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This programme, delivered by and taught at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, offers an unrivalled opportunity for the study of Shakespeare. Read more
This programme, delivered by and taught at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, offers an unrivalled opportunity for the study of Shakespeare.

It develops a critical but appreciative understanding of Shakespeare’s contribution to literary and theatrical history, and the place his works occupy in today’s cultural landscape. The programme has gained a strong reputation both in Britain and abroad. It has proved invaluable for students heading towards a variety of careers, and it provides a solid foundation for research at a higher level.

The dynamism of Shakespeare studies owes much to the sheer diversity of critical, theatrical, and historical approaches.

It offers sustained study in a variety of fields, drawing on the special interests of a dedicated team of Shakespeare scholars.

You will study five core modules:

Plays and Poems of Shakespeare A
Plays and Poems of Shakespeare B
Textual Studies in Shakespeare
Research Skills in Shakespeare
History of Shakespeare in Performance OR Shakespeare’s Legacy

You will also choose one optional module from a range of Shakespeare Institute modules.

Each module is assessed by one 4,000-word essay with the exception of the optional module in Shakespeare and Theatre Practice which is assessed by either two performance assignments and a 2,000-word research paper, or by one 4,000-word research paper. You will also submit a 15,000-word dissertation at the end of the programme. The dissertation will focus on a relevant topic of your choice, agreed with the programme convenor earlier in the year.

You will also attend Thursday Seminars held once a week during term-time at the Shakespeare Institute which feature papers presented by a range of established visiting scholars as well as fellows of the Shakespeare Institute and other University of Birmingham academic staff.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:
> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask
> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte
> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance
> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

CONTEMPORARY STRAND

The Contemporary strand addresses the actor’s relationship with the writer, from Early Modern times to the present day through the exploration of:
> Shakespeare and his legacy
> Chekhov, Stanislavski and the birth of naturalism
> the actor and 20th century playwriting
> new writing and the development of new work.

The Contemporary strand combines teaching in practical voice, movement and acting techniques with an exploration of some of the key playwrights that have helped forge the canon of Western theatre, from the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists to Chekhov and from Beckett to Kane. Uniquely, it explores the relationship between the two artists at the core of much Western theatre: the actor and the writer.
From Shakespeare and the King’s Men to the work of modern day producing houses, plays are frequently developed in collaboration between actors and writers, sometimes directly and sometimes mediated by a director. Students are encouraged to explore their role as creative artists in relation to writers and the written word. Throughout the course you will have the chance to work with, and alongside, writers on plays in development, both the next generation of playwrights on the MA Writing for Stage and Broadcast Media, and established playwrights with a track record of produced plays.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage
of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa
Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools
Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.

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Led by some of the country's leading teachers and practitioners in the field, this course is designed for aspiring playwrights and dramaturgs as well as those who want to gain an intensive, hands-on training in playwriting. Read more
Led by some of the country's leading teachers and practitioners in the field, this course is designed for aspiring playwrights and dramaturgs as well as those who want to gain an intensive, hands-on training in playwriting.

Studying at the UK's largest drama department, you will enhance your skills in writing for performance by developing your own plays in a variety of different forms and styles, from stage to radio, the traditional single-authored play to writing for devised theatre and live art. Students will be taught by experienced, professionally-produced and published playwrights. Recent visitors to the college have included Simon Stephens, April de Angelis, Roy Williams, Dennis Kelly, Martin Crimp, David Eldridge, Linda McLean, David Greig, Howard Barker, Michael Frayn and Duncan Macmillan.

All students complete an independently-researched dissertation, which offers a further opportunity to develop your own area of specialist interest.

The class is normally taught in the College’s London base in Bedford Square.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maplaywriting.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edges of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- The topics taught reflect the research excellence of the course faculty and our distinctive commitment to nurturing critically-informed practice.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, a fully equipped black box studio and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

- The department has strong links with a range of theatre companies, organisations and practitioners and regularly invites visiting speakers and practitioners to work with students.

- There are a number of active research groups in the department that organise a range of activities each year addressing specific subject areas and research questions.

- Members of the academic staff are leading researchers in the field of theatre and performance practice.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
- Playwriting (25%)
This unit is taught over the two teaching terms and assessed through a portfolio of theatrical and performance texts, accompanied by written analysis of this work.

- Making Performance Texts (25%)
You will explore alternative means of generating performance text – for devising, live art, physical theatre, for example. Support will be offered through intensive practical workshops by visiting practitioners.

- Theatre Contexts, Histories, Practices (25%)
This unit examines the relationship between theatre theory and practice and is assessed through practice and written work.

