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Masters Degrees (Textual Criticism)

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Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise. Read more

Research profile

Our researchers are internationally recognised experts in their fields, with three quarters of their research rated world leading, internationally excellent or internationally recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise.

The Hispanic Studies division was rated 5A in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise.

Supervision is provided in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies. Members of staff have research interests in the following fields: Medieval: modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts; mythology and fantasy; oral literature; questions of transmission and textual criticism; Golden Age: Cervantes and the development of fiction; political and social thought; theatre; European Baroque culture; Modern Peninsular: Generation of 98; modern and contemporary fiction; narrative forms; Spanish American and Brazilian: Argentinian culture; women writers; gender, sexuality and representation; and theory.

Training and support

We offer supervision in the major areas of Spanish, Spanish-American and Portuguese literary and cultural studies, with particular research strengths in the 19th century, theatre of all periods, and the visual arts.

Thanks to the breadth of language research undertaken within the graduate school here at Edinburgh, we can also accommodate an interest in cross-cultural research with a programme of joint supervision.

Our staff pursue a diversity of research interests, offering you a wide choice of areas for study. Research staff have interests in the following fields:

Cervantes and the development of fiction
European Baroque culture
gender, sexuality and representation
Golden Age
medieval (modern literary theory as applied to medieval texts)
modern and contemporary fiction
modern peninsular: generation of ’98
mythology and fantasy
narrative forms
oral literature
political and social thought
questions of transmission and textual criticism
Spanish American, Brazilian and Argentinian culture
the essay and newspaper columns
theatre
women writers

Facilities

You will have access to the impressive collections of the University’s Main Library, in addition to the nearby National Library of Scotland and its outstanding collection of early modern Spanish material.

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MA Culture, Criticism and Curation offers a unique framework for critically engaging with the history and present scenarios of culture. Read more

Introduction

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation offers a unique framework for critically engaging with the history and present scenarios of culture. We create outcomes through which new understandings can be generated through critical writing and expanded forms of curation.

Content

This postgraduate course combines interdisciplinary and innovative research, using techniques of image, object and textual analysis, and practical work in handling archives, curating and writing. Its combination of critical engagement and creative skills bridges scholarly research and the cultural and creative industries. The Course aims to teach students to be high level researchers and innovative practitioners, responding to a need for professionals with a broad interest in cultural production and the skills to communicate this to specialist and general audiences alike.

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation is aimed at candidates with an interest in research and its application in organising cultural events. Students should be keen to collaborate and work in teams, as well as able to work alone. Taking advantage of its location in an art school, MA CCC is neither a ‘straight’ academic course, nor one aimed at training cultural managers. Rather it integrates theoretical issues and practical skills, interrogating history and working critically and creatively to consider how potential new knowledge can be presented in the public realm.

The course will make use of London’s wealth of collections, archives and creative practitioners, staging the teaching in relation to ‘live’ resources. Key focuses of the course are collections and archives, including those that are institutional, personal and /or produced in the context of creative art practices, which you will address from both theoretical and practical standpoints. Collections and archives are historical constructions as much as physical (or other), and the course encourages you to see them as discursive, technological, social and political.

The course is taught by a team of tutors who bridge academic research and writing and professional practices of criticism, journalism, art, exhibition design, curating and collections management, most of whom developed and currently teach on the successful BA Criticism, Communication and Curation: Arts and Design degree. We will support your acquisition of high-level critical and practical skills enabling you to work in the field of art and culture or progress to a research degree. MA CCC aspires to generate criticality, as a skill and mode of address, applicable both within and outside the Humanities. The course’s main aim is to take research based in the academic environment and make it accessible to larger or new audiences.

Structure

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation lasts 45 weeks, arranged across one academic year – 3 terms of 10 weeks – plus an additional 15 weeks of independent work.

MA Culture, Criticism and Curation is credit rated at 180 credits. It comprises two Units:

Unit 1, (60 credits), for the first 15 weeks of the course

Unit 2 (120 credits) that runs for 30 weeks.

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This programme offers a unique opportunity to deepen and develop your knowledge of classical antiquity by combining a substantial (20,000 words) research dissertation with research training and taught elements through three taught modules. Read more
This programme offers a unique opportunity to deepen and develop your knowledge of classical antiquity by combining a substantial (20,000 words) research dissertation with research training and taught elements through three taught modules.

