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This programme can be a stand-alone qualification (for those wanting to broaden and deepen their understanding of the relationship between theology and the arts) or a natural stepping stone for those considering doctoral research in the field. Read more

MLitt in Theology, Imagination and The Arts

This programme can be a stand-alone qualification (for those wanting to broaden and deepen their understanding of the relationship between theology and the arts) or a natural stepping stone for those considering doctoral research in the field. In particular, the course offers students an opportunity to:

• Gain a theoretically inflected and historically contextualised introduction to the field of theology and the arts.
• Explore how art might facilitate religious experience or serve as a theological text.
• Engage with diverse forms of culture, such as the visual arts, poetry, science fiction and pop music.

Features

Scotland’s oldest university offers a rich heritage of academic excellence in theology extending from its founding in 1413. Probably the two most important factors in choosing a place for advanced study are the academic staff and the research environment.

* Divinity has 22 members of staff undertaking research in a wide range of specialisms, an undergraduate student population of around 100 full-time equivalents, and 90 postgraduates, of whom 20-30 are in MLitt programmes.

* A closely-knit community of academics and postgraduates provides a context in which to engage in stimulating theological explorations.

* St Andrews has gathered one of the most outstanding communities of internationally-renowned scholars.

* Four weekly seminars cover Biblical Studies; Religion and Politics; Theology, Imagination and the Arts; Systematic Theology. There are also regular workshops on the theme of Scripture and Theology.

* Intellectual abilities are promoted as part of a broad package of development, including the enhancement of effective communication and leadership skills, in preparation for your future career.

* The School is home to the Centre for the Study of Religion and Politics, the Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts and the Institute for Bible, Theology and Hermeneutics.

Postgraduate community

The School of Divinity promotes a friendly atmosphere with a cross-flow of ideas between the disciplines, while providing the depth and breadth necessary to ground the pursuit of scholarly activity at an international level.
Our biggest asset is not our distinguished history or our fine facilities but rather our people – both staff and students. It is a popular place for visiting scholars from all over the world.

Library resources

As a result of enjoying copyright status during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the University is rich in theological, historical and biblical works from that period. In more recent times, the University has further developed its library resources, strategically investing in key publications for research and teaching. In addition to the holdings in the University Library, Divinity has a further collection of its books housed in the King James Library which adjoins the College quadrangle and study facilities are also available there.

Careers

The close contacts of many St Andrews staff with North America, including regular attendance at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion and Society of Biblical Literature, provide an important network for aiding graduates in finding academic positions. This is strengthened by our own alumni who have, over many decades, become established in teaching positions in the United States and Canada. Over 70% of graduates from this programme go on to do a PhD – 60% apply to continue here at St Andrews.

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Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. Read more
Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. The so-called ‘resurgence’ of religion in the public sphere in recent decades is now a significant area of interdisciplinary scholarship eliciting a complex array of responses, ranging from vehement opposition to the very idea that religious concepts and commitments have a right to expression in political debates, to a reassessment of the origins and implications of divisions between the secular and the religious and their relationship to the nation state. The notion that there is no singular secularism, but rather a plurality of secularisms, and of ‘religion’ as an invention of European modernity and colonial interests are two of many emerging efforts to reconceptualise the meanings of religion and the secular and the entangled relationship between them.

About the MA

The MA Religion in Global Politics offers an opportunity to examine these questions and issues at an advanced level by studying the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international) of the regions of the Asia, Africa and the Middle East. A core objective is to challenge the Eurocentrism of current debates around secularism, secularisation, the nature of the public sphere within modernity, by indicating the plurality and contested nature of conceptions of both religion and the secular when considered in a global framework.

The programme is unique: it has a regional focus and disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes in the subject area, draws on a wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives (Law, International Relations and Politics, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and Gender Studies, amongst others) and has a rigorous theoretical basis built in, such that students will be familiarised with the current state-of-the-art debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, postsecularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues of democracy, war, violence, human rights, humanitarianism and development, multiculturalism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism, and free speech amongst others. The range of course options available on the programme is unparalleled, ensuring that students will benefit from a truly interdisciplinary, intellectually rigorous, and regionally focused programme.

