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This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. Read more
This highly focused MSc explores some of the mathematics behind modern secure information and communications systems, specialising in mathematics relevant for public key cryptography, coding theory and information theory. During the course critical awareness of problems in information transmission, data compression and cryptography is raised, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems are explored.

The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography and our academic staff include several leading researchers in these areas. Students on the programme have the opportunity to carry out their dissertation projects in cutting-edge research areas and to be supervised by experts.

The transferable skills gained during the MSc will open up a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsofcryptographyandcommunications(msc).aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and a knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course former students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses as well as complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Channels
In this unit, you will investigate the problems of data compression and information transmission in both noiseless and noisy environments.

Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Public Key Cryptography
This course introduces some of the mathematical ideas essential for an understanding of public key cryptography, such as discrete logarithms, lattices and elliptic curves. Several important public key cryptosystems are studied, such as RSA, Rabin, ElGamal Encryption, Schnorr signatures; and modern notions of security and attack models for public key cryptosystems are discussed.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a suitable mathematical foundation for undertaking research or professional employment in cryptography and/or communications

- the appropriate background in information theory and coding theory enabling them to understand and be able to apply the theory of communication through noisy channels

- the appropriate background in algebra and number theory to develop an understanding of modern public key cryptosystems

- a critical awareness of problems in information transmission and data compression, and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to solve these problems

- a critical awareness of problems in cryptography and the mathematical techniques which are commonly used to provide solutions to these problems

- a range of transferable skills including familiarity with a computer algebra package, experience with independent research and managing the writing of a dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications. Read more
This course covers a wide range of topics from both applied and applicable mathematics and is aimed at students who want to study the field in greater depth, in areas which are relevant to real life applications.

You will explore the mathematical techniques that are commonly used to solve problems in the real world, in particular in communication theory and in physics. As part of the course you will carry out an independent research investigation under the supervision of a member of staff. Popular dissertation topics chosen by students include projects in the areas of communication theory, mathematical physics, and financial mathematics.

The transferable skills gained on this course will open you up to a range of career options as well as provide a solid foundation for advanced research at PhD level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mathematics/coursefinder/mscmathematicsforapplications.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will be provided with a solid mathematical foundation and knowledge and understanding of the subjects of cryptography and communications, preparing you for research or professional employment in this area.

- The Mathematics Department at Royal Holloway is well known for its expertise in information security and cryptography. The academics who teach on this course include several leading researchers in these areas.

- The mathematical foundations needed for applications in communication theory and cryptography are covered including Algebra, Combinatorics Complexity Theory/Algorithms and Number Theory.

- You will have the opportunity to carry out your dissertation project in a cutting-edge research area; our dissertation supervisors are experts in their fields who publish regularly in internationally competitive journals and there are several joint projects with industrial partners and Royal Holloway staff.

- After completing the course students have a good foundation for the next step of their career both inside and outside academia.

Department research and industry highlights

The members of the Mathematics Department cover a range of research areas. There are particularly strong groups in information security, number theory, quantum theory, group theory and combinatorics. The Information Security Group has particularly strong links to industry.

Course content and structure

You will study eight courses and complete a main project under the supervision of a member of staff.

Core courses:
Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
The aim of this unit is to provide you with an introduction to the theory of error-correcting codes employing the methods of elementary enumeration, linear algebra and finite fields.

Advanced Cipher Systems
Mathematical and security properties of both symmetric key cipher systems and public key cryptography are discussed, as well as methods for obtaining confidentiality and authentication.

Main project
The main project (dissertation) accounts for 25% of the assessment of the course and you will conduct this under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

Additional courses:
Applications of Field Theory
You will be introduced to some of the basic theory of field extensions, with special emphasis on applications in the context of finite fields.

Quantum Information Theory
‘Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it' (Niels Bohr). The aim of this unit is to provide you with a sufficient understanding of quantum theory in the spirit of the above quote. Many applications of the novel field of quantum information theory can be studied using undergraduate mathematics.

Network Algorithms
In this unit you will be introduced to the formal idea of an algorithm, when it is a good algorithm and techniques for constructing algorithms and checking that they work; explore connectivity and colourings of graphs, from an algorithmic perspective; and study how algebraic methods such as path algebras and cycle spaces may be used to solve network problems.

