your choice. Assessment takes the form of three assessed essays of 5,000 words and a 15,000-word thesis. A background in literature, anthropology, modern languages, area studies, history or the social sciences is useful but not essential. Evidence of interest in or commitment to Latin America is expected. Students already at Cambridge applying to continue from the MPhil to the PhD should have attained, or be expecting to obtain, an overall mark of 73% with at least 75% in the thesis or the coursework.

Not applicable, although you may wish to carry out some research / fieldwork towards your thesis in Latin America during the Easter vacation period, depending upon your research topic. Fieldwork is expensive, however, and although some funding sources are available to offer small travel grants, students should expect to incur some costs themselves.

Students will receive feedback via individual essay and thesis supervisions, with detailed feedback provided by examiners for all coursework.

Students should expect to receive formal termly progress reports from their Principal Supervisor on their thesis writing and research, with more regular feedback provided on an ongoing basis via email or in face-to-face meetings.

Assessment

Each candidate for the M.Phil is required to submit an original thesis on an approved topic. On application students are asked to submit a thesis proposal (500 words) and, subject to the success of an application, will be assigned a thesis supervisor as part of the admissions process. In some cases further study may lead to a change of topic and even to a consequential change of supervisor. The provisional title for the thesis must be agreed between candidate and supervisor by the end of Lent Term (mid-March). Theses submitted for the M.Phil in Latin American Studies must not exceed 15,000 words, including footnotes, tables, and any appendices but excluding the bibliography and must be written in English.

Students write one essay over the course of the first term and two essays during the second term. Each essay must be no more than 5,000 words long, including notes, but excluding bibliography, tables, and appendices, and a word-count must be provided at the end. The first essay will usually be related to a topic covered in the Core Course whilst the second and third essays will relate closely to topics explored in the two option modules.

An oral examination must take place if the thesis is in danger of failing or if the Examiners and External Examiner cannot agree on a recommendation. Moreover, an oral examination must be held in any case where a candidate who, because of a borderline or failing performance in the compulsory essay examinations, needs to achieve a high performance in the thesis examination in order to qualify for award of the M.Phil degree.

Continuing

Candidates who achieve an average of 73 (High Pass) on the MPhil course, with a 75 (Distinction) either in the thesis or across the three essays (averaged), may apply to be registered for the PhD. Students who wish to apply for provisional leave to continue to the PhD will be given full information on how to apply during Michaelmas Term (October-December).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please consult the Centre's website for detailed information on funding available to both prospective and current students (http://www.latin-american.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree. the thesis option, and the coursework option. Read more
There are two options within our master’s program, both of which lead to the MS degree: the thesis option, and the coursework option.

Plan I (Thesis Option)

The Plan I master’s degree requires a minimum of 30 credit hours — 24 hours of coursework and 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Four lecture courses (12 credit hours) are required for this degree option. At least two of these courses must be in the student’s major area, and at least one must be outside the major area.

In addition to formal coursework, students will generally register for 10 hours of advanced research technique courses in their major area. Students will also take at least 6 hours of thesis research (CH 699).

Students will present a research seminar in their second year prior to the oral defense of their thesis. Students will register for the seminar course (CH 586) in the semester that they give their seminar.

Each student will meet with their thesis committee in the first semester of their third semester (September of the second year for students starting in the fall semester) to present an initial research review (IRR). In the IRR, the student will describe the progress made on the thesis project to his or her committee. The student will also discuss the work remaining to complete the thesis research.

Upon completing their research, the student will prepare a thesis according to the UA Graduate School’s guidelines. The thesis should be distributed to the thesis committee two weeks prior to the oral defense.

The student’s research advisor and thesis committee will read the thesis and meet to hear an oral defense of the thesis. The oral defense will serve as the comprehensive exam for the MS degree.

Plan II (Coursework Option)

The Plan II option requires a minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework.

Six lecture courses (18 hours) are required. Four of these courses will be in the student’s major, and two will be outside the major area of study.

The remaining 12 hours of the program will be made up of the seminar course (CH 586) and research techniques courses in the student’s major area.

Each student in this program will present a seminar on a literature topic not related to his or her research during their second year in the program. This seminar will serve as the comprehensive exam for the Plan II master’s degree.