Course detail

Designed as a professional development qualification as well as a platform for doctoral research, this programme will give you the opportunity to examine the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international), across the globe.

You will engage in current topical debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, post-secularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues including democracy, war, human rights, humanitarianism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism and free speech.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

The unparalleled range of course options available will allow you to benefit from an intellectually rigorous and globally focused programme which provides a disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes. A wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives are drawn upon including Law, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology and Diaspora Studies.

Expert at where the world is changing

With our highly diversified expertise, our comprehensive resources and our interdisciplinary approach, we offer a unique learning and research environment for a truly inter-cultural approach to systems of belief and thought.

Programme Aims

The programme’s inter-disciplinary focus aims to provide students with advanced training in the area of religion and politics through the study of a wide range of theoretical and regional perspectives. It will serve primarily as a platform for professional development and further (MPhil/PhD) graduate research. The programme offers students:

• Advanced knowledge and understanding of significant approaches, methods, debates, and theories in the field of religion and politics, with particular reference to the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

• Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in and theorisations of religion and politics;

• Advanced skills in the presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religion and politics as they pertain to regional, international, and transnational contexts

Format

Students are required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words. Courses are assessed through a variety of methods including short and long essays, examinations, oral presentations, and response papers. An overall percentage mark is awarded for each course, based on the marks awarded for individual assessment items within the courses.

The MA may be awarded at Distinction, Merit or Pass level in accordance with the common regulations for MA/MSc at SOAS.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Engage with the study of Christian doctrine in its historical context and systematic expression. Examine the historical development and present expression of a number of core doctrines, and investigate the theological contribution of some major figures in the tradition. Read more

MLitt in Systematic and Historical Theology

• Engage with the study of Christian doctrine in its historical context and systematic expression.

• Examine the historical development and present expression of a number of core doctrines, and investigate the theological contribution of some major figures in the tradition.

• Integrate the study of theology with biblical interpretation.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/divinity/admissions/pg/

Features

Scotland’s oldest university offers a rich heritage of academic excellence in theology extending from its founding in 1413. Probably the two most important factors in choosing a place for advanced study are the academic staff and the research environment.

* Divinity has 22 members of staff undertaking research in a wide range of specialisms, an undergraduate student population of around 100 full-time equivalents, and 90 postgraduates, of whom 20-30 are in MLitt programmes.

* A closely-knit community of academics and postgraduates provides a context in which to engage in stimulating theological explorations.

* St Andrews has gathered one of the most outstanding communities of internationally-renowned scholars.

* Four weekly seminars cover Biblical Studies; Religion and Politics; Theology, Imagination and the Arts; Systematic Theology. There are also regular workshops on the theme of Scripture and Theology.

* Intellectual abilities are promoted as part of a broad package of development, including the enhancement of effective communication and leadership skills, in preparation for your future career.

* The School is home to the Centre for the Study of Religion and Politics, the Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts and the Institute for Bible, Theology and Hermeneutics.

Postgraduate community

The School of Divinity promotes a friendly atmosphere with a cross-flow of ideas between the disciplines, while providing the depth and breadth necessary to ground the pursuit of scholarly activity at an international level.
Our biggest asset is not our distinguished history or our fine facilities but rather our people – both staff and students. It is a popular place for visiting scholars from all over the world.

Library resources

As a result of enjoying copyright status during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the University is rich in theological, historical and biblical works from that period. In more recent times, the University has further developed its library resources, strategically investing in key publications for research and teaching. In addition to the holdings in the University Library, Divinity has a further collection of its books housed in the King James Library which adjoins the College quadrangle and study facilities are also available there.

Careers

The close contacts of many St Andrews staff with North America, including regular attendance at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion and Society of Biblical Literature, provide an important network for aiding graduates in finding academic positions. This is strengthened by our own alumni who have, over many decades, become established in teaching positions in the United States and Canada. Over 70% of graduates from this programme go on to do a PhD – 60% apply to continue here at St Andrews.

