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Masters Degrees (Theory Of Constraints)

We have 75 Masters Degrees (Theory Of Constraints)

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You will be provided with rigorous training in the analysis of issues in finance and corporate policy while improving your analytical and technical expertise. Read more
You will be provided with rigorous training in the analysis of issues in finance and corporate policy while improving your analytical and technical expertise. The programme is ideal for those whose career objectives lie broadly with the financial services and banking sectors. You will have the opportunity to gain an in depth grounding with core courses such as Foundations in Finance, Corporate Finance and Quantitative Methods in Finance, and subsequently tailor your programme to match your end goals through the range of optional courses on offer. These include Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives, Investment and Portfolio Management and Decision Theory and Behaviour amongst others.

You will be taught by a top-ranking Department of Economics with expertise in a broad range of areas, including people who have worked and are still working in the finance industry in the broad areas of asset allocation and risk, as well as algorithmic trading.

With a relatively small intake each year you will benefit from a strong sense of group identity and will enjoy close contact with the academic staff of the department. The course director and course coordinators serve as your personal advisors up until the spring, when you will then be assigned a personal dissertation supervisor.

The MSc Finance is an excellent preparation both for a career in the financial services, banking and business sectors and policy making, as well further academic study.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/economics/coursefinder/mscfinance.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course offers an excellent opportunity to get a strong grounding in core areas of Finance and to specialise your knowledge further through the optional courses on offer.

-You will be taught by academics who produce world leading research some of whom are also currently working in the Finance and Banking sectors. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were ranked among the top 10 Economics Departments in the UK

- Students attend a two week pre-sessional quantitative methods course to ensure they are in a good position to start this challenging Masters courses

- The Department of Economics at Royal Holloway is unique in being a young department, created in 1995, in an established and prestigious college of the University of London.

- Our courses are small and select, thus ensuring that you will receive individual attention from the academic staff.

Department research and industry highlights

Economics is among the top departments in the UK for Research Excellence. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 80% of the Department's research submitted was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent (rated 3* and 4*).

A recent analysis of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) shows that the Economics Department at Royal Holloway is ranked 8th best department in the UK for publications. The study by Jim Taylor and Ian Walker provides further insight into the research standing of UK economics departments. Previous rankings from the data already showed the Department in the top 10 in the UK.

We run a weekly Internal Seminar which provides a lively forum for work at an early stage of development. Our External Seminar Series runs weekly during term and during the last academic year, welcomed over 20 external speakers from prominent places. Invitees are the usual mixture of established names and newer entrants to the profession thought to be doing exciting work. Our Discussion Paper Series provides a forum for journal-ready work.

Course content and structure

You will study five core course units and, in addition, a mathematics refresher course and a dissertation, as well as choosing two elective course units.

Core course units:
- Pre-sessional mathematics refresher course
All students attend the compulsory pre-sessional mathematics refresher course, which runs for 2 weeks in September, before the start of term. There are no additional fees for this course however students will need to pay for accommodation for the period of this course.

- Corporate Finance
You will be introduced to the techniques of financial analysis and their applications to corporate finance. The concepts developed form the foundation of most elective finance course units. You will learn about the time value of money and the net present value rule, how to value financial assets, capital budgeting decisions, uncertainty and the risk-return trade-off and corporate governance.

- Quantitative Methods in Finance
This course unit will introduce you to mathematical statistics and theories that are applied in financial econometrics. The second half of the unit concerns the analysis of time series data including ARMA models, the analysis of non-stationary time series data, cointegration analysis, vector autoregressive models, modelling volatility in asset returns, forecasting and bootstrapping.

- Foundations of Finance
The course unit in finance will expose you to the structure of the financial markets, the instruments traded and the participants. You will be provided with the necessary tools with which to analyse how the financial markets function and how problems arise from their operations.

- Research Methods
While conducting research sounds like an easy task, it can present difficulties. This unit aims to help you avoid such traps and to assist you in developing strong research skills so that you can conduct an efficient piece of research at the end of your degree.

- Dissertation
The dissertation gives you the opportunity to analyse an economics issue in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and, by the end of March, will submit a preliminary dissertation report that contains a clear statement of the problem under consideration, the structure of the project and the research methods that are going to be applied. The dissertation is then written over the summer.

Elective course units:
- Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives
You will gain an introduction to the alternative forms of financial assets that are traded in addition to stocks. Fixed income securities are bonds, bills and notes that offer a certain stream of income to holders. Derivatives are contingent and non-contingent claims on financial assets and are widely used for hedging risk. You will learn how to price these assets, and how to use them effectively in managing portfolios and hedging risk.

- Empirical Finance
The broad aims of this unit are to give you advanced-level training in evaluation of empirical models in finance. It will enable you to apply both quantitative techniques and qualitative methods, learnt elsewhere, to test theories and get acquainted with the existing literature in the field of finance.

- Investment and Portfolio Management
Underlying theory and empirical evidence in portfolio management will familiarise you with its practice in the finance sector. You will acquire an understanding of how funds are allocated when constructing a portfolio.

- Decision Theory and Behaviour
This course unit will deepen your knowledge of rational decision making through the exploration of behavioural models, their formalization and their scope, including applications to finance. You will also become familiarized with both theoretical and experimental methods for research in decision theory and behavioural economics.

- Public Economics
Public Economics is concerned with the study of the effects of government policy and the design of optimal policies. You will assess the implications of basic welfare economics in public policy. A number of recent research areas in public economics are then discussed including income taxation, tax evasion, externalities and social security.

