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Masters Degrees (Textile Technology)

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The complete Masters (MSc) course in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of modern technical textiles, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career. Read more
The complete Masters (MSc) course in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of modern technical textiles, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career.
Graduates of this programme are expected to understand the whole process of converting fibrous materials into the end product and to be able to identify and analyse the appropriate material and production route for a specific end product. You will also have developed the expertise and skill to conduct quality evaluation of textile products.

The complete MSc programme is made up of taught course units and a research dissertation. The taught course units are delivered through a combination of lectures and practical laboratory work.

Special features

The Masters programme in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of the advanced Technical Textiles sector, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career.
After successfully completing the programme, you will have gained a thorough grounding and understanding of the whole process of converting fibrous polymeric materials to the end product. This successful delivery to the Technical Textiles sector involves materials performance, Computer Aided Design (CAD), 2D/3D product design and specification, sustainability, effective supply chains and an understanding of diverse product sectors such as textile composites, protective wear, filtration, sportswear, medical textiles and the integration of electronics into textile structures.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed by a combination of exams and coursework. The coursework supports the development of your transferable skills such as literature review and report writing. You will complete your MSc programme with a dissertation project. Your dissertation is an opportunity to apply your learning on a five-month technical textiles project. It also enables you to further develop your knowledge and skill in your chosen field. Your choice of topic, in consultation with your personal tutor, will range in purpose from investigatory and problem-solving work, through studies of state-of-the-art technology and current practice, to experimental and analytical research.

Accrediting organisations

Accredited by the Institute of Minerals, Materials and Mining (IOM 3 ) as meeting the Further Learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

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The textiles industry is continually evolving. Developing new products that meet the needs of a changing market demands a combination of technology and design technology. Read more

The textiles industry is continually evolving. Developing new products that meet the needs of a changing market demands a combination of technology and design technology. This programme will give you access to the latest developments across the textile industry to equip you for these challenges.

You’ll receive training in key skills including laboratory practice, problem solving, and reasoning, and you’ll undertake a substantial research dissertation. In addition, you’ll have the chance to specialise in either textile technology or textile design technology, depending on your own interests and career plans. A variety of optional modules will also give you the chance to learn about topics such as medical textiles, or fashion and sustainability.

Taught by experts in one of the UK’s major hubs for textile research, this programme will help you gain the specialist knowledge and skills to build a career in a fast-paced and challenging industry.

We have plenty of facilities to help you make the most of your time at Leeds, including well-equipped laboratories and purpose-built computer clusters so you can build your skills on both PC and Mac.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Society of Dyers and Colourists as being equivalent to its ASDC examinations leading to Chartered Colourist (CCol) status. It is also accredited by The Textile Institute at Associate level (CText ATI), this demonstrates a good broad knowledge of textiles and its application, and allows you to apply for Licentiateship (LTI) upon graduation, and Associateship (CText ATI) after one year in industry.

Course content

Everyone studies the same compulsory modules throughout the programme, which allow you to become a confident researcher and give you experience of practical lab work in Semester 2. You’ll apply the knowledge and skills that you have gained throughout the course to a substantial piece of independent research, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme in September.

You’ll also have the chance to specialise in the aspects of textiles that interest you by selecting the appropriate pathway.

Textile Design Technology pathway

In the modules on this pathway you’ll learn how to view technology through the eyes of both the designer and the technologist. You’ll gain understanding of how to manipulate technology to design and produce new products and how to maintain and/or improve the desirability of current products.

Textile Technology pathway

You will gain in-depth knowledge of advanced textile technology, textile processes and quality management together with the science, technology and testing of functional textile materials, product development, coloration and finishing processes, medical textiles, nonwovens and performance clothing.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Dissertation 60 credits
  • Laboratory Practicals and Case Studies 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Sustainability and Fashion 15 credits
  • Textile Design Technology 15 credits
  • Colour and the Design Process for Textiles 15 credits
  • Digital Printing 15 credits
  • Textile technology including nonwovens 15 credits
  • Coloration and Finishing Technology 15 credits
  • Technical Textiles 15 credits
  • Textiles in Medical Devices and Healthcare Products 15 credits
  • Textile Consultancy and Management 15 credits
  • Textile Product Design, Innovation and Development 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Textiles MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Textiles MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use various teaching and learning methods, including practicals, lectures, seminars and tutorials. Independent study is also vital to this degree, allowing you to develop your skills and prepare for taught sessions so you can make the most of them.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed by a range of methods including essays and exams as well as practical and project work, reports, literature reviews and presentations.