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These programmes focus on the interdisciplinary and inter-professional issues that emerge in the study of spirituality and wellbeing, particularly in the healthcare context. Read more
These programmes focus on the interdisciplinary and inter-professional issues that emerge in the study of spirituality and wellbeing, particularly in the healthcare context. It is possible to take an MA or MSc, depending upon the balance of theology and science options selected. However, all students will engage in theological reflection on a relevant topic and undertake a double module research dissertation, as well as taking the taught core module on spirituality, religion and health. Both programmes provide a stepping-stone to doctoral work.

Course Structure

Two core taught modules, two optional modules, and a dissertation.

Core Modules

-Spirituality, Religion & Health
-Practical Theology: Context, Practice and Methodology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included (1-2 choices from):
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Christian Gender
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Catholic Social Thought
-Doctrine of Creation
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Quantitative Health Research Methods
-Qualitative Health Research Methods
-Global Health Issues & Governance
-Public Policy, Health & Health Inequalities
-Health Systems Analysis and Comparison
-The Dynamics of Evidence Informed Policy
-Gender, Sex, Health & Politics
-Qualitative Methods Applied to Policy and Health Research
-Epidemiology and Statistics
-Anthropology of Global Health
-Public Health Anthropology
-Body, Politics and Experience
-Thinking Anthropologically
-Advanced Anthropology of Mental Health and Illness
-Fieldwork and Interpretation

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The core modules introduce students to questions of method, interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by spirituality, religion and practical theology in relation to health, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

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Are you interested in learning about the issues at the intersections of International Law, European Law, ethics and international politics and how they are all interrelated?. Read more
Are you interested in learning about the issues at the intersections of International Law, European Law, ethics and international politics and how they are all interrelated?

The MA in International Law, Ethics and Politics will cover the application of International Law, European Law, ethics and international politics to problems such as poverty reduction; international trade; war and terrorism; climate change; and democracy.

This programme is ideal for candidates from the NGO world who wish to improve their academic credentials, and students from the humanities and social sciences who want to take Law courses. The course should also be of interest to graduates in public or European law who want to deepen their understanding of issues that they have previously encountered only within a legal framework.

The programme contains a broad range of optional modules from the Law, Politics and Philosophy departments.

You will study the following compulsory modules:

For students with a law background - Research Skills and Methods. You will also attend mandatory pre-sessional generic LLM introductory classes
For students without a law background - Socio-Legal Theory. You will also attend mandatory bespoke pre-sessional introduction to law classes and mandatory pre-sessional generic LLM introductory classes
In addition, you will take at least one module from each of the Law, Politics and Philosophy departments and complete a 15,000-word dissertation. Students may choose between a dissertation or practice-based dissertation. Dissertations may be supervised by any of the three schools involved in the MA, or joint-supervision may occur for interdisciplinary dissertations.

You will also be required to take two further modules from any of the three departments. Examples of the modules on offer (split by department) can be found below.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The programme allows you to research the role of religion in society and politics, and its important role in public policy dimensions and significant potential for impact and intervention in the public sphere. Read more
The programme allows you to research the role of religion in society and politics, and its important role in public policy dimensions and significant potential for impact and intervention in the public sphere.

It will also focus on the public roles of religious communities and individuals, particularly in liberal pluralist societies, and considers theoretical issues such as:

The relationship of religion and religious bodies to public spaces, institutions and events
Theological responses to public issues
The place of religion in public policy
There will be particular attention paid to the UK and European contexts, as well as offering the opportunity for exploring these issues in other national contexts and transnationally.

All students will take two core modules:

Religion in Contemporary Global Politics I
Religion in Contemporary Global Politics II
MA and Diploma students will also study a core module in Research Methods.

If you are studying for the Certificate, you will choose one optional module, while MA and Diploma students will choose three optional modules. MA students will complete their programme with a 15,000-word dissertation, or a placement-based dissertation.