- Dissertation (25%)
Students on the MA Playwriting programme write a full-length play with an accompanying substantial essay (6-7000 words). This work is supported by a non-weighted methodologies course.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective playwrights
- worked in a range of different theatrical/dramaturgical contexts
- developed their understanding of contemporary playwriting and its contexts
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays and performance analyses, practical projects as well as a final dissertation. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. You will undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This Masters programme engages with a wide variety of histories and practices attached to the study of theatre. It is designed to enable you to become proficient in the techniques of historical, sociological and theoretical analysis of the theatrical process, past and present. Read more
This Masters programme engages with a wide variety of histories and practices attached to the study of theatre. It is designed to enable you to become proficient in the techniques of historical, sociological and theoretical analysis of the theatrical process, past and present. A key strength of this programme is its flexibility, which enables you to create a portfolio of courses based on your individual needs and interests. You will be taught by leading academics as well as external professional practitioners.

Why this programme

-Our facilities include a studio theatre and large flexible-seat theatre seating over 200 spectators.
-Glasgow is the base for a number of nationally significant theatre organisations, including the National Theatre of Scotland, the Playwrights’ Studio Scotland, Ankur Arts, Vanishing Point and Theatre Cryptic.
-The city of Glasgow provides an unbeatable location for the programme. Glasgow is home to a huge variety of theatres that produce and show a range from the experimental and risky, to the traditional and repertory, from canonical and new writing, to devised and physical performance. World leading venues include the Citizens Theatre, Tramway, Centre for Contemporary Art (CCA) and the Glue Factory.

Programme structure

The programme is mostly comprised of optional courses, enabling you to create your own Masters programme. It also allows you to work in an interdisciplinary capacity, selecting courses from across the College of Arts, according to personal interests. The programme convenor will work with you to ensure a sensible portfolio of courses is constructed, according to your personal aims and objectives.

Core teaching is delivered in two semesters, followed by an independent desk- or practice-based project. The Independent Research Project provides an opportunity for you to identify an area of interest and to create a research project that allows in-depth critical exploration of this.

Core courses
-Research Methods
-Independent Research Project.

Optional courses - you will undertake five optional courses which you will select from a pool of courses. Optional courses are updated each year, but may include:
-Applied Theatre
-Arts Criticism
-Contemporary Devising Practices
-Debating Dramaturgy
-Directing
-Documentary Drama
-Exhibiting Cultures
-Festivals
-Interwar cultures
-Performance Theory and Analysis
-Playwriting
-Shakesperean Adaptations
-Space, Place and Performance
-Theatre Archive Placement
-Work placement

By the end of this programme you will have developed knowledge of a range of issues pertinent to the study of theatre, including historical, contemporary, theoretical and practical. This programme will allow you to develop a wide range of subject knowledge combined with confidence in utilising different research methodologies.

Career prospects

This programme examines the nature and function of the theatrical event and theatre culture from a range of critical, historical and practical perspectives. It prepares you for a wide range of careers closely connected to theatre provision and production.

The programme's critical components also provide a good foundation for those wishing to progress to doctoral study.

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The MA in Theatre Practice is ideal for anyone wishing to further their practical and theoretical knowledge along with advanced research skills. Read more
The MA in Theatre Practice is ideal for anyone wishing to further their practical and theoretical knowledge along with advanced research skills. Whether you seek to develop an area of theatre that you have enjoyed in your previous degree, or to tackle new horizons you have not yet had the opportunity to study, during the programme you will pursue a range of practical and theoretical knowledge whilst being taught by leading academics. The MA in Theatre Practice offers students the chance to develop skills and knowledge in Shakespeare, performer training, socially engaged practice or theatre and performance research.

The programme consists of five compulsory modules including a 60 credit dissertation module. The two core practice modules focus on Exeter’s specialist areas which include performer training, applied theatre, inter-and transcultural theatre, Shakespeare and theatre and performance research.

During your first term you will take a compulsory module that studies the internationalisation of performance culture and the adaptation of theatre practices across cultures. This comparative study embraces cultures from around the world, introduces you to the wide experience of other students and asks you to reflect on what matters most to you in contemporary performance.

In term 2 you advance your research skills, reflecting on what it is to do theatrical research today and how to imagine, refine, and present on an area of theatrical practice and research of your choosing. In your final term you will conduct an in-depth research project in form of a dissertation, that can be fully written or partially practice-as-research.

Over the course of the programme you will gain knowledge of new performance skills and edit and produce a digital portfolio of your work.