- Political Economy
This course will provide an advanced treatment of the tools used in political economy to tackle some major questions faced by public sector economists. It will in particular focus on the modelling of voters and politicians’ behaviours to address the role played by incentives and constraints faced by politicians when choosing public policies. The effect of different forms of institutional arrangements on public decision making and electoral accountability will be analysed from both a theoretical and empirical perspective.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different economics-related areas, including careers as economists, financial analysts, accountants, bankers, journalists and business analysts. Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, TNS, RBS, Deloitte, and Baker and McKenzie. At the same time, this course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies. Your careers ambitions are supported by our College Careers Service, located right next door to the economics department. They offer application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions, and the opportunity to network with major finance employers on campus. Our careers service is provided by the Careers Group, the main provider of graduate recruitment services in London. Thus, you will have additional access to a wealth of presentations and networking opportunities which make the most of London’s financial centre.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online.

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Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. Read more

Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. It has gained credibility and has spread worldwide and is the preferred way of banking for one fifth of the world's population. This taught MBA offers an opportunity to study the structure of the Islamic banking and finance industry, including its theoretical foundations, products, performance, Islamic financial instruments and risk management issues. These and other topics will be studied within the wider context of the banking and finance industry worldwide. The MBA aims to develop executives who will progress quickly to senior management positions in institutions that transact banking business on Islamic principles.

Course Structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Islamic Finance: This course provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the course examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part of the course focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing and highlights financial engineering issues and well as risk management features of this type of business.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business. The first part of the course outlines the theoretical foundations and development of Islamic banking practices. In particular, the main characteristics of various types of Islamic banking products are discussed. The second part of the course examines the operational features of Islamic banks focusing on their performance and how they compete with conventional interest-based banks. The final part of the course outlines contemporary challenges to Islamic banking business.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks' strategic decision-making.

Optional Modules:

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

Marketing Financial Services: This module surveys the tools of modern financial services marketing, focussing on the key methods of financial services marketing in the acquisition of customers and sale and distribution of financial services. The module progresses considering consumer behaviour, the changing customer demands, consumer heuristics and biases and ways in which financial services marketing has succeeded and failed.

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module develops several theories and concepts introduced in Organisations and People, critiquing key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and management. It provides a detailed and critical analysis of management, further developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Banking and Development: This module critically evaluates the theory underlying the policy of financial liberalisation, and examines its implementation, primarily in developing countries. The impact of financial liberalisation on the financial systems of developing countries is analysed in depth.

Islamic Insurance: This module analyses the nature and principles of Islamic insurance, and examines the operational modes and practice of Islamic insurance. The structure of Islamic insurance markets is described, and constraints and opportunities for Islamic insurance and Islamic insurance accounting are highlighted.

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

Merger and Acquisition: This module provides an analysis of incentives and outcomes associated with merger and acquisition deals. It covers the development and execution of an acquisition strategy, the valuation of the target, the conduct of the negotiation, and the implementation of the post-merger integration plan.



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The MPhil course in Engineering for Sustainable Development is designed for graduates who want to help tackle pressing global problems by developing practical engineering solutions. Read more
The MPhil course in Engineering for Sustainable Development is designed for graduates who want to help tackle pressing global problems by developing practical engineering solutions. The course is about recognising that engineers have to operate within an increasingly complex set of constraints, and therefore must be capable of dealing with a range of challenges. The subject is based on some very straightforward principles: it is about living within Earth’s finite limits and resources, helping everyone on the planet to achieve an acceptable quality of life; acting as stewards of the environment for future generations; dealing with complexity and handling the many trade-offs which have to be made.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egegmpesd

Course detail

The programme aims to:

- produce engineers who are equipped to lead change with the understanding and skills necessary to conceive and deliver fitting solutions to society’s needs and to address global challenges within a sustainability framework;
- explore value frameworks for engineers which are based on the concepts behind sustainable development and which can guide the design and management of engineering artefacts and schemes, so that their impacts are addressed at every stage of planning, implementation and disposal;
- develop strong business awareness in engineering graduates and foster an understanding of the foundations of management theory in the areas of strategy, organisation, marketing and finance, the connections between technology and management, and the introduction of change within organisations;
- encourage an appreciation of the trade-offs and conflicts inherent in decision making and the need to seek wider and alternative solutions to engineering problems so that graduates of the course can engage in strategic thinking during their future employment within industry, business or government.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the MPhil programme will be equipped with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the challenges of engineering work in a sustainable development context. By the end of the programme, they will have:

- the ability to work with complex or ill-defined problems both systematically and creatively, including being equipped for dialogue with stakeholder groups;
- a knowledge of current and potential engineering responses and specific technologies for moving to sustainable development, of both the technical and non-technical barriers to change, and of both good and bad sustainability practice in a range of engineering sectors;
- well-developed team-work and two-way communication skills;
- the ability to evaluate, using a range of methodologies, the merits and demerits of options, taking into account environmental, economic, financial and political as well as technical factors;
- a thorough understanding of the role of value-judgements in defining problems and implementing engineering solutions;
- an understanding of the pathways by which new technologies reach the marketplace and how management structures shape the evolution of technologies, and how institutions, NGOs, public policy and regulation influence the rate of progress towards sustainable development;
- the ability to act as a change-agent and to manage change effectively in an organisation, equipped with theories about and examples of organisational structure and change;
- experience of planning, executing and critically evaluating an original and investigative piece of work.