About the School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion

The School of Philosophy, Theology and Religion offers a variety of forward-thinking postgraduate study opportunities and is home to a dynamic and friendly community of staff and students, pursuing original research on a wide range of topics.
The School is made up of the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Theology and Religion, both of which were ranked second among other departments in the country in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework exercise.
The Departments are closely linked, providing opportunities for interdisciplinary study, but have also developed links more widely, in order to explore synergies with other disciplines.
The Department of Philosophy has links with the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, the International Development Department, the Birmingham Business School, the School of Psychology and the Birmingham Law School. In addition, the Department includes the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics, which was founded in 2001 to address the practical and theoretical issues raised by globalisation. Global Ethics has natural affinities with Political Science and International Studies, as well as the Institute of Applied Social Studies.
The Department of Theology and Religion has extensive formal and informal links with a wide range of academic and religious institutions across five continents. It has also built up excellent relationships and partnerships with Birmingham’s many different faith communities; this offers an ideal context to study religion in its contemporary as well as its ancient cultural contexts. These relationships, coupled with our large international community of postgraduates, means you will be studying in a diverse, yet well-connected environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Our MA programme is designed both for specialists to deepen their knowledge and skills and for graduates of other Humanities disciplines to switch into postgraduate level understanding of our subjects. Read more
Our MA programme is designed both for specialists to deepen their knowledge and skills and for graduates of other Humanities disciplines to switch into postgraduate level understanding of our subjects. The key to us being able to do this is the centering of the courses around high-level, small-group seminar discussion, mainly assessed by essays that form mini-research projects in areas of your interest. These courses are followed by one-to one supervision for a research dissertation. This structure means that if you have studied an undergraduate degree in Religious Studies, Theology, Philosophy, Ethics or related subjects, the MA provides an extended opportunity to work in depth in what fascinated you in your BA, while also offering the chance for exploring other areas that you might have missed. On the other hand, if your degree is in another area of Humanities, the small-group and one-to-one focus gives us the chance to provide tailored help to get up to speed in any area of Religions and Theology. You are also able to join in undergraduate classes, whether that is to have an extended exposure to the basics of a topic or to learn a language. In fact, even students who already have a BA in the field quite often find that they want to pick up a subject that they previously missed. One of Manchester's key distinctive features is that you are very free to do this.

This programme enables specialisation, while stressing a broad, interdisciplinary and comparative approach. Courses can be taken from across the offerings within the discipline and beyond. Courses cover a wide range of topics, including Biblical studies, Jewish studies, Christian studies, South Asian studies, philosophy, ethics, gender studies and politics.

Aims

-To provide multi-disciplinary curricula informed by the research and scholarly activities of the teaching staff.
-To develop in students a critical understanding of religion and theology through a range of learning and teaching methods.
-To equip students with the skills necessary to interpret primary and secondary sources and to make available appropriate language instruction, where feasible.
-To help students from diverse backgrounds progress though their programme by providing effective academic and pastoral support.
-To equip students for a variety of careers through subject specific knowledge, active engagement in their own learning and the development of analytical and other transferable skills.
-To provide a stimulating research environment through seminars, tutorials and programmes of guest lectures that will foster postgraduate study
-To develop skills in research and analysis that will foster postgraduate study.

Coursework and assessment

MA students take two core courses and up to six options, then write a dissertation. The programme takes 12 months full-time or up to 27 months part-time. Assessment is usually by essay on a topic agreed between the student and lecturer. Language course units may also involve an examination. The dissertation is 12-15000 words and you will receive one-to-one supervisory support.

Career opportunities

The primary focus of all our postgraduate degrees is to give people research skills, whether for academic work or for another career. Many professions today require investigative skills. Some in the media spend time researching angles of events that relate to religions. Some in the health service investigate the experiences of various cultural groups in accessing services. Many in museums, libraries and other archives require the textual and historical research skills that our courses teach. Postgraduate study in Religions and Theology gives you a high level qualification for a wide range of investigative tasks.

Our masters degrees qualify you for research study at Manchester or at virtually any other high-level academic institution in the world. Many of our MA students are preparing for PhD study. Other students take Manchester MAs to enhance their understanding of a particular religious tradition, either their own or that of others. The programmes in Biblical Studies and Theology, Culture and Society offer particular opportunities for continuing professional development for church ministers. All of our courses offer valuable further professional development for teachers of Religious Education. In applying for a job in any field, a Manchester postgraduate degree will mark you out as someone with high-level skills and a track-record of successful engagement with serious and complex issues.