Students completing a terminal Plan II master’s must have either completed the IRR research review, or hold a short final defense with their graduate committee. The student will complete a short written document and discuss their research with their committee.

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This program is designed for those who possess an interest in pursuing an intensive, research-based program within the Haskayne School of Business. Read more
This program is designed for those who possess an interest in pursuing an intensive, research-based program within the Haskayne School of Business. The MBA Thesis curriculum offers a challenge for those strongly interested and committed to research. Choosing a thesis-based graduate degree should not be considered a quick way to completing an MBA degree.

The MBA Thesis degree is offered to students who possess a Bachelor of Commerce degree or equivalent. In addition to a thesis meeting all Master’s thesis requirements of the Faculty of Graduate studies, the thesis option requires a minimum of eight half course equivalents selected by students in consultation with his or her supervisor.

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The MSc in Management is a rigorous and challenging program and is intended to position you for admission to a top Ph.D. program or to give you a jump-start in a research-intensive career. Read more
The MSc in Management is a rigorous and challenging program and is intended to position you for admission to a top Ph.D. program or to give you a jump-start in a research-intensive career.

We offer an exceptional graduate experience.

Goodman’s renown MSc program consists of research-focused coursework and a year-long thesis project. You’ll receive individual attention and mentoring from our faculty members who are leading researchers in their respective fields and who are committed to your success.

The MSc takes two years to complete and is offered on a full-time basis.

Your MSc degree will include relevant coursework, research seminars, courses in research methodology and a thesis in your area of study.

MSc Curriculum

COURSEWORK

Your coursework is carefully designed in consultation with your thesis supervisor to include specialized MSc courses in relevant subject areas. The coursework provides you with a strong foundation for your future thesis and gives you exposure to different aspects of your discipline.

RESEARCH SEMINARS

We believe strongly that you should be an expert in your own field and also be familiar with other core areas of management. Biweekly research seminars focus on the presentation of academic research by yourself and your classmates, Goodman faculty members and visiting scholars.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Our research methodology courses provide you with a comprehensive overview of the methods commonly used in management research. You’ll gain knowledge of statistical techniques, survey research and experimental research design.

TYPICAL PROGRAM PLAN

Your MSc curriculum is designed in careful consultation with your thesis supervisor. These sample program plans provide with examples of a possible program plan based on specialization.

THESIS

As the final component of your MSc in Management degree, the thesis demonstrates your ability for independent and original research. The thesis component is the focus of your second year of study and includes the preparation of your thesis proposal, the writing and research of your thesis and your thesis defense. You will work closely with your thesis supervisor and the members of your supervisory committee during this time.

SAMPLE THESIS TOPICS

Management of Online Stock Keeping Units and Its Impact on E-Retailer Performance
Moderating role of supervisory behaviours and employee customer orientation
Reaction of the U.S. Treasury Market to the Auctions of Economic Derivatives
Search Engine Marketing Strategies and Key Performance Metrics in Web Retailing: A Data-Driven Modelling and Analysis
Environmental Disclosures: Firm characteristics and Market Response

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Our M.A. programs offer training in the areas of French and Francophone Literature and Culture, Applied and Descriptive Linguistics, and Second-language Pedagogy. Read more
Our M.A. programs offer training in the areas of French and Francophone Literature and Culture, Applied and Descriptive Linguistics, and Second-language Pedagogy. Our programs are designed to promote professional development and preparation for the job market. To that end, qualified students awarded Graduate Teaching Assistantships learn to teach at the undergraduate level at the same time that they complete requirements toward the advanced degree. Many of them also present research at local and national conferences and publish their findings.

Students choose either the Standard (Literature) Track or the Applied Linguistics Track, each with or without thesis.

Standard (Literature) Track Degree requirements

33 credit hours of coursework without thesis; or 27 credit hours of coursework and 6 credit hours of thesis research (FR 599) resulting in a completed and approved thesis. Find out more information on thesis procedures.
At least one course in five of six fields:
- Medieval and Renaissance
- Early Modern (17th and 18th centuries)
- 19th century
- 20th and 21st centuries
- Francophone and French studies
- French linguistics
A comprehensive exam with written and oral components based on coursework completed in the five fields.*

*On the written portion of the comprehensive exam for the Standard Track, candidates may be exempted from examination in a maximum of two fields: by writing a thesis in a field; by presenting a research paper in a field at a professional conference; or by earning a grade of “A” or “B” in two courses in a field. For the oral portion of the exam, students present a topic assigned in advance.