Modules

Some examples of the optional modules are; Voice for the Actor Term; The Actor's Body: Intercultural Theories and Practices; Versioning Shakespeare Term; Theatre and Environment; History of Acting and Restoration Theatre: Culture and Politics

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

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This highly distinctive MA course, run as a partnership between Birkbeck and RADA, brings together cutting-edge practice and scholarship in theatre and performance. Read more
This highly distinctive MA course, run as a partnership between Birkbeck and RADA, brings together cutting-edge practice and scholarship in theatre and performance. Join us and you will work with both Birkbeck's experts in theatre and performance studies and RADA's faculty and visiting theatre practitioners to experience both making and studying theatre. This course does not offer actor training, but will deepen your critical and practical understanding of theatre and performance practices in context and leads to a prestigious postgraduate qualification from the University of London.

What our students say

'Since finishing the MA course, I have worked on projects as a writer, director, and teacher - this is largely thanks to the way this course nurtures you as both artist and academic and helps you develop a diverse skill set.'

'Perhaps the best 2 years of my life.'

'The MA course allowed me to change my career path and gave me the skills and confidence to launch myself into an arts career.'

'The course helped to refine my approach as a theatre practitioner, while widening my scope for theatrical discourse and inspiration to create work. It encourages the intertwining of the creative and the academic, resulting in thought provoking and unique theatre. Most importantly, the course taught me to risk, to dare to create something new, to have an opinion and express it through my art.'

'Mature students can give at least as much and get as much out of this course as young people and taking the risk to do it was one of the best decisions I have ever made.'

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Taking the dramatic text as a critical starting point, our course encompasses drama from the early modern period to the contemporary.
In the rehearsal room, you will create new theatre and performance work responding to set texts and themes. You will also engage with performance techniques to develop your skills as a playwright, director and dramaturg.
In academic lectures and seminars, you will encounter theoretical, historical, critical and philosophical writings. You will theorise live performance and write about the ways in which new performance work is informed by both contemporary concerns and older theatrical traditions and legacies.
In the final dissertation project, you will exercise your own creative voice as a director, dramaturg, playwright or scholar.
Student projects are tutored by a combination of faculty and visiting artists. In 2015-16, visiting artist tutors included A.C. Smith, David Slater, Karen Christopher, Peader Kirk and Rachel Mars.
We also offer informal, unassessed creative enhancement opportunities: RADA’s TheatreVision initiative, which brings together students from the MA Text and Performance and the MA Theatre Lab to explore writing for theatre; Birkbeck’s Centre for Contemporary Theatre runs a postgraduate reading group and offers opportunities to show work in progress as part of the School of Arts summer festival Arts Week.
RADA and Birkbeck are just 3 minutes' walk apart so you will study in a campus-style environment. Our close proximity also allows us to draw on the rich range of resources available across both institutions, including: studio space; technical support for group and individual presentations; RADA’s excellent library of playtexts and theatre and performance literature; and Birkbeck’s world-class research resources in the arts and humanities.
The course incorporates visits to London theatre and both institutions are well placed for you to access the extraordinary array of theatre available in London.
The renowned British Library is also located nearby.

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The Theatre Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) degree program, intended to ground the student in advanced fundamentals of theatrical theories and practice while accommodating individual interests and strengths. Read more
The Theatre Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) degree program, intended to ground the student in advanced fundamentals of theatrical theories and practice while accommodating individual interests and strengths. Comprised of a broad curriculum that balances both academic and production experiences, the MA program constitutes a period of study and practice en route to professional work, teaching or further advanced degrees.The program includes a carefully planned combination of theory and practice; however, with attentive counseling, students determine a sub-specialization in history, criticism or some aspect of performance, technology, or design.

At Binghamton University, students practice theatre in excellent facilities and receive individual guidance in small classes and through close advising. Qualified MA degree candidates may have the opportunity to teach a section of an undergraduate course, undertake assistantships in technical theatre or departmental administration, mount productions in the studio theaters, or act, direct, design or write as part of the department's theatre and dance season.

Graduate Degrees Offered

MA in Theatre. Concentrations, though not required, are available in the following:
- Directing
- Performance
- Technical Production/Design
- Theory and Criticism

All applicants must submit the following:

- Online graduate degree application and application fee
- Transcripts from each college/university you have attended. Undergraduate major in theatre is not required; however, students lacking a suitable background in theatre studies are required to satisfactorily complete certain undergraduate courses beyond those required for the graduate degree.
- Three letters of recommendation
- Personal statement (2-3 pages) describing your reasons for pursuing graduate study, your career aspirations, your special interests within your field, and any unusual features of your background that might need explanation or be of interest to your program's admissions committee.
- Resume or Curriculum Vitae (max. 2 pages)
- Official GRE scores
- If available, the following may be submitted to supply the Graduate Committee with supplementary information. All supplementary application materials must be e-mailed to .
----Writing sample (one paper from an upper-division undergraduate course of no more than 20 pages)
----Samples of theatrical work (a portfolio in electronic or DVD form) of tech/design and/or performance work

And, for international applicants:
- International Student Financial Statement form (PDF)
- Official bank statement/proof of support
- Official TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE Academic scores

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Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama. Read more

Summary

Become a qualified dramatherapist with this unique programme at Roehampton. It offers a practical and clinical approach, underpinned by Ritual Theatre theory, for working with others to impact healing and a positive change through drama.