Advanced Financial Mathematics
In this unit you will investigate the validity of various linear and non-linear time series occurring in finance and extend the use of stochastic calculus to interest rate movements and credit rating;

Combinatorics
The aim of this unit is to introduce some standard techniques and concepts of combinatorics, including: methods of counting including the principle of inclusion and exclusion; generating functions; probabilistic methods; and permutations, Ramsey theory.

Computational Number Theory
You will be provided with an introduction to many major methods currently used for testing/proving primality and for the factorisation of composite integers. The course will develop the mathematical theory that underlies these methods, as well as describing the methods themselves.

Complexity Theory
Several classes of computational complexity are introduced. You will discuss how to recognise when different problems have different computational hardness, and be able to deduce cryptographic properties of related algorithms and protocols.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- knowledge and understanding of: the principles of communication through noisy channels using coding theory; the principles of cryptography as a tool for securing data; and the role and limitations of mathematics in the solution of problems arising in the real world

- a high level of ability in subject-specific skills, such as algebra and number theory

- developed the capacity to synthesise information from a number of sources with critical awareness

- critically analysed the strengths and weaknesses of solutions to problems in applications of mathematics

- the ability to clearly formulate problems and express technical content and conclusions in written form

- personal skills of time management, self-motivation, flexibility and adaptability.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation. The examinations in May/June count for 75% of the final average and the dissertation, which has to be submitted in September, counts for the remaining 25%.

Employability & career opportunities

Our students have gone on to successful careers in a variety of industries, such as information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunication. In recent years our graduates have entered into roles including Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security Manager at London Underground.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. Read more
This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience.

You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. It is for those interested in writing, reading, language, art, the self, literature and discovering more about the relations between literature and philosophy.

The MA in Critical Theory offers a choice of two core courses that survey a wide range of modern theoretical approaches, and a range of taught options covering postcolonial theory, theories of art, modern approaches to comparative literature, deconstruction and a chance to work in depth on a single key theoretical text and the writings it refers to.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/216/critical-theory

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; one core module (FR866: Literature and Theory) and three optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a theory-based dissertation between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR807 - Postmodern French Detective Fiction (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH833 - Contemporary Critical Approaches to the Study of Religion (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)

Assessment

The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory

- study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language

- offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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It is sometimes said that political theory concerns the questions of “who gets what and who says?”. In modern pluralistic societies an additional question arises. Read more
It is sometimes said that political theory concerns the questions of “who gets what and who says?”. In modern pluralistic societies an additional question arises: how can we live together peacefully in circumstances in which we disagree about how best to live? These issues are both political and legal. States, and increasingly the international domain, regulate citizens’ lives through law. The LLM in Legal and Political Theory – a unique collaboration between the Departments of Politics and Philosophy and the York Law School offers students the opportunity to study the core issues and approaches of political and legal theory and to consider the relations between them.

The LLM in Legal and Political Theory aims to provide:
-Opportunities to study some of the enduring questions of political life including: By what right do some people rule over others?; What is the relationship of law and morality?; Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law?; and, What is the just distribution of rights and socio-economic goods and opportunities within states and globally?
-Opportunities to choose from a wide range of Option Modules in Law, Politics, and Philosophy
-The opportunity to write an independent dissertation on a topic of your choosing supervised by a member of the academic staff

At the end of the course students will:
-Have a critical understanding of the central questions of legal and political theory and of the works of the great legal and political theorists both past and present who have examined these questions
-Have knowledge of the fundamental questions of jurisprudence and of how these connect to issues of political theory
-Understand the distinctive methodologies of the study of legal and political theory

The taught programme, which can also be taken Part Time over two years, is organised around three Core modules that run through the first two Terms and provide the foundations of the study of legal and political theory. In addition, students take Option modules in subjects of their choosing. In the third Term and over the summer, students write a Dissertation.

Each student is allocated a Personal Advisor who will help you to tailor the programme to suit your individual interests. Teaching is done through small groups led by members of the academic staff.