It can lead to doctoral research, but also provides the chance to undertake scholarly research as an enrichment of undergraduate study or for career development purposes.

A research skills training module equips you with a range of specialised and generic skills, including textual criticism, document handling, literary theory, information resources, thesis presentation and bibliographical management.

Many students also opt to take further training in classical languages.

In addition, you may choose modules from the MA Antiquity syllabus, which allows for interdisciplinary study of the ancient world. We also offer the opportunity to take modules from other related postgraduate programmes, such as Byzantine Studies.

Typically, applicants will have a degree in some area of classical or ancient historical studies, and we recommend that you discuss your proposed research with a potential supervisor before applying.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA English in Literatures offers a structured learning environment, a good grounding in literary theory, and the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice. Read more

Overview

The MA English in Literatures offers a structured learning environment, a good grounding in literary theory, and the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice.

All students:
- follow a full research training programme
- take dedicated masters modules designed to deepen their understanding of issues in literature and theory
- choose an elective module from a variety of offerings, including modules from the MA in Creative Writing or from those offered as part of our English and American Literatures research-led undergraduate teaching
- work with a research-active supervisor to develop and pursue a dissertation topic of their own choosing

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/englishliteratures/

Course Aims

The Masters programme aims to enable students to:
- Engage in wide and varied reading among the regional and global varieties of literature and literary criticism.

- Think both critically and creatively about literature in English.

- Assess the form and meaning of literary and filmic texts.

- Develop their understanding of the characteristics of key literary genres (prose fiction, poetry, and drama) and periods (post-1500), and of the principles of canonisation that elevate and marginalise texts and their authors.

- Understand, evaluate, and apply to literary texts a range of critical ideas and theories relevant to textual criticism at Masters level.

- Communicate ideas and arguments with clarity and care in a number of different forms—including essays, oral presentations, reflective diaries—using appropriate language and techniques of presentation.

- Work both constructively and critically, by themselves and as part of a team, to deliver specific projects.

- Reflect productively on their strengths, weaknesses, and methods of learning.

- Develop research skills commensurate with postgraduate study in the field of English Literary Studies.

Teaching & Assessment

The function of the assessments listed in the table above is to test students’ achievement of the learning outcomes of the English Literatures Programme. For example:

- Essays test the quality and application of subject knowledge. They allow students to demonstrate their ability to carry out bibliographic research and to communicate their ideas effectively in writing in an appropriate scholarly style using appropriate systems of referencing.

- Critical Analyses of other scholars’ work test students’ ability to identify and summarise the key points of a text and to evaluate the quality of arguments and the evidence used to support them. Critical analyses also assess students’ knowledge of research methodologies and their ability to make critical judgements about the appropriateness of different approaches.

- Annotated Bibliographies test students’ ability to analyse and evaluate critically a range of secondary and source materials with a view towards specific areas of research.

- Project Outlines test students’ ability to plan, prepare, and structure a viable research project. They also test the students’ knowledge of relevant and important areas of research within English literary studies, and to assess the originality and impact of certain areas of research to the field.

- Reflective Study Diaries test students’ ability to engage self-reflexively with their study and practice within their field. They encourage students to develop a critical engagement with their modes and practices of study, learning and development of research topics.

- Short research papers test student’s knowledge of different research methodologies. They also enable students to demonstrate their ability to formulate research questions and to answer them using an appropriate strategy.

- Oral presentations, either by individual students or in groups, assess students’ subject knowledge and understanding. Where applicable, they also test their ability to work effectively as members of a team, to communicate what they know orally and visually, and to reflect on these processes as part of their own personal development.

- Dissertations test students’ ability to carry out independent research and communicate findings in an extended piece of written work following recognised academic standards of presentation.

Marks are awarded for summative assessments designed to assess students’ achievement of learning outcomes. Students are also assessed formatively to enable them to monitor their own progress and to assist staff in identifying and addressing any specific learning needs. Formative assessment is not formally marked. Feedback, including guidance on how students can improve the quality of their work, is also provided on all summative assessments and more informally in the course of tutorial and seminar discussions.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This programme offers a unique opportunity to deepen and develop your knowledge of ancient history by combining a substantial (20,000 words) dissertation with research training and taught elements. Read more
This programme offers a unique opportunity to deepen and develop your knowledge of ancient history by combining a substantial (20,000 words) dissertation with research training and taught elements. It can lead to doctoral research, but also provides the chance to undertake scholarly research as enrichment of undergraduate study or for career development purposes.