Career opportunities

This degree is designed to equip you with a wide range of knowledge and skills to succeed in careers such as textile management, technical consultancy, and education and training. You’ll also be well prepared to continue with academic research in textiles at PhD level.

If you take the Textile Design Technology pathway, you could work in the industry as designers or in areas, which need an understanding of technology and design e.g. buying, textile product development for apparel, and in various third party testing houses. Moreover, you could work in various textile industries in managerial positions including the retail and supply chain management with major clothing companies and their suppliers.

The Textile Technology pathway will allow you to gain the skills to pursue a career in any of the following fields: technical consultancy; education and training; and academic research in technical textiles. You may also be employed as a product development technologist in specialist fields such as medical textiles, geotextiles and civil engineering materials, aerospace and transport engineering materials, and sport and performance clothing.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The Textile Science and Technology research degrees are part of a multi-disciplinary School of Materials. State-of-the-art facilities and a leading academic team, the largest and most comprehensive in Europe, are complemented by innovative research areas, and make this an exciting and forward-looking area for research. Read more
The Textile Science and Technology research degrees are part of a multi-disciplinary School of Materials. State-of-the-art facilities and a leading academic team, the largest and most comprehensive in Europe, are complemented by innovative research areas, and make this an exciting and forward-looking area for research.

Innovation

Textiles are a platform for innovation. Our research draws on the natural flexibility and versatility of fibres to produce novel fibre structures and physical properties. Through an integrated approach, our research expertise has been established across a broad technological base allowing multi-disciplinary problems to be solved.

High Performance Textiles

A huge manufacturing and commercial area in the textile science and technology sector is High Performance Technical Textiles. Such textiles require the specialist equipment infrastructure and critical scientific mass available at Manchester and in turn, allow us to carry out focused research and collaborate with important industry sectors, such as aerospace composites, where 3D textile structures are critical to lowering weight, maintaining strength and improving efficiency and economy.

International links

We work closely with various international research centres. Collaboration with the Faraday Technitex Centre, focusing on Technical Textiles, has assisted UK industry to develop novel performance materials and technology. We also have an important partnership in novel chemical processing with the Lenzig supported Christian Doppler Laboratory, which is primarily focused on the development of the sustainable cellulosic materials sector.

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

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The Textile Science and Technology research degrees are part of a multi-disciplinary School of Materials. State-of-the-art facilities and a leading academic team, the largest and most comprehensive in Europe, are complemented by innovative research areas, and make this an exciting and forward-looking area for research. Read more
The Textile Science and Technology research degrees are part of a multi-disciplinary School of Materials. State-of-the-art facilities and a leading academic team, the largest and most comprehensive in Europe, are complemented by innovative research areas, and make this an exciting and forward-looking area for research.

Innovation

Textiles are a platform for innovation. Our research draws on the natural flexibility and versatility of fibres to produce novel fibre structures and physical properties. Through an integrated approach, our research expertise has been established across a broad technological base allowing multi-disciplinary problems to be solved.

High Performance Textiles

A huge manufacturing and commercial area in the textile science and technology sector is High Performance Technical Textiles. Such textiles require the specialist equipment infrastructure and critical scientific mass available at Manchester and in turn, allow us to carry out focused research and collaborate with important industry sectors, such as aerospace composites, where 3D textile structures are critical to lowering weight, maintaining strength and improving efficiency and economy.

International links

We work closely with various international research centres. Collaboration with the Faraday Technitex Centre, focusing on Technical Textiles, has assisted UK industry to develop novel performance materials and technology. We also have an important partnership in novel chemical processing with the Lenzig supported Christian Doppler Laboratory, which is primarily focused on the development of the sustainable cellulosic materials sector.

Facilities

To underpin the research and teaching activities, we have established state-of-the-art laboratories, which allow comprehensive characterisation and development of materials. These facilities range from synthetic/textile fibre chemistry to materials processing and materials testing.

To complement our teaching resources, there is a comprehensive range of electrochemical, electronoptical imaging and surface and bulk analytical facilities and techniques.

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Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. Read more

Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. This MPhil is both an academic programme and professional training; it will give you a framework of theoretical knowledge and a range of practical experience which will enable you to contribute to the understanding and preservation of culturally significant textile artefacts.