Structure of the Programme

The LLM in Legal and Political Theory taught programme of one year (or two years if taken part time). The LLM is made up of 180 credits. 120 credits are studied through a mix of compulsory and optional taught modules. The remaining 60 credits are obtained through undertaking a 13,000 word dissertation. The programme is structured in the following way:
-Autumn Term: 60 credits (Foundational Issues in Legal Theory; Approaches to Political Theory; and one 20 credit option module)
-Spring Term: 60 credits (Advanced Issues in Legal Theory; and two 20 credit option modules)
-Summer Term/Summer: 60 credits (Dissertation, including research training)

A stimulating environment for postgraduate study

York Law School has developed a reputation for offering academically rigorous, innovative, practical and stimulating programmes of study. We offer a rounded student experience – reflecting the best of academic and professional practice – and have a friendly and dynamic team of experienced academics, committed to the best methods of legal education.

In addition, we enjoy a close relationship with the legal profession, with practitioners involved in the design and delivery of key aspects of all our programmes, and have forged collaborative links in teaching and research across the University as a whole. You'll find studying here a stimulating and rewarding experience which will equip you for your chosen career.

How you’ll be taught on the LLM

On the LLM programme you will be taught using a wide variety of modern teaching and learning methods. Through rigorous academic study you will engage with theoretical, applied and practical studies, ensuring that you develop a deep understanding of legal political theory.

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This programme will provide you with a firm grounding in political analysis and a critical insight into the real politics behind the headlines. Read more

This programme will provide you with a firm grounding in political analysis and a critical insight into the real politics behind the headlines.

You will explore the variety, dynamism and relevance of political theory in the modern world, gaining an insight into political thought and practical application of political ideas.

You will consider the various ways in which theory is vital to understanding a range of urgent and pressing problems (such as terrorism, global poverty, social cohesion, immigration, censorship, war and the environment) in contemporary politics and address the practical implications of these ideas.

Throughout the course you will build a portfolio of in-depth study of many of the defining events and dynamics of modern society, across Europe, North America, Africa and Asia, providing an understanding of the world that will prove invaluable in further academic study or a range of postgraduate careers.

The Political Theory and Cultural Values Research Group is an active team of enthusiastic academics, pursuing cutting-edge research into a wide variety of strands of political thought.

The Political Theory Centre is part of the White Rose Association for Political Philosophy, linking you into the complementary political theory teams at York and Sheffield Universities.

Links with the Leeds Centre for Democratisation afford excellent opportunities for discussing the application of many of the ideas studied on the programme. Political theorists form part of a large department of political studies, including International Relations and Development, which additionally provide an auspicious context for the study of applied theory.

Course content

Through compulsory and optional modules, this programme will offer you:

  • the chance to engage in in-depth critical analysis of political thought
  • the opportunity to examine the nature of freedom, justice and equality
  • a firm grounding in political analysis
  • a critical insight into the defining events and dynamics of modern society
  • a rigorous grounding in the dominant paradigms of political science
  • the chance to personalise your programme.

You will also be able to hone your research and writing skills in your compulsory dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a diverse range of related subjects of interest to you.

If you are a part-time student, you will study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Political Theory in Action 30 credits
  • Advanced Political Analysis 30 credits
  • POLIS MA Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Global Politics of Health: Power and Inequity 30 credits
  • Conflict, Complex Emergencies and Global Governance 30 credits
  • Political Economy of Resources and Development 30 credits
  • European Defence and Security Analysis 30 credits
  • The Rise of China 30 credits
  • American Foreign Policy 30 credits
  • Contemporary Politics of the Middle East 30 credits
  • The Politics of the Israel-Palestine Conflict 30 credits
  • International Political Economy 30 credits
  • International Relations and the Environment 30 credits
  • Global Justice 30 credits
  • Research Methods 30 credits
  • Political Theory in Action 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Politics (Political Theory) MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Politics (Political Theory) MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is tailored for interactive small-group work, and uses a combination of lecture and seminar-discussion modes.

Teaching on political theory modules is predominantly seminar discussion-based, while other modules include more lecture-oriented material.

You will be expected to do a significant amount of preparatory reading before each session, and emphasis will be on student-led discussion to build critical and reflective confidence in a group environment.