Applied Linguistics Track Degree requirements

36 credit hours of coursework without thesis; or 30 credit hours of coursework and 6 credit hours of thesis research (FR 599) resulting in a completed and approved thesis. Find out more information on thesis procedures and consult the special instructions for French Linguistics students.

Coursework in three areas (French Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, French electives) as follows:
- French descriptive linguistics course for 3 credit hours (FR 561)
- 12 credit hours in SLA, pedagogy, and research (FR 512 and other approved courses)
- 21 credit hours of French electives (language, literature, film, culture, linguistics, etc.) for the non-thesis track; 15 credit hours of French electives for the thesis track.

A comprehensive written exam, based on the coursework.

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The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. Read more
The MFA program in imaging arts emphasizes a broad interpretation of photography as a conceptual art form, with the intention of inspiring and nurturing the individuality of each student as a creative, productive artist. The program encourages graduate study in photography and related media as a means to personal, aesthetic, intellectual, and career development.

The curriculum provides a flexible focus of study that is continually sensitive to the needs of each student, building upon the strengths each individual brings to the program. Successful completion of the program enables students to seek careers in many fields including education, museum or gallery work, or as self-employed visual artists.

Program goals

The program provides students with the opportunity to use the still and moving image as a means to:

- pursue a professional career and earn a livelihood,
- enrich their personal lives and society as a whole, and
- create a community of creativity, scholarship, and purpose.

Plan of study

Distribution of work within these guidelines is subject to modification based upon the candidate’s background, abilities, and interests. An individualized course of study is prepared with the advice of the graduate faculty and made a matter of record. Modifications in this prescribed program thereafter must be approved and recorded.

Electives

Elective courses are available throughout the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences in areas such as but not limited to: video, printmaking, painting, sculpture, communication design, crafts, bookmaking, graphic design, new media, computer graphics, art history, and archival preservation and conservation. A complete list of graduate electives offered in the college is available through the student's adviser. There are also graduate electives offered throughout the university. Students also have opportunities to enhance their studies through independent studies and internships.

Thesis

Matriculation from the MFA program is obtained when the student has completed and mounted their graduate thesis exhibition, successfully passed their thesis defense, and completed and submitted their thesis publication. The thesis must be an original body of work appropriate to the major commitment of the degree. The thesis publication is a professional, published presentation of the thesis project, which must be submitted, in both print and digital form. It must contain an extended artist statement and a presentation of the majority of thesis artwork. It is prepared for inclusion in the Wallace Library, the School's Archive, and the Graduate Annex Space. The verbal defense requires a public address by the student, discussion of the thesis project, and exhibition in a digital presentation format.

Accreditation

The MFA program in imaging arts and the BFA program in photographic and imaging arts are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in imaging arts, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited college or university,

- Submit a portfolio containing a focused body of artwork that demonstrates visual sophistication, aesthetic awareness, skill, and craft, as well as a commitment to a purpose and idea.

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.

- Submit three letters of recommendation.

- Submit a Letter of Intent, which should include a candidate's interest in obtaing an MFA, the selection of RIT for the MFA degree, and professional goals to be achieved.

- Submit an Artist Statement explaining the intention behind the portfolio submitted.

- Complete a graduate application through the Graduate Admission Website.

- Participate in an interview (optional).

Applicants who are capable of graduate level academic work, as well as artistic visual expression, and who demonstrate an interest in the exploration of new artistic ideas and experiences will be recommended.

- Portfolio

The portfolio, along with written records of achievements and recommendations, serves to inform the faculty of the applicant’s readiness for advanced graduate study. It provides understanding into the applicant’s performance to date, ability to create advanced, self-directed work and his/her aesthetic development and maturity.

Applicants should submit a portfolio of 20 images representing a cohesive body or bodies of recent work. Images must be uploaded to rit.slideroom.com, the college's portfolio website, or via a personal website. Through Slideroom, applicants will submit their Letter of Intent and an Artist’s Statement.

The application deadline is Jan 15. Admission selection for the fall semester is made in the spring from among all portfolios and completed applications received. Acceptance occurs only once a year for a fall admission.