Format

The course is divided into three components, which students must pass independently:

The first of these is a core programme of lectures which all students take, and this focuses on developing a breadth of skills and understanding which complement the technical background of participants.

The second component comprises four elective modules from a list of around 30 topics offered by the Centre for Sustainable Development, the Engineering Department and other Departments within the University. All students also study the Management of Technology and Innovation course led by the Judge Business School; this course comprises both evening lectures, and a group in-company consultancy project working on a real area of concern for the client.

The final component is undertaken between April and August when students complete an individual piece of research for their Master’s Dissertation.

Additionally, students participate in a number of residential field trips and site visits through the year, attend a distinguished lecture series, and will engage in role plays, weekly seminars, and a practitioner viewpoint course.

Assessment

All students must submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words. Planning for the dissertation begins in January, and students will work full-time on research betwen April and August. 5% of the dissertation marks will be assigned through a plan submitted in January; 15% will be assigned through an oral presentation given at a Dissertation Conference in July; 10% will be assigned through the preparation of a research poster which will also be displayed in July.

Continuing

The MPhil is a professional practice programme and is not specifically designed to lead on to doctoral research. Nevertheless, students wishing to apply for continuation to a PhD in Engineering at Cambridge would normally be expected to attain an overall mark of at least 70%.

Students take two compulsory 'inner core' modules, at least two 'outer core' modules, and four elective modules chosen from a broad list (this list includes the remaining outer core modules).

All core modules, and most of the elective modules, are assessed exclusively by coursework.

A minority of the elective modules are assessed solely through written examination, or through a combination of written examination and coursework. Some students will take no written examinations, but others may take up to four, depending upon module choice.

Students are expected to attend two residential field courses. These are important elements of the programme, but no numerical mark will be given.

At end of the project element of the Management of Technology and Innovation module, students are required to give a 20 minute presentation to the project client, followed by a 30 minute question-and-answer session.

At the discretion of the Examiners, candidates may be required to take an additional oral examination on the work submitted during the course, and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. Read more

Over the past two or three decades or so, Islamic banking and finance has emerged as another viable way of financial intermediation. It has gained credibility and has spread worldwide and is the preferred way of banking for one fifth of the world’s population. This taught MA offers an opportunity to study the structure of the Islamic banking and finance industry, including its theoretical foundations, products, performance, Islamic financial instruments and risk management issues. These and other topics will be studied within the wider context of the banking and finance industry worldwide. There is also an MSc version of this MA programme, and whilst the MSc is more suitable for candidates with some previous background in mathematics, statistics or econometrics, this MA is more suitable for candidates who prefer a less quantitative approach to their studies.

Course structure

January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

International Financial Markets: This module provides an overview of financial instruments in a multi-currency world, taking account of insights from portfolio theory concerning the relationship between risk and return, the diversification of risk, and the pricing of assets.

Islamic Finance: This module provides an insight into topical issues relating to Islamic financial instruments and related risk management issues. The first part of the module examines issues relating to financial contracting, instruments and various intermediation issues. The second part focuses on the role of the capital market in providing Islamic financing, and highlights financial engineering and risk management features of this type of business.

Islamic Banking: This module provides an insight into the key features of Islamic banking business. The first part of the course outlines the theoretical foundations and development of Islamic banking practices. In particular, the main characteristics of various types of Islamic banking products are discussed. The second part of the course examines the operational features of Islamic banks, focusing on their performance and how they compete with conventional interest-based banks. The final part of the course outlines contemporary challenges to Islamic banking business.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Islamic Accounting and Financial Reporting: This module develops a critical awareness of theoretical and practical approaches to Islamic accounting and financial reporting. Islamic accounting standards are compared with IFRS, and the content and impact of academic research in this area is examined.

Corporate Risk Management: This module provides an analysis of pure risk and its management.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Investment Strategy and Portfolio Management: This module evaluates the development of investment strategies for bonds, equities and derivatives that are designed to achieve optimal risk-return outcomes, and examines the measurement and evaluation of the performance of a portfolio of investments.

Islamic Insurance: This module analyses the nature and principles of Islamic insurance, and examines the operational modes and practice of Islamic insurance. The structure of Islamic insurance markets is described, and constraints and opportunities are highlighted.



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EIT is pleased to bring you the Master of Engineering (Electrical Systems)** program. IN THIS ACCREDITED AND PRESTIGIOUS PROGRAM YOU WILL GAIN. Read more
EIT is pleased to bring you the Master of Engineering (Electrical Systems)** program.

IN THIS ACCREDITED AND PRESTIGIOUS PROGRAM YOU WILL GAIN:
- Skills and know-how in the latest and developing technologies in electrical systems
- Practical guidance and feedback from experts from around the world
- Live knowledge from the extensive experience of expert instructors, rather than from just theoretical information gained from books and college
- Credibility and respect as the local electrical systems expert in your firm
- Global networking contacts in the industry
- Improved career choices and income
- A valuable and accredited Master of Engineering (Electrical Systems)** qualification

The next intake will start on the week of June 27, 2016.

Contact us to find out more and apply (http://www.eit.edu.au/course-enquiry).

** A note regarding recognition of this program in the Australian education system: EIT is the owner of this program. The qualification is officially accredited by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA). EIT delivers this program to students worldwide.

Visit the website http://www.eit.edu.au/master-engineering-electrical-systems

PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION

This Master Degree (or Graduate Diploma) is officially accredited by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) in Australia.

It is a professional development program and is not currently an entry-to-practice qualification. Engineers Australia are considering this and other programs for those students desiring professional status (e.g. CPEng). However, the outcome of this review may or may not result in a student gaining chartered professional status if he or she does not already possess this.