Assessment

Modules are assessed by varying combinations of exam and coursework, depending on the module.

Career opportunities

The emphasis on applied use of political thought, particularly from a transformative perspective, means the critical analytical skills learnt here are of use in a wide range of employment sectors, including the civil service, public sector organisations and the third sector.

Many graduates go on to complete PhDs in Political Theory, having had the opportunity to strengthen their command of a certain area of political thought during their Masters studies.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Master's specialisation in Political Theory. Focusing on the interface of theories of the good society, globalisation, legitimacy and power. Read more

Master's specialisation in Political Theory

Focusing on the interface of theories of the good society, globalisation, legitimacy and power.

Political theory is the soul of political science: it’s not about determining what the facts are but about determining what they mean and what should be done with them. It’s about the genuine and the deceptive arguments used to interfere in other people’s lives and business. We need political theory anywhere where power is used both covertly and openly, where policies are made and where choices are questioned and criticised.

As a political theorist, you will ask what would be sensible instead of what people call sensible. Just a handful of questions you will be asking and seeking the answers to: Is there a moral foundation for national sovereignty or self-determination? How far should tolerance go? What can and should be our ambitions for local community building? When does a political theory become a weapon or a form of power? Can authority ever be legitimate? Do we owe anything to future generations, animals, the global poor or minority groups?

This Master’s specialisation offers students an unprecedented opportunity to learn to assess political values, aspirations and dreams in terms of their desirability and reasonability. You will also discover how political theoretical work can be introduced fruitfully in other relevant contexts. This will enable you to help civil initiatives and governmental institutions, not to mention the public at large by imagining and designing policies and ambitions that are both viable and defensible.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/pt

Why study Political Theory at Radboud University

- Our programme is consistently ranked the best Political Science/PT programme in the Netherlands

- The programme has a unique focus on justification and recognition, globalisation and their relationship with power

- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups

- You are encouraged to critically reflect on the staff’s ongoing research in the Nijmegen Political Philosophical Workshop

- We are the conscience of real-world politics and policies and prepare you to interpret and contribute to real-world politics

Career prospects

Graduates of political theory are academics, not politicians. We believe that to be a good policy advisor, manager or administrator, you need to have good research skills. Research is what is going to make your advice be both valid and practical: both sides of the coin of policies are equally important to the political theorists.

Job positions

Our graduates find employment in a variety of settings, including in consulting, national and international diplomacy and EU institutions. They can work as policy advisors, managers and leaders in local, regional and national government, as well as in business, media, NGOs, think-tanks and civic organisations. Quite a few go on to pursue a PhD degree.

Our approach to this field

Don’t rules, laws, commands and regulations always imply a violation of human autonomy? Are they not insults to humanity? Is there a way to escape from power?

Political theory is the key to good and valid politics. It is practice-oriented and should not be confused with political philosophy. Political theory is more than a reflection on eternal truths and the essence of concepts; it makes the difference between knowing and understanding. Compared to classical political philosophy it is more concrete, more interdisciplinary in nature, and sensitive both to the workings of power and the limits of feasibility.

Political Theory at Radboud University focuses on four aspects:

1. Critical understanding of theories of the good society

Of course, just like most Political Theory programmes we take a critical look at the theories of the good society. Who is – but also who should be – included in the theories: families or individuals, distinct people or everyone, animals and environment or humans only, future or only present generations?

2. Globalisation

We focus on globalisation in the broadest sense: the globalisation of people, money, technology and values so that we address global, ecological, intergenerational justice, multiculturalism and agonism. We definitely do not limit ourselves to the dominant redistributive justice discourse.

3. Justification and legitimisation

We start off by justifying and discrediting particular policies by the standards of theories of the good society. But we go further. What values, rules, tests and mechanisms are there to help design and assess political choices? Which are appropriate and when? Are they biased? We will discuss deliberative democracy, Habermas’s domination-free discourse, Rawls’s reflective equilibrium, the agora of agonists like Mouffe and, of course, foundationalism.