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As faiths of all kinds navigate their way through a period of great social change, it is more important than ever to possess an in-depth understanding of how faiths interact with each other and society. Read more

Summary

As faiths of all kinds navigate their way through a period of great social change, it is more important than ever to possess an in-depth understanding of how faiths interact with each other and society. This MA creatively balances the close study of particular traditions with a broad understanding of the subject area. It is one of the few programmes in London that offers specialised teaching in Islam as well as several different aspects of Christian theology.

On this course, you can study a variety of religious traditions in relation to key topics such as social justice, gender, text and textual interpretation, and inter-religious dialogue and conflict. You will have the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of particular religious themes, with a broad view of religious studies, and its diverse forms of interpretation and practice. This course will suit students who want to develop advanced skills in the study and analysis of a range of issues, rather than focus on one specialist subject.

A strength of the course is that it allows you to have a critical awareness of the relationship between different religions and modern secular society, with an informed and scholarly understanding of differences within as well as between religious traditions and cultures. From this,you will use advanced methods of research and critical analysis to explore the ways in which different religious perspectives contribute to contemporary debates about identity, politics and culture.

Drawing on London's rich resources for studying religions in their material, social and historical contexts, this course provides an enhanced learning environment and contributes to your wider cultural awareness and understanding. This is underpinned by a focus on advanced study and research skills, designed to equip you with a high level of proven academic competence and preparing you for careers and vocations that require this expertise. This might include educational institutions, NGOs and other organisations in which understanding of religious perspectives is an advantage.

Content

The MA in Theology and Religious Studies allows you to focus on a broad range of topics within the subject area, and study your particular interests in-depth.

On offer is specialised teaching in Hinduism and Islam as well as different aspects of Christian theology. You could study gender across these traditions, for example looking at women in Islam from feminist, reformist and traditionalist perspectives, or specifically looking at gender across religious texts and narratives. Or you could study contemporary doctrine, such as Pentecostalism in different parts of the world, or in Christian marriage and family life, also taking into account qualitative and quantitative data on marriage and family today, and the political and policy decisions that affect families.

As well as contemporary debates, you will look at historical issues, for example through the effect of Christian theology on art and culture throughout history. You will look at how depictions of nature and grace, suffering and redemption, and gender and incarnation, changed through the Reformation, and then how these new representations influenced modern art and philosophy.

The course also provides opportunity to investigate the relationship of religion and society through modules look at, for example, human rights and community engagement. You will gain an understanding of the historic and contemporary relationship between the Church and the State, as well as the nature of Christian activism in public policy and public discourse.

Finally, you will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice, which can be informed by your study on the optional modules, or from an area of interest of your own.

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Political Theology for Peace is a single module combining distance learning with an intensive teaching weekend at Lancaster. Read more
Political Theology for Peace is a single module combining distance learning with an intensive teaching weekend at Lancaster. The ten week course aims to serve peace practitioners already located within the various occupational spheres of society and enables them to investigate contemporary political theology as a context to evaluate and test an innovative, inclusive, reconfiguration of the politics of Jesus known as kenarchy.

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In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Read more
In this course, the focus is on religion in its anthropological and sociological perspectives. Durham has particular strengths in the study of Mormonism; death, dying and disposal; shamanism; religion and emotion; religion/faith and globalisation; religion and politics; contemporary evangelicalism and post-evangelicalism; and religion and generational change. It also boasts the Centre for Death and Life Studies and the Project for Spirituality, Theology and Health.

Course Structure

Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules

-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Literature and Religion
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Catholic Social Thought
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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Research Profile. In this research area, you can pursue interdisciplinary study of Islamic thought and practice, and of historical, theological, ethical and political encounters between Christianity and Islam. Read more

Research Profile

In this research area, you can pursue interdisciplinary study of Islamic thought and practice, and of historical, theological, ethical and political encounters between Christianity and Islam.

Staff research interests focus on Islamic theology (kalam), law (shari‘a and fiqh), and philosophy; Qur’an, Hadith, and Tafsir; Muslim views of Christianity and Judaism; Christian theological engagements with Islam; constructive theology and ethics from a Christian or Muslim perspective; Arab Christianity, classic and contemporary; political Islam; political theology; comparative theology; migration, religion and politics.