Additional Entry Requirements

An appropriate level of English Language Proficiency equivalent to an English pass level in an Australian Senior Certificate of Education, or an IELTS score of 6.5 (with no individual band less than 6.0) or equivalent as outlined in the EIT Admissions Policy.

Congruent field of practice means one of the following with adequate electrical engineering content (with fields not listed below to be considered by the Dean and the Admissions committee on a case-by-case basis):

• Electrical Engineering

• Electronic and Communication Systems

• Industrial Engineering

• Instrumentation, Control and Automation

• Mechatronic Systems

• Manufacturing and Management Systems

• Industrial Automation

• Production Engineering

Overview

Electrical power is an essential infrastructure of our society. Adequate and uninterrupted supply of electrical power of the required quality is essential for industries, commercial establishments and residences; and almost any type of human activity is impossible without the use of electricity. The ever-increasing cost of fuels required for power generation, restricted availability in many parts of the world, demand for electricity fueled by industrial growth and shortage of skilled engineers to design, operate and maintain power network components are problems felt everywhere today. The Master of Engineering (Electrical Systems) is designed to address the last-mentioned constraint, especially in today’s context where the field of electrical power is not perceived as being ‘cool’ unlike computers and communications and other similar nascent fields experiencing explosive growth. But it is often forgotten that even a highly complex and sophisticated data centre needs huge amounts of power of extremely high reliability, without which it is just so much silicon (and copper).

This program presents the topics at two levels. The first year addresses the design level where the student learns how to design the components of a power system such as generation, transmission and distribution as well as the other systems contributing to the safety of operation. The topics in the first year also cover the automation and control components that contribute to the high level of reliability expected from today’s power systems. Because of the constraints imposed by the fuel for power generation and the environmental degradation that accompanies power generation by fossil fuels, the attention today is focused on renewable energy sources and also more importantly how to make the generation of power more efficient and less polluting so that you get a double benefit of lower fuel usage and lower environmental impact. Even the best designed systems need to be put together efficiently. Setting up power generation and transmission facilities involves appreciable capital input and complex techniques for planning, installation and commissioning. Keeping this in view, a unit covering project management is included in the first year.

The second year of the program focuses on the highly complex theory of power systems. If the power system has to perform with a high degree of reliability and tide over various disturbances that invariably occur due to abnormal events in the power system, it is necessary to use simulation techniques that can accurately model a power system and predict its behavior under various possible disturbance conditions. These aspects are covered in the course units dealing with power system analysis and stability studies for steady-state, dynamic and transient conditions. The aspect of power quality and harmonic flow studies is also included as a separate unit.

The study of power systems has an extensive scope and besides the topics listed above, a student may also like to cover some other related topic of special interest. The ‘Special Topics in Electrical Power Systems’ unit aims to provide students with the opportunity for adding one ‘state-of-the art’ topic from a list of suggested fields. Examples are: Smart grids, Micro-grids and Geographic Information System (GIS) application in utility environment.

The Masters Thesis which spans over two complete semesters is the capstone of the program, requiring a high level of personal autonomy and accountability, and reinforces the knowledge and skill base developed in the preceding units. As a significant research component of the course, this program component will facilitate research, critical evaluation and the application of knowledge and skills with creativity and initiative, enabling the students to critique current professional practice in the electrical power industry.

WHO WOULD BENEFIT

Those seeking to achieve advanced know-how and expertise in industrial automation, including but not limited to:

- Electric Utility engineers

- Electrical Engineers and Electricians

- Maintenance Engineers and Supervisors

- Energy Management Consultants

- Automation and Process Engineers

- Design Engineers

- Project Managers

- Consulting Engineers

- Production Managers

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

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Public awareness of hazards and risks has enhanced the importance of safety assessment and management in today’s increasingly litigious society. Read more

Programme Background

Public awareness of hazards and risks has enhanced the importance of safety assessment and management in today’s increasingly litigious society. Worldwide the burden of responsibility for health and safety is shifting towards those who own, manage and work in industrial and commercial organisations. Legal reform is tending to replace detailed industry specific legislation with a modern approach in which, where possible, goals and general principles are set and the onus is on organisations to show how they manage to achieve these goals.

The management of safety and risk needs to be integrated into the overall management of the organisation. It should be appropriate and cost-effective without dampening the innovative entrepreneurial spirit of employees with inflexible bureaucratic rules and procedures. An organisation’s exposure to potential hazards needs to be managed so as to reduce the chance of loss and mitigate any effects. Risk and safety issues need to be evaluated in a structured and calculated manner but in the light of an overall organisational strategy.

The MSc/PG Diploma programme in Safety and Risk Management aims to provide students with advanced knowledge of risk assessment techniques, the public and individual perception of risk, and how decisions are made in competitive business markets. The focus is on practical applications of safety methodologies, ergonomics and human factors, and safety and risk management techniques.

All of these skills will be drawn together to undertake complex qualitative and quantitative risk assessments. The core of the programme is the management of safety, but it is set within a broader remit where safety issues are part of a general risk management system with a balance of financial, quality and environmental concerns. The overall aim of the programme is to develop students’ skills and personal qualities to be able to undertake safety studies and manage safety and risk to the best national and international standards.

Professional Recognition

This MSc degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See http://www.jbm.org.ukfor further information.

The MSc and PgDip degrees have also been accredited by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). Graduates are eligible to join IOSH as Graduate members and then undertake an initial professional development process that leads to Chartered membership. http://www.iosh.co.uk for further information.