Why this programme

  • If you are looking to enter a career in textile conservation practice in a museum or other institution, or to pursue doctoral-level research in this field, this programme is designed for you.
  • You will take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
  • You will be based in our specialist conservation laboratories. The facilities include workrooms, a wet lab, dye lab, chemistry lab and well-equipped analytical lab.
  • You will benefit from our close links with Glasgow Museums, as well as the University’s own Hunterian Museum. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You will have the opportunity to draw on the museums’ rich and varied textile collections.
  • This is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and one of only a few specialist textile conservation programmes in the world.
  • You will be taught by visiting specialists from local and national museums in Scotland and the wider UK.

Programme structure

You will take core courses over two semesters in each year, with a work placement in the summer between the first and second years. You will write up your dissertation over the second summer and submit it at the end of August.

The core courses will develop an understanding of

  • the practical skills used in textile conservation
  • related practical skills including dyeing and photography
  • the science underpinning textile deterioration and conservation treatments
  • preventive conservation techniques
  • the technological, cultural, historic and aesthetic contexts of textile artefacts
  • the place of conservation in the wider cultural sector.

Core courses

Year 1

  • Research methods in practice
  • Principles and practice: core skills and ethics
  • Understanding textiles: technology
  • Principles and practice: developing skills
  • Preventive conservation
  • Material cultures
  • Placement

Year 2

  • Principles and practice: advanced skills
  • Conservation in practice
  • Deconstructing the artefact 
  • Principles and practice: conservation projects
  • Professional development
  • Research management
  • Dissertation

Career prospects

The programme is at career-entry level and graduates are qualified to go on to a post-training internship or directly into the workplace as a textile conservator in a museum or other institution around the world, as well as to undertake further study at PhD level.

The great majority of graduates of this programme and of its predecessor, the Textile Conservation Centre’s MA Textile Conservation programme, now work in museums and other institutions. Graduates of the two programmes have an outstanding record of employment on graduation and of remaining in the sector. They now work in nearly 30 countries and are in senior positions worldwide.

MPhil graduates have been awarded Mellon Fellowships at Denver Art Museum, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution in the USA.

In the UK, others work for:

  • National Museums Scotland
  • Historic Royal Palaces
  • The Victoria and Albert Museum 
  • The National Maritime Museum
  • Freelance conservators

Graduates also work in museums in Singapore, Japan, Qatar, the USA, Canada and other countries around the world.

However, it is worth noting that many graduates go on to short-term contract posts initially. It is easier to find a textile conservation post if you are able to be flexible in terms of location.



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If you’d like to teach design, technology or engineering, but need to brush up on your skills before you start your teacher-training, we can help. Read more

If you’d like to teach design, technology or engineering, but need to brush up on your skills before you start your teacher-training, we can help. This one-year (36-week), accredited, full-time Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) course helps prepare you to train to teach design and technology. Its stimulating combination of creative, practical and technical skills are so useful that some of our most outstanding PGCE graduates are the ones who did this course.

You might be eligible to receive a bursary while on the course.

Work towards teacher-training at Sheffield Hallam

Successfully completing this SKE course qualifies you to do our one year PGCE Design and Technology or PGCE Engineering courses.

An outstanding national reputation

Sheffield Hallam is the UK’s largest provider of design and technology education, which makes it a great place to come for teacher-training: as a result, we enjoy a national reputation for excellence in design and technology.

We are the Design and Technology Association’s regional provider of training to qualified teachers in schools — we deliver that training on electronics and systems control or CAD/CAM. One of our lecturers is also the curriculum advisor to the Design and Technology Association on electronics and systems control.

A remarkable place to learn

One of the exciting things about this course is that it’s not based in our education department but in our Faculty of Arts, Computing, Engineering and Sciences. That means you are based right at the heart of our workshops and studios, surrounded by other students and staff from a range of creative backgrounds and disciplines.

Learn in a variety of ways and settings

This course involves studying full-time for one year at our City Campus, right in the heart of Sheffield. We help you to develop your subject knowledge and your confidence using a range of teaching and learning strategies enhanced by practical work and field study.

Further information

For more information regarding our routes into teaching, including funding, placements, QTS skills tests and career prospects visit our teach site.

Course structure

Modules

  • health and safety
  • visual communication for design
  • timber design and manufacture
  • mechatronics
  • CAD/CAM design and manufacture
  • textile design and manufacture
  • design technology engineering

Employability

Trying to decide about teaching?

We would always recommend that spending some time in a school design and technology department is a valuable experience to help you see the work of a teacher. Many schools are helpful in offering some time where you can shadow a teacher and observe lessons.

