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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Read more
Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

Overview

Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Our course will provide you with a wide range of experiences and prepare you to deliver high quality care with confidence. All of our pre-registration nursing courses are developed by nurses for nurses and will support you to work with health care teams to meet the needs of vulnerable adults requiring health care across a variety of settings. Learning and working at Masters level will support you to shape and improve your future profession and the health care experiences of patients in your care.

Adult nurses have a unique role within the healthcare setting. Making a positive change or improving the quality of people’s lives is a central tenet of this role. This may involve enabling people to improve, maintain, or recover their health, and to achieve the best possible quality of life, whatever the circumstances.

We are committed to the principles and values of the NHS Constitution (DH, 2013) and our Adult Nursing course promotes the behaviours and values that patients and staff believe to be at the heart of our NHS. These include respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, improving lives, working together for patients and the understanding that everyone counts.

The course places equal value on clinical practice and theory. It will take you from university lectures to clinical placement settings, from young to mature adults. You may well find yourself at a GP surgery, working with mulita-skilled teams in patients’ own homes or in the middle of a variety of hospital settings, from accident & emergency through to medical or surgical areas or providing compassionate care for patients with life limiting illnesses.

We’ll support you all the way. You’ll soon discover that our faculty is a stimulating place to learn, with modern facilities and registered, practising tutors who’ll make sure you’re being taught the latest techniques. We’re passionate about healthcare and dedicated to delivering the values set out by the NHS Constitution.

You’ll have the chance to share experiences and knowledge with other health care disciplines and to see how the professions work together.

Teaching on campus takes place between 9am and 7pm, Monday to Friday. On placement, you’ll be allocated to a mentor who will support your development and you’ll be expected to work the same shifts as the health care team and your mentor. Each week you will work 37.5 hours. This will include early, late and night shifts, as well as working weekends and bank holidays. Each year, five weeks’ of annual leave is built into the course at set points to support you in balancing your course and relaxation time.

Each of the two years is divided in three 30-credit modules. Each module will start with theory, followed by a hospital or community placement. A series of short Medicines Calculations modules are also embedded through the course.

Placements last around 5 weeks and will include both acute and community settings. Placement opportunities include: Older Person’s Care, Dementia Care, District Nursing, Surgical Setting, Acute Care Nursing and many more. Your final placement will be 12 weeks in length and you will also undertake additional placements each year which will enable you to explore other areas.

You’ll be linked to one of our NHS healthcare trust partners for your placements in hospitals or community settings.

If you study in Cambridge or Peterborough, you’ll do your placement in or around Cambridge, Huntingdon or Peterborough. You’ll get plenty of support from experienced mentors.

Our state of the art skills laboratories provide an ideal environment in which to learn a suite of practical skills in the safety of the university. This ensures that you gain understanding about the underpinning evidence that supports these skills, preparing you for the delivery of these skills in the practice setting.

In year 2 of the course you may choose the option to undertake an overseas placement and gain insight into another health care system.

Careers

All pre-registration nursing courses delivered by Anglia Ruskin University are approved by the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). On successful completion of the MSc Nursing course, you’ll be eligible to apply for registration with the NMC and join a profession with a wide range of opportunity. You may choose to become a community professional, such as a practice nurse, or to work as a staff nurse within a hospital. With experience you could become a nursing specialist or nurse consultant. You may enjoy managing a health care team or leading a specialist team in, for example, the community setting. Nurses also undertake roles in research and education.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules -

- Evidence Based Knowledge and Skills for Nursing:
This first module aims to prepare students for the knowledge and skills required to deliver fundamental and safe care. A series of key strands which underpin nursing practice will be commenced in this module including: patient safety; human anatomy and physiology; health promotion and the recognition of the nurse’s role in public health; mental health and common mental health problems; leadership skills and the use of research evidence that underpins care provision. Communication and interpersonal skills will also be considered including principles of de-escalation and the importance of sound interpersonal and professional skills in practice.

- Promoting Professional Practice in Nursing:
In this module students will be supported to understand the significance of prioritising patients as central to the role of the nurse and a key component of the NMC Code (2015). Person-centred care will be addressed through the exploration of patient autonomy and patients' rights. The concepts of advocacy, raising concerns and candour will provide students with an understanding of the legal and ethical parameters that support the delivery of safe care. The module builds on knowledge of bioscience and clinical skills to further enhance delivery of safe fundamental care. Introductions to leadership, management and team working will be provided.

- Nursing Adults with Challenging Health Needs:
This module addresses the complexities of long term conditions and palliative care for adult patients. Preventing the development of long term conditions and life-threatening disease, promoting health and wellbeing and supporting adults with long term conditions to live well independently are key aspects of the nurse’s role. Effective integrated care is critical to the patient experience and students will explore the impact of national drivers from a theoretical and practice based perspective, with a focus on the use and effectiveness of care pathways. This module provides the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical skills and ethical and legal issues to meet the challenges faced by those affected by long term and life limiting conditions.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 1

Year two, core modules -

- Ensuring the Safety of Patients Experiencing Acute Illness:
Patients become acutely unwell in clinical or home settings. This module will provide students with the knowledge, skills and experience to recognise, communicate and respond competently when a patient’s clinical condition indicates that they are becoming acutely unwell. Students will explore how psychological well-being can impact on recovery and the importance of patient focused care and empowerment. Alongside theory input students will participate in clinical scenarios around deteriorating patients (e.g. acute respiratory failure, acute coronary syndrome, and sepsis). Computer-controlled mannequins and simulation skills environments will be utilised to develop students’ skills in recognising and responding to patient deterioration.

- Decision Making, Leadership and Management in Nursing:
This theory/practice module enables students to enhance their leadership, peer coaching and decision making skills. The module aims to develop a varied and flexible repertoire of skills to be able to work effectively within multi-disciplinary teams, in the often challenging environments encountered in modern clinical practice. The module promotes students’ growth and expertise in professional knowledge and judgment, focusing on self-awareness and personal development. Development of key management skills of leadership, assertiveness, delegation and coaching will be provided as well as tools for resilience to withstand the stresses and pressures of practice.