Portfolio instructions to SlideRoom:

- Submit a portfolio of no more than 20 images to the college's portfolio website: rit.slideroom.com. (Size restrictions can be found through SlideRoom.) SlideRoom supplies space for titling and additional information about each image, such as: title of the work, date, size, and medium.
- Number images 1 to 20 in the order the applicant wishes them to be viewed.
- Include a numbered page detailing portfolio image information.
- Include a one-page Artist's Statement discussing submitted work and applicant’s creative process.
- Include a one-page Letter of Intert explaining why the applicant is interested in obtaining an MFA and specifically why RIT would be a successful fit for pursuit of a professional study degree.

Additional information

- Faculty

Thirteen full-time faculty members, all critically regarded for their artistic work in exhibition and publication, contribute to the MFA program. The faculty brings individual expertise and dedication to their work with graduate students, encouraging intellectual inquiry of contemporary art-making practices and aesthetics. The MFA program is supported by a staff of 30 full-time faculty members from the schools of Art and Photographic Arts and Sciences, faculty from the art history department, adjunct faculty members from George Eastman Museum, as well as noted regional, national, and international practitioners, critics, and historians. To learn about the MFA faculty, facilities, equipment cage, MFA events and curriculum, please visit the school's website at https://photography.rit.edu.

- Scholarships and graduate assistantships

All accepted applicants are awarded a university scholarship. Level of scholarship support is based on merit of application materials. Concurrently, the MFA program faculty grants graduate assistantships to all accepted applicants. Assistantships include a variety of positions, including team teaching, faculty assistant in the classroom and with research projects, gallery management, and working in an archive among opportunities. Upon acceptance into the MFA program, applicants are notified by the MFA director as to level of support for both the university scholarship and the graduate assistantship. Both scholarship and assistantship are renewable in the second year of graduate study.

- Transfer credit

Graduate-level course work completed prior to admission should be submitted for approval upon entrance into the program. Up to 8 semester hours of graduate work with a minimum grade of a B (3.0) or higher is transferable toward the degree, with the approval of the Graduate Director.

- Grades and maximum time limit

The average of all grades for graduate credit taken at the university must be at least a B (3.0) to qualify for the degree. University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program.

- Policy regarding student work

The School of Photographic Arts and Sciences reserves the right to retain at least one original piece of work from a student’s MFA thesis show for inclusion in the MFA Collection, to be used for educational, promotional, and exhibition purposes. Graduates must also submit a copy of the thesis publication to the School's MFA archive.

- William Harris Gallery

William Harris Gallery (http://cias.rit.edu/spas-gallery/) supports the exhibition of graduate thesis work, student work, and the works of contemporary image-makers. It maintains a calendar of exhibitions, public lectures, and receptions. Importantly, it also provides real world experience for interested graduate students, where they learn firsthand about gallery operations, installation, and communications as a gallery manager or staff member.

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The MA program at the University of Calgary supplies students with a strong foundation of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Students can also diversify their academic portfolio by choosing their own areas of specialization. Read more
The MA program at the University of Calgary supplies students with a strong foundation of theoretical and empirical knowledge. Students can also diversify their academic portfolio by choosing their own areas of specialization. Areas of specialization at our Department of Economics include, but are not limited to: international trade, environmental economics, industrial organization, and behavioral economics.

We offer two different M.A. programs: Course- Based and Thesis-Based.

Our Course-based MA program is a twelve month program consisting of both course work and a major research project. Approximately 20 students are admitted to this program every year. This program is designed to prepare students for employment in the public or private sector, or to pursue further studies in a PhD program. Recent graduates have taken positions at such institutions as Canadian Pacific, BMO Financial Group, and the Alberta Utilities Commission.

Our Thesis-based MA program is intended for MA students with a greater interest in independent research. In return for a slightly reduced course load, students are required to prepare and orally defend a formal thesis (original research). Students usually complete this program in 12 to 24 months and recent graduates have gone on to work in such institutions as Industry Canada and have earned placement in PhD programs ranging from UBC to Princeton University.

Our faculty continuously receive funding from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council as well as other agencies. Some members of our faculty also hold Tier I and II Canada Research Chairs. Because of this, we can offer our M.A. students ample opportunity to gain research experience at the University of Calgary. Given our large undergraduate base, M.A. students have a very high likelihood of consistently getting a full Teaching Assistantship position each semester.

