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The course is run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. Read more

The course is run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. It covers the following main areas:

  • quantum field theory, particle physics and string theory
  • theoretical condensed matter physics,
  • theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and physics of continuous media
  • mathematical foundations of theoretical physics

The course concentrates on the main areas of modern mathematical and theoretical physics: elementary-particle theory, including string theory, condensed matter theory (both quantum and soft matter), theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and the physics of continuous media (including fluid dynamics and related areas usually associated with courses in applied mathematics in the UK system). If you are a physics student with a strong interest in theoretical physics or a mathematics student keen to apply high-level mathematics to physical systems, this is a course for you.

The course offers considerable flexibility and choice; you will be able to choose a path reflecting your intellectual tastes or career choices. This arrangement caters to you if you prefer a broad theoretical education across subject areas or if you have already firmly set your sights on one of the subject areas, although you are encouraged to explore across sub-field boundaries.

You will have to attend at least ten units' worth of courses, with one unit corresponding to a 16-hour lecture course or equivalent. You can opt to offer a dissertation as part of your ten units. Your performance will be assessed by one or several of the following means: 

  • invigilated written exams
  • course work marked on a pass/fail basis
  • take-home exams
  • mini-projects due shortly after the end of the lecture course.

The modes of assessment for a given course are decided by the course lecturer and will be published at the beginning of each academic year. As a general rule, foundational courses will be offered with an invigilated exam while some of the more advanced courses will typically be relying on the other assessment methods mentioned above. In addition, you will be required to give an oral presentation towards the end of the academic year which will cover a more specialised and advanced topic related to one of the subject areas of the course. At least four of the ten units must be assessed by an invigilated exam and, therefore, have to be taken from lecture courses which provide this type of assessment. A further three units must be assessed by invigilated written exam, take-home exam or mini-project. Apart from these restrictions, you are free to choose from the available programme of lecture courses.

The course offers a substantial opportunity for independent study and research in the form of an optional dissertation (worth at least one unit). The dissertation is undertaken under the guidance of a member of staff and will typically involve investigating and write in a particular area of theoretical physics or mathematics, without the requirement (while not excluding the possibility) of obtaining original results.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of

positronium

CW and pulsed laser systems

Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

Raman microscope

CPU parallel cluster

Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.



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What is the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling all about?. Get in at the bleeding edge of contemporary chemistry. Read more

What is the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling all about?

Get in at the bleeding edge of contemporary chemistry: theoretical and computational chemistry are marking the new era that lies ahead in the molecular sciences. The aim of the programme is to train scientists that are able to address a wide range of problems inmodern chemical, physical and biological sciences through the combination of theoretical and computational tools.

This programme is organised by:

  • Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (coordinating institution), Spain
  • Universiteit Groningen, the Netherlands
  • KU Leuven, Belgium
  • Università degli Studi di Perugia, Italy
  • Universidade do Porto, Portugal
  • Université Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III, France
  • Universitat de Valencia, Spain

The Erasmus Mundus Master of Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling is a joint initiative of these European Universities, including KU Leuven and co-ordinated by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. 

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The programme is organised according to a two-year structure.

  • The first year of the programme introduces you to concepts and methods. The core of the programme is an intensive international course intended to bring all participants to a common level of excellence. It takes place in the summer between year 1 and year 2 and runs for four weeks. Coursework is taught by a select group of invited international experts.
  • The second year of the programme is devoted to tutorials covering the material dealt with in the intensive course and to a thesis project carried out in part at another university within the consortium. The intensive course is organised at the partner institutions on a rotating basis.

Department

The Department of Chemistry consists of four divisions, all of which conduct highquality research embedded in well-established collaborations with other universities, research institutes and companies around the world. Its academic staff is committed to excellence in teaching and research. Although the department's primary goal is to obtain insight into the composition, structure and properties of chemical compounds and the design, synthesis and development of new (bio)molecular materials, this knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits.

The department aims to develop and maintain leading, internationally renowned research programmes dedicated to solving fundamental and applied problems in the fields of:

  • the design, synthesis and characterisation of new compounds (organic-inorganic, polymers).
  • the simulation of the properties and reactivity of (bio)molecules, polymers and clusters by quantum chemical and molecular modelling methods.
  • the determination of the chemical and physical properties of (bio)molecules, and polymers on the molecular as well as on the material level by spectroscopy, microscopy and other characterisation tools as related to their structure.