- Major Project - MSc Nursing Adult:
This theory/practice module comprises a major project that is situated in and developed from the care setting. During the final practice placement, students will be expected to negotiate an area for service improvement to enhance the patient experience. This module will consolidate the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in clinical management and leadership and seeks to complement these with insight to mechanisms for improving the quality of healthcare. Understanding and applying concepts of quality assurance, clinical governance, standard setting and the role of audit in maintaining standards will be key drivers.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 2
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 3

Assessment -

To make sure you’re developing the skills and knowledge needed for professional practice, we use a range of assessment methods. These include essays, presentations, written exams, and multi-choice questions. We know feedback is essential for your progress and our lecturers take pride in giving you clear guidance on how to improve your expertise. Assessment also takes place in the practice setting and your mentor will support your development and undertake your assessment in each of your placements.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Cambridge - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/cambridge-campus

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice. Read more
Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Through online delivery of content, our Higher Education MA offers you the flexibility to create a programme that suits your professional development needs in the field of university teaching, and is offered on a part-time basis over five years.

The programme allows you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules. You will do this by engaging with the explicit pedagogic framework that underpins the programme, emphasising the connections between concepts, theory and practice, teaching and research, disciplinary methods, and teachers and students.

On the programme you will analyse issues relating to your everyday teaching practice, share practice and explore solutions with your fellow participants and tutors.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied over three academic years and is part-time via distance learning. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

On successful completion of the PGDip in Higher Education and a review of a portfolio of work via an accreditation panel, participants may apply to become a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (subject to accreditation). The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Teaching in Your Own Discipline
-Researching in Higher Education
-Research Dissertation
-Signature Concepts in Higher Education
-Evaluating Educational Research
-Assessment and Feedback
-From Student Voice to Co-Enquiry
-Peer Observation of Teaching
-Moving into Academic Leadership
-Designing Technology Enhanced Learning
-Exploring Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Clinical Teaching
-Technical and Professional Skills Teaching in Veterinary Education

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Contribute to the development of participants' theoretically informed understandings, and teach in ways that support epistemological access for a diverse student body
-Respect participants' disciplinary backgrounds, and encourage participants to interrogate the nature of their own disciplines and relate this to ideas presented in the programme
-Promote reflective practice, requiring critical engagement based on evidence and theory with the roles and practices of higher education teaching, rather than having as its goal the teaching of a set of generic skills and techniques
-Disrupt participants' existing beliefs about teaching and learning

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes. The overarching programme learning outcomes are to:
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Knowledge and understanding
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Professional practical skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Key / transferable skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature
-Further details of the programme’s pedagogic framework is available by contacting the programme team. The programme is aligned to the requirements of the UK Professional Standards Framework at D3 which relates to Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

Initial enquires should be directed to Dr Dawn Morley -

STUDENT EXPERIENCE

As part of induction to the programme, you will have a discussion with a personal tutor to help you make the appropriate choices for your professional learning journey based on your previous teaching and learning experience in the higher education context and your developmental aspirations.

A personal tutor will work with you to develop a personalised plan to ensure you get the most from the programme by developing your professional knowledge and skills.

REGISTRATION

As we recognised that you will be working within your own higher education institutions while you study, the programme is offered as part-time registration. It is anticipated that the Diploma would be completed within two years of registration and the Dissertation would normally be completed within an additional year.

You will be registered initially for the MA in Higher Education (180 credits). However, you can choose to step-off at Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or the Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) Level.

You can decide to study for a general MA in Higher Education or a MA in Higher Education with a specialist pathway. Specialist pathways are only available for the MA in Higher Education (not at the award of Diploma).

If you decide, a pathway is right for you, you will need to take 60 credits from the specialist modules and conduct research within the Research Dissertation module on an area relating to the pathway. The following are the three specialist pathways available:
-Academic Leadership
-Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Education

If you decide to take the Academic Leadership pathway, you will be awarded for example, 'MA in Higher Education (Academic Leadership)'.

Postgraduate Certificate
The postgraduate certificate is built around the compulsory module of 'Teaching in Your Own Discipline'. You will choose three optional modules that help builds your own professional pathway and suits your needs.

Postgraduate Diploma
For the Postgraduate Diploma, based on your personal/professional development plan, you will choose three further modules that fulfil your personal and professional aims and which strengthens your activities, knowledge and professional values in your career.

You will also do the compulsory module of 'Researching in Higher Education', which aims to help you to start thinking about how to investigate and explore issues that intrigues and challenges you in the Higher Education landscape.

MA
For the MA in Higher Education, you will have to conduct a piece of independent research as part of the compulsory Research Dissertation module.

This allows you to investigate an issue that you have personally selected that will contribute to your growing understanding of your professional practice.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Read more
Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Our research specialisms include American studies and the literary periods Early Modern, Victorian, and Modern and Contemporary.

Additional areas of expertise include linguistics, Irish studies, drama, and the history of the book. We guarantee all students that each module will include components relating to our stated research specialisms.

Alongside our flagship ‘Research Mentoring’ module—where students work under the mentorship of a range of literary experts, studying the research they are currently undertaking – this allows students to follow a specific specialism through their MA.

Study areas include resources for advanced research, research mentorship, icons and iconoclasts, boundaries and transgressions, texts and technology, and a dissertation.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

Programme modules

This is not a conclusive but typical structure of the programme.

Programme modules:
Semester 1

- Icons and Iconoclasts
This module considers issues in literary history, particularly those of canonisation, the politics of reputation, fashion, and posterity, and the processes by which certain writers and texts become culturally embedded and certain others do not. It also examines ideas of formal and generic convention and reception history. In seminars, students will look at either a single text (which could be ‘iconic’ and canonical, ‘iconoclastic’ and unassimilated by cultural institutions such as universities, or a text which is deemed canonical despite its apparent rejection of convention, respectability, etc., e.g. Ulysses), or pit an ‘iconic’ and an ‘iconoclastic’ text against each other. The module will be driven by authors and texts rather than by overarching theoretical considerations. For example, one could read an H.G. Wells scientific romance' such as The Time Machine (1895) against a less well-known example of Victorian or Edwardian science fiction, or pit a familiar early modern drama alongside one which is less often studied or performed. The course will fashion a series of dialogues between writers, texts, history and audiences. These dialogues will range across historical eras appropriate to the research interests of staff teaching on the module, so coverage may vary from one year to another.

- Resources for Advanced Research
The module aims to introduce students to a range of different research methods; develop their research skills to Master’s level; and enhance their library skills. It also aims to introduce them to different ways of engaging in research cultures appropriate to the focus of their studies; enable them to develop a research profile; and gain skills in the presentation of their research. The module prepares students for the Dissertation module and aims to provide them with skills useful for disseminating the results of their dissertation after they graduate.