Our students have access to a plethora of information pertinent to their research and learning through our libraries which includes textbooks, handbooks and journals in all the specializations that we offer. We are also home to a federal data centre that permits students to apply directly for their own research agendas.

We encourage our senior students to participate in a mentoring program for incoming students. If you are anxious about joining our Economics department, coming to the university, or living in Calgary in general, you can request a mentor to help you adjust to the University of Calgary lifestyle.

M.A. students have access to a number of recreational facilities including a fully equipped gym, swimming pool, and squash courts. Access to such facilities is included with tuition. Our department holds start of semester welcoming parties, Christmas parties and a variety of social events are carried out by our student graduate association.

MA Course-based

The standard course-based MA program is a twelve month combination of formal coursework and closely supervised structured research. Students complete two semesters of course work in the fall and winter terms and must complete no less than seven one semester graduate courses. In addition to the standard seven one semester graduate courses, students are required to enroll in a set of four research methods courses over the course of their twelve month program of study. These courses are conducted by active researchers in the economics department and are intended to provide structure and help for students through the process of conducting original research in economics. The program is capped by a formal research paper which is completed over the spring and summer semesters. Students are required to present their paper at the department’s annual “open conference” held in August.

MA Thesis-based

The Thesis based MA program is similar to the course based but replaces the closely supervised structured research with a less formal supervision arrangement. Instead of enrolling in the four research methods courses, thesis based students will be expected to find a single faculty member to supervise their research. The research paper requirement is also replaced by a formal thesis. The quality and originality of a formal thesis is required to be higher than that of the course based research paper. Additionally, thesis based students are required to undergo a formal oral thesis defense. Given the increased demands of a formal thesis, thesis based students are required to take six one semester graduate courses rather than the seven required for course based students.

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The MSc by thesis is ideal for you if you want to get involved in postgraduate research, and obtain the skills to progress to a PhD or MD. Read more
The MSc by thesis is ideal for you if you want to get involved in postgraduate research, and obtain the skills to progress to a PhD or MD.

About the MSc by thesis

The MSc by thesis gives you an opportunity to conduct an independent research project.

You can work in a wide range of areas. Our current students are researching topics as diverse as interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis, care of the newborn infant, and the development of new methods for analysing cell-to-cell interactions in tissue using a micro-fluidic based approach.

Throughout your degree, you will be supervised by a leading expert in the field and supported by a Thesis Advisory Panel.

Part-time or full-time?

The HYMS MSc by thesis is offered either full-time (one year) or part-time (two years).

If you have fewer than about 35 hours a week to devote to your studies, you should consider studying part-time. Part-time study is at least 17.5 hours per week.

Postgraduate Training Scheme

As a MSc student at HYMS, you will also take part in our Postgraduate Training Scheme (PGTS), which provides you with extra opportunities to develop both specialist and transferable skills.

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This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Read more
This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Students will spend their first year at one of the EIT's partner universities in Europe, and can elect to spend their second year at UCL.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/ict-innovation-msc

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 15 February 2016
Fees note: UK/EU full-time fee available on request from the department

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The thematic core foundations together with modules on Innovation and Entrepreneurship will be taught during the first year. In the second year at UCL, the programme focuses on the two thesis projects and on specialised taught modules. Students at UCL will choose either Human Computer Interaction and Design (HCID) or Digital Media Technology (DMT) as their major specialisation.

This two year dual masters degree has an overall credit value of 120 ECTS.

Students take modules to the value of 60 ECTS (150 Credits) in their second year at UCL, consisting of four taught modules (60 credits), a minor thesis (15 credits) and a master's thesis (75 credits).