Our excellent graduate employment record

We have a superb record for graduate employment: over 90% of our PGCE graduates are teaching or in further study within six months of graduating.

Many students gain employment in the region, thanks to our excellent links with over 600 placement partners. About a third of our students accept a job where they did a placement — you complete two placements, increasing your chances of being offered a job at a place that you already know.

What you’ll be teaching and to whom

Successfully completing this SKE course qualifies you to take our PGCE Design and Technology.

Once you complete your PGCE, you can begin teaching design and technology at Key Stages 3 and 4 (11-16) and 5 (16-18) as well as in the learning and skills sector (also called post-16 or post-compulsory education)



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The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Read more

The Masters in Dress & Textile Histories provides you with the skills to research and interpret the history of dress and textiles. Drawing on the knowledge of interdisciplinary academic and curatorial experts, the programme combines taught and research components based on a combination of theoretical and object based approaches. Working with museum collections, archives and historic interiors you will also be given a unique insight into the curation, interpretation and preservation of historic dress and textile collections.

Why this programme

  • The programme provides you with a unique opportunity within the UK to study historic dress and textiles, enabling you to develop knowledge and understanding of theory and practice in dress and textile histories in a critical and/or historical context
  • Scotland has a rich textile heritage and Glasgow is the ideal city in which to study dress and textile history, as there are internationally significant object and archival collections in the city and close by, including the National Museums Scotland, Paisley Museum and Art Gallery, and the Scottish Business Archives at the University of Glasgow.
  • You will have privileged access to primary source material, objects and archives, including at the University of Glasgow’s Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery and Glasgow Museums.   
  • The work placement option will enable you to develop your professional expertise within the heritage sector.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of three core courses and three optional courses running over two semesters. This is followed by a period of supervised research and writing of a dissertation.

A number of study visits are built into the programme, introducing important local collections.

Teaching is delivered by a combination of in-house specialist and visiting scholars and experts. The lectures are enhanced by seminar discussions, some based in museums and galleries, giving you the opportunity to present your ideas and discuss them with classmates in a supportive yet challenging environment. 

Core courses

  • Framing Dress and Textile Histories
  • Research Methods in Practice
  • Museums and the Making of Dress and Textile Histories

Optional courses

  • The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680 - 1815
  • Understanding Textiles
  • Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c.1837-1901
  • Material Cultures

You may also choose from the following options run by History of Art:

  • Work placement
  • Independent study

Or from the following options in the College of Arts:

  • A Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institution (HATII) course : 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
  • A course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Study trip

These courses are supported by a self-funded four day study trip in semester 2. Previous trips have included Manchester (2012), Leeds (2013) and London (2014-16).

Dissertation

Submitted at the end of August, the dissertation (or other substantial piece of work) encourages independent work and the application of acquired research skills. It is expected that MLitt dissertations should make a contribution to some aspect of the subject. The dissertation is 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be an in-depth critical exploration on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Career prospects

The attributes you gain will be attractive to employers from museums, the heritage sector, art dealers and auction houses. You could also get into theatre, film and television production as a costume researcher/designer. The programme also offers an excellent foundation upon which to progress to PhD studies and an academic career.



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Textiles is an industry where innovations in process as well as product are required to effectively integrate all aspects of design, technology, retail and management. Read more
Textiles is an industry where innovations in process as well as product are required to effectively integrate all aspects of design, technology, retail and management. To address this, the Textile Design, Fashion and Management research group is multi-disciplinary and covers areas as diverse as applied management, textile design, colour, trend forecasting, retail management, fashion merchandising, supply chain management, CAD, digital design, consumer behaviour, internet shopping, retail marketing, product development, enterprise and innovation.

Industry links

We have strong links with industry and work with many major retailers, manufacturers and well-known designers.

Research interests

Our current research interests cover a wide spectrum, and include:
-Design communication
-Design education
-Design management
-Digital design
-Emotional aspects of design and consumer behaviour
-Fashion design
-Fashion retailing
-Global operations management
-International supply chain management
-Textile design

Facilities

Facilities in the School are excellent, and include dedicated design and retailing studios and CAD facilities. Software includes Scotweave, AVA, Lectra (PrimaVision, Kaledo Style and Modaris), Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Research projects

Some of the exciting research projects our students have completed, or are completing, include:
-Investigating the relationship between consumer adoption and new product development of wearables
-Development of the Chinese textile sector as an UK/EU trading partner post Multi Fibre Agreement, January 2005
-Strategic Agile Merchandising: a new market opportunity for European textile producers

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Textiles is an industry where innovations in process as well as product are required to effectively integrate all aspects of design, technology, retail and management. Read more
Textiles is an industry where innovations in process as well as product are required to effectively integrate all aspects of design, technology, retail and management. To address this, the Textile Design, Fashion and Management research group is multi-disciplinary and covers areas as diverse as applied management, textile design, colour, trend forecasting, retail management, fashion merchandising, supply chain management, CAD, digital design, consumer behaviour, internet shopping, retail marketing, product development, enterprise and innovation.