- Research Mentorship
From a list of available faculty, students choose four staff members (mentors) to work with in three-week blocks throughout the semester. They study what the staff member is currently researching, giving them a unique insight into current research as it happens. The process is one of mentorship and academic shadowing. The reading is likely to be a mixture of primary and secondary texts, and potentially an introduction to specific research questions and methodologies. Staff will be offered in groups, e.g. for every three weeks, there should be between three to five members of staff to choose from and, as far as possible, there will be a spread of expertise so that students can follow an area of faculty research specialism as much as possible. This may include the early-modern, Victorian, or Modern and Contemporary literary periods, American studies, or Irish Studies.

Semester 2:
- Boundaries and Transgressions
This module aims to identify and explore forms of transgression in a wide range of written texts from the early modern period to the present. Working with members of staff with a variety of research specialisms, students will assess what is at stake – aesthetically, culturally and ideologically – in boundary-crossings of very diverse kinds. ‘Boundaries and Transgressions’ will be issue-led, analysing some of the conceptual, temporal and spatial crossings performed by literary texts. This module offers students an exciting opportunity to consider mutations in literary transgression during some four hundred years. Cultural boundaries will appear as violated rather than safely policed (as when gender divides break down, or the body and the mind mingle promiscuously, or the human is entangled with – not shielded from – the animal). Elsewhere, the module will explore texts that cross periods (writings in which, for example, Victorianism and modernism interweave) or range across plural geographies (American literature, say, that refuses a posture of national autonomy and traverses the Atlantic or the Pacific).

- Texts and Technologies
This module focuses upon how texts and technologies have developed in intertwined manners. As technology changes, so can texts, their modes of distribution, their social and cultural significance and influence, and their manner of being collected, stored, and accessed. The module seeks to explore how texts and technology have influenced each other in different historical periods; to examine the response to communication technology in literary and theoretical texts; and to trace fundamental changes in literature and literary research brought about by radical technological developments such as the printing press, the internet, digital analysis, and digital data storage. How do changes in technology alter the way we experience texts and how we use them?

Summer
- Dissertation
The module enables students to initiate, devise, develop and successfully complete a research-based dissertation, and to further their knowledge and practical experience of research methods and techniques in English Studies. Students will identify an area of study that they would like to develop further. The module will consist of independent research, but students will meet with, and receive oral and written feedback from, an individual supervisor. The supervisor will give guidance on the subject matter, focus, structure and research area of the dissertation. Between Easter and the end of semester they can submit up to 5,000 words in draft form for comment and discuss the development of their chapters with their supervisors. Students will then work independently after the end of the semester to produce a 15,000 word dissertation.

Careers and further study

This programme meets the needs of students seeking to qualify for entry to a research degree, teachers of literature and those wishing to update their knowledge or develop their own research skills.

Why choose Arts, English and Drama at Loughborough?

The School of Arts, English and Drama is renowned as one of the world’s top places for studying the visual, literary and performing arts, offering outstanding opportunities across its wide remit. Each course is designed to inspire talented individuals with the drive and determination to succeed.

We provide many exciting ways to enhance skills, including research-led teaching by recognised international scholars, access to multi-million pound facilities, contact with prominent industry links, and superb entrepreneurial support.

A unique range of post-graduate taught programmes and research opportunities encompass art, design, history, theory, performance, postmedieval literature, linguistics studies.

We offer a unique range of postgraduate taught programmes and research opportunities which encompasses art, design, theory, performance by practice, post-medieval literature, creative writing, linguistics and theatre

- Facilities
Our students have full access to our state-of-the-art facilities, which offer a tantalising number of creative possibilities. They provide industry standard outputs, and you will receive an unparalleled level of professional training in using them.

- Career Prospects
Over 92% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Our students develop excellent transferable skills because of the range of topics studied on our courses and the diversity of teaching and learning methods we use.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

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Working in this sector is very rewarding. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. The role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. Read more
Working in this sector is very rewarding. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. The role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. Social workers often spend their time with people – be it at hospitals, care homes or at people's homes, assessing their circumstances and building relationships.

This is both an academic and a professional qualification with all successful graduates are eligible for registration as professional social workers with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The aim of the programme is to develop practitioners who can meet the needs of the service users, carers and communities in the context of a complex and changing welfare environment. Founded on holistic, service user-centred model of care, the course produces creative, innovative and reflective social work professionals committed to working in partnership to promote well-being and make a real difference.

On MA Social Work practice-based learning complements university-based lectures, seminars and workshops, drawing on established, contemporary and innovative approaches to work with a diverse range of service users. The course is underpinned by a commitment to inter-professionalism, service-user and carer empowerment and involvement, anti-oppressive and anti-discriminatory values and evidence based practice. The course adopts a systematic approach to the development and assessment of your social work skills and includes a specific programme of social work development.

There are five core areas of knowledge and understanding relevant to social work:
- Social work services and the needs of service users
- The service delivery context
- Values and ethics
- Social work theory
- The nature of social work practice.

These areas are systematically explored throughout the course in relation to the key roles of social work, which include:
- Assessment
- Intervention
- Support
- Managing risk
- Managing your own practice
- Demonstrating professional competence.

Employment based route

It is also possible to study the MA Social Care on an employment based route (EBR). Candidates need to be sponsored and supported by their employing agency to undertake this. It is taught alongside the existing MA Social Work and the structure is the same, but students have the option of doing the dissertation in a third year and completing their qualification over a three year period.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/social-work-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Readiness for direct practice
This module develops practice relevant skills and awareness of the social work role and responsibilities. It will ensure that you are ready for your initial period of direct practice and to provide you with a foundation for skills development throughout the programme. Service users, carers and practitioners will be involved in the development, delivery and assessments of the module.

- Human growth and development
This module critically explores a range of human growth and development theories across the life course in order to facilitate understanding of ordinary development and the impact of life events, disability, abuse, mental health issues, drug and alcohol use on development throughout life. You will complete a series of child observations over the period of the module which provide a key opportunity to integrate theoretical knowledge with practice, and to develop reflective skills.

- Practice placement 1
70 days practice learning in practice placement.

- Social work Law
This module introduces legal context and statutory responsibilities of social workers in England and Wales. You will be familiarised with the basic principles of English Law and the systems through which the legal process operates. You will be enabled to develop a sound understanding of the key legislation relevant to professional practice. There is a strong focus on the key major current legislation Children Act (1989), the NHS and Community Care Act (1990), the Mental Health Acts (1983 and 2007) and the Mental Capacity Act (2005). The module aims to ensure that you not only understand relevant law but are also able to apply it to specific areas of practice. The module familiarises you with the powers and duties of social workers and others in relation to children and families, and vulnerable adults. It also examines the implications for social work practice of the UK legislation on discrimination and the implications of the incorporation into UK law of the European Convention on Human Rights.