4. Power

Power is the mother of all political concepts; it is a concept that is too easily taken for granted or ignored by political scientists, political philosophers and politicians. We recognise that power, ultimately the threat of violence, will always be part of politics and that there will always be a gap between what you think you can justify and what others will embrace. At Radboud University we train students to try and chart where power hides in justification practices, both in political theory and political practise.

The combination of these aspects is what makes the Political Theory Master’s specialisation at Radboud University unique.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/pt

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The Cultural and Critical Theory MA will give you a sophisticated appreciation of the limits of human understanding, the interdependence of philosophy and theory, and the implications of these for political action, aesthetic sensibility and representation in art and activism. Read more
The Cultural and Critical Theory MA will give you a sophisticated appreciation of the limits of human understanding, the interdependence of philosophy and theory, and the implications of these for political action, aesthetic sensibility and representation in art and activism.

The course offers three distinct pathways:

• Aesthetics and Cultural Theory
• Globalisation, Politics and Culture
• Philosophy and Critical Theory

All pathways provide for the development of an advanced understanding of specialist areas in cultural and critical theory, and effective preparation for doctoral research.

The core course, delivered during the autumn and spring terms, is complemented by a research methods module and two elective modules that offer opportunities for study across the range of humanities provision.

The course culminates in the submission of a specialist 20,000-word (or equivalent) project, which allows you to apply your advanced philosophical and theoretical understanding to an issue or text of your choice.

Taught courses are delivered with a maximum size of 12 students. Supervision for the project, and for pre and post-essay tutorials, is on a one-to-one basis with the appropriate tutor.

Why study with us?

• Opportunity to specialise in aesthetics and cultural theory, political and cultural globalisation, or philosophy and critical theory

• Successful international conferences – for example 'Slavery, Race and Reparative History', 'Globalisation and its Discontents' and 'Complicity', all with visiting scholars from across the globe

• The Philosophy, Politics and Aesthetics seminar series that invites debate from across the College, and hosts visiting scholars to deliver seminar papers twice a month

• A research methods module that improves your skills in independent study, and prepares you for doctoral work as well as for your MA project

• Staff with diverse research interests that span art practices, ethics, aesthetics, Marxisms, Freudianisms, Liberalisms, the political philosophy of international relations and global change, philosophy and filmmaking, literature and visual art, political activism and forms of democracy, and more

Areas of study

Delivered during the autumn and spring terms, the core course consists of a common lecture line and two modules in aesthetics and cultural theory, philosophy and critical theory, or political and cultural globalisation, depending on your chosen specialist area.

You also take a research methods module, which prepares you for the research project by considering the various approaches taken by relevant disciplines, interrogating the requirements of MA-level research and addressing how your intended research topic might best be refined.

The project itself normally consists of 18-20,000 word dissertation (or 12,000 words alongside a video, an installation or studio-based work) in which you apply your knowledge of cultural or critical theory to an issue or text of your choosing. Your work towards this submission is supported by one-to-one project supervision.

The elective modules can take one of three forms:

• a module from one of our other arts and humanities MA courses
• a Higher Education Teaching and Learning Course in which you shadow a tutor in the delivery of a module on the undergraduate programme
• a 10,000-word extended essay with regular one-to-one tutorial supervision.

To find out more about the course syllabus please visit the website:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/cultural-and-critical-theory-ma-pgcert-pgdip.aspx

Careers and employability

About a third of graduates from the Cultural and Critical Theory MA go on to PhD study, equipped with advanced research skills and specialist knowledge of their subject area. Others start or continue work as museum or gallery curators, in arts administration, journalism, social work, education or politics.

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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. Read more
The Department of Mathematics offers graduate courses leading to M.Sc., and eventually to Ph.D., degree in Mathematics. The Master of Science program aims to provide a sound foundation for the students who wish to pursue a research career in mathematics as well as other related areas. The department emphasizes both pure and applied mathematics. Research in the department covers algebra, number theory, combinatorics, differential equations, functional analysis, abstract harmonic analysis, mathematical physics, stochastic analysis, biomathematics and topology.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Ring Theory and Module Theory, especially Krull dimension, torsion theories, and localization

• Algebraic Theory of Lattices, especially their dimensions (Krull, Goldie, Gabriel, etc.) with applications to Grothendieck categories and module categories equipped with torsion theories