Industry links

We have strong links with industry and work with many major retailers, manufacturers and well-known designers.

Research interests

Our current research interests cover a wide spectrum, and include:
-Design communication
-Design education
-Design management
-Digital design
-Emotional aspects of design and consumer behaviour
-Fashion design
-Fashion retailing
-Global operations management
-International supply chain management
-Textile design

Facilities

Facilities in the School are excellent, and include dedicated design and retailing studios and CAD facilities. Software includes Scotweave, AVA, Lectra (PrimaVision, Kaledo Style and Modaris), Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Research projects

Some of the exciting research projects our students have completed, or are completing, include:
-Investigating the relationship between consumer adoption and new product development of wearables
-Development of the Chinese textile sector as an UK/EU trading partner post Multi Fibre Agreement, January 2005
-Strategic Agile Merchandising: a new market opportunity for European textile producers

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A UNIQUE, INTERDISCIPLINARY POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME DESIGNED TO RESPOND TO THE DIVERSE NEEDS OF THE TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED AND CREATIVELY DYNAMIC FASHION AND TEXTILE INDUSTRIES. Read more

A UNIQUE, INTERDISCIPLINARY POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMME DESIGNED TO RESPOND TO THE DIVERSE NEEDS OF THE TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED AND CREATIVELY DYNAMIC FASHION AND TEXTILE INDUSTRIES.

Heriot-Watt University's School of Textiles and Design is enagaged in leading-edge international research and our unrivalled facilities, combined with traditional and cutting edge expertise in technology and management, make our graduates highly sought after in these rapidly evolving sectors. Staff knowledge and expertise span the full spectrum from design to manufacture, context to management, technology to creativity and practice to theory.

The School has developed an enhanced postgraduate programme designed to respond to the needs of the global fashion and textile industries, utilising our unique combination of traditional and contemporary expertise in science, technology and creativity. The benefits of our location within Scotland's manufacturing centre of high-end cashmere and textile production and design, are extended and maintained through international links in fashion and textiles. Studying within a school that reflects such high-quality collaborations, research and teaching, positions our graduates highly within these rapidly evolving sectors.

Our taught postgraduate programme aims to develop advanced knowledge and practice through the exploration of concepts and contemporary topics in design, fashion and textiles. The programme content challenges traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity, through well-resourced workshops, to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles. The design of the programme also encourages inter-disciplinary projects reflecting the School's strategy of creative collaborations between subject areas to foster design innovation.

The MSc in Fashion and Textiles Management attracts applicants from business as well as fashion and textile backgrounds and results in projects that test and develop theory in the form of an academic paper.

Structure:

Students negotiate with their supervisor to concentrate on an appropriate area of study to acquire knowledge and expertise in an area of fashion and textiles that supports their individual project intended outcome. The areas available across the School reflect the breadth of expertise relevant to fashion and textiles.

Semester 1

Design context

Creative and Critical Thinking: Research principles

Management Studies in Design

Fashion and Textile Practice and Expertise

Semester 2

Design Technologies and Textiles Futures

Reflective Practice to plan the agreed course of study

Industrial placement

Fashion and Textile Practice and Expertise

Semester 3

Masters Project: an academic paper or report on a design management theme.

Objectives:

Challenge traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles

Provide students with the knowledge, skills and competencies to meet the diverse demands of the fashion and textile industries

Encourage, in inter-disciplinary projects, creative collaborations between subject areas to foster innovation

Develop an inter-disciplinary understanding of key issues relating to the design, management and innovation in fashion and textiles

Develop competent and confident professionals for the global fashion and textiles industries with an in-depth understanding of the creative process and its management in international and local contexts.

Course length

The full-time Fashion Management masters starts in mid September and lasts one year. The course can also be taken part-time over two years.