Objectives

Modern Chemistry is unthinkable without the achievements of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. As a result these disciplines have become a mandatory tool for the molecular science towards the end of the 20th century, and they will undoubtedly mark the new era that lies ahead of us.

In this perspective the training and formation of the new generations of computational and theoretical chemists with a deep and broad knowledge is of paramount importance. Experts from seven European universities have decided to join forces in a European Master Course for Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling (TCCM). This course is recognized as an Erasmus Mundus course by the European Union.

Graduates will have acquired the skills and competences for advanced research in chemical, physical and material sciences, will be qualified to collaborate in an international research team, and will be able to develop professional activities as experts in molecular design in pharmaceutical industry, petrochemical companies and new-materials industry.

Career perspectives

In addition to commanding sound theoretical knowledge in chemistry and computational modelling, you will be equipped to apply any of the scientific codes mastered in the programme in a work environment, or develop new codes to address new requirements associated with research or productive activities.

You will have attained the necessary skills to pursue a scientific career as a doctoral student in chemistry, physics or material science. You will also be qualified to work as an expert in molecular design in the pharmaceutical industry, at petrochemical companies and in the new-materials industry. You will also have a suitable profile to work as a computational expert.



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This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts. Read more

This MSc programme is designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable in a wide range of research areas, while emphasising the underlying physics concepts.

The MSc programme is a core part of the Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, which has been created to mark the start of a new era in theoretical physics research, following the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. You will take part in the centre’s activities, including weekly seminars, colloquia and workshops involving physicists from around the world, and you will be involved in research-level projects as part of your dissertation.

The partnership between mathematics and physics is an essential one. In theoretical physics we attempt to build abstract constructs that rationalise, explain and predict physical phenomena. To do this we need mathematics: the language of physics. The underlying structure of the physical world can be understood in great detail using mathematics; this is a never-ending source of fascination to theoretical physicists.

Programme structure

Taught courses

You will take two compulsory courses plus a selection of courses that will bring you to an advanced level in subjects such as general relativity, cosmology, statistical physics, condensed matter physics, quantum field theory and the standard model of particle physics. You may also take courses drawn from a wider pool including specialist courses in mathematics, computing and climate science.

Dissertation

Following the taught component of the programme, you will undertake a three-month research project, which leads to a dissertation.

Learning outcomes

By engaging with and completing the MSc in Theoretical Physics, graduates will acquire core knowledge of theoretical physics subjects and the research methodologies of modern theoretical and mathematical physics. The programme aims to develop research skills and problem solving skills, especially in mathematics. It also aims to develop an attitude of mind conductive to critical questioning and creative thinking and the capacity to formulate ideas mathematically.

Career opportunities

These degrees are designed to prepare you for a research career in academia or industry by introducing advanced ideas and techniques that are applicable to a wide range of research areas and sectors including academia, industry, education and finance.



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Goal of the pro­gramme. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

The basis of natural sciences is the modelling of phenomena and solving these models. The Master’s programme in theoretical and computational methods will give you a strong basis in the theoretical methods, modelling, and mathematical and numerical analysis within physics, mathematics, chemistry and/or computer science.  The special feature of this programme is that you can combine the above disciplines into a comprehensive programme. It is well suited for the needs of fundamental and applied research. This programme requires a strong commitment from you to develop your own skills and plan your degree. You can tailor your programme according to your existing knowledge and interests, in cooperation with the programme professors.

The programme’s strong scientific emphasis makes it a natural gateway to further studies in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and computer science. This will usually take place within one of the research groups working on the Kumpula campus.

Upon completing the Master’s programme, you will:

  • Have a solid basis of skills in your chosen scientific field
  • Have good skills in analytical and computational thinking and deduction
  • Be able to apply theoretical and computational methods to the analysis and understanding of problems in various fields 
  • Be able to generalise information on scientific phenomena, and identify the inner relationships
  • Be able to create mathematical models of natural phenomena
  • Be able to solve the models, both analytically and numerically

As a graduate of this Master’s programme you can work as an expert in many kinds of scientific jobs in the private and the public sectors. The employment rate in this field is good.