• Field Theory, especially Galois Theory, Cogalois Theory, and Galois cohomology

• Algebraic Number Theory, especially rings of algebraic integers

• Iwasawa Theory of Galois representations and their deformations Euler and Kolyvagin systems, Equivariant Tamagawa Number
Conjecture

• Combinatorial design theory, in particular metamorphosis of designs, perfect hexagon triple systems

• Graph theory, in particular number of cycles in 2-factorizations of complete graphs

• Coding theory, especially relation of designs to codes

• Random graphs, in particular, random proximity catch graphs and digraphs

• Partial Differential Equations

• Nonlinear Problems of Mathematical Physics

• Dissipative Dynamical Systems

• Scattering of classical and quantum waves

• Wavelet analysis

• Molecular dynamics

• Banach algebras, especially the structure of the second Arens duals of Banach algebras

• Abstract Harmonic Analysis, especially the Fourier and Fourier-Stieltjes algebras associated to a locally compact group

• Geometry of Banach spaces, especially vector measures, spaces of vector valued continuous functions, fixed point theory, isomorphic properties of Banach spaces

• Differential geometric, topologic, and algebraic methods used in quantum mechanics

• Geometric phases and dynamical invariants

• Supersymmetry and its generalizations

• Pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics

• Quantum cosmology

• Numerical Linear Algebra

• Numerical Optimization

• Perturbation Theory of Eigenvalues

• Eigenvalue Optimization

• Mathematical finance

• Stochastic optimal control and dynamic programming

• Stochastic flows and random velocity fields

• Lyapunov exponents of flows

• Unicast and multicast data traffic in telecommunications

• Probabilistic Inference

• Inference on Random Graphs (with emphasis on modeling email and internet traffic and clustering analysis)

• Graph Theory (probabilistic investigation of graphs emerging from computational geometry)

• Statistics (analysis of spatial data and spatial point patterns with applications in epidemiology and ecology and statistical methods for medical data and image analysis)

• Classification and Pattern Recognition (with applications in mine field and face detection)

• Arithmetical Algebraic Geometry, Arakelov geometry, Mixed Tate motives

• p-adic methods in arithmetical algebraic geometry, Ramification theory of arithmetic varieties

• Topology of low-dimensional manifolds, in particular Lefschetz fibrations, symplectic and contact structures, Stein fillings

• Symplectic topology and geometry, Seiberg-Witten theory, Floer homology

• Foliation and Lamination Theory, Minimal Surfaces, and Hyperbolic Geometry

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The Master’s programme in Political Theory will teach you political theory and applied philosophy in a theoretical, practical and analytical way. Read more

The Master’s programme in Political Theory will teach you political theory and applied philosophy in a theoretical, practical and analytical way. You are challenged to critically analyse and reflect on current political contexts and social and political thought.

The Political Theory track provides students with the conceptual tool-kits to analyse the complex normative and methodological issues of contemporary political life. Students are encouraged to take an active role in critical reflection on political practices, institutional arrangements, and social science methods by building on a solid foundation in social and political thought. The track combines analytical rigor with policy relevance.

  • How should public policy develop when there is moral and religious disagreement or confusion?
  • What are the proper norms to guide the ethics of war or immigration and refugee policy?
  • How should political and economic institutions be reformed to deal with the global financial crisis, international inequality or the democratic deficit in the EU?

Three reasons to study Political Theory at the University of Amsterdam

The Political Theory track provides a unique opportunity to study analytically rigorous political theory and applied philosophy in a political science programme; we apply political theory as a guide to public policy and pressing social problems.

We have an international student body and an international faculty.

The Department of Political Science is consistently ranked among the World’s top-50, and is the largest in the Netherlands. This provides students with a broad foundation in political theory and opportunities for electives and thesis research in a wide variety of related areas of study, from international relations to political economy, from electoral politics to public administration.

Student profile 

The track is designed for independent students that wish to gain a rigorous foundation in political theory and moral philosophy in order to apply these to pressing social problems. It is aimed at students that aim to develop normative and methodological tools that they can apply to complex domestic and international challenges. The programme is writing intensive; students are expected to develop a capacity to work independently and in group settings.