- Methods and theories for practice
This module introduces the core body of knowledge clustered around the major social work theories, processes and methods. A major emphasis will be on anti-discriminatory practice, evidence based practice and critical reflection. You will learn about a range of theoretical perspectives and methods of intervention and their application in practice.

Year 2:
- Society and ethics
This module brings together selected key areas of social policy and ethics relevant to social work. There will be a strong emphasis on the use of social policy to illuminate the challenges facing and social work in contemporary British society. Using a critical analysis of the impact of neo-liberalism and globalisation the module will be a focus on the ethical dimensions of decision making and practice delivery of policy. You will be encouraged to engage with contemporary debates and controversies associated with social work and to relate your work in class, with your reading and developing practice.

- Professional capabilities in social work practice settings
This module covers the four settings of social work; disability, adults at risk, mental health and child and family. It is focused on gaining familiarity with the process and delivery of social work services, with particular regard to safe-guarding and empowering service-users.

- Communication and collaborative working

- Practice learning placement 2
100 days practice learning in practice placement.

- Limited systematic review dissertation
This module provides the opportunity to undertake a limited systematic review into a contemporary and novel topic of choice with reference to the specific profession of social work. The findings would add to the professional evidence base. Dissemination of findings by publication is encouraged and expected.

Employability

- Social work as a career
You will normally specialise in a certain group of society, such as children. Much of the work is around helping decide the level of support or protection required, responding to requests for help and working with other agencies and professionals for the best outcomes. Most opportunities are with local authorities, where salaries can vary substantially between regions - you are likely to earn more working in London. However there are also opportunities available at private care homes, charities and NHS Trusts.

A patient, non-judgemental mind-set is needed, with the ability to communicate effectively with a host of different people and gain their trust. The work demands a level of resilience and a genuine desire to help people, as some cases may be disturbing, and some people won't want your help.

- Career progression
On graduation you will be eligible to register as a Social Worker, with starting salaries ranging from £19,500-£25,000, with this possibly rising to £40,000 with experience and further responsibilities. (National Careers Service)

After qualifying as a social worker there are a variety of postgraduate professional development courses you could undertake. To find out more about what's on offer visit our online CPPD prospectus.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This course has been developed in partnership with local authority and voluntary sector partners, with input from a wide range of service users and carers. We work in partnership with a number of London local authorities, and other organisations on both the public and private sector, who contribute to planning the programme, to learning and teaching, and to the provision of practice learning opportunities. The MA Social Work is both an academic and professional qualification.

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- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. This programme is the UK’s first Master's in Philanthropic Studies. It is an innovative online course that builds on our expertise and teaching in civil society, fundraising, philanthropy, the third sector and volunteering. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

- https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

This programme is the UK’s first Master's in Philanthropic Studies. It is an innovative online course that builds on our expertise and teaching in civil society, fundraising, philanthropy, the third sector and volunteering.

Our programme meets demands for better higher educational provision for the charity workforce, as well as demands from donors for greater understanding of the meaning and purpose of philanthropy. It is delivered by academics trained in a wide range of relevant disciplines including social policy, business, history, sociology, geography, moral philosophy, anthropology, law and economics.

The programme also draws significantly on expertise from beyond the University, including teaching contributions from leading philanthropy experts, advisers, consultants, grant-makers, fundraisers and strategic philanthropists.

The team at Kent is led by Dr Beth Breeze - author of the annual ‘Million Pound Donor Report’, co-author of Richer Lives: Why Rich People Give, and frequent contributor to charity sector and media debates.

This programme will be attractive to students seeking a high-level understanding of philanthropy and/or a career in the buoyant philanthropy sector, as well as to professionals seeking an opportunity to reflect on their practice.

The programme is distance learning with occasional seminar attendance at either our Medway or Canterbury campuses.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/769/philanthropic-studies

Course structure

This programme is offered as a distance-learning course, with an optional three-day induction at the start of each year, and one study day per term, held at our Canterbury campus. All course work is completed online, where you participate in online discussion forums and have access to journal articles and specialist materials. After successful completion of the assignment, the module is equivalent to 20 credits at Master’s level.

We offer a ‘modular’ system so that you can choose whether to study three modules to gain a PG Certificate or six modules to gain a PG Diploma. There is also the opportunity to study any one module as a taster before committing to a full Certificate, Diploma or Master’s programme.

Each module comprises:

- Study days, which will feature guest lectures and question and answer sessions from key academics and practitioners.

- Short online lectures

- Short video/audio recordings from key academic experts

- Short video/audio recordings from a range of practitioner sources

- Online seminars

- Weekly guided study using a range of academic sources

- Student-led discussion using online forums

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

You take three compulsory modules:

- Fundamentals of Philanthropy – introducing you to key conceptual approaches and mapping how philanthropy has evolved over time.

- Global Philanthropy: Comparative Perspectives – studying philanthropy around the world to understand the diversity of cultural, social and political contexts that influence the understanding and practice of philanthropy.

- Understanding Social Research – preparation for your dissertation through the introduction of research methodologies and developing a critical understanding of how to employ different techniques.

Optional modules include:

- The Art and Science of Fundraising – understanding the nature of fundraising and how asking interacts with giving, plus thorough instruction on the techniques, knowledge and attributes required by development professionals.

- Advising Donors – covering the growing body of research on the role of advisers and consultants in supporting more effective philanthropy, designed with the needs of community foundation staff in mind.

- Volunteering and Society – exploring volunteering and its role in society, by looking at volunteer motivations, strategies for volunteer management, and the relationship between volunteering and the changing policy environment.

Programme Learning Outcomes:

- An advanced critical understanding of the major theories of philanthropy and how these relate to practice.

- A systematic understanding of the historical evolution of philanthropy and charity across the world and how these relate to and impact upon current debates.

- An advanced knowledge of the range of funding streams available to charitable organisations and the impact and consequences of pursuing different types of income.

- A comprehensive understanding of the theory and practice of key techniques used in the philanthropy sector.

- A critical awareness of the policy environment in which philanthropy and charitable organisations operate and how this impacts upon their work.

- A practical understanding of the rationale and methods for collaborating with a range of stakeholders, including colleagues, trustees, volunteers, donors, funders, beneficiaries and representatives of statutory funders.

- An advanced knowledge of qualitative methods for researching outcomes and applying best practice.

- An advanced knowledge of quantitative methods for researching outcomes and applying best practice.

- A comprehensive understanding of how to apply theoretical knowledge in order to reflect upon and develop professional practice.