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The special feature of this programme is its great scope: it consists of several modules in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and/or computer science. Out of these, you may select a suitable group of subjects according to your interests and the courses you took for your Bachelor's degree. The programme incorporates modules from e.g. the following areas:

  • Theoretical physics
  • Mathematics
  • Cosmology and particle physics
  • Computational physics
  • Physical chemistry
  • Laser spectroscopy
  • Mathematical physics and stochastics
  • Applied analysis
  • Software engineering
  • Theoretical computer science

The courses include group and lecture instruction, exercises, literature, and workshops. Most courses also include exams or project assignments. In addition, you can complete some courses independently, by taking exams.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Computer Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Theoretical Computer Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Computer Science is at the cutting edge of modern technology, is developing rapidly, and Swansea Computer Science graduates enjoy excellent employment prospects.

Computer Science now plays a part in almost every aspect of our lives - science, engineering, the media, entertainment, travel, commerce and industry, public services and the home.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Computer Science enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The

Theoretical Computer Science programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Theoretical Computer Science MSc by Research programme, you will be fully integrated into one of our established computer science research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features of Theoretical Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science is amongst the top 25 in the UK, with a growing reputation in research both nationally and internationally in computer science. It is home to world class researchers, excellent teaching programmes and fine laboratory facilities.

All postgraduate Computer Science programmes will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that we lead Wales in the field of Computer Science and are in the UK Top 20.

We are ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).

Links with Industry

Each spring, Computer Science students prepare and present a poster about their project at a project fair – usually together with a system or software demonstration. The Department of Computer Science also strongly encourages students to create CVs and business cards to take along to the fair, as businesses and employers visit to view the range of projects and make contact with the graduating students.



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The Masters in Theoretical Physics provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on the theoretical aspects of the subject, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Theoretical Physics provides an understanding of the principles and methods of modern physics, with particular emphasis on the theoretical aspects of the subject, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

◾Physics and Astronomy at the University of Glasgow is ranked 3rd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾The School plays a leading role in the exploitation of data from the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN.
◾You will gain the theoretical and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve a range of advanced physics problems, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership in academia or industry.
◾You will develop transferable skills that will improve your career prospects, such as project management, team-working, advanced data analysis, problem-solving, critical evaluation of scientific literature, advanced laboratory and computing skills, and how to effectively communicate with different audiences.
◾You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾This programme has a September and January intake*.

*For suitably qualified candidates

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Theoretical Physics include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

The programme draws upon a wide range of advanced Masters-level courses. You will have the flexibility to tailor your choice of optional lecture courses and project work to a wide variety of specific research topics and their applications in the area of theoretical physics.

Core courses include
◾Advanced data analysis
◾Quantum information
◾Quantum theory
◾Research skills
◾Extended project

Optional courses include
◾Advanced electromagnetic theory
◾Advanced mathematical methods
◾Applied optics
◾Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
◾General relativity and gravitation (alternate years, starting 2018-19)
◾Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years, starting 2017-18)
◾Relativistic quantum fields
◾Statistical mechanics
◾The sun's atmosphere

For further information on the content of individual courses please see Honours and Masters level courses.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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Our MSc Theoretical Physics programme will provide you with exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills. Read more

Our MSc Theoretical Physics programme will provide you with exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills. As well as the wide range of modules offered by the Department of Mathematics, many optional modules are available from across the University of London, subject to approval. King's will offer you a unique module in 'General Research Techniques' which will prepare you for life as a research scientist. You will also undertake an extended research project supervised by one of our academic staff.

Key benefits

  • This intensive programme covers basic topics in theoretical and mathematical physics such as general relativity and quantum field theory, and leads to advanced topics such as string theory, supersymmetry and integrable quantum field theory.
  • Intimate class environment with small class sizes (typically fewer than 30 students per module) allows good student-lecturer interactions.
  • A full 12-month course with a three-month supervised summer project to give a real introduction to research.

Description

This programme covers topics like string theory, quantum field theory, supersymmetry, general relativity, and conformal and integrable field theory. Students gain a coherent, comprehensive introduction to the building blocks of modern theoretical physics. Students study at least eight taught modules and develop individual projects in areas of current research. The programme ideally prepares students for active research.