The MA Dramatherapy programme at Roehampton offers unique training within the Ritual Theatre process of dramatherapy. Drawing heavily on the theatrical observations of Peter Brook and the experiments of Jerzy Grotowski, as well as anthropological notions of “rites of passage” and the importance of “myth”, the programmes offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy at various levels.

On this course, you will learn to facilitate an in-depth therapeutic process for a range of client groups, and devise therapeutic performances and workshops. You will also undertake an original piece of research into dramatherapy practice. The course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and leads to a nationally-recognised professional qualification.

The programme consists of three stages, which offers a clearly structured developmental process for the clinical application of dramatherapy. In Stage One, you will be introduced to basic theatre skills and use these creatively to work with established stories and characters. This progresses into an exploration of the personal identifications that we have with stories and myths, and an understanding of the deep foundations within many cultural traditions of using ritual, drama and performance for the enhancement of health. In Stage Two, the focus moves on to employing drama and theatre processes as vehicles for exploring our own inter-personal and internal ‘dramas’.

Stage Three is where you will conduct your own piece of practical investigation or research into the literature and theory-base of dramatherapy practice. The Dramatherapy programme will provide you with a broad range of skills enabling you to pursue your own research interests across a wide spectrum of dramatherapy practice and theory.

Content

You will study a range of topics including how to crafting therapeutic drama stories, understanding the individual and group process, Ritual Theatre, working with myths, paratheatrical explorations and the art of structure when working in dramatherapy.

Our research areas include individual dramatherapy in schizophrenia; perception and evaluation of therapeutic outcomes from therapist and client perspectives; the role of race, culture and gender; dramatherapy and “mentalisation” with borderline personality disorder and complex trauma; therapeutic scenarios and resistance; creativity and destructiveness; the dramatherapist; and the multidisciplinary team.

Alongside the experiential focus of the training, the programme also aims to develop the necessary understanding and reflective capacity required to practice as a professional dramatherapist. This is achieved through workshops, lecture series and clinical application seminars, as well as through assessed clinical placements.

We also offer introductory courses which provide a useful background to those working in related professions or anyone simply wishing to find out more about the work. For information on our Introduction Courses, Summer Schools and Foundation Course in Dramatherapy, see the Psychology Short Courses.

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This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Applied drama/ theatre is an umbrella term which includes the practice of drama in a wide range of settings, such as drama and theatre in education; young people’s theatre; drama, health and healing; reminiscence and heritage theatres; theatre in prisons; theatre for development and community theatre.

This course addresses the 'social turn' at the cutting-edge of contemporary theatre, where new forms of participation are blurring the boundaries between performer and spectator. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore creative and research opportunities in some of these diverse and dynamic contexts and analyse the politics and values of applied drama. You will experience radically different approaches to performance-making in both conventional theatre spaces and in non-theatrical settings, enabling you to consider the relationship between innovative performance practices and work in applied theatre. The programme considers the international dimension of applied and participatory theatre, and the local and global implications of artistic practice.

By the end of this degree you will be well prepared to work in different locations and have developed your own praxis and practical skills as a practitioner, workshop leader and artist.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maappliedandparticipatorytheatre.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught by world leading experts in applied theatre, whose published research includes theatre education, theatre and health, theatre and refugees, devised theatre and applied drama/theatre.

- You will have the opportunity to benefit from our industry partnerships and our professional links with theatre companies. Previous students have benefitted from working with Age Exchange Theatre Trust, the Lyric Hammersmith, The Globe Theatre Education, Attic Theatre, Bravo 22 Company and many local schools, museums and hospital settings.

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edge of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, the fully equipped Caryl Churchill Theatre and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

You will benefit from working in partnership with professional practitioners, undertaking placements in different settings and developing your own practice. Previous practical projects have included reminiscence theatre in a day centre for the elderly; theatre with young people at risk of offending; drama and film with young carers; an interfaith installation with students of different religious beliefs; theatre with young people in hospital; theatre with young disabled performers; performance with unaccompanied refugees, and many, many more. Each project is designed and facilitated by students, and professional placements support their development.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
The MA in Applied and Participatory theatre will appeal to anyone who is interested in socially engaged art. It is focused on theatre in different institutional, therapeutic and community settings, and raises questions about how artists might encourage public participation in a range of different forms of theatre and performance-making. You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

You will follow a course called Applied and Participatory Theatre Workshop where you will develop your skills as a practitioner and artist, as well as engaging in critical debates about the field. The next specialist module is the Independent Practical Project, where you gain valuable professional experience in community settings.