This programme will enhance your skills as an ancient historian. You will undertake training in key fields such as classical languages or historiography, which will equip you with the essential skills for your Greek or Roman History research project in any period from Archaic Greece to Imperial Rome and its provinces. You will also have the opportunity to choose modules from across the MA Antiquity syllabus which are complementary to your research.

Your thesis will be on an aspect of Greek or Roman history, culture or society.

It will be supervised by a specialist in the area of your work. A research skills training module equips you for your thesis with a range of specialised and generic skills, including textual criticism, document handling, literary theory, information resources, thesis presentation and bibliographical management.

Many students also opt to take training in classical languages but you may choose to take modules from the MA Antiquity syllabus, which allows for interdisciplinary study of the ancient world and includes modules on historiography and ancient societies. We also offer the opportunity to take modules from other related postgraduate programmes, such as Byzantine Studies.

Typically, applicants will have a degree in some area of ancient historical, archaeological, historical or classical studies, and we recommend that you discuss your proposed research with a potential supervisor before applying - see the full range of academic research interests of individual staff.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Read more
The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Our MPhil programme provides a 9-month course (October to June) in the scholarly methods and disciplines relevant to the study of the history, languages, literatures, and material culture of the peoples of Britain and Ireland, Brittany and Scandinavia in the earlier Middle Ages.

The course enables candidates to achieve an understanding of early Insular culture as a whole, as well as specialising in aspects of particular interest, whether historical, palaeographical, literary, or linguistic. Training is given in scholarly methods and practices, complemented by instruction in the particular fields of the candidate's interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc

Course detail

During the MPhil, students should have:

(1) developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen area within Anglo- Saxon, Norse & Celtic and of the critical debates within it;
(2) developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field;
(3) shown independent judgement based on their own research.
(4) acquired and/or consolidated linguistic, palaeographical or other scholarly skills;
(5) participated effectively in seminar discussions and made an oral presentation of their research;
(6) learnt how to schedule independent research to produce written work of a high standard to a strict deadline.

Format

After two weeks of orientation and study-skills training, MPhil students meet for a weekly hour-long text-seminar throughout the first two terms of the course. The text-seminar focuses on a sequence of literary texts (studied in translation), including key Latin and vernacular texts from all the fields within ASNC, preceded by a group of earlier works that provided the intellectual background to the medieval world.

Alongside this core seminar, students are expected to attend the two courses they have chosen to pursue from among the selection of linguistic/literary and historical subjects offered in the Department, which are taught through a varying combination of lectures, classes and seminars. In this way, a significant proportion of the taught element of this MPhil is tailored to the individual needs of each student, hence the possible variation in weekly hours of seminars, classes and lectures.

Assessment

The MPhil dissertation (between 10,000 and 15,000 words) makes up 50% of the total mark for the course, and is submitted in the last week of the third term (mid-June). Students are required to submit a dissertation title, with abstract, by the mid-point of the second term (February).

At the end of the first term of the course (December), students are required to submit a 5000-word Review of Scholarship essay, intended as a survey and assessment of scholarship on the topic of the projected MPhil dissertation. The mark for the Review of Scholarship essay constitutes 10% of the overall MPhil grade.

Over the course of four days in the first week of the third term (April), students write a 3000-word take-home essay, on a broad topic chosen from a selection, and drawing on at least three of the works of literature discussed during the course of the MPhil text-seminar, which runs throughout the first two terms of the course. The mark for the take-home essay makes up 10% of the overall mark.

Students are required to take two 3-hour written examinations which assess knowledge and skills acquired during the first two terms of the academic year, in two courses chosen from among those taught in the Department. Courses on offer include Anglo-Saxon history, Scandinavian history, Brittonic and Gaelic history, Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Welsh, Medieval Irish, Insular Latin, and palaeography, most of which can be pursued at beginner, intermediate or advanced level; Germanic philology, Celtic philology, and textual criticism are further options for students with the appropriate prior knowledge. Each written examination is worth 15% of the total MPhil mark, and is assessed independently by two examiners.

Continuing

MPhil students may apply to continue to a PhD in ASNC; the academic condition for continuation is an overall mark of 70 or more in the MPhil course, and 70 or more for the dissertation. A viva on the dissertation is compulsory for all students who have been made an offer for continuation to PhD.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc/apply

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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This programme is intended for students who wish to develop their expertise in Biblical Studies, including those who wish to prepare for subsequent PhD work. Read more

Programme description

This programme is intended for students who wish to develop their expertise in Biblical Studies, including those who wish to prepare for subsequent PhD work. The emphasis is on adding depth and breadth to expertise in biblical languages.