Course purpose

The MSc Theoretical Physics programme provides experience of research in rapidly developing areas of theoretical and mathematical physics and related disciplines. The programme provides experience of the planning, administration, execution and dissemination of research, and will equip you with the background knowledge and transferable and generic skills required to become an effective researcher.

Course format and assessment

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

Each module in your degree is worth a number of credits: you are expected to spend approximately 10 hours of effort for each credit (so for a typical module of 15 credits this means 150 hours of effort). These hours cover every aspect of the module: lectures, tutorials, labs (if any), independent study based on lecture notes, tutorial preparation and extension, lab preparation and extension, coursework preparation and submission, examination revision and preparation, and examinations. 

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary method of assessment for this course is written examination. You may also be assessed by class tests, essays, assessment reports and oral presentations.



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Non-equilibrium processes underpin many challenging problems across the natural sciences. The mission of the Non-Equilibrium Systems. Read more

Non-equilibrium processes underpin many challenging problems across the natural sciences. The mission of the Non-Equilibrium Systems: Theoretical Modelling, Simulation and Data-Driven Analysis MSc is to provide students an insight into cross-disciplinary approaches to non-equilibrium systems, focussing on the three key strands of theoretical modelling, simulation and data-driven analysis. It draws on a broad range of expertise in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Informatics, Computational and Systems Biomedicine, Earth and Environmental Sciences at King’s College London. This course is an ideal study pathway for graduates who wish to work in research and development in an academic or industrial environment. 

Key benefits

  • Located in the heart of London, giving unparalleled access to research facilities.
  • You will be studying innovative modules covering Non-Equilibrium Systems.
  • Research-led study programme taught by staff who are recognised leaders in their field.
  • We offer a friendly and supportive learning environment with small class sizes.

Description

The Non-Equilibrium Systems: Theoretical Modelling, Simulation and Data-Driven Analysis MSc programme aims to provide you with deeper insights into non-equilibrium processes using theoretical modelling, simulation and data-driven analysis and prepare you for roles within active research.

You will complete the course in one year, studying September to September and taking a combination of required and optional modules totalling 180 credits. The broad range of optional modules will allow you to develop a study pathway that reflect your interests.

We also offer the opportunity to explore an additional zero-credit module called Foundations for CSM and CANES, designed as a refresher module covering vital mathematics and physics skills. 

For more information visit http://www.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/groups/noneqsys/Handbook/MSc%20Handbook/CANES-MSc-Programme/CANES-MSc.aspx

Course purpose

For graduates with excellent undergraduate or equivalent qualifications in any relevant discipline (including; mathematics, physics, chemistry, engineering, materials science, biophysics, geophysical sciences and computer science) who want to work in research and development in an academic or industrial environment. The programme aim is to develop deeper insights into non-equilibrium processes using theoretical modelling, simulation and data-driven analysis and prepare students ideally for active research.

Course format and assessment

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the programme. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study.

Each module in your degree is worth a number of credits. You are expected to spend approximately 10 hours of effort for each credit (so for a typical module of 15 credits this means 150 hours of effort). These hours cover every aspect of the module: lectures, tutorials, labs (if any), independent study based on lecture notes, tutorial preparation and extension, coursework preparation and submission, examination revision and preparation, and examination.

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary methods of assessment for this course are written examinations and coursework. You may also be assessed by reports, problem sets and oral presentations.

Career prospects

Leads to PhD study or careers in teaching, industrial research or the financial sector.



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In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. Read more
In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.
The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, Complexity Theory, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.
Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Mathematics or Computer Science
In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor's in mathematics or computer science that have a strong mathematical background and theoretical interests. We will select students based on their motivation and their background. Mathematical maturity is essential and basic knowledge of logic and discrete mathematics is expected.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based)
- IELTS score of ≥6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our approach to this field

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, General Topology, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Our research in this field

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

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Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area. Read more

Theoretical Physics

Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area.

This programme serves as a gateway to understanding the fascinating world of physics, ranging from the unimaginably small scales of elementary particles to the vast dimensions of our universe.

The central goal of the Theoretical Physics programme is to obtain a detailed understanding of the collective behaviour of many particle systems from a fully microscopic point of view. In most physical systems, microscopic details determine the properties observed. Our condensed matter theorists and statistical physicists develop and apply methods for explaining and predicting these connections.