Assessment:

- Participation in ’online learning environment’ forums

- Coursework assignments

- Reflective learning logs

- Professional documents including audits, business cases, strategic plans and critical appraisals

- Mid-module quizzes

- Dissertation (supported by regular Skype meetings and at least one face to face meeting)

Research areas

SSPSSR has a long and distinguished history, and is one of the largest and most successful social science research communities in Europe.

Based on our results in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, research in the School was ranked 2nd for research power in the UK by the Times Higher Education. It was also 3rd for research intensity, 5th for research impact and 5th for research quality (GPA) with:

- an impressive 94% of our research-active staff submitted to the REF

- 99% of the research submitted was judged to be of international quality

- the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research, gaining the highest possible score of 100%.

This reflects that when not on campus or teaching, our staff actively engage in research activities such as writing books, speaking at conferences, and contributing to academic and professional journals.

Our research work also involves supervising PhD students who also teach on the programme, some of which are graduates of the School. Students with an interest in further study are actively encouraged and valued as part of a department that offers the best in teaching and research.

Careers

Understanding philanthropy is a crucial skill for anyone aspiring to be effective in a role in a charity or grant-making body or as a philanthropist. The knowledge and skills that you gain through this Master's programme will equip you with an essential and highly practical understanding of the history, methodologies and impact of philanthropic activity.

The distance learning delivery of the Master’s programme enables you to fit learning around your life and work commitments and you have the chance to apply your knowledge as you progress. Each cohort contains a unique mix of experiences and professions, providing a valuable opportunity for information exchange and networking.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This accredited masters course is for individuals wishing to further their careers in project management or consultancy. In today's business environment, the skills of the project manager have never been more in demand. Read more
This accredited masters course is for individuals wishing to further their careers in project management or consultancy. In today's business environment, the skills of the project manager have never been more in demand. Organisations, businesses and governments are becoming increasingly aware of the strategic importance of effective project management for gaining a competitive advantage.

A masters degree in the rapidly growing area of project management will help develop skills that are highly sought-after globally in almost every sector.

This course is particularly relevant for professionals who wish to be able to run complex projects with a range of stakeholders, managing all phases to time and to budget.

This course is underpinned by the core competencies at the heart of the Association of Project Managers (APM), so you can be sure that what you learn is contemporary, relevant, and directly applicable in the workplace.

Our aim is to help you develop a range of technical skills that will be complemented by transferable soft skills so that you develop as an independent learner and thinker who is comfortable tackling the two key ideas in modern Business Project Management: choosing the right project and doing the project right. This means you'll be able to identify and select projects that are going to benefit an organisation, and then deliver them within the scope required, to the budget and on schedule. With that skill set, it isn't hard to see why graduates from this course are in high demand.

The course also provides professional training to gain a relevant project management certification examination, for instance PRINCE2. The course also provides further opportunities to gain certification in the following areas for a discounted rate via the university:

- PRINCE2® Foundation
- PRINCE2® Practitioner
- APM Introductory Certificate (IC)
- MSP® (Managing Successful Programmes) Foundation
- MSP® (Managing Successful Programmes) Practitioner
- MoP® (Management of Portfolio) Foundation
- MoV® (Management of Value) Foundation
- M_o_R® (Management of Risk) Foundation
- P3O® (Portfolio, Programme and Project Office) Foundation
- AgilePM Foundation
- PPS (Programme and Project Sponsorship)

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/business-project-management-msc

Modules

Core modules:

- Fundamentals of PRINCE2 project management
The module outlines the fundamental principles, methodologies, methods, techniques and tools that are used in PRINCE2 approach to project management.Project technical skills are developed through the practice of planning, executing and evaluating a new product, service or process.

- Business case development
The module outlines continued justification for the project. It highlights a range of qualitative and quantitative approaches used in the construction of a business case. Technical skills are developed in exploring costs, benefits, risks and schedules which are used to evaluate alternative project scenarios and provides the rationale for the preferred project option.

- Operational research and systems approaches
This module develops a range of quantitative and qualitative modelling skills with which financial and other information can be structured, manipulated and used for business decision support and project control and evaluation.

- Project: Value, innovation and change
This module provides a thorough grounding on how projects and organisations might deal with various aspects of innovation, value development as means of executing the scope of the project and management change from a business project perspectives. Following aspects of the MoV certification competencies.

- Fundamentals of AGILE project management
The module outlines the principles, methodologies, methods, techniques, tools and metaphors that are applied to scrum/agile projects via the AgilePM Foundation practices. Different scrum skills (i.e. soft and technical) are developed through the practice of an iterative and incremental process, and underpinned by a distinctive quality approach in order to produce a product for a business need.

- Quality standards and management
The module focuses on methodologies; methods and techniques used to enhance the quality of project. Various concepts, principles and models associated with contemporary quality approaches are examined and applied. Additionally, key product and process improvement standards are reviewed through quality auditing of ISO and standards management.

- Project risk management
This module examines the systematic process of identifying, analysing, monitoring, controlling and responding to mitigate project risk as considered through M_o_R certification and also develop an understanding as a PMO the principles of P3O, P3M3 and PPS. The module brings together tools to enhance positive project objectives while dealing with negatives concerns and considering project risk management and finance.

- Research methods
The module enables you to use and undertake different types of Business Project Management research. Various research strategies and associated methodologies, methods, techniques and tools are examined and practiced. Additionally, these strategies and approaches are linked with business Project Management metaphors and scientific philosophies to develop your dissertation of a business project management theme.

- Dissertation
The dissertation aims to bring together all the various methodologies considered in the course, giving you the chance to illustrate mastery in the field of project management.

Employability

A project manager plays a key role in helping businesses introduce change through the development of a new product, process or service. In order to succeed, you'll need to be highly adaptable and able to work in areas as diverse as IT, health services and education, local and national government, media and sport and leisure.

Practical application enhances skill set

This course is all about the practical application of theory. It comes to life through case studies and examples of a variety of businesses and organisations across the world, rather than existing only in the dusty pages of a textbook. This practical element, along with the understanding of key concepts and principles of identified approaches, enhances your professional competency and gives you the platform to work either in direct control of projects or in a research-based capacity looking at improving project processes, integrating projects with the business environment.

We're committed to helping you develop your employability. That commitment means that we've worked hard to make the course relevant to the industry that awaits you, but in a competitive marketplace, we're also able to help you go even further.