Programme Content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Safety, Risk and Management is only available by attendance-free distance learning. The programme comprises eight courses. All courses have written examinations and some have compulsory coursework elements. MSc students are also required to complete an individual project (dissertation).

For the project component of the programme distance learners are likely to develop something based in their country of residence with advice and supervision from staff in the School. This may well include work with a local company or may involve independent study. Individual arrangements will be set up with each student.

For more detailed information on this programme please contact the Programme Leader before applying (see above).

Courses

• Risk Assessment and Safety Management
This courses aims to give students an appreciation of risk from individual and societal perspectives as well as understanding the basic principles of risk assessment and modelling and how safety management works in practice.

• Human Factors Methods
This course will equip students from academic and/or industrial backgrounds with knowledge on, and the means to deploy, a wide range of specialist human factors techniques. The emphasis is on method selection, application, combination and integration within existing business practices. Students will develop a critical awareness of what methods exist, how to apply them in practice and their principle benefits and limitations.

• Human Factors in the Design and Evaluation of Control Rooms
The course will equip students from academic and/or industrial backgrounds with in-depth knowledge on, insights into, and the means to deploy a wide range of specialist techniques relevant to the ergonomic design and evaluation of control rooms. The emphasis is on key areas of control room operations and on actionable ways to deploy theory on human capabilities and limitations in order to improve performance, safety, efficiency and overall operator well being.

• Fire Safety, Explosions and Process Safety
Introduces students to the basic principles of fire safety science and engineering, and develops skills in associated modelling leading to an understanding of principal fire/explosion related issues in process safety.

• Environmental Impact Assessment
Provides the candidate with the knowledge and understanding of the principles and processes of the Environmental Impact Assessment. By the end of the course, the student should be familiar with the European EIA legislation and its translation into the Scottish planning system, and be able to demonstrate an understanding of the EIA process, the tools and the agents involved in an EIA and the possible problems with using EIA as a decision making tool. . It is also intended that the student will be able to appreciate the purpose of the EIA process from a number of perspectives; that of a developer, an EIA practitioner and a policy maker.

• Project Management Theory and Practice
Provides students with an understanding of the concepts and practices of construction project management used to provide value added services to clients within the constraints of time, cost, quality sustainability and health and safety management.

• Learning from Disasters
Gives students an in depth understanding of some of the classic disasters and their consequences by using a range of practical accident investigation techniques. Students will learn to analyse complex histories in order to find the underlying root cause.

• Value and Risk Management.
Aims to introduce the concepts of value and risk management, apply them to strategic and tactical problems and illustrate their tools and techniques through case study.

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This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

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The MSc in Archaeological Science is designed to provide a broad theoretical and practical understanding of current issues and the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the human past. Read more
The MSc in Archaeological Science is designed to provide a broad theoretical and practical understanding of current issues and the techniques archaeologists use to investigate the human past. Its purpose is to provide a pathway for archaeologists or graduates of other scientific disciplines to either professional posts or doctoral research in archaeological science. It focuses particularly on the organic remains of humans, animals and plants which is a rapidly developing and exciting field of archaeometry. Major global themes such as animal and plant domestication and human migration and diet will be explored integrating evidence from a range of sub-disciplines in environmental and biomolecular archaeology Students taking this course will study and work in a range of environmental, DNA, isotope and dating laboratories alongside expert academic staff.

The aim of this programme is to equip students to:
-Devise and carry out in-depth study in archaeological science
-Analyse and interpret results
-Communicate scientific results to a variety of audiences
-Develop the inter-disciplinary skills (cultural and scientific) to work effectively in archaeology

Students will gain a critical understanding of the application of scientific techniques to our study of the human past, and receive intensive training in a specific area of archaeological science. Students will examine the theory underpinning a range of scientific techniques, as well as the current archaeological context in which they are applied and interpreted. This will be achieved through a broad archaeological framework which will educate students to reconcile the underlying constraints of analytical science with the concept-based approach of cultural archaeology. Students will therefore examine both theoretical and practical approaches to particular problems, and to the choice of suitable techniques to address them. They will learn how to assess the uncertainties of their conclusions, and to acknowledge the probable need for future reinterpretations as the methods develop. Following training in one specific archaeological science area of their choice, students will be expected to demonstrate that they can combine a broad contextual and theoretical knowledge of archaeology with their detailed understanding of the methods in their chosen area, through an original research dissertation.

Course Structure

The course consists of four taught modules of 30 credits each and a 60 credit research dissertation. Students will study two core modules in Term 1 and two elective modules in Term1/2 followed by a research dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Topics in Archaeological Science
-Research Dissertation

Optional Modules:
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Plants and People
-Animals and People
-Chronometry
-Isotope and Molecular Archaeology
-Practical Guided Study

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among archaeologists in a specific area or on a particular theme. Seminars and tutorials then provide opportunities for smaller groups of student-led discussion and debate of particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours.

Practical classes and workshops allow students to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills in Archaeological Science with guidance from experienced and qualified scientists in Archaeology. Finally, independent supervised study enables students to develop and undertake a research project to an advanced level. Throughout the programme emphasis is placed on working independently outside the contact hours, in order to synthesise large datasets and to develop critical and analytical skills to an advanced level.

The balance of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and the ability as independent learners and researchers. In Terms 1 and 2 the emphasis is upon students acquiring the generic, practical skills and knowledge that archaeological scientists need to undertake scientific study in archaeology whilst examining and debating relevant archaeological theory and the 'big questions' to which scientific methods are applied. They also study a choice of specific areas creating their individual research profile and interests.