Finely honed skills in biblical languages are central to this programme’s engagement with the Bible, the world that produced it and its later readers.

The programme will provide you with expert, in-depth study of the Hebrew Bible and New Testaments, the wider, ancient Near East, and related extra-biblical literature, including the Dead Sea Scrolls and scholarly methods for studying them.

You will be taught by leading academics whose research interests are the Hebrew Bible, Old Testament, New Testament, early Judaism and early Christianity.

You will benefit from weekly seminars from senior specialists in biblical studies and related subjects, and the School’s Centre for the Study of Christian Origins.

Programme structure

The programme runs over one year (two years if part time).

The programme runs over one year (two years part-time). You will be taught mainly in small classroom/seminar groups. You will receive training in research methods and individual supervision for your 15,000-word dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

The core components comprise two biblical language/reading courses, in Greek or Hebrew/Aramaic.

There are numerous scenarios for language study chosen in consultation with the Programme Director. If you have only one year previous study of a biblical language you may take Intermediate Biblical Hebrew or Intermediate New Testament Greek.

Option courses:

You may choose two from options including:

Hebrew and Aramaic Texts from Qumran
Hebrew Scripture Theology
Studies in Ancient Judaism
Textual Criticism in Biblical Studies
The Bible, Literature and Hermeneutics
New Testament Exegesis
Hebrew Bible Exegesis

You can choose another course from the School of Divinity, or from another School at the discretion of the Programme Director, and subject to availability.

Career opportunities

The programme is designed to provide a strong foundation for postgraduate research in biblical studies.

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The French and Francophone Studies. Language, Culture and History MA aims to encourage innovative approaches to issues in the field, as well as to sharpen students' creative and critical responses. Read more
The French and Francophone Studies: Language, Culture and History MA aims to encourage innovative approaches to issues in the field, as well as to sharpen students' creative and critical responses.

Degree information

The programme provides a thorough understanding of key methods and issues in textual criticism, and of aspects of French and francophone culture, within a broadly interdisciplinary focus. The modules are designed to offer exciting critical engagement with topical issues currently being addressed in French and francophone studies, such as: text and theory, text and image, historiography, film history, trauma, creativity and post-colonial theory.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), and a research dissertation (90 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module - Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:
-Dead Things and Demolition Sites: Cultural, Visual and Historical Representations in France, 1598-1889
-Advanced Translation into French
-Advanced Translation into English
-Gender, Race and Sexuality: New Readings in Francophone Literature and Visual Culture
-The French New Wave

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project related to the broad area of French and Francophone Studies which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words for the taught pathway and 18,000 for research.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. French-specific translation courses are assessed by take-home examinations. Other courses are mainly assessed by essays.

Careers

The programme provides an excellent foundation for further doctoral study in the field. Graduates of the department have entered a wide range of professions including finance, commerce, journalism, education, the media, public relations, translation and interpreting, and the police.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Educational Researcher, TEN
-Operating graduate scheme - Graduate manager, Network Rail Ltd
-Freelance Language Teacher, Freelance French Tutor
-Graduate Diploma in Law, College of Law

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a renowned tradition in both teaching and research in French, dating back to its foundation in 1826 and continuing to the present day. UCL is at the leading-edge of current debate in French, which involves challenging the boundaries of French studies and contributing to its remapping. Students are taught by nationally and internationally renowned experts in their fields.

There is a thriving research culture in the school: students can attend and participate in an extensive programme of seminars. Students also have access to conferences held at the Institute of Modern Language Research and are welcome to participate in its graduate forum.

The department has excellent research facilities, including an extensive library of films on DVD.

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The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism. Read more
The Ancient History MA is an intercollegiate degree programme of the University of London. It offers students the opportunity to focus on a specific period or topic, explore adjacent disciplines, and acquire technical skills in such areas as archaeology, epigraphy, numismatics, papyrology, and textual criticism.