Objectives

  • Challenge traditional and contemporary uses of fashion and textiles, as well as creating the opportunity to promote new approaches and processes in fashion and textiles
  • Provide students with the knowledge, skills and competencies to meet the diverse demands of the fashion and textile industries
  • Encourage, in inter-disciplinary projects, creative collaborations between subject areas to foster innovation
  • Develop an inter-disciplinary understanding of key issues relating to the design, management and innovation in fashion and textiles
  • Develop competent and confident professionals for the global fashion and textiles industries with an in-depth understanding of the creative process and its management in international and local contexts.

Course content:

Students negotiate with their supervisor to concentrate on an appropriate area of study to acquire knowledge and expertise in an area of fashion and textiles that supports their individual project intended outcome. The areas available across the School reflect the breadth of expertise relevant to fashion and textiles.

Semester 1

  • Fashion Management
  • Design Context
  • Design Project
  • Design Technology and Innovation

Semester 2

  • Brand Management
  • Research Methodologies
  • Business Enterprise

And

  • Raw Materials Testing and Exploration

or

  • Consumer Motivations

Semester 3

  • Research project

Assessment

Students are assessed through a combination of practical and written course work, examinations and the Masters project. Emphasis is placed on rigorous academic standards as well as acquiring and developing a range of transferable industry skills and individual creative development. Assessment exercises can therefore include making effective visual and oral presentations, writing reports and as well as team and group work.

How to Apply:

https://www.hw.ac.uk/study/apply/uk/postgraduate.htm

 



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The aim of the Specializing Master is to expand a System of Skills aimed at innovation in textile products for the fashion sector and for public and domestic furnishing. Read more
The aim of the Specializing Master is to expand a System of Skills aimed at innovation in textile products for the fashion sector and for public and domestic furnishing. These industrial design skills are aimed at product innovation that is not simply formal and aesthetic - material performance, comfort, function and ergonomics become innovative as well.
The aim is to provide participants with the design and organisational tools linked to the creative processes in fashion companies.

Professional Outcomes
The Specializing Master aims at training a professional figure who has what IBM calls “T-Shaped skills”, i.e. a combination between broadness of knowledge and depth of understanding. These professionals have specific skills in the field of fashion, design and interiors and can perceive the changes in behaviour and needs of modern society, systematizying them in a planning key for the development of innovative projects.

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What's the Master of Mechanical Engineering all about? . The Master of Science in Engineering. Mechanical Engineering is a general training programme integrating all disciplines of basic sciences, engineering and technology. Read more

What's the Master of Mechanical Engineering all about? 

The Master of Science in Engineering: Mechanical Engineering is a general training programme integrating all disciplines of basic sciences, engineering and technology. An essential element of the mechanical engineering curriculum at KU Leuven is the direct training of each student in a real-life industrial or research setting. Following up on the design assignment in the Bachelor's programme, the Master's programme brings the student in close contact with the industrial reality.

Structure 

Three versions

The Master's programme in Mechanical Engineering has three versions:

  • A Dutch-language version for students who have already obtained a Master's degree of Engineering Technology: Electromechanical Engineering
  • A Dutch-language version for students who have completed their Bachelor's training at our Faculty or at another university with Mechanical Engineering either as a major or as minor.
  • An English-language version which mainly addresses foreign students, and to which admission is granted after evaluation of the application file.

Five modules 

The programme consists of five modules.

  • The first major component is the core module in mechanical engineering.
  • The second major component is one out of five options, which have been put together in a complementary way.

Three generic options 

  • Manufacturing and Management: modern techniques for the design and production of discrete components, CAD and computer integration in production, management techniques, maintenance and logistics of a production company.
  • Mechatronics and Robotics: mechatronics is the discipline in which the synergy of construction, sensing, actuation and control of machinery are concurrently defined and tuned for optimum integration
  • Thermo-technical Sciences: physical principles and analysis, design, construction and operation of combustion engines and thermal and flow machines, cooling machines, power plants, etc.

Two application oriented options

  • Aerospace technology: physical principles, analysis, design, construction, exploitation and operation of aircraft and space systems;
  • Vehicle technology: physical principles, design, analysis and production of cars and ground vehicles and of systems for ground transportation.

Elective courses 

The third and fourth components in the programme structure concern a set of elective courses, to be chosen from a list of technical coursesand from a list of general interest courses.

Master's thesis

The final component is the Master's thesis, which represents 20% of the credits of the entire curriculum.