In addition to the two modules above you will study a shared module for all MA students in the Drama and Theatre Department that considers the contexts for theatre and performance, its histories and practices. The details and assessment methods of this course are being updated for the new year and will appear in more detail on the department website once validated.

The fourth module is the dissertation on a chosen subject within your field of study with accompanying Research Methodologies course that supports students in independent research and writing.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective theatre practitioners
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their understanding of contemporary performance practices and its contexts
- explored the links between theory and practice
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of means including essays, performance analyses, evaluative reflections on practice, and practical projects, as well as a final dissertation of 10-14,000 words. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. All students undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Whether you simply enjoy Victorian literature or are looking to prepare for further research, the Victorian Literature pathway provides a comprehensive training in nineteenth-century literature and culture. Read more
Whether you simply enjoy Victorian literature or are looking to prepare for further research, the Victorian Literature pathway provides a comprehensive training in nineteenth-century literature and culture. Victorian studies at Liverpool has a long history of combining a strong literary focus with a commitment to innovative critical techniques and interdisciplinary study, and the modules examine such varied issues as the relationship of Victorian writers to their Romantic predecessors; the impact of different sub-cultures in the Victorian period (print culture, theatrical culture, scientific culture); the rich variety of poetry and fantasy in the period; and how the Victorians have been received and re-shaped in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The Victorian Literature pathway also offers the opportunity for students to go on organised visits to local Victorian heritage sites, and attend informal postgraduate colloquia with like-minded students from other local universities in the stunning surroundings of Gladstone’s Library in North Wales.

Students opting for the Victorian Literature pathway are required to take at least 60 credits from the specialist modules listed below in addition to the core modules (Research Skills, Dissertation Project, Dissertation). The remaining 30 elective credits can be taken in any pathway run by the School of English or across the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Why English?

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), we ranked 10th out of 89 in the UK for 4* (world-leading) and 3* (internationally excellent) research.

Strong postgraduate community

With over 150 taught and research students from all over the world, you will be part of a genuine international community. You will be able to participate in our lively research culture through attending regular seminars and lectures by guest speakers as well as our own staff and students. A legacy from former tutor Miriam Allott has allowed the department to host a creative writing fellow (currently the poet Sean Borodale), and a vibrant series of international poetry readings. Recent conferences include ‘On Liberties’ at St Deiniol’s Library, and ‘Renaissance Old Worlds’ in collaboration with the British Library. As a doctoral student you can participate in the optional English Graduate Teaching Programme, which allows doctoral students to get the best of the teaching opportunities available without making significant demands on their time.

Career prospects

The independence of study, clarity of expression and management of time demanded by all our taught programmes equip the successful graduate with the skills and knowledge base required for further academic study and research in English and other areas.

However, many graduates choose to enter careers such as teaching, publishing and journalism, or to work in the business sector, often in human resources, administration, marketing or sales.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies to PhD level.

Successful alumni have gone on to teach English at elementary, secondary and tertiary levels in schools around the globe. A significant number of MA graduates have also continued their studies at PhD level.

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This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Read more
This is an exciting and dynamic time for documentary practice; in recent years there has been a renaissance in documentary, seeing huge developments in both technology and form. Documentary stories are now being told via telecommunications, in cinemas, on TV, and online.

In this contemporary course you will be provided tuition in the technological, ethical and intellectual developments in this recent boom in theatrical, broadcast and cross platform documentary. You will be taught by award winning documentary filmmakers and high profile TV, film and cross platform commissioners. Tutors Marc Isaacs , Helen Littleboy and Victoria Mapplebeck, are all active filmmakers with excellent industry contacts and through collaborating with them on work in progress you will gain a unique learning opportunity that will provide genuine vocational experience. We also welcome regular guest lecturers, giving students a direct link to industry professionals and the opportunity to learn from their substantial experience and expertise.

On graduating, our students are skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have gone on to become award-winning filmmakers and journalists.

This is a split campus course, taught in both Egham and Bedford Square in central London.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/madocumentarybypractice.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We have had regular lectures from award winning filmmaker Marc Isaacs, Channel 4 commissioner Kate Vogel and Emily Renshaw Smith, commissioner of Current TV. Forthcoming guest lectures include BBC Director Adam Curtis, feature director Chris Waitts and Matt Locke, Commissioning Editor for New Media and Education at Channel 4.

- Guest commissioners provide students with knowledge of and links to current commissioning strategies. Several of our invited commissioners have subsequently worked with our students on developing their projects.