Students typically attend three hours a week of lectures, and two one hour seminars or tutorials each week. In addition, they may be required to attend three-four hours a week of workshops or practicals based on lectures. The practical work complements desk-based analytical skills which are intended to develop skills applicable within and outside the field of archaeology. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare effectively for their classes, focus their subject knowledge and develop a research agenda.

The balance shifts into Term 3, as students develop their abilities as independent researchers with a dissertation. The lectures and practicals already attended have introduced them to and given them the chance to practice archaeology research methods within specific fields of study. Students have also engaged with academic issues, archaeological datasets and their interpretation which are at the forefront of archaeological research. The dissertation is regarded as the cap-stone of the taught programme and an indicator of advanced research potential, which could be developed further in a professional or academic field. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have ten one-hour supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular theme or area resulting in a significant piece of independent research. They also interact with scientific lab staff as they carry out their research.

Throughout the programme, all students also have access to an academic adviser who will provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student will meet with their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend..

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Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints. Read more

Why this course?

Architectural conservation - the action of conserving built heritage while maintaining its values - is practiced differently across the world; sometimes not at all due to cultural and economic constraints.

It is an emerging area of work which requires specialist training and knowledge to deal with its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary nature. It also requires the development of a critical approach for the analysis and design of the intervention, informed by the shared international principles and the specific nature and context of the historic building to be conserved.

We need to attract new talent to the field of architectural conservation. To work with historic buildings is an enriching experience, which combines the creative aspects of designing a new building with the in-depth research required to understand in full the building and its context. Working with historic buildings is also a great training to improve the design of new buildings, as you learn a great deal about the importance of design ideas, innovation, durability and care. It is also a very sociable work, interacting with a variety of people from all backgrounds, joining forces in helping current generations to enjoy historic buildings, to create community identities around them, and to transmit the buildings and their values to the future.

Glasgow and its surrounding area provide an excellent location for the course, with architectural heritage from all periods, from Roman to Medieval, Georgian, Victorian and contemporary, without forgetting the better known C. R. Mackintosh and Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson’s buildings. Strathclyde has a lively international community of staff and students and we enjoy a privileged position in the centre of Glasgow.

Study mode and duration:
- MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 18 months part-time
- PgCert: 5 months full-time; 9 months part-time

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/architecturaldesignfortheconservationofbuiltheritage/

You’ll study

The course is a platform for:
- collaboration with both practice and research partners
- architectural critique
- discussion and debate

All full-time students take instructional classes and a design project in the first two semesters. MSc students then complete a dissertation project.

Compulsory taught classes are delivered intensively, making them more accessible to part-time students and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). Areas explored in classes include:
- theory
- history
- survey
- investigations
- legislation
- materials
- structures

The course is informed by the outcomes of the research being carried out at the Architectural Design and Conservation Research Unit (ADCRU). It is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Open Access

Open Access modules are offered on individual modules from the MSc programme. They can be taken as stand-alone CPD options or gradually built towards a qualification.

Open Access students may transfer onto a part-time MSc or PgDip programme to complete their studies (subject to a maximum period of time).

Guest Lecturers/speakers

You’ll benefit from a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, who’ll lecture on up-to-date current practices, with a diverse point of views.

Facilities

- Studios
There are two fully-networked design studios; one dedicated to student self-study, the other to interactive design teaching.

- Library
In addition to the main University library, we have our own, on-site, reference library. Our collection is developed in direct response to the teaching delivered in the department.

- Workshop
A full range of hand and portable power tools are available (complete with instruction).

- PC Lab
Our lab computers have AutoCad and InDesign.

We also offer plotter printing, scanning and laser cutting services.

Accreditation

The course is fully recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The IHBC is the principal professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment specialists working in United Kingdom.

The course also conforms to the internationally recognised Guidelines for Education and Training in the Conservation of Monuments, Ensembles and Sites adopted by the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS). These criteria are used by professional institutes for the assessment of evidence and professional accreditation in conservation.

Learning & teaching

The course is balanced between theory and practice. It’s delivered through:
- lectures
- workshops
- studio-based, and seminar-led learning, by staff and visiting experts from the UK and overseas

The course is a platform for collaboration with both practice and research partners; architectural critique, discussion and debate are fundamental parts of the course.

Assessment

Formative assessment will take place throughout the course.
You’ll be assessed through lectures, seminars, interim Studio Reviews and workshops, supported by student presentations, symposia and peer feedback.
Methods of teaching vary; some subjects are formally taught using lectures and seminars, others use a mix of methods which may incorporate small projects.
The main architectural conservation project is a studio based project which involves one-to-one tuition and appraisals in review seminars. Team teaching techniques are used in several projects and increasing use is made of student peer group reviews. Summative assessment will be through:
- studio reviews
- individual written essays and reports
- oral presentations
- dissertation - directly linked to the conservation project

Careers

Areas of employment for graduates are numerous. They can work as independent professionals in conservation or for architectural firms all over the worlds. The completion of the Masters will give a variety of opportunities:
- IHBC affiliate member with option to progress to full membership
- RIBA Conservation Registrant (CR) and/or RIAS Accredited Conservation Architect
- progress to RIBA Conservation architect (CA), RIBA Specialist Conservation architect (SCA) and/or RIAS Accredited or Advance Conservation Architect
- progress to Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE), the joint register between the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) and Institution of Structural Engineers (IStructE)

"We work with a large number of government, local authority and industry partners, offering potential placement opportunities for students to work after their postgraduate degree study."