In addition, you'll have the opportunity to publish research dissertations and gain project management experience, which can only add to your employability.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

All taught modules are underpinned by the APM's core competencies. Additionally, PRINCE2 is the management methodology used in the assignment for Fundamentals of Project Management. The modules provide a thorough grounding to enable the student to work towards professional management qualifications.

Teaching and learning

In addition to addressing the APM's core competencies, the course has five objectives which underpin it:
- Enabling change through combining traditional techniques such as cash flow spreadsheets with innovative new ideas, like qualitative system dynamics
- Applying soft and hard analysis approaches associated with Operational Research and Systems Movement
- Applying PRINCE2 and MS Project theories and practices/

Developing a critical understanding of different research methods and methodologies for project management
We've developed this course with three interconnected areas in mind of profession, practice and research. As a result, every module is built with an awareness of the requirements of project management bodies such as the APM (in the UK) and the Project Management Institute (in the USA). The bodies of knowledge of these organisations are combined with PRINCE2 project management methodology and MS Project, and applied to real world project assignments that will also require the application of a variety of methodologies and techniques to give you invaluable practical experience, which you can further enhance through work placements undertaken while studying for your dissertation.

Our academic team then take all of this knowledge and experience and develop and apply new theories and approaches as part of their research, which in turn influences how project management develops as a discipline. Lecturing staff have a history of publishing dissertations, with postgraduate students, in journals and conferences. Moreover, staff regularly chair project management streams at Business Research Methodology and Operational Research conferences

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In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler). Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophical Anthropology (Research)

In Philosophical Anthropology you study the philosophical significance of psychoanalytical hermeneutics as developed by Freud and followers (Lacan, Klein, et al.) Research focuses in particular on the phenomenological tradition (Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Deleuze and Butler).
The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium). The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.
Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.
Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasizes the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.
However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, with the potential for a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.
Clearly, this approach has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of the relation between normality and pathology. This avenue is currently being pursued at the CPPA in an endeavour to explore philosophical psychopathology and its consequences, both as a contribution to Freudian metapsychology and as a critique of it.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, nor to one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills; namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions using clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate; they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first vocational step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

The Centre for Psychoanalysis and Philosophical Anthropology (CPPA) was founded in 1999 as a cooperative venture between two departments of Philosophical Anthropology, at Radboud University and at the Catholic University Leuven (Belgium), respectively. The CPPA works closely with several other psychoanalytical and philosophical centres and departments in the Low Countries.

Philosophers usually assume that philosophy is important for psychoanalysis (and psychotherapy in general) in that it can elucidate and analyse the foundations of the latter, but that psychoanalysis can contribute little or nothing to philosophy as a consequence.

Yet, a long-standing tradition at the Radboud University and the Catholic University Leuven emphasises the role of psychoanalysis and Freudian metapsychology as critical tools for philosophy. According to this school of thought, the Unconscious (language, the Other) generates a radical alienation in the human subject, which is of the utmost importance for philosophical theorizing about human nature.

However, it would be wrong to reduce the philosophical implications of psychoanalysis to this aspect of alienation. The methodology of psychoanalysis as applied to an understanding of human thinking, feeling and behaviour through psychiatric concepts and phenomena appears to be equally important, harbouring the possibility of a theory of human nature, in which different pathological variants are understood as intrinsic possibilities of human existence.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/anthropology

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Our intensive MSc Psychology (Conversion) programme is designed to provide students with a grounding in the theories and research practice of contemporary psychology. Read more
Our intensive MSc Psychology (Conversion) programme is designed to provide students with a grounding in the theories and research practice of contemporary psychology.

It places particular emphasis on the application of psychology to real-world problems, based on a combination of pure and applied research.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This competitive BPS-accredited programme is aimed primarily towards people wishing to pursue a career change in any field of psychology. It prepares students for their professional journey by helping them develop a broad knowledge base across the key areas of psychology in a contained period of time.

As a student, you will learn about the core areas of psychology, such as social, developmental and cognitive psychology, biological bases of psychology, and individual differences.

In addition, you will acquire statistical and research methods skills needed to conduct, under expert supervision, your independent research project on a topic of your choosing.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. All modules are compulsory, there are no elective modules, and modules may be subject to change.
-Preparation for Academic Research in Psychology
-Brain and Behaviour with Research Methods
-Fundamental Concepts in Social Psychology with Research Methods
-Statistics and Data Analysis for the MSc in Psychology (Conversion)
-Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology (MSc Level)
-Social and Cognitive Development with Research Methods
-Cognitive Psychology with Research Methods
-Personality, Intelligence, Individual Differences & Psychopathology
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Fundamental scientific understanding of the mind, behaviour and experiences and the complex interactions between these
Ability to present multiple perspectives is a way to foster critical thinking and evaluation of research
-Provide an understanding for real life applications of theory to the full range of experience and behaviour
-Ability to show deepened understanding of the role of empirical evidence in the creation and constraint of theory, and also in how theory guides the collection, analysis and interpretation of empirical data
-Acquisition and knowledge of a range of research skills and methods for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in an ability to conduct research independently
-Develop scientific psychological knowledge, leading to an ability to appreciate and critically evaluate theory, research findings, and application

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A critical understanding of all elements of psychology and the ability to assess their relevance in the understanding of the contemporary world
-A reflective understanding of the main theoretical perspectives and debates of psychology and their relevance to a range of areas
-An ability to identify, summarise and apply key concepts in psychology to a range of psychology areas
-An ability to distinguish between and evaluate different methodological approaches to the study of mind, behaviour and experiences
-An ability to conduct a research project on the post graduate level.

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Summarise and apply key concepts in psychology to a range of research areas
-Read psychology research, critically evaluate it and identify the key points
-Distinguish between and evaluate different methodological approaches to study psychology
-Assemble data from a variety of sources, discern and establish connections, and draw well-grounded conclusions
-Evaluate the integrity of evidence and of ‘data’ and to discern the difference between opinion an evidence
-Design and execute psychological research studies, and be competent in the collection, management and analysis of research data and derivation of conclusions
-Form grounded defensible theories, reasoned arguments in relation to evidence, and interpretations of findings. In addition students should be able to compare and contrast different theoretical approaches within the discipline
-Ask questions from a range of different angles and to challenge given views drawing on theory, evidence, and critical insight
-Plan, conduct, analyse and report an individual study to test formulated hypotheses for the dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Demonstrate competence in commonly used psychology research methodology
-Design and carry out psychological research using a variant of psychological research methods
-Gather, analyse and interpret qualitative and quantitative data
-Use information and computer technology to collect, analyse, and report on psychological research
-Collect, evaluate, and utilise information from primary and secondary sources in order to inform psychological questions
-Produce and present a poster
-Write a scientific research proposal and research reports in accordance with guidelines
-Write essays in accordance with guidelines
-Effectively communicate both orally and in writing
-Learn and think independently, as well as part of a group
-Demonstrate good time management and personal organisation
-Plan and execute an investigation/experiment, act autonomously and demonstrate originality