Examples include density functional theory, renormalisation-group theory and the scaling theory of critical phenomena. Dynamical properties are studied using such methods as kinetic theory and the theory of stochastic processes. These theories can be quantum mechanical, including theories of the quantum Hall effect, superconductivity, Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum magnetism and quantum computing. More classical are relationships between chaos and transport, nucleation phenomena, polymer dynamics and phase structure and dynamics of colloids.

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This MSc gives students a grounding in the nature, history, content and context of psychoanalytic theory, as used by practising psychoanalysts. Read more
This MSc gives students a grounding in the nature, history, content and context of psychoanalytic theory, as used by practising psychoanalysts. It provides a comprehensive introduction to current psychoanalytic thinking, rooted in the history and development of ideas and with attention to the application of psychoanalytic ideas to other fields.

Degree information

Students learn about the medical and cultural context in which psychoanalysis began, through to contemporary clinical and theoretical perspectives. The teaching programme has a firm basis in the works of Sigmund Freud, but represents the breadth of the British psychoanalytic traditions, as well as major international contributions, the interface with the arts, and how psychoanalysis fits in with modern science.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core taught modules (120 credits) and a conceptual research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Theory
-Major Schools of Psychoanalysis
-Core Psychoanalytic Theory
-Applications of Psychoanalysis

Please note:
Students accepted on to the Foundation Course at the Institute of Psychoanalysis in London can request to be assessed on the Foundation Course's theoretical lecture material by UCL as part of the Foundation Course Optional Pathway. This assessment will count as one module of the MSc Theoretical Psychoanalytical Studies programme.

Those given approval can choose to register for the 99PSGFC1 Foundation Course MSc module, in place of the PSYCGT13 Applications of Psychoanalysis module.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. The various seminar series are organised by experienced psychoanalysts or academics who are experts in the field concerned. Student performance is assessed through unseen written examination, coursework in the form of essays, and the dissertation.

Careers

This MSc provides a very good background to formal clinical training in psychoanalysis, adult or child psychotherapy or counselling and nearly half of our graduates pursue these options. A similar number continue with their academic studies either at UCL or elsewhere, often registering for a PhD in either psychoanalytic theory or empirical research. Some graduates progress to the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, often at UCL which has the largest programme in the UK.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Support Worker, Turning Point
-Clinical Psychology, California School of Professional Psychology
-Research Degree: Division of Psychol and Lang Sci, University College London (UCL)
-Lecturer, Kingston University and studying PhD Philosophy, Kingston University
-Systems Psychologist, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

Employability
This programme acts as a springboard especially for further clinical or theoretical training in the field (although it is not itself a clinical qualification). The teaching is organised and provided by eminent academics and psychoanalysts with international reputations. The option to take the Institute of Psychoanalysis Foundation Course, part of which counts towards the degree, helps with that career path. Many other able students go on to research posts in the unit or with our large network of clinical research collaborators in London and around the world.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Psychoanalysis Unit is a thriving academic centre for psychoanalytic research, with its own MPhil/PhD programme alongside the MSc. It has affiliations with the International Psychoanalytic Association, the Institute of Psychoanalysis, the Anna Freud Centre, the Menninger Clinic, and leading scholars at Yale and Harvard Universities. The unit is based within UCL's Division of Psychology & Language Sciences which undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour and language.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world, creating an outstanding and vibrant environment. Opportunities for graduate students to work with world-renowned researchers can exist in all areas of investigation, from basic processes to applied research. The division offers a supportive environment including numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

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The MPhil is offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (DTAL) within the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge. Read more
The MPhil is offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (DTAL) within the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages as a full-time period of research and introduces students to research skills and specialist knowledge.