You can find out more and identify a potential supervisor by looking at the School’s staff profiles, which give details of research interests and publications, and email addresses.

You are encouraged to contact a potential supervisor to discuss your research project before making a formal application.

At the School of Divinity you will join a community of around 150 research students, drawn from around the world, and from a variety of religious and non-religious backgrounds.

You will study in a stimulating environment. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranked the School’s research environment at 100% world-leading / internationally excellent, second in the UK on this front in theology and religion. This outstanding result reflects the vibrancy of the School’s research culture.

Training and Support

The ethos of the Graduate School is to promote excellence in postgraduate study, within a stimulating and supportive environment. We value equality and diversity in the School community, and an academic culture that is both critical and constructive.

At the start of the academic year, you will be invited to Welcome Week, an intensive introduction to study and life in Edinburgh. Some events are especially for international students new to Scotland and the UK, but everything is open to all.

In the first weeks, the School provides a general orientation to research skills and to wider opportunities for training and support.

From your first days as a PhD or MPhil student, you will work one-to-one with your primary research supervisor.

Your progress will be tracked, through regular supervisions and milestone reviews, to ensure that you get the support you need to bring your project to fruition.

You will be part of the research seminars in Theology and Ethics, and in Religious Studies, to which visiting speakers are invited and to which postgraduates present work-in-progress.

You will be able to follow taught courses that contribute to your interests and research needs, and can also take advantage of opportunities to learn ancient and modern languages.

If you are a PhD student, after successful completion of your first year, you will be eligible to apply for tutoring opportunities, to gain teaching experience.

A University review (2015) commended the Graduate School for providing excellent support: responsive to student feedback; proactive in helping new postgraduates to adjust to their studies and to life in Scotland; enthusiastic and practical in promoting career development. The postgraduate student committee works closely with the School to make the research student experience the best it can be.

Facilities

The School of Divinity, one of the largest centres for the study of religion in the United Kingdom, is located in the historic setting of New College, close to Edinburgh Castle and overlooking Princes Street.

Resources for research are excellent. You can draw on the outstanding holdings of New College Library, the University of Edinburgh’s main library, and the nearby National Library of Scotland. New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection. The University library exceeds 2.25 million volumes. The National Library of Scotland – a ‘legal deposit’ library like the British Library in London and the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge – is just around the corner.

The School provides an extensive programme of weekly research seminars and special guest lectures. In addition, three research centres provide a special focus for activity: the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins; the Centre for Theology and Public Issues; the Centre for the Study of World Christianity.

Masters by Research

If you have academic training in theology or religious studies (or another relevant subject), and would like to develop your interest with a focus on a particular area, the Masters by Research may interest you.

You can study full-time (one year) or part-time (two years). Your pattern of study can either be three supervised research essays followed by a 15,000 word dissertation, or a 30,000 word dissertation. Most students take the ‘research essays + shorter dissertation’ path. All students receive research training.



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Social and political philosophy is part of a practical philosophy that aims to research fundamental questions regarding human society. Read more

Master's specialisation in Social and Political Philosophy (Research)