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral, written and visual means
-Formulate and solve problems, both individually and as part of a team
-Apply statistical and numerical skills to psychological data
-Execute research skills through the formulation of questions / hypotheses, designing studies that address these questions / hypotheses, collecting and managing ‘evidence’ through various data management techniques, making sense, and disseminating findings
-Acquire and demonstrate a research-based orientation to real world and scientific problems
-Use Information and communication technology e.g. WWW, databases, statistical software, Microsoft Office, and literature search tools, for a variety of generic and subject-specific purposes
-Work effectively and independently on a given project or task
-Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common goal/outcome
-Work towards targets and deadlines under pressure through discipline and careful organisation
-Demonstrate personal organisation and time management skills through meeting multiple deadlines

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The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Read more

Multicultural, Multi-Disciplinary MA

The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Students analyse imperial ascendancies, race and racial theories, nationalist movements, postcolonial experiences, the rise of neo-colonial thought, multiculturalism and interculturalism, and the implications of globalisation and development for the modern world.

This MA allows students to combine the specialisation of postgraduate research with the adaptable skills training of a multi-disciplinary approach. Students benefit from the legacy of an MA programme established in 1994; the programme has continuously re-invented itself in changing ideological climates while maintaining its primary goal: to offer a critical education in the cultural discourses of power.

Careers

MA in Culture and Colonialism graduates have gone on to careers in development work, NGOs, law, university lecturing, publishing, media, journalism, community work, teaching (primary and secondary), film-making, advertising, and the Civil Service. The programme has a particularly strong record in research training: a high proportion of its students have proceeded to doctoral programmes in Ireland, Britain and North America, with many of them winning prestigious funding awards.

Teaching Staff

The programme's teaching staff over the years has been drawn from the disciplines of English, History, Political Science and Sociology, Economics, Irish Studies, Film Studies, Spanish, French, Archaeology, German, Italian, and Classics, and is supplemented by Irish and international guest lecturers.

Programme Outline

The full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period from September. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April), with the summer period devoted to completing the dissertation. A two-year part-time option is also available. Students take six taught modules together with a (non-assessed) research training seminar, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation (30 ECTS) on a topic of their choice.

Programme Modules

Central Modules

EN541 Colonialism in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Cultural Theory
This module focuses on issues of identity, political agency and representation. It offers an introduction to twentieth-century theorisations of colonialism and neo-colonialism, especially in relation to cultural production, and their implications for twenty-first century socio-political thought. The distinctive position of Ireland in relation to postcolonial theory is considered, together with other national and international contexts. Some of the theorists discussed include Fanon, Said, Spivak and Ahmad.

SP544 Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism: The Politics of 'Development'
The phenomena of development and underdevelopment in those lands that have experienced colonial rule have been theorised in two broadly contrasting ways in social science: the modernisation perspective, which derives from the northern hemisphere by and large, and a series of counter-perspectives (such as structuralism, dependency, neo-Marxism and world systems theory), whose exponents hail from the southern hemisphere in the main. The module also considers the issue of how much light modernisation and counter-perspectives can shed on the Irish experience of development and underdevelopment.

HI546 Studies in the History of Colonialism and Imperialism
This module introduces students to some of the key thinkers and concepts in the writing of British imperial history. The work of scholars such as J. A. Hobson, Ronald Robinson and Jack Gallagher, Peter Cain and Tony Hopkins, Chris Bayly, Alan Lester and John Darwin will be discussed. Concepts such as finance imperialism, informal empire, the official mind, gentlemanly capitalism, colonial knowledge, imperial networks, and bridgeheads will be examined from a critical perspective. Students will be asked to read key texts, undertake wider reading and research to help put these key texts in context, comment on their readings, and present their own ideas as the basis for class discussion and debate.

Research Seminar (compulsory but not examined)
This module provides a training in research, analysis and writing techniques appropriate to the programme, as well as individual consultations on the formulation of dissertation topics. The seminar will take place throughout the year.

Option Modules (two chosen)

EN547 Literature and Colonialism
This module considers the relationship between literary modes and aesthetics and political power. It analyses literature connected to the British Empire and its former colonies, discussing English, Irish, Indian and African writers in relation to colonial power structures, nationalist movements and postcolonial developments. Genres covered include imperial adventure fiction, travel writing, late-Victorian urban Gothic, modernist and post-modernist fiction and poetry, postcolonial writing, and the twenty-first century multicultural novel.

EC535 Political Economy, Colonialism and Globalization
The aim of the module will be to identify the fundamental concepts of globalization by analysing the various ideologies, systems and structures that underpin the progression of global capitalism through the ages. Underlying philosophical theories will be linked with political, legal sociological and economic ideals that are often the driving forces behind these processes.

EN573 Travel Literature
The genre of travel writing includes a vast array of literary forms from journals to letters, ambassadorial reports, captivity narratives, historical descriptions, ethnographies, and natural histories. The appearance of such accounts explodes in the early modern period in an era of expanded travel for purposes of trade, education, exploration, and colonial settlement. This module looks at a range of documents from different historical moments to track the development of this important genre, including the emergence of travel writing by women.

EN549 Cinema and Colonialism
This module considers the relationships between colonialism and the theory and practice of cinema. Seminars may address the following themes: the Hollywood genres of the ‘Western’ and the ‘Vietnam movie’; postcolonial theories of cinema; Cuban cinema; cinema of anti-colonial revolution; neocolonialism and Irish cinema; African cinema; gender, colonialism and cinema; and Western representations of imperialism.

HI588 Studies in Regional Identities
This module introduces students to concepts of regional identities and explores various interpretative approaches to regional identity. Students will examine the role of history, language and religion in the construction and perpetuation of regional identity and will consider the relationship between regions and nation states. This is a team-taught module. While the content may vary according to the availability of staff from year to year, it will include Irish and European case studies.

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This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre. Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments. Read more
This course is also offered at the Bangor Business School - London Centre.

Changes in the business environment create the need for individuals wishing to pursue a senior management role to be aware of contemporary accounting and finance developments.

Understanding these theoretical and practical issues is critical for managers who often have to make rapid and far-reaching decisions about the short term financial operations and long term strategies of firms.