Strengths

  • The department has a large experimental research laboratory with advanced equipment, to which Master's students have access. FabLab (a "Fabrication Laboratory") is also directly accessible for students.
  • The department has built up an extensive network of companies which recruit a large number of our alumni since many years already, from whom we receive lots of informal feedback on the programme.
  • In addition to their academic teaching and research assignments, several members of the teaching staff also have other responsibilities in advisory boards, in external companies, science & technology committees, etc. and they share that expertise with students.
  • The programme attracts a large number of students.
  • The programme offers students the choice between application oriented options and generic methodology oriented options.
  • Many courses are dealing with contents in which the R&D of the Department has created spin-off companies, and hence can offer very relevant and innovation driven contents.
  • The programme has a clearly structured, extensive and transparent evaluation procedure for Master's theses, involving several complementary assessment views on every single thesis.
  • Several courses are closely linked to top-level research of the lecturers, and they can hence offer up-to-date and advanced contents to the students.

International experience

The Erasmus+ programme gives students the opportunity to complete one or two semesters of their degree at a participating European university. Student exchange agreements are also in place with Japanese and American universities.

Students are also encouraged to learn more about industrial and research internships abroad by contacting our Internship Coordinator. Internships are scheduled in between two course phases of the Master’s programme (in the summer period after the second semester and before the third semester).

These studying abroad opportunities and internships are complemented by the short summer courses offered via the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST) network. This student organisation allows students to follow short courses in the summer period between the second and the third semester. The Faculty of Engineering Science is also member of the international networks CESAER, CLUSTER and T.I.M.E.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty

Career perspectives

The field of mechanical engineering is very wide. Mechanical engineers find employment in many industrial sectors thanks to our broad training programme. Demand for this engineering degree on the labour market is very strong and constant. A study by the Royal Flemish Engineers Association, identifies the specific sectors in which graduated mechanical engineers are employed.

  • mechanical engineering: e.g. production machinery, compressed air systems, agricultural machinery
  • metal and non-metal products: a very wide range of products e.g. pressure vessels, piping, suit cases,...
  • off-shore and maritime engineering
  • automation industry
  • vehicle components, such as exhaust systems, drivetrain components and windshield wipers,...
  • development and production of bicycles
  • aircraft components, such as high lift devices, aircraft engines and cockpit display systems
  • building, textile, plastic, paper sector
  • electrical industry
  • chemical industry
  • environmental engineering and waste management
  • energy sector
  • financial, banking and insurance sector
  • communications sector
  • transportation sector: infrastructure and exploitation and maintenance of rolling stock
  • software development and vendors
  • technical and management consulting: large companies and small offices
  • education and research
  • technical and management functions in the public sector


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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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The increased understanding and use of textiles as both a decorative and technical material has led to a rapid expansion of the industry into areas such as architecture and engineering. Read more
The increased understanding and use of textiles as both a decorative and technical material has led to a rapid expansion of the industry into areas such as architecture and engineering.

This merging of textiles technology and aesthetics is complex and requires designers who are able to converse with engineers and scientists, handling technical information as well as expressing conceptual design ideas.

Through established links with the DR-i (Design Research Initiative) and Brighton's School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, this MA is designed to stimulate such diversity in textile design thinking. We are seeking talented students who are keen to push the boundaries and perception of what we understand textiles to be.

This course is suitable both for recent graduates interested in furthering their skills or exploring new areas and markets, and for experienced designers who want to challenge their practice in a creative environment.

Due to the open and explorative nature of the course, students from non-textiles backgrounds such as 3D craft design, fine art, materials development, engineering and science are welcome to bring a fresh viewpoint and build on their existing specialist knowledge.

Semester 1

The first semester is made up of three modules and serves as a foundation to your learning experience, imparting key research skills, exploration beyond your discipline and initial explorative practice-based enquiry.

• Practice-Based Enquiry (Part One)
Spanning semesters one and two, this module provides a reflective environment for rigorous explorative practice-based enquiry and the development of design concepts identified in the self-initiated project proposal submitted at interview. Increasingly informed by research and critical awareness skills developed in the supporting modules, you will explore and reflect on novel design concepts and the application of practice-based research methods. You will also be encouraged to engage with live research, industry contacts and collaborative projects.

• Research Skills and Training
Through a series of lectures and seminar groups with active researchers, you will explore the value of research within a practice-based design context. You will develop research skills and an understanding of different methodologies and how research can be used as a design tool.

• Options module
Placed in the first semester to maximise the potential areas of study, the options module takes advantage of the range of subjects and learning experiences available from across the college. This module allows you to tailor your study and learning experience to complement and inform your specific area of interest from an early stage. Learning alongside students from varied disciplines, you will be able to explore areas of personal interest from subjects including design history, sustainable design, professional practice, and historical and critical studies.