The course aims:

(a) to provide students with necessary background in linguistic theory and related topics at intermediate and advanced level using a range of approaches and methodologies;

(b) to give students the opportunity to acquire expertise in their specific research interests in part by offering the opportunity of specialisation through pathways in the linguistics of particular languages (e.g. English, Romance, Celtic etc.);

(c) to provide foundations for continuation to PhD research;

(d) to offer the opportunity to participate in research culture within and beyond the Faculty, by attending and contributing to graduate seminars and reading groups;

(e) to develop the research skills required to conduct independent study such as
- formulating a realistic research proposal, with suitably delineated aims, objectives, methods, scope and expected outcome;
- preparing written work based on the proposal;
- selecting and mastering suitable research methods;
- collecting relevant bibliography;
- using computer databases and corpora;
- using relevant software, including statistical packages where appropriate;
- presenting well-argued academic material to the wider research community.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mmalmptal

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the MPhil in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics:
(a) will be aware of the nature of linguistic theories, and how theories relate to models, description, analysis, and explanation

(b) will have gained, in at least four areas of linguistics, a solid foundation, including:
- familiarity with one or more models in each area
- an appreciation of the fact that there can be alternative analyses of given data, and of how to evaluate the alternatives
- where relevant, an awareness of the relation between linguistic models and the mind
- where relevant, an understanding of the relation between linguistic models and their application

(c) will have become familiar with a variety of research skills relevant to research in linguistics

(d) will have developed the strategies needed to present linguistic data, arguments, interpretations, and conclusions both in writing and in oral presentation

(e) will have built up in-depth knowledge of at least one area of linguistics to the point where original research questions can be defined and pursued independently

(f) will have had experience in research sufficient to facilitate the transition to doctoral research

(g) will have acquired both the breadth and the depth of knowledge in linguistics that will prepare them for jobs in linguistics in the future.

Format

The MPhil programme is structured progressively to form a bridge between undergraduate study and possible further research. Its balance changes through the year so that in the first two months (Michaelmas Term - October to December) there is instruction through lectures, whilst by the last three months students are carrying out independent research full-time.

All students are required to follow a course in 'Research Methods' and a statistics course to acquire skills needed for research and 'transferable' skills. Beyond that, each student will follow his or her own 'Study Plan', which allows the individual interests, needs, and strengths of the student to be met. At the start of the course the student, with advice if needed from the Director of the MPhil and subject specialists, draws up a Study Plan for the Michaelmas and Lent Terms (October to March) which is approved by the Department. This will include the selection of a minimum of four introductory taught courses to be followed in Michaelmas, and participation in a minimum of two research seminars in Lent Term. Usually the Lent Term seminars chosen build on courses which have been followed in Michaelmas.

The course structure allows great flexibility in combining areas and approaches. It provides for tailored combinations of work in any of the areas of theoretical, applied, and descriptive linguistics, ranging for instance from formal semantics to experimental phonetics and phonology, from language acquisition to computational linguistics, and from Welsh syntax to the history of linguistics in France. A piece of work may have as its focus the development of an argument in linguistic theory, the description of some aspect of a language or its use, the psycholinguistic testing of alternative linguistic analyses, the application of linguistic theory to the history of a language or languages, the acoustic description of sound systems, and so on. The various pieces of work may relate to any language or combination of languages subject to adequate advice and facilities being available for the topic in question. Some students may wish to specialise and opt for a 'Pathway' relating to a particular language or language family.

The thesis demands independent study under the guidance of the supervisor and will involve a substantial piece of original research. A proposed title and summary for the 20,000 word thesis, formulated in discussion with the supervisor, must be submitted in mid-February, and this will be subject to approval by the Department of Linguistics, the supervisor, and the Faculty's Degree Committee. Because seminars finish at the end of Lent term, students can then devote themselves full time to research for the thesis during the Easter vacation and the Easter Term (April to June). The thesis is submitted on the seventh Friday of Easter Full Term, and about two to three weeks later there may be an oral examination on the thesis at the discretion of the examiners.

Continuing

For those applying to continue from the MPhil to PhD, the minimum academic standard is normally a distinction on the MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or… Read more
Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or astronomy? Develop valuable new knowledge and skills? Prepare for a research career, or embark on a completely new path? Whatever your motivation, a postgraduate degree from the School of Physics and Astronomy can help you achieve your ambitions.

The MSc Physics is available in three different pathways: Particle Physic, Theoretical Physics and Condensed Matter Physics. The School of Physics and Astronomy also offers an MSc in Astrophysics and a PGCert in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Programme outcomes

The aim of the programme is to deepen your understanding of contemporary theoretical physics, covering advanced concepts and techniques, leaving you well prepared for further doctoral level study and research. The programme will also enable you to develop skills transferable to a wide range of other careers.