Heritage is recognised as a sector of international strategic importance. Local authorities and communities are also very interested in preserving their heritage. The conservation of historic buildings becomes more and more a day to day activity for architects and engineers.

Potential careers include:
- conservation architect in architectural firms
- conservation engineer in engineering firms
- conservation Officer in local authorities
- work in UK government agencies: Historic Scotland, English Heritage, CadW and the Environment and Heritage Service in Northern Ireland
- architect/conservation officer in other countries for government and local authorities
- work in UK and internationally architect/conservation officer for conservation organisations and charities such as UNESCO, ICOMOS, Council of Europe, ICCROM

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/

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Project management is key to successful implementation of strategic change in any organisation. This programme develops your academic skills in modelling and evaluating the process of project management, allowing you to develop strategic and practical approaches in a wide variety of business environments. Read more

Why take this course?

Project management is key to successful implementation of strategic change in any organisation. This programme develops your academic skills in modelling and evaluating the process of project management, allowing you to develop strategic and practical approaches in a wide variety of business environments.

You will gain a broad understanding of the principles and practice of project management and the tools and techniques required to contribute to business effectiveness.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Attend lectures by practising project managers who speak about their experiences and give guidance on project management issues
Participate in live web-based chat forums to discuss your work with lecturers and other students
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is fully accredited by the Association for Project Management, demonstrating that it provides a level of knowledge recognised by a professional project management association It will provide you with the advanced ability to lead or act as part of a team progressing project issues from initiation through to completion. You can expect to find employment opportunities in virtually any industry, especially those within the commercial sector.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Project management
Consultancy
Project planning
Logistics
Product development

Module Details

You will complete a total of five units (including your dissertation) involving attendance of six or eight days for each unit. You will study several key topics covering areas of project management theory and methods, while gaining an insight into their practical application in a business context.

Here are the units you will study:

Project Environment and Planning: You will develop an understanding of the relationship between project and business management, as well as the project management environment and the factors that influence project outcomes. Strategic aspects of projects are addressed, including project selection and portfolio design. You will also learn how project managers must understand the benefits to be delivered by projects, the requirements of stakeholders and how to work within the constraints of cost, time and quality. Estimation methods and planning techniques are taught together with quality management. Approaches to the planning and control of projects that have been developed in different sectors are also covered, including agile methods and fast tracking.

Budgets and Commercial Management: This unit introduces you to raising project finance, building, monitoring and controlling project budgets and measuring Earned Value of project deliverables. It also covers the commercial aspects of procurement including tendering, contracting and the skills and practices of contract and bid negotiation, providing you with the tools and techniques for managing project budgets. The units also examines the key roles that project managers, budget managers and key project personnel play in managing project budgets.

People Management and Risk: This unit develops a critical understanding of individual, team and organisational working in order to deliver project goals successfully. It covers how individual characteristics such as personality, intelligence, ability and skills, motivation and attitudes affect individual performance. You will learn how to empower individuals and teams to achieve quality standards which enhance personal team and organisational performance, together with the development of creative and credible leadership. It also examines the key challenges in the application of risk management frameworks and models in project management, crisis management and corporate governance. Risk management strategies and the development of effective project mitigation and contingency action plans are critically evaluated.

Project Investigation and Systems Methods: This unit explores the investigation of project issues through the use of a structured research methodology and project management analysis tools to enhance the research process. Wider strategic issues are explored to place the research process into context and to illustrate how appropriate research methods can be identified for specific types of research problems. You will also look at tools for the modelling and analysis of complex problem situations (including systems thinking, soft systems methods and influence diagrams) and how these can be used to diagnose problem situations to identify relevant areas for further investigation. Project management methodologies including PRINCE2, Partnering and Programme Management as a wider context for project management research issues are examined. You will produce a research proposal that brings together the use of research methodology and project systems in identifying, justifying and investigating a research question that will feed into the research conducted in your final dissertation.

Dissertation: This unit enables you to deepen your understanding of an aspect of project management of your own choice. Many students choose to investigate topics which they intend to focus on in the next stage of their career. The unit is structured as a research project so you can demonstrate your ability to identify, design, plan and undertake research on a specific project management issue and effectively communicate your findings in an appropriate manner for a Master’s degree.

Programme Assessment

The units are structured as eight teaching blocks of three days of lectures, seminars and interactive syndicate work, with periods of self-managed study between blocks. Each of these will be assessed by coursework assignments. You will also produce a dissertation with guidance from a supervisor. The dissertation is structured as an independent research project to deepen your understanding of a chosen aspect of project management. Your choice of topic can contribute towards the next stage of your career by demonstrating your ability to identify, design, undertake and communicate your original research on a specific project management topic.

Each unit will be assessed by coursework assignments. You will also produce a dissertation with guidance from a supervisor.

Student Destinations

The key characteristic of this programme is the emphasis on strategic aspects of projects which provide a platform for a career as a senior project manager in high profile organisations, Graduate destinations have included:

Public sector management, including NHS and Fire Services
Infrastructure planning and implementation
Naval and Aerospace construction industries
Doctorate level study in Project Management

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Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

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This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/. Read more
This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/

Increasingly, no matter how we live, we know this 'world' primarily through the experience of living within and between cities. These cities continuously produce new challenges for their inhabitants and administrators. In doing so, they also produce opportunities for understanding the constraints and potentials of both human and non-human life.