- Core Modules
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Ergonomics for Design
Affective Interaction
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Virtual Environments
Advanced Modelling, Rendering and Animation
Computational Photography and Capture
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

- Options
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Affective Computing and Human-robot Interaction
Societechnical Systems: IT and the Future of Work
Interfaces and Interactivity
Qualitative Research Methods
Virtual Environments

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Machine Vision
Geometry of Images
Image Processing
Computational Modelling for Biomedical Imaging
Acquisition and Processing of 3D Geometry
Multimedia Systems
Network and Application Programming
Interaction Design
Professional Practice

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake a minor thesis and a master's thesis, in collaboration with an external partner. For the master's thesis, students will spend at least two months in the external partner's environment.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, practical sessions, case studies, problem-based learning and project work. Assessment is through coursework assignments, unseen examinations and the two thesis projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site ICT Innovation MSc http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/admissions/msc_ict_innovation/

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Brown Family Bursary - NOW CLOSED FOR 2015/16 ENTRY
Value: £15,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK students
Criteria: Based on both academic merit and financial need

- Computer Science Excellence Scholarships
Value: £4,000 (1)
Eligibility: UK, EU students
Criteria:

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme will have the key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship necessary for the international market, together with a solid foundation in the technical topics that drive the modern technological economy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The EIT Digital Master School is a European initiative designed to turn Europe into a global leader in ICT innovation, fostering a partnership between leading companies, research centres and technical universities in Europe.

The school offers two-year programmes where you can choose two universities in two different European institutes to build a curriculum of your choice based on your skills and interest. We offer double degrees, which combine technical competence with a set of skills in innovation and entrepreneurship. While you get an excellent theoretical education, you also get the opportunity to work with leading European research institutes and leading business partners.

Student / staff ratios › 200 staff including 120 postdocs › 650 taught students › 175 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
This programme is suitable for students with a relevant degree who wish to develop key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship together with an advanced education in ICT engineering, for a future career or further study in this field.

The admission procedure for the EIT ICT Labs Master's programme is organised centrally from Sweden by the KTH Admissions Office. Please read the admission requirements and application instructions before sending your documents. For further details of how to apply please visit http://www.eitictlabs.masterschool.eu/programme/application-admission/application-instructions.
Please note that applications after the deadline may be accepted. Late applications will be processed subject to time, availability and resources.

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The master of arts degree in telecommunication and film focuses on the media (television, film, and digital/online platforms) as informative, influential and meaning-producing forms. Read more
The master of arts degree in telecommunication and film focuses on the media (television, film, and digital/online platforms) as informative, influential and meaning-producing forms. The program emphasizes the study of these media in terms of law and policy, technological systems, economic and industrial infrastructures, news and public affairs, management leadership, individual and societal effects, history, aesthetics, and cultural studies.

The program is not a master of fine arts degree. It offers no graduate-level courses in television/film production, news announcing, sports production, or similar hands-on activities.

Visit the website https://tcf.ua.edu/academic-programs/graduate-studies-policies/

Implementation

The principal goals of the program are to develop students’ analytical and interpretive skills through thoughtful and informed consideration of the possibilities, limitations, and responsibilities of the media. Our students study television, film, the Internet, video games and other digital media systems.

The program culminates in a Master’s thesis or a research project specific to an area such as:

- law and policy,
- programming and economic analysis,
- news analysis,
- audiences and social implications,
- media effects,
- cultural studies,
- cinema and television critical studies, or
- another emphasis when the student can combine particular interests with those of appropriate faculty members.

A specific course of study is selected in consultation with the student’s advisor and with the approval of the student’s program committee.

Degree Plans

Plan I: Thesis Option

Students choosing to write a Master’s thesis must complete a minimum of 30 graduate credits, including six credits for thesis research and courses stipulated by the student’s program committee. At least 18 of these credits must be in TCF courses.

- The thesis should evidence capability for research, originality of thought, facility in organizing materials, and lucid writing.

- The subject of the thesis must be approved by the student’s program committee. The student should select a topic during his or her second semester.

- The thesis must follow an approved style manual, such as The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers or the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

- The thesis must be prepared in accordance with the Graduate School’s Student Guide to Preparing Electronic Theses and Dissertations.

- An oral defense of the completed thesis, conducted by the student’s thesis committee, is required.

- At least six weeks before graduation, the thesis must be electronically submitted to the Graduate School.

Plan II: Nonthesis Options:
Students who choose Plan II must successfully complete the courses stipulated by the student’s program committee.

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A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks. There are three options. the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). Read more
A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks:
There are three options: the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). All three options have thesis and nonthesis tracks. The French and Spanish options also allow for an applied linguistics track (thesis or nonthesis). Regardless of the option or track, all new graduate teaching assistants must enroll for the Practicum in Applied Linguistics (either FR 512 or SP 502).

Nonthesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan II). The nonthesis track for the French, Spanish, and Romance languages options incorporates 30 hours of coursework (or 36 hours of coursework for the applied linguistics version). Included in all nonthesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages is a core of five courses in the five areas listed below (approximately 50 percent of the major). Twenty-one hours of the coursework must be language specific.

1. Teaching Practicum/Topics in Linguistics
2. Proseminar: Research Methodology/Critical Theory
3. Topics in Culture and Civilization
4. Graduate Seminar
5. Special Topics/Directed Readings

All nonthesis tracks require success on comprehensive exams before granting of the degree.
Thesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan I). A description of the typical configuration for the various thesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages follows.

* Spanish Option, standard version with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum centers on Peninsular and Spanish-American literature. Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. The written examination is based on the coursework. The oral examination is based on the coursework and on a pre-established reading list.

* Spanish Option, applied linguistics track with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 30 hours of coursework and a thesis. In addition to the thesis, the applied linguistics track involves three components: language, linguistics, and applied linguistics. The language component consists of 15 hours of course credit in Spanish language, literature, and culture (a minimum of 6 hours must be in Peninsular literature and 6 hours in Spanish-American literature). The linguistics component is comprised of a 3-hour descriptive linguistics course (SP 556). The applied linguistics component consists of 12 hours of coursework in second language acquisition and pedagogy (SP 502, EN 613, and two of the following: SP 581, EN 610, EN 612, CIE 577, or other approved courses; for descriptions of courses bearing the EN prefix, see the Department of English section of this catalog; for a description of CIE 577, see "Curriculum and Instruction Course Descriptions" in the College of Education section). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All examinations are based on the coursework.

* Romance Languages Option, with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24-30 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum requires study of French and Spanish, one as the major and one as the minor. The major includes a minimum of 18 hours. The minor includes a minimum of 12 hours. More than the minimum is recommended for both the major and the minor. Graduate courses in Italian studies are also available (see the RL prefix in course listings below). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All exams are based on the coursework.

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The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Read more
The Master of Science (MSc) is a two-year degree which encompasses both coursework and research. The first year involves mainly coursework and preliminary research preparation. Students will have the opportunity to contribute to existing fields of research, or to begin to develop new areas.

The MSc can be studied in any of the subjects listed below, and may be taken by a combination of coursework and thesis, or by thesis only. Students who have a Bachelor's degree will complete the MSc by papers and thesis (at least two years of full-time study). Students who have an Honours degree or postgraduate diploma can complete the degree by thesis only (minimum of one year of study).

Subject areas

-Anatomy
-Biochemistry
-Bioengineering
-Botany
-Chemistry
-Clothing and Textile Sciences
-Cognitive Science
-Computational Modelling
-Computer Science
-Consumer Food Science
-Design for Technology (No new enrolments)
-Ecology
-Economics
-Electronics
-Energy Studies
-Environmental Management
-Environmental Science
-Food Science
-Genetics
-Geographic Information Systems
-Geography
-Geology
-Geophysics
-Human Nutrition
-Immunology
-Information Science
-Marine Science
-Mathematics
-Microbiology
-Neuroscience
-Pharmacology
-Physics
-Physiology
-Plant Biotechnology
-Psychology
-Statistics
-Surveying
-Toxicology
-Wildlife Management
-Zoology

Structure of the Programme

The degree may be awarded in any of the subjects listed above. With the approval of the Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Sciences) the degree may be awarded in a subject not listed above.

The programme of study shall be as prescribed for the subject concerned. A candidate whose qualification for entry to the programme is the degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours or the Postgraduate Diploma in Science or equivalent may achieve the degree after a minimum of one year of further study, normally by completing a thesis or equivalent as prescribed in the MSc Schedule.
A candidate may be exempted from some of the prescribed papers on the basis of previous study.

A candidate shall, before commencing the investigation to be described in a thesis, secure the approval of the Head of the Department concerned for the topic, the supervisor(s), and the proposed course of the investigation.

A candidate may not present a thesis which has previously been accepted for another degree. A candidate taking the degree by papers and thesis must pass both the papers and the thesis components.

For the thesis, the research should be of a kind that a diligent and competent student should complete within one year of full-time study

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