- You will have exclusive 24-7 access to six purpose-built editing rooms equipped with Final Cut Studio 2 on Mac Pro editing systems. Our Location Store provides an equipment loan and advisory support service with a lending stock that includes twenty Sony HVR-V1E cameras, twenty Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

- With access to the latest digital recording and editing equipment, and covering areas from authorship to authenticity, this course offers you an in-depth study of creative production, taking you from conception through commissioning to research, composition and exhibition.

- You will be provided with excellent tuition in self-shooting documentary filmmaking techniques. You will be able to meet the growing demand for self-shooting directors and producers in both the independent and commercial documentary industries.

Department research and industry highlights

- TRENT is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between the British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC) and Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Led by John Ellis the project brings together the nine existing online databases hosted and curated by the BUFVC which provide important film, radio and television material along with accompanying metadata and contextual information for academics, students, teachers and researchers. This project brings together all the material contained in these databases, yet Trent is not simply a master database. Instead it foregrounds creative searching through a common interactive interface using real-time ‘intelligent’ filtering to bringing disparate databases into a single search and discovery environment whilst maintaining the integrity and individual provenance of each.

- The EUscreen project is major funded EU project which aims to digitise and provide access to European’s audio-visual heritage. This innovative and ambitious three year project began in October 2009 and the project consortium is made up of 28 partners from 19 European countries and is a best practice network within the eContentplus programme of the European Commission. The Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway’s is responsible for the content selection policy for EUscreen and those involved include John Ellis, Rob Turnock and Sian Barber.

- Video Active is a major EU-funded project aiming to create access to digitised television programme content from archives around Europe. It involves collaboration between the Department of Media Arts at Royal Holloway and Utrecht University, and eleven European archives including the BBC, to provide access to content and supporting contextual materials via a specially designed web portal. The team from the Department of Media Arts, who are John Ellis, Cathy Johnson and Rob Turnock, are responsible for developing content selection strategy and policy for the project.

- Migrant and Diasporic Cinema in Contemporary Europe is an AHRC-funded international Research Network, led by Daniela Berghahn, which brings together researchers from ten UK and European universities, filmmakers, policy makers and representatives from the cultural sector. The Research Network explores how the films of migrant and diasporic filmmakers have redefined our understanding of European identity as constructed and narrated in European cinema. The project seeks to identify the numerous ways in which multi-cultural and multi-ethnic presences and themes have revitalised contemporary European cinema by introducing an eclectic mix of non-Western traditions and new genres.

- Lina Khatib was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete a book on the representation of Lebanese politics and society in Lebanese cinema over the last thirty years. The study focuses on cinema’s relationship with national identity in the context of the Civil War and the post-war period in Lebanon.

- Gideon Koppel was awarded an AHRC Research Leave Grant to complete his feature-length documentary portrait of a rural community in Wales, The Library Van, which has been partly funded by the Arts Council of Wales.

Course content and structure

You will study three core units during the year.

Core course units:
- From Idea to Screen
From Idea to Screen introduces the practice of documentary film making - exploring eclectic notions of the genre, from the conventional to those more associated with fine art. The course tutors also use their own work which is deconstructed across all its constituent parts idea, conception, pre-production planning, and research, shooting and post-production. Ideas to Screen will explore ways of translating observations and ideas into imagery – both visual and aural. There will be an emphasis on experimental forms of narrative – at time crossing the boundaries between fine art and documentary. For the final and assessed project in this unit, each student will be asked make a video ‘portrait’ of a character.

- Foundations of Production
Contemporary documentary production requires managerial and business skills as well as creative ones. This unit will instruct you in the industrial skills required for the production of video, television and multimedia documentary. These include researching the market, writing proposals, acquiring funding for development and production, drafting contracts, drawing up budgets, copyright clearance, and marketing.

- Major Documentary Production – Dissertation
Developing out of study, research and practice from previous units, you will direct and produce a substantial documentary production. This is the largest assignment in the course and is appropriately weighted. The unit is tutorial based.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- gained invaluable experience of both authored and commercial documentary production

- the ability to develop their own ideas, preparing them for the documentary industry but also finding ways to reinvent it

- an understanding of documentary film genre and its changing boundaries as well as the changing technologies and their impact on the genre

- an advanced understanding of the processes of making a documentary film from initial concept to final form and the various stages of production.

- an awareness of the institutions and mechanisms of the UK film and television industry

- a critical knowledge of the current and changing platforms for documentary film, from cinema to television and the internet.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including project work, photo essays and written production papers.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, our students will be skilled in creative and professional documentary practice. We have one of the highest employability rates amongst UK Universities and our graduates have become award-winning filmmakers and BBC journalists; recently one of our alumni Charlotte Cook was appointed Strand Co -Coordinator of BBC’s prestigious Documentary Strand Storyville.

Our graduate students have won and been nominated for many awards including, The One World Broadcasting Trust Award and The Jerwood First Cuts Documentary. In 2009 two of our students, Aashish Gadhvi and Michael Watts won the One World Student Documentary Fund which funds challenging international documentary projects.