Degree information

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key aspects of and approaches to ancient history. They develop the ability to assess historical evidence critically and synthesise historical data from printed, manuscript, archaeological, numismatic, epigraphic, and papyrological sources, and are equipped with the tools necessary for further research in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two to four optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules:
-Sources and Methods in Ancient History

Optional modules - options include the following (for a list of what is available in any given year please see our departmental website page):
-Ancient Rome on Film
-Change and Continuity in the Ancient Near East
-The City of Rome (BA/MA), (Royal Holloway)
-Economic and Social History of Archaic and Classical Greece
-Economic and Social History of Rome (Royal Holloway)
-Greek and Latin language at various levels
-Greek Epigraphy
-Greek Historiography
-Greek Law and Lawcourts (Royal Holloway)
-Greek Papyrology
-Latin Epigraphy
-Lived Religion in Ancient Greece
-The Making of the Christian Empire AD 284-425
-Persepolis (King's College London)
-Propaganda and Ideology in Rome
-Roman Britain (King's College London)
-Roman Egypt

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in the field of Ancient History, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and museum visits. Most teaching is available inside UCL, but some is held in other London colleges. Assessment is through unseen examinations, coursework essays, and the dissertation.

Careers

This degree provides an outstanding foundation for those wishing to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career. It is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museums and heritage and the education sector.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Head of Admissions, Unspecified International School in London
-Consulting Intern, Oracle Corporation
-Editorial Assistant, Bloomsbury Publishing
-Senior Intelligence Analyst, British Transport Police
-Senior Executive Officer, Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

Employability
Students develop an enviable range of skills by taking this degree. Debates, small-group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. The analytical and research skills gained are also highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example, departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with UCL History alumni.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

This intercollegiate programme is taught jointly with King's College London and Royal Holloway, University of London, and students benefit from the international expertise and wealth of resources that the three colleges have to offer.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

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Recent staff publications have focused on the gospels; Paul; the apocalypse; the apocryphal gospels and early second-century texts and developments; textual criticism; New Testament ethics; Qumran; the historical, religious and literary environment of the New Testament; and New Testament Christology. Read more

Research profile

Recent staff publications have focused on the gospels; Paul; the apocalypse; the apocryphal gospels and early second-century texts and developments; textual criticism; New Testament ethics; Qumran; the historical, religious and literary environment of the New Testament; and New Testament Christology.

Postgraduate research is welcomed in a variety of areas, including exegesis, historical-critical issues, textual and literary criticism, the relation between early Christianity and its religious and historical setting, history of interpretation, and hermeneutical questions.

There is a research seminar for staff and students to which visiting speakers are invited. Taught courses, at an advanced level, which contribute to your interest and research needs, may be undertaken where available.

The School of Divinity is home to a thriving research community. All of our academic staff are engaged in individual research and writing projects and many are also involved in collaborative projects with colleagues across the globe.

The School of Divinity has consistently scored exceptionally highly in the Research Assessment Exercise, the most recent assessment putting us among the best schools in theology, philosophical theology and religious studies in the UK.

Our researchers currently boast the highest percentage of 4* scores (world-leading in terms of originality, significance and rigour) of any Scottish university in theology and religious studies.

We have the largest number of divinity research-active staff in Scotland, and the third largest in the UK. Overall, the RAE ranked us third in the UK with 60 per cent of our research activity judged internationally excellent or world-leading.

Training and support

Our community comprises 450 students (undergraduate and postgraduate) and nearly 30 full-time academic staff, including internationally respected scholars in a wide range of specialisms.

We welcome students from around the world, from religious and non-religious backgrounds, taking pride in our status as a renowned research centre in a broad spectrum of subject areas.

We take a personal interest in our students and offer a welcoming and friendly setting in which to pursue the exciting and demanding study of theology and religious studies.

The large graduate school and the presence of visiting academics from around the world help ensure a diverse and stimulating research environment.

All research students are assigned a primary and secondary supervisor. You are offered a training course in research methods, and are given conscientious supervision from your first weeks through to submission of your thesis.

There are also special orientation events for international students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate researcher you can draw on the outstanding library resources of New College, the University of Edinburgh and the nearby National Library of Scotland.

New College Library has one of the largest theology collections in the UK, with more than a quarter of a million items and a large and rich manuscript collection, including the papers of Thomas Chalmers, John Baillie, JH Oldham and James S Stewart.

The strengths of the Library collections contribute greatly to the teaching and research of members of the School as well as students elsewhere in the University.

These collections are complemented by the many resources available in the University and beyond. The total holdings in all the University libraries exceed 2.25 million volumes. In addition, the National Library of Scotland holds more than five million volumes.

The New College Library boasts a magnificent reading hall, originally built as the sanctuary of the Free High Kirk.