Social and political philosophy is part of a practical philosophy that aims to research fundamental questions regarding human society: What is a political order? How are new institutions formed? What are the differences between a community and a society? What is the ideal society like? What is justice? What is the relation between morality and politics?
In Nijmegen we focus on interpreting and critiquing classical texts that are part of the European political philosophy - from Plato to Habermas. Additionally, we engage in actual discussions on the crisis and conceptualisation of democracy. Also important are studies concerning spacial and metaphorical imaginations (city, garden, desert) in core political philosophical texts. Regarding these different fields, our research in Nijmegen takes a descriptive as well as a normative perspective.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Social and Political Philosophy you study ‘the political' as an essential but conflict-ridden aspect of the human condition, and politics as a way of coping with this. Spinoza, Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Zizek and Foucault are central figures in this specialisation.
The point of departure for the research conducted within the department of Social and Political Philosophy is the idea that ‘the political' is a ubiquitous dimension of all social phenomena and relations: everything is political, but nothing is only political. There is no such thing as ‘pure politics', but at the same time everything societal is ‘political' in the sense of entailing an ineradicable aspect of contestability and of decision. The very existence of a politically ordered society, liberal democracies or a secular polities, rests upon a contestable decision. (Recent developments in both world and domestic politics demonstrate a tendency to ‘forgetfulness' with respect to such decisions). As a result, we conceive of social and political philosophy not only as a matter of reflection about existing politics or political systems, but also as an investigation of the nature of the social (designated by notions such as ‘society', ‘community', ‘civil society') and the political as such, and an awareness that the political is also present in philosophy itself. Today's world is marked by a clash not of civilisations (Huntington), but of conceptualisations - and philosophy necessarily plays a significant role in the latter.
Both our research and teaching revolve around this focal insight. In 2005/6, our research seminar analysed the ‘dividing line' between church/religion and state/politics and between public and private. In 2006/7, the topic was the "Neutralisation of the Political" in the many forms this neutralisation took in modern times, notably in the writing by Carl Schmitt, Max Weber, Chantal Mouffe and in the recently published debate between Robert Audi and Jonathan Wolterstorff.
The scholarly competence of this group lies in classical, medieval, early modern and modern social and political philosophy, with a particular emphasis on 19th and 20th century Anglo-Saxon and continental thought (notably including Russia/USSR). Key authors for us are, in alphabetical order, Arendt, Aristotle, Augustine, Bulgakov, Colas, Foucault, Frank, Gauchet, Hegel, Hobbes, Lefort, Leibniz, Luhmann, Machiavelli, Mamardashvili, Marx, Mouffe, Plato, Rawls, Schmitt, Solov'ëv, Soviet Marxism, Spinoza, Leo Strauss, Taylor, Walzer, Weber, and Zizek.
The work of the research group is directly linked to that of the research group on political theology Res Mixtae, to the Centre for Russian Humanities Studies, and to the Institute of Eastern Christian Studies.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/social

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate, they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers poke delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/social

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Focus on the reading of biblical manuscripts and the use of the apparati of the critical editions of the Hebrew Bible, Septuagint and the New Testament with preparation for research degrees. Read more

MLitt in Biblical Languages and Literature

• Focus on the reading of biblical manuscripts and the use of the apparati of the critical editions of the Hebrew Bible, Septuagint and the New Testament with preparation for research degrees.

• Gain a critically and historically informed understanding of biblical traditions and their textual development.

• Contextualise the various methods and sources employed in biblical scholarship in order to facilitate the use of textual investigations in broader biblical, historical and theological research.

Features

Scotland’s oldest university offers a rich heritage of academic excellence in theology extending from its founding in 1413. Probably the two most important factors in choosing a place for advanced study are the academic staff and the research environment.

* Divinity has 22 members of staff undertaking research in a wide range of specialisms, an undergraduate student population of around 100 full-time equivalents, and 90 postgraduates, of whom 20-30 are in MLitt programmes.

* A closely-knit community of academics and postgraduates provides a context in which to engage in stimulating theological explorations.

* St Andrews has gathered one of the most outstanding communities of internationally-renowned scholars.

* Four weekly seminars cover Biblical Studies; Religion and Politics; Theology, Imagination and the Arts; Systematic Theology. There are also regular workshops on the theme of Scripture and Theology.

* Intellectual abilities are promoted as part of a broad package of development, including the enhancement of effective communication and leadership skills, in preparation for your future career.

* The School is home to the Centre for the Study of Religion and Politics, the Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts and the Institute for Bible, Theology and Hermeneutics.

Postgraduate community

The School of Divinity promotes a friendly atmosphere with a cross-flow of ideas between the disciplines, while providing the depth and breadth necessary to ground the pursuit of scholarly activity at an international level.
Our biggest asset is not our distinguished history or our fine facilities but rather our people – both staff and students. It is a popular place for visiting scholars from all over the world.

Library resources

As a result of enjoying copyright status during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the University is rich in theological, historical and biblical works from that period. In more recent times, the University has further developed its library resources, strategically investing in key publications for research and teaching. In addition to the holdings in the University Library, Divinity has a further collection of its books housed in the King James Library which adjoins the College quadrangle and study facilities are also available there.