Career prospects

This programme prepares students for careers in government, global business, think-tanks, non-profits, and journalism with a focus on public policy, analysis, and advocacy at the local, national, and international level. The programme also provides a strong foundation for a career in academia. For more information, see the webpage on career prospects.

Degree certificate

Political Theory is a track of the accredited degree programme Political Science. After successful completion of this programme, you will receive a legally accredited Master’s degree in Political Science and the title Master of Science (MSc).



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The Architecture and Digital Theory MRes explores digital theory, history, and cultures, in all their guises. from design and fabrication, to many related fields and disciplines that are being affected and transformed by the new digital paradigm. Read more

The Architecture and Digital Theory MRes explores digital theory, history, and cultures, in all their guises: from design and fabrication, to many related fields and disciplines that are being affected and transformed by the new digital paradigm.

About this degree

Students on this programme gain understanding of the ways that information about architecture and digital theory can be analysed, evaluated and categorised. They will also consider the role of the practitioner in respect to research and design in the built environment and be introduced to theories of design as a knowledge- or evidence-based process.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • History and Theory of Digital Design
  • Architecture and Digital Theory: Mini Research Project
  • Architecture and Digital Theory: Main Research Project

Optional modules

Students choose two of the following:

  • Design as a Knowledge-Based Process
  • Introduction to Programming for Architecture and Design
  • Architectural Design: Historical, Cultural and Theoretical Skills

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of Informal and formal presentation to critics, lectures and seminars, face-to-face and email tutorials. Assessment is through coursework, written papers and public presentations.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Architecture and Digital Theory MRes

Careers

Graduates from the Bartlett have been very successful in gaining subsequent employment. At present there is a growing demand for our Master's graduates from a wide range of both public and private employers. Many graduates from the programme have gone on to research, teach and publish at universities and other institutions worldwide.

Employability

Postgraduate study at the UCL Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment is situated within a vibrant graduate and research environment, which includes a large cohort of PhD students and an extensive range of academic staff with diverse interests. Students on the Architecture and Digital Theory MRes are in one of the world's first Master’s in this important and growing field, and are able to engage in innumerable seminars, research representations and other events. Our graduates are highly sought after. Some choose to continue with academic research or teaching, others go on to roles in the visual arts, publishing, design and architecture.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Bartlett School of Architecture is a hotbed of research, design, theorising and discussion on and around architecture and digital theory. Leading academics and practitioners in this field, on matters of design and on history, theory and writing, are actively involved in teaching and research at the school.

The Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future. Located in London, we are at the heart of a large cluster of creative architects and engineering firms and with all the resources of a world city at hand. Conceived as a research laboratory, the programme offers a hybrid pedagogical format where learning and experiments, inspired by today’s evolving design technologies, are informed by the culture of the design community and relevant recent scholarship in the arts and humanities.

A new MA version of the programme is also being developed. Applicants interested in this mode should contact Teaching and Learning Officer 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Architecture

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This MA provides students with key analytical skills to study the ethical dimensions of public policy. The programme, drawing on three areas of excellence at UCL, is a unique mix of politics, law and philosophy, centred on the normative evaluation of public policy at both the domestic and international levels. Read more

This MA provides students with key analytical skills to study the ethical dimensions of public policy. The programme, drawing on three areas of excellence at UCL, is a unique mix of politics, law and philosophy, centred on the normative evaluation of public policy at both the domestic and international levels.

About this degree

The programme explores the moral quality of the decisions citizens and professionals take, and the justice of the legal and political structures within which they operate. Students develop the ability to analyse important modern political theories, and justify their position on issues concerning the relationship between politics, law and society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Meanings of Liberty: Applied Methods in Political Theory (30)
  • Seminars in Political Theory, Colloquium in Legal Philosophy and Peer Assisted Learning Sessions (30)

Optional modules

Students choose modules worth a total of 45 credits from the list below (the others remain available as options).