Syed Atef Amjad Ali has recently had his film The Red Mosque previewed at The Amsterdam International Documentary Festival. The Red Mosque was made with production funds Syed received from The Jan Virijman Fund and also from the One World-Broadcasting Award.

Chung Yee Yu has won the Cinematography Award at Next Frame (A Touring Festival of International Student Film and Video) Chung Yee Yu has also won the Silver Award of Open Category of IFVA (The Hong Kong Independent Short Film & Video Awards)

Recent graduate Suzanne Cohen has just has her work selected for the BBC’s Film Network website; an interactive showcase for ‘new British filmmakers, screening three new short films in broadband quality every week, adding to a growing catalogue of great shorts’.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-making/. Read more
This unique international laboratory programme brings diverse individuals into collaborative research, acknowledging the challenges of creating original, performer-driven theatre in today's complex, globalised culture- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-performance-making/

In over 3 decades there has been a creative surge in hybrid live performance worldwide. This has been the work of solo artists, ensembles, auteurs and performer-directors across creative fields, who have redefined boundaries and stretched the artistic and social imagination into new spaces, both literally and figuratively.

Within the vibrant environment of Goldsmiths, and with all the stimulus that London offers culturally, practising or emerging practitioners develop compositional, critical, technical and management skills and strategies for forging independent and self-motivated careers. Our graduates work as practitioners, teachers and cultural leaders worldwide.

On the programme you will conceive, research, construct and deliver your ideas and articulate what motivates these. Teaching is rigorous and interdisciplinary. You study with distinguished international artists as well as scholars within a praxis ethos where theory informs creativity and vice versa. The emphasis throughout is on encouraging collaboration across disciplines and cultures, and on contextualising practice within its social, political and architectural environment.

Physical training, scenographic/environmental exploration and hands-on introduction to technologies (lighting, video and sound) support composition and artistic experimentation. You identify your own practice within the historical and contemporary field, and write critically and creatively. You archive your practice digitally, and on graduation will have developed a portfolio of projects. You are guided on professional development by the Live Art Development Agency (LADA) and the Institute for Cultural and Creative Entrepreneurship (ICCE) at Goldsmiths.

The programme enjoys a wide international professional network of organisations, commissions, venues and festivals of benefit to students. You study both at Goldsmiths and ArtsAdmin. Click here for a full list of artists associated with the programme as permanent and guest tutors.

"The MA in Performance Making at Goldsmiths attracts artists from all over the world seeking to develop their skills, creativity, pragmatics and independence. Taught by distinguished professionals, it encourages original, collaborative research into new forms, new imperatives and new contexts for live performance. As such it makes an invaluable contribution to the culture of performance."

Lois Keidan, Director: Live Art Development Agency, London

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Department of Theatre and Performance Office.

Modules & Structure

This is a praxis programme on which you gain 180 CATS (credits).

Practical Study- 30 credits
Performance Making A and B- 60 credits
MA in Performance Making Dissertation- 60 credits
Contextual Theory- 30 credits

Skills

You will become conversant, confident and skilled in a range of methodological practices as well as compositional strategies for independent theatrical, dance theatre and live art creation.

Your critical and analytical skills in interpreting artistic practice will be tested in a range of verbal, written and oral ways. Your study of your own body as a creative instrument will be complemented by learning the principles of scenography and film narrative.

You will research intellectually and produce theoretically informed writing. You will learn to contextualise your own practice and interests in the contemporary field of performance both in the UK and internationally, and to articulate such practice.

Overall you will learn how to research, construct and deliver your ideas performatively and how to advocate your own projects to producers, venues, funders and other agencies.

Careers

Graduates work in a wide variety of professional contexts globally as commissioned performance makers, directors, project leaders, programmers, teachers and academic researchers.

The programme has launched international production companies and collaborations whilst the many organisations employing them include:

Dreamthinkspeak
Station House Opera
Marie Gabrielle Rotie Productions
The Clod Ensemble
Corridor
Lift
The Royal Court Theatre
The Gate Theatre
The Globe Theatre
Goossun Art-Illery
Northern Stage
The Royal National Theatre
The Beijing Academy
BAC
Bernie Grant Arts Centre
Artsadmin
Shunt
Hackney Empire
Greenwich Dance Agency
The Convenor’s Company
Athletes of the Heart

And a range of international commissions and festivals including Edinburgh Festival and Brighton Fringe.