Semester 2

The second semester encourages you to explore diverse cross-disciplinary sources to inform and contextualise your research project before focusing on your final proposal.

• Practice-Based Enquiry (Part Two)
Continuing from initial explorations in Practice-Based Enquiry (Part One), you will develop an increasingly focused, reflective body of work that demonstrates applied research methodologies and an understanding of their position within a broader textiles and industry context. You will conclude the module with a final 500-word proposal to define the area of study that you will undertake in your thesis.

• Creative and Contextual Enquiry
Informed by the learning undertaken in semester one, you will critically engage with and reflect on your subject area, exploring diverse cross-disciplinary influences that inform your practice. Through the use of relevant research methods, this creative contextual enquiry will stimulate awareness and rigorous critical evaluation of cultural, technological and research debates, both within and outside of your discipline.

Semester 3

In the third semester, you will fully integrate your previous learning into the realisation of your thesis.

• Practice-Based Textile Design Thesis
During this self-directed module, you will put into practice the skills acquired throughout the programme of study, working towards the realisation of the final proposal submitted at the end of semester two. You are expected to rigorously explore and fully resolve a body of practice-based textile design inquiry, which should be positioned at the forefront of your academic or professional discipline and advance design thinking within your stated field.

The module contains planned lectures, group seminars and individual tutorials delivered by lecturers who are active researchers or innovative design practitioners. You will have access to a diverse range of lecture series and conferences held at the university as well as exhibitions and trade fairs relevant to your study.

You will have the opportunity to extend your skills through advanced textiles technology, working closely with expert technical demonstrators. Relevant placements or access to external study are negotiable on an individual basis, determined by the requirements of your proposal.

Facilities

Our facilities range from traditional hand looms, screen printing equipment and knitting resources to advanced industrial textile technologies, including a Mimaki TX2 digital printer, Dornier industrial 20 shaft electronic dobby, twin rapier Powerloom, TC1 Electronic Jacquard Loom and Shima Seiki industrial knitting machine. We also make use of Scotweave design software.

Other resources that you can use include a 3D body scanner, laser cutter, rapid prototyping machine, CNC router and plasma cutter, and 5 axis milling machine. You will have access to our facilities through specialist workshops in knitted, printed and woven textiles, which are run by a highly skilled team of technical demonstrators.

Careers and employability

Successful completion of the course signifies specialist and transferable skills in design and research, and will prepare you for work across the textiles and allied design industries. You could also choose to pursue research in the commercial sector or continue your studies at doctoral level.

Many graduates of the Textiles MA hold high-level design and trend forecasting positions at international companies including Abercrombie and Fitch, Donna Karan, DKNY, Burberry, Alexander McQueen, Cath Kidston, H&M, WGSN and Forpeople.

Others have forged independent careers in the industry, from establishing design labels such as Marchesa, (Keren Craig), Eley Kishimoto (Mark Eley) and Julien Macdonald to textile design studios and consultancies (Larch Rose and Woven Studios).

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Students base their study in one of the four Textiles specialisms. knit, mixed media, print and weave and orientate their study in the context of 'body' or 'space'. Read more
Students base their study in one of the four Textiles specialisms: knit, mixed media, print and weave and orientate their study in the context of 'body' or 'space'.

- Body – involves fabric design for fashion, accessories and clothing, incorporating issues such as health, well-being and smart wearables
- Space – incorporates textile and material design for the built environment, interiors, furnishings and transport.

Both pathways will take relevant contemporary issues into strong consideration such as market knowledge, sustainability and manufacture.

Textile students employ traditional and innovative skills, while exploring constantly evolving materials and technology to create diverse and surprising results. The interface encourages a dynamic and challenging environment, frequently employing multidisciplinary and collaborative methods to express the breadth of textiles, and pushing the boundaries of current textile practice.

During the first year, students are required to take part in induction programmes using our equipment and technology, to ensure that they have adequate specialist skills. Practical instruction in dyeing, fabric and fibre technologies is provided. Industrial projects are included to introduce students to a great variety of design experiences. Collaborative work is strongly encouraged in the School and across the College.

Progress is monitored through tutorials, group critiques, work reviews and seminars. All students must pass a formal Interim Exam to progress to the second year, when they are expected to direct their work towards a specified context. The staff team work within the specialisms and interact with all the textile students. They are all involved in external professional practice and research.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

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