The School provides extensive and well-equipped computing facilities for coursework and research at all levels, including dissertations. We provide all students with access to PCs, scanners and printers, across four labs.

Research opportunities

We offer two types of research-based masters degree, as well as PhD programmes.

Masters by Research (MSc by Research/MTh by Research)
These one-year masters degrees by research are designed for students with an academic training in divinity or religious studies (or other relevant subject) who wish to focus on a particular topic.

The programme may be taken as either a Master of Theology by Research or a Master of Science by Research. The difference is one of nomenclature only.

Both involve research training and orientation courses, after which you may either research and submit a dissertation of about 30,000 words, which comprises the remaining assessment for the degree, or write three supervised research essays to provide appropriate background and preparatory study for the topic of your research, and then submit a dissertation of about 15,000 words.

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The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme will focus on advanced-level engagement with Classical Chinese Confucian texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

Modules will focus on enhancing understanding of Classical Chinese and methodologies such as textual criticism, commentary, and textual analysis.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopedia of the Four Branches of Literature. Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider issues such as the origins and content of key texts, and the history of and developments in translation and commentary.

Confucian Classics Studies (SICH7013) will explore some of the main texts of Confucianism, and interpretations of the philosophy and the cultural impact of these texts, including The Book of I Ching, The Book of History and Three Annals of Spring and Autumn.

Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius. Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the Exoteric traditions of the Han version of the Songs, the Sayings of Confucius and his disciples, the Six Secret Strategic Teachings, An Essay on Government by Liu Yi, Yangzi Book on Government and On the Important List of Government.

Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles (SICH7010) will focus on key Confucian texts from the Compilation including, for example, Luxuriant Dew of the Spring and Autumn Annals and The Book of Discussion on Legalism.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables students to engage in a detailed study of the reception of Confucianism in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and to develop translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows students to complete a detailed critical commentary of a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7010 Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles
-SICH7013 Confucian Classical Studies
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Confucian Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established Academy in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London.

Assessment

An MA degree in Confucian Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

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The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme will focus on advanced-level engagement with (Classical Chinese) Buddhist texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

Modules will focus on enhancing understanding of Classical Chinese and methodologies such as textual criticism, commentary, and textual analysis, also aspects of Sanskrit and the communication of Buddhist texts through Sanskrit.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopaedia of the Four Branches of Literature. Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider the issues such as the origins and content of key texts, and the history and developments in translation, commentary and reception of them.

Chinese Buddhist Scriptural Studies: the Sutras (SICH7005) will focus upon the value systems and philosophical ideas contained within the (Chinese) Buddhist Sutras, and translations and annotations of and on key texts. Engaging with the Chinese Buddhist Eight Schools (SICH7007) will focus on selected texts from the Eight Schools, concentrating in any given year on one or two Schools and the ideas they contain. Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius. Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the key Sinological texts.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables students to engage in a detailed study of the reception of Buddhism and its different traditions in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and to develop translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows the student to complete a detailed critical commentary of a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7005 Chinese Buddhist Scriptural Studies: the Sutras
-SICH7007 Engaging with the Chinese Buddhist Eight Schools
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Chinese Buddhist Textual Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established Academy in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London.

Assessment

An MA degree in Chinese Buddhist Textual Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

Read less
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme will focus on advanced-level engagement with Classical Chinese Daoist texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

Modules will focus on enhancing understanding of Classical Chinese and methodologies such as textual criticism, commentary, and textual analysis.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopedia of the Four Branches of Literature. Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider issues such as the origins and content of key texts, as well as history and developments in translation, commentary and reception of them.

Daoist Text Studies (SICH7008) will enable students to engage in detailed study of the key Daoist text the Dao De Jing. Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius.

Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the key Sinological texts. Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles (SICH7010) will focus on key Daoist texts from the Compilation, for example the Book of Zhuangzi and the Book of Liezi.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables a detailed study of key Doaist texts, notably the Dao De Jing, and the reception of Daoism and its different traditions in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and to develop translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows the student to complete a detailed critical commentary of a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7010 Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles
-SICH7008 Daoist Text Studies
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Chinese Daoist Textual Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established Academy in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London.