What some of our alumni are doing now

http://www.taniaelkhoury.com
http://www.niabarge.com
http://www.liveartgardeninitiative.org.uk/mariallanderas.html
http://www.2divide.weebly.com
http://www.palimpsest.weebly.com
hekayet.com/chirin.htm
http://www.zoukak.org

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This Master's degree offers a professionally recognised training for theatre directors. It is the result of a unique collaboration between Birkbeck and the National Council for Drama Training, Arts Council England, Equity and the Theatrical Management Association. Read more
This Master's degree offers a professionally recognised training for theatre directors. It is the result of a unique collaboration between Birkbeck and the National Council for Drama Training, Arts Council England, Equity and the Theatrical Management Association. The programme has been planned in close co-operation with a wide range of distinguished theatre practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The programme is practice-centred and predominantly practice-based.
Direct input of professional theatre practitioners: Mike Leigh, Vicki Mortimer, Simon Stephens and Sam West have been recent contributors.
Includes a 6-month secondment with a theatre company, providing the opportunity to direct and work with professional actors.
Extended mentoring relationships between students and professional directors.
An opportunity for the student to establish a relationship with a professional drama school offering a course or courses accredited by NCDT.
Regular observation of the course by a highly experienced group of professional directors under the umbrella of NCDT.
Participation in the teaching of the course by a substantial number of experienced theatre practitioners.
We have a range of world-class research resources.

International entry requirements

If English is not your first language or you have not previously studied in English, the requirement for this programme is the equivalent of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS Academic Test) score of 7.5, with not less than 6.5 in each of the sub-tests and at least 7.0 in writing.

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This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Read more
This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Engaging with recent developments in theoretical and critical practice, the course will develop your knowledge and understanding of English literature and will sharpen your skills of literary research, writing and analysis.

Key features

-This course enables you to become part of a vibrant postgraduate community and attend lectures and events organised by the London Graduate School and the Kingston Writing School.
-Capitalising on our location, several modules are complemented by field trips (for example, to the British Library, museums and theatres) to enhance and support your learning experience.
-The English department is home to two archives relating to the work of Iris Murdoch, as well as the Sheridan Morley archive of theatrical life writing and ephemera. It also contributes to the Cultural Histories and Suburban Studies at Kingston, the Life Narrative Research Group, the Iris Murdoch Centre and the Victorian Popular Fiction Association.

What will you study?

The core module, Transgression and Dissidence, introduces the course's central themes by focusing on texts that explore the limits of human experience and contravene cultural boundaries. You will explore how literature, through such transgression, has provided opportunities for dissent and resistance, and will consider the extent to which writing has acted as a catalyst for social and political change. You will then study various conceptual approaches to literature through your choice of option modules, which provide the opportunity to analyse and discuss a range of contentious issues across a number of historical periods and with respect to different genres.

The option modules involve the study of traumatic experience, human rights work and life narrative (Trauma and Justice); the complex relationships between desire, embodiment and writing (Sex and Text); gender, culture and international exchange in early modern Europe (Markets and Materiality); the construction of place and identity in 19th-century travel writing and adventure fiction (Mappings and Crossings); and the 'post-human' and interspecies interaction in recent global literature (Humans and Animals).

The MA programme has been devised to allow you to study diverse topics and periods or, if you prefer, to focus on areas in which the Department of English Literature has particular research strengths: Renaissance literature and culture; Victorian literature, 20th-century and contemporary writing; literature, sex and gender; and writing, space and the environment.

Your 15,000-word dissertation will allow you to research a subject of your choice, produced under the supervision of a specialist academic member of staff.

Assessment

Essays and other written coursework, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-English Literature Dissertation
-Transgression and Dissidence

Optional modules
-Diffractive Creativities, Transversal Practices
-Humans and Animals
-Mappings and crossings
-Markets and Materiality
-Sex and Text
-Special Study: American Dreaming: Suburbia, Literature and Culture
-Special Study: Bruce Springsteen and Contemporary American Culture
-Special Study: Monsters: Theory, Fiction, Culture
-Special Study: Music and Theory
-Special Study: Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama
-Special Study: Writing Women in the 20th and 21st Century
-Trauma and Justice

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The MA in Theatre Directing is a one-year course on which students learn through practice in three main areas. Read more
The MA in Theatre Directing is a one-year course on which students learn through practice in three main areas: working as a director of historical and poetic texts with undergraduate drama students, guided by our professional directors; working with new stage writing as taught by major contemporary playwrights and in collaboration with MA students in scriptwriting; creating a philosophical and critical language to identify the common elements and skills required by the theatrical art, in relation to the genres of painting, literature, architecture and music.

The longest established such MA in the country, it was founded in 1993 in response to the Gulbenkian Report on Director Training of 1989, by Tony Gash, who has taught at RADA as well as UEA. He continues as its director, teaching alongside James Robert Carson, Opera and Theatre Director, Steve Waters and Timberlake Wertenbaker, playwrights, and Mike Bernardin, an experienced actor trainer.

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