Careers

The close contacts of many St Andrews staff with North America, including regular attendance at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion and Society of Biblical Literature, provide an important network for aiding graduates in finding academic positions. This is strengthened by our own alumni who have, over many decades, become established in teaching positions in the United States and Canada. Over 70% of graduates from this programme go on to do a PhD – 60% apply to continue here at St Andrews.

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Part-time by Distance Learning. MLitt and PG Dip (Postgraduate Diploma). Aimed at both lay people seeking personal development and clergy seeking continued professional development. Read more

MLitt in Bible and the Contemporary World

Part-time by Distance Learning: MLitt and PG Dip (Postgraduate Diploma)
• Aimed at both lay people seeking personal development and clergy seeking continued professional development.

• Enables you to think critically about your own and others’ professional development and social contexts, with a view to enhancing reflective practice.

• The scope oftopics and direct connection with contemporary public issues make this programme unique.

• Entry is available September or January.

• Interdisciplinary between biblical and theological studies, and between these and various other human disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

• Substantial use of an internet-based virtual learning environment.

• Blended mode of delivery, including short study conference held at the University at the start of each module.

A full-time (one year) version is also available with participation in distance learning and campus-based modules. Part-time distance learners take three modules (one each semester). A fourth, dissertation, module follows for MLitt students. In 2016- 2017 the modules will be Theological Issues in Medical Ethics (Semester 1) and The Bible and Contemporary Issues (Semester 2).

Features

Scotland’s oldest university offers a rich heritage of academic excellence in theology extending from its founding in 1413. Probably the two most important factors in choosing a place for advanced study are the academic staff and the research environment.

* Divinity has 22 members of staff undertaking research in a wide range of specialisms, an undergraduate student population of around 100 full-time equivalents, and 90 postgraduates, of whom 20-30 are in MLitt programmes.

* A closely-knit community of academics and postgraduates provides a context in which to engage in stimulating theological explorations.

* St Andrews has gathered one of the most outstanding communities of internationally-renowned scholars.

* Four weekly seminars cover Biblical Studies; Religion and Politics; Theology, Imagination and the Arts; Systematic Theology. There are also regular workshops on the theme of Scripture and Theology.

* Intellectual abilities are promoted as part of a broad package of development, including the enhancement of effective communication and leadership skills, in preparation for your future career.

* The School is home to the Centre for the Study of Religion and Politics, the Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts and the Institute for Bible, Theology and Hermeneutics.

Postgraduate community

The School of Divinity promotes a friendly atmosphere with a cross-flow of ideas between the disciplines, while providing the depth and breadth necessary to ground the pursuit of scholarly activity at an international level.
Our biggest asset is not our distinguished history or our fine facilities but rather our people – both staff and students. It is a popular place for visiting scholars from all over the world.

Library resources

As a result of enjoying copyright status during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the University is rich in theological, historical and biblical works from that period. In more recent times, the University has further developed its library resources, strategically investing in key publications for research and teaching. In addition to the holdings in the University Library, Divinity has a further collection of its books housed in the King James Library which adjoins the College quadrangle and study facilities are also available there.

Careers

The close contacts of many St Andrews staff with North America, including regular attendance at the annual meetings of the American Academy of Religion and Society of Biblical Literature, provide an important network for aiding graduates in finding academic positions. This is strengthened by our own alumni who have, over many decades, become established in teaching positions in the United States and Canada. Over 70% of graduates from this programme go on to do a PhD – 60% apply to continue here at St Andrews.

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The Master of Arts (Theology). Read more
The Master of Arts (Theology): Bible and Culture is a two-year graduate program for those preparing to do doctoral work in Biblical or Cultural Studies, or anyone interested in sustained, critical reflection on the political, economic, social, and scientific intersections between the Bible and contemporary local and global cultures.

Students will develop their ability to:
1. Demonstrate in written and oral communication an advanced critical understanding of the academic study of Bible and Culture.
2. Do extensive academic research and writing using cultural criticism and related critical methodologies.

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