The MSc in Accounting and Finance offers you a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the causes and significance of current developments in the financial and corporate sectors, and to study advanced theory and practice relating to accounting and finance.

The aim of the programme is to provide graduates and other individuals that have practical accounting and financial training with the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a senior level professional career in accounting, financial services or related sectors of the economy.

Issues you will tackle as part of your MSc Accounting and Finance degree programme include:

How are the financial accounts of companies formulated, and how do they differ across jurisdictions?
What agency issues are important in the creation of company accounts?
How does accounting theory inform financial and management accounting practice?
How does regulation impact on the performance of firms, and how do accounting practices highlight profit and/or loss realisation?
What empirical techniques can be used to evaluate company performance?
In what ways have financial accounting requirements and auditing been influenced by recent company failures?
What are the relationships between risk and return governing investment in company shares and other derivative instruments?
Which factors are most likely to influence the evaluation and implementation of international investment projects?
How can we calculate a suitable cost of capital to appraise the capital investment decision?
How should institutional investors go about constructing a portfolio of assets to maximise returns on behalf of investors?
How are futures, options, derivatives and swaps used to manage balance sheet and off-balance sheet risks?
What are the key principles of international portfolio management in a world of fast and unpredictable movements in exchange rates?
How can financial forecasts be used in business valuation, and what techniques should be used to improve trend analysis and interfirm comparison?

With these needs in mind, the MSc Accounting and Finance programme at Bangor is designed to develop participants’ existing skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to accounting and finance. The programme provides a coherent theoretical framework for the various subject areas, but the emphasis throughout is on advanced practical application of accounting and financial techniques in a real-world setting.
Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Accounting Theory: This module critically evaluates a widespread and widely based set of theories that underpin any explanation of accounting behaviour and accounting regulatory output.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Advanced Financial Reporting and Regulation: This module provides an advanced treatment of the main theoretical principles underlying financial reporting, and the practical implications of alternative regulatory regimes.

Financial Analysis: This module analyses the techniques that are used to evaluate a company’s financial position and performance.

Management Accounting: This module provides an understanding of the uses of financial data in measuring and evaluating business performance, and in setting the strategic aims of the organisation.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues.

Financial Econometrics: This module provides advanced coverage of econometric methods and practices that are used to model financial and business data. You will develop the independent capability to design, estimate and evaluate appropriate econometric models using econometric software.

International Financial Management: In this module, the financial management of multinational companies, and the influence of the macroeconomic, fiscal, currency and political environments on business and financial decision-making are examined in an international and global context.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

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This course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
This course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (e.g. Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (i.e. evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiners’ Report (May 2012)

“Overall, students on these programmes (MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology) are producing work of a very good quality. It is clear that the programme develops students’ theoretical and research knowledge base, critical thinking and evaluation skills, understanding of research methods and a range of analytical techniques, and communication and professional skills to a very high level.”

In addition to the above, students undertake an optional module from either Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching. They also study two additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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The Doctor of Education degree is aimed at experienced educational professionals and sets out to place you at the leading edge of your professional field in terms of knowledge, awareness and understanding. Read more

Overview

The Doctor of Education degree is aimed at experienced educational professionals and sets out to place you at the leading edge of your professional field in terms of knowledge, awareness and understanding.

The professional doctorate is for those who are eager to make substantial and original contributions to the development of educational knowledge in a broad range of settings.

The degree meets the need for the highest levels of professional development and training of both educators and those concerned with educational policy and administration. The prime focus is on the interplay between the multi-dimensional practices of education and scholarship.

The degree is designed to engage current practitioners with knowledge, awareness and understanding of the philosophical, organisational, political, social, managerial, interpersonal, and technical dimensions of schools and other educational institutions.

Exploration of the nexus between theory and practice begins with a series of taught units that will develop you capability to perceive critical issues facing educators and policymakers today through the lens of contemporary and historical research and philosophy. This broad foundation will enable you to hone your specific interests towards the conduct of supervised research that will make an original contribution to your field.

Programme features

- a high-level academic study of a range of educational and professional issues
- four tutored units and a supervised research component
- will enable you to make a contribution to knowledge through unit assignments, and through your research enquiry
- focus on the interplay and relationship between professional practice and scholarship.

Programme structure

You will complete four taught units (two are optional) before moving onto the Research Enquiry.
Core units

- Educational Research: philosophy and practice
- Educational Policy: theory and practice

Optional units

- Curriculum philosophy and practice
- Educational management, leadership and administration
- International education: philosophy and practice
- Language, culture and education
- Philosophy of education
- Pilot research enquiry *
- Reading paper *

* If your background and experience is appropriate, one of your units can be a reading paper or a pilot research enquiry.

Learning and teaching

Each unit is led by a specialist tutor and comprises:

- Tutored time - 40 hours involving you in lectures, group work and individual or paired tasks.
- Independent study - 80 hours in which you will research issues raised in tutored time and plan, research and write the Unit Assignment.

Studying by means of directed learning is currently possible for some units. In the Research Enquiry phase, a supervisor and co-supervisor will be responsible for giving you advice and support, and monitoring your progress.

Intensive teaching weeks

On-campus units are offered at specific times of the year according to a programme published in advance.

The Summer School normally runs for three weeks from the beginning of July, one or two units are also usually offered in January (applications for both must be made via Summer School process).

One core and one optional unit are typically offered via distance learning in either the spring or autumn term.

Methods of assessment

Units will normally be assessed through one assignment of 8,000 words.

Your Research Enquiry will be assessed through a viva voce examination at the University by a member of staff (not your supervisor) and by an external examiner especially appointed to your thesis. The Research Enquiry must provide evidence of originality of mind and critical judgement about your chosen aspect of education, and must contain material which is worthy of publication.

Entry requirements

Academic requirements

- First or 2:1 Honours degree (or equivalent) in an appropriate subject, from a recognised university.
- Advanced qualification (MEd, MA or MPhil) in education or a related field. Alternatively, the completion of two Masters level education-focused units at the University of Bath will be considered.

Professional requirements

- Appropriate professional experience in the practice of education or a related field.

English Language requirements
(Certificates must be dated to within two years of the start of the programme of study.)

- IELTS 7.0 (with not less than 6.5 in each of the four components)
- TOEFL 600 (paper-based test) or 250 (computer-based test) with a score of not less than 4 in TWE or 100 (internet-based test) with not less than 24 in each of the components.

References

- Two references are required. At least one of these should be an academic reference.

Financial information

Please see the programme page for full programme fees.

Funding

http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/funding

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