Assessment

An MA degree in Chinese Daoist Textual Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

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How is meaning attributed to biblical texts? By following Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Biblical Exegesis you will be well-equipped with analytical instruments to discern the crucial decision points in giving meaning in a text. Read more

Master's specialisation in Biblical Exegesis

How is meaning attributed to biblical texts? By following Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Biblical Exegesis you will be well-equipped with analytical instruments to discern the crucial decision points in giving meaning in a text. Core concepts in Bible texts are explored in connection to their cultural and historical context.
Students will also investigate and discuss the relation between Bible texts and ethics. How do the texts aim to change the behaviour of their readers? These texts are a crucial point of reference for theological reflection and provide direction in contemporary society and church.
Students are expected to read the Old Testament and the New Testament in their original languages and will be taught to understand these books in the original context in which they were written. They will be handed the necessary tools to study the biblical texts, focussing on such aspects as grammar, sentence structure, literary devices and plot construction. And since these texts function in distinct cognitive environments, students will get acquainted with various ancient Near Eastern and ancient Eastern Mediterranean frameworks of experiencing and thinking.
Although heavily focussed on the Old and New Testament, students will learn skills that can be used to analyse any kind of text. This programme can therefore be compared to other academic literary subjects in that students are taught the general skills of literary criticisms as well as contextualisation. Important to note is the academic approach; students will be able to critically and thoroughly analyse texts. Graduates of Biblical Exegesis will be able to provide explanations and give meaning to the foundational texts of Judaism and Christianity, whether they do that in their role as researcher, spiritual caregiver, pastoral care worker, journalist, policy maker, or educator.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/biblicalexegesis

Why study Biblical Exegesis at Radboud University?

- This Master’s specialisation offers a beautiful mix of literary criticism and theological reflection.
- A distinctive characteristic of Biblical Exegesis at Radboud University is the unique combination of cognitive linguistics with literary criticism.
- Attention is equally given to both the Old and the New Testament and the relationship between their language, cultural framework and historical context.
- Thanks to electives, students have plenty of room to choose a direction that meets their professional and academic interests. Taking a few seminars from the other theology disciplines of choice (History of Church and Theology, Practical or Systematic Theology) is mandatory to broaden students general knowledge on Theology.
- The third year is aimed at training students for a specific profession. Students can choose research (English), education (Dutch), religion and policy (Dutch) or spiritual care (Dutch).
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups, allowing for ample opportunity for questions and discussion.
- Radboud University and its Theology department are Roman Catholic in origin, but its Master’s programme in Theology is open to all students. Our students have very diverse religious and cultural backgrounds.

Change perspective

Students of the Master’s specialisation in Biblical Exegesis are taught critical engagement with the Bible. Engagement because students are invited to involve themselves in these texts and in their academic examination. Critical because the analyses will often open up their minds to the fact that Jewish and Christian traditions of interpretations have developed over time, sometimes in ways that distance themselves from the biblical texts’ meanings in their original contexts. Students will get an in-depth understanding of Christian traditions and values and will be encouraged to analyse them thoroughly. They will come to understand that things came to be as they are due to choices made in the past. Students will see that both Bible and tradition have been and will be formative for our present engagements.

Career prospects

In a globalising world more and more institutions require skills in theological communication and hermeneutics. Biblical Exegesis students know how to analyse important texts. Our graduates have an analytical attitude and the strong empirical skills to formulate critical theological perspectives on questions of meaning of life and a viable civil society in our contemporary situation. In addition, the programme teaches you how to think independently and critically about the way Christian doctrine can give meaning contemporary issues.

Job positions

The Master’s programme Theology has a strong emphasis on career prospects by allowing students to focus on one professional path in their third year: research, education, spiritual care or religion and policy.

Our approach to this field

The Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts that are analysed in this Master’s specialisation found their origin in cultures of the ancient Near East and the ancient Eastern Mediterranean. These cultures differ greatly from our present day cultures. It is, therefore, a challenging task to understand the meanings of these texts in their contexts of origin and their original conceptual frameworks, to acknowledge their textual composition and aims, as well as their intended social and religious functions. It requires linguistic, literary, cultural, social, ethical, historical, and hermeneutical research. That is why the development and application of research methods plays such an important role in biblical exegesis.

How is meaning is attributed?
In the Master’s specialisation in Biblical Exegesis, students learn how to apply the instruments of textual explanation at an advanced level. Both diachronic analysis (text criticism, historical linguistics) and synchronic analysis (literary criticism) are taught and applied. The central question students engage with is how meaning is attributed in a text. Students will therefore become well equipped to discern the crucial decision points in attributing meaning.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/biblicalexegesis

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