The MA Cities and Society is a research and training programme designed to support strategic interventions in urban governance, design, institution-building and change, as well as social-spatial development. Distinguished by it's theoretical rigour, integrity and amenability to experimental empirical research, the programme focuses particularly on:

The organisation of contemporary urban economies, including the production of built and virtual environments, physical and social infrastructure
The ways in which different forms of economic accumulation and economic practices impact upon cities, and how any city reflects a particular set of constraints and possibilities
The proliferation of technical systems, media, and practices of interpretation and organisation that change our notions about the ‘proper’ use of things and bodies
The intersections of finance, governance, ecology, and culture in producing multiple forms for assessing urban futures; particularly calculations of risk, sustainability, productivity and creativity
This programme covers the following disciplines: geography, anthropology, architecture, cultural studies, fine arts, media and communications.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Alex Rhys-Taylor.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

-Three core modules
-A specialist option module taken from the department's extensive list, or from the departments of Anthropology, Media and Communications, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Music, Educational Studies or the Centre for Cultural Studies
-A dissertation

Dissertation (60 credits)
In the summer term you complete a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff. 
The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Teaching

One hour lectures address the core themes of each module, followed by one hour seminars in small groups (under 20). You'll be encouraged to attend dissertation classes that train you in the basic principles of dissertation preparation, research and writing. You are also assigned a dissertation supervisor who will be available when you are writing the dissertation (approximately one hour contact time per month).

The main aim of the program is thus to explore new approaches to thinking about and researching the city formation and urban life. This can be broken down into three inter-related aims:

To promote an appreciation of the relevance of the social, sociological knowledge and ways of knowing in the understanding of cities, urban economy, culture and politics, and the management of social change, and to encourage critical understanding of interrelated concepts, debates and themes.
To enable students critically to engage sociological and geographical theories and methodologies relevant to the studies of cities and urbanities, controversies and social change, and conduct an intellectually informed sustained investigation.
To expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the Sociology and related departments and centres to provide a catalyst for independent thought and study.

Expert walks and seminars

The course is also accompanied by a series of expert 'London walks' spread across the year. These are led by a range of researchers from within the Centre for Urban and Community Research, as well as project managers and planners from organisations such as the Greater London Authority, and take students through the sites of that their work focuses on. The Centre for Urban Community research also holds regular seminars with a range of urban professionals, architects and academics from outside the university, giving the MA Cities and Society a spaces to join in with the Centre’s intellectual community.

Asssessment

Essays and dissertation.

MA granted on the completion of 180 CATS (all coursework and dissertation); Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education granted on the completion of 120 CATS (all coursework without dissertation); Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education granted on the completion of 60 CATS (the completion of two core modules).

Skills

Analytical and research skills that intersect basic sociological knowledge with that of architecture, the built environment, cultural and postcolonial theory, geography, planning, digital communications, and ethnography as they apply to the study of cities across the world.

Careers

The training in this programme is applicable to work in multilateral institutions, NGOs, urban research institutes, municipal government, cultural and policy institutions, urban design firms, and universities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. Read more
The Principles of Conservation MA offers students an introduction to the context of heritage conservation, of how conservation works, and of the issues and constraints which affect conservation practice. The programme explores the principles, theory, ethics and practicalities relating to the care and conservation of a wide variety of objects and structures.

Degree information

Students gain an in-depth understanding of approaches to collections care, preventive conservation, risk assessment, conservation strategies, ethics, management and professionalism, and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (30 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following:
-Issues in Conservation: Context of Conservation
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Conservation in Practice: Preventive Conservation
-Skills for Conservation Management

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 30 credits from the following list of related options (the degree coordinator may seek to guide the option choices made by those intending to carry on for the MSc in Conservation for Archaeology and Museums):
-Approaches to Artefact Studies
-Archaeology and Ethnicity
-Archaeolmetallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Ceramics Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Materials structure and deterioration of craft materials

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, small-group tutorials, workshops and practical projects. Some modules include visits to conservation workshops and museums, including the British Museum, National Trust and the Museum of London. Assessment is through coursework, essays, poster, portfolio, project reports and the dissertation.

Careers

The Institute of Archaeology has a long history of training in conservation, and many of its graduates are now employed in key posts around the world. Many students go on to take the Conservation for Archaeology and Museums MSc. Others pursue careers in preventive conservation and collections management in local and national museums, art galleries and heritage organisations (mainly in Europe, North America and Asia). Some students have also used this degree as a platform to become a PhD candidate at both UCL and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Conservator/Preparator, The Natural History Museum
-Assistant Curator, Tower of London
-MLitt Art, Style and Design, Christie's Education
-Historic Property Steward, English Heritage

Employability
Knowledge and skills acquired during the programme include the understanding of the roles conservators play in the care and study of cultural heritage, and the ethical issues involved. This is complemented by a basic understanding of raw materials, manufacturing technologies, assessment of condition and the ways in which different values and meanings are assigned to cultural objects. The student will be able to perform visual examination techniques as well as assessments and monitoring of museum collections. They will also be proficient in various types of documentation, analysis of numerical data, report writing, and presentation of conservation issues through posters, social media, talks and essays.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its conservation programmes have an international reputation.

Students benefit from the institute's lively international involvement in archaeology and heritage, from its well-equipped facilities, and access to UCL's extensive science, art and archaeology collections.

The institute's conservation laboratories provide a modern and pleasant learning environment, while the Wolfson Archaeological Science Laboratories provide excellent facilities for the examination and analysis of a wide variety of archaeological materials.

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