They also choose one further 15-credit module from a list available at: the programme website

  • Contemporary Political Philosophy I: Authority, Obligation & Democracy (15)
  • Contemporary Political Philosophy II: Social Justice and Equality (15)
  • Equality, Justice and Difference (15)
  • Global Ethics (15)
  • Jeremy Bentham and the Utilitarian Tradition I and II (30)
  • Jeremy Bentham and the Utilitarian Tradition I (15)
  • Jurisprudence and Legal Theory I & II (30)
  • Jurispudence and Legal Theory I (15)
  • The Ethics of Poverty (15)
  • Public Ethics (15)
  • Theoretical Foundations of Human Rights (15)
  • The Ethics of Counterterrorism (15)

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Teaching for all modules takes the form of seminars where time is dedicated both to introducing knowledge and materials, and allowing students to test their understanding, knowledge and evaluative skills, through discussion, criticism and debate. Assessment is primarily through long essays, coursework and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Legal and Political Theory MA

Careers

This MA provides an excellent foundation for further research in political theory, or a wide variety of careers in this field.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Leadership Fellow, Princeton University
  • Research Assistant, Labour
  • MPhil in International Relations and Politics, University of Cambridge
  • Journalist, BBC
  • Policy Adviser, HM Treasury

Employability

Students of the Legal and Political Theory MA acquire advanced analytical transferable skills and exposure to cutting-edge legal and philosophical work - problem-solving, logical skills - combined with deep understanding of challenges of the contemporary world. As a result our students have an excellent record of employability in leading professions - law, consultancy, politics, journalism and academic careers.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of legal and political theory.

Weekly interactive seminars offer students an unrivalled opportunity to meet and engage with some of the leading figures in the field.

The Legal and Political Theory MA benefits from the interdisciplinary research culture of the Department of Political Science, as well as from the participation of UCL Philosophy and UCL Laws.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Political Science

89% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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The ALGANT Master program provides a study and research track in pure mathematics, with a strong focus on algebra, geometry and number theory. … Read more

The ALGANT Master program provides a study and research track in pure mathematics, with a strong focus on algebra, geometry and number theory. This track may be completed throughout Europe and the world, thanks to a partnership between leading research universities. The ALGANT course introduces students to the latest developments within these subjects, and provides the best possible preparation for their forthcoming doctoral studies.

The ALGANT program consists mainly of advanced courses within the field of mathematics and of a research project or internship leading to a Master thesis. Courses are offered in: algebraic geometry, algebraic and geometric topology, algebraic and analytic number theory, coding theory, combinatorics, complex function theory, cryptology, elliptic curves, manifolds. Students are encouraged to participate actively in seminars.

The university partners offer compatible basic preparation in the first year (level 1), which then leads to a complementary offer for more specialized courses in the second year (level 2). 

Program structure

Year 1 (courses in French)

Semester 1

  • Modules and quadratic spaces (9 ECTS)
  • Group theory (6 ECTS)
  • Complex analysis (9 ECTS)
  • Functional analysis (6 ECTS)

Semester 2

  • Geometry (6 ECTS)
  • Number theory (6 ECTS)
  • Spectral theory and distributions (6 ECTS)
  • Probability and statistics (6 ECTS)
  • Cryptology (6 ECTS)
  • Algebra and formal computations (6 ECTS)

Year 2 (courses in English)

Semester 1

  • Number theory (9 ECTS)
  • Algorithmic number theory (6 ECTS)
  • Geometry (9 ECTS)
  • Elliptic curves (6 ECTS)
  • Algebraic geometry (9 ECTS)
  • Analytic number theory: advanced course 1 (6 ECTS)

Semester 2

  • Cohomology of groups: advanced course 2 (6 ECTS)
  • The key role of certain inequalities at the interface between complex geometry (6 ECTS)

Strengths of this Master program

  • Courses given by academic experts within the field of mathematics.
  • Individually tailored study tracks.
  • Top-quality scientific environment and facilities provided by leading global research institutes, e.g. Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux.
  • Supported by the International Master program of the Bordeaux Initiative of Excellence.

After this Master program?

Students who successfully complete the ALGANT program will be well equipped to pursue a career in research by preparing a Ph.D.

Graduates may also directly apply for positions as highly trained mathematicians, especially in the areas of cryptography, information security and numerical communications.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Lattice Gauge Theory enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Lattice Gauge Theory programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of Lattice Gauge Theory programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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