This programme will:

Teach you the fundamental laws and physical principles, along with their applications, in your chosen area of physics.
Introduce you to research methodology, and how to manage your own research, making use of journal articles and other primary sources.
Allow you to communicate complex scientific ideas, concisely, accurately and informatively.
Instruct you how to use mathematical analysis to model physical behaviour and interpret the mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena.

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The PG Dip programme equips students with a critical understanding of psychological models of psychosis and the skills to deliver high quality and creative cognitive behavioural interventions. Read more

The PG Dip programme equips students with a critical understanding of psychological models of psychosis and the skills to deliver high quality and creative cognitive behavioural interventions. The shorter PG Cert programmes focus on clinical skills, for clinicians, or on theoretical background for researchers, academics and non-practitioners.

Key benefits

  • The Internationally renowned centre for the development and evaluation of cognitive behavioural interventions for people with psychosis, offers unrivalled access to current innovations in practice and research.
  • Close supervision with expert practitioners develops students' ability to become skilled and creative independent practitioners of CBT for Psychosis.
  • Develops students' skills in training and supervising other professionals and thus improves the provision of CBT for Psychosis in students' own work settings.

Description

The courses have been developed with the South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) and designed in accordance with the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence Schizophrenia Guideline psychological therapy recommendations (NICE, 2003, 2014).

The purpose of the courses is to improve the delivery of cognitive behavioural interventions for people with psychosis. CBTp is a complex therapeutic intervention and requires of independent practitioners an advanced theoretical understanding of cognitive models of psychosis and specialist post-qualification skills in relationship building, assessment, formulation and intervention. Our courses train students in each of these requirements, enabling them to develop competence then mastery in therapy delivery, and to provide consultancy, training and supervision to others.

The courses are modular, following a credit framework. Two clinical skills modules build from early therapy activities (Engagement, Assessment & Formulation – Module 1) through to intervention and specialised applications (Intervention & Supervised Practice; Module 2). Two academic modules develop students’ critical appraisal of the theory underlying psychological models of psychosis (Theoretical background I: Psychological Models, Module 3) and the evidence base for interventions (Theoretical Background II: Interventions, efficacy & future directions, Module 4). Diploma students complete all four modules; clinical skills certificate students complete Module 1 and Module 2 only; theoretical background certificate students complete Modules 3 and Module 4 only. 

Case supervision is strongly emphasised on the clinical programmes. Weekly morning supervision sessions take place in small groups (four to five) on the teaching day with all supervision carried out by the programme team. Additional close supervision (listening to audiorecordings of therapy sessions) is a course requirement.

Course purpose

The programmes deliver the clinical skills and theoretical background to work creatively and effectively with people with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis.

The Postgraduate Diploma in CBT for psychosis (CBTp) is designed for qualified mental health practitioners and covers both the clinical skills and theoretical background required to become an innovative and successful practitioner of CBTp. We recommend completion of the programme on a part-time basis, over two years. A fast-track one year full time option is available for students with previous experience of relevant clinical work and masters level study.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Therapy Skills emphasises the clinical skills component of the programme, for mental health practitioners who are primarily concerned with clinical practice, rather than academic development. The Postgraduate Certificate in Theoretical Background is designed for people without a mental health qualification, for researchers or academics, or as an introduction to CBTp. Students attend seminars and workshop teaching in order to acquire a detailed understanding of psychological models and interventions, together with their evidence base, but clinical supervision is not usually provided. Certificate programmes are offered on a part-time basis over a calendar year. 

Course format and assessment

The course begins with three introductory intensive one-day workshops, which aim to provide students with an overview of the model, therapeutic style and content of initial sessions. This is usually a refresher for more experienced students and sets the scene for identifying students' individual learning targets and goals. Teaching modules are examined by assignments – audio recordings, case reports and practice portfolios for the clinical modules; essays and research presentations for the academic modules. Clinical students will be required to work with at least four clients for at least 16 sessions from assessment to completion or termination of therapy over the duration of the programme.

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations.

Examination (50%) | Coursework (30%) | Practical (20%)

Extra information

Regulating body

King’s College is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England



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