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The MA English in Literatures offers a structured learning environment, a good grounding in literary theory, and the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice. Read more

Overview

The MA English in Literatures offers a structured learning environment, a good grounding in literary theory, and the opportunity to specialise in an area of your choice.

All students:
- follow a full research training programme
- take dedicated masters modules designed to deepen their understanding of issues in literature and theory
- choose an elective module from a variety of offerings, including modules from the MA in Creative Writing or from those offered as part of our English and American Literatures research-led undergraduate teaching
- work with a research-active supervisor to develop and pursue a dissertation topic of their own choosing

See the website http://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/englishliteratures/

Course Aims

The Masters programme aims to enable students to:
- Engage in wide and varied reading among the regional and global varieties of literature and literary criticism.

- Think both critically and creatively about literature in English.

- Assess the form and meaning of literary and filmic texts.

- Develop their understanding of the characteristics of key literary genres (prose fiction, poetry, and drama) and periods (post-1500), and of the principles of canonisation that elevate and marginalise texts and their authors.

- Understand, evaluate, and apply to literary texts a range of critical ideas and theories relevant to textual criticism at Masters level.

- Communicate ideas and arguments with clarity and care in a number of different forms—including essays, oral presentations, reflective diaries—using appropriate language and techniques of presentation.

- Work both constructively and critically, by themselves and as part of a team, to deliver specific projects.

- Reflect productively on their strengths, weaknesses, and methods of learning.

- Develop research skills commensurate with postgraduate study in the field of English Literary Studies.

Teaching & Assessment

The function of the assessments listed in the table above is to test students’ achievement of the learning outcomes of the English Literatures Programme. For example:

- Essays test the quality and application of subject knowledge. They allow students to demonstrate their ability to carry out bibliographic research and to communicate their ideas effectively in writing in an appropriate scholarly style using appropriate systems of referencing.

- Critical Analyses of other scholars’ work test students’ ability to identify and summarise the key points of a text and to evaluate the quality of arguments and the evidence used to support them. Critical analyses also assess students’ knowledge of research methodologies and their ability to make critical judgements about the appropriateness of different approaches.

- Annotated Bibliographies test students’ ability to analyse and evaluate critically a range of secondary and source materials with a view towards specific areas of research.

- Project Outlines test students’ ability to plan, prepare, and structure a viable research project. They also test the students’ knowledge of relevant and important areas of research within English literary studies, and to assess the originality and impact of certain areas of research to the field.

- Reflective Study Diaries test students’ ability to engage self-reflexively with their study and practice within their field. They encourage students to develop a critical engagement with their modes and practices of study, learning and development of research topics.

- Short research papers test student’s knowledge of different research methodologies. They also enable students to demonstrate their ability to formulate research questions and to answer them using an appropriate strategy.

- Oral presentations, either by individual students or in groups, assess students’ subject knowledge and understanding. Where applicable, they also test their ability to work effectively as members of a team, to communicate what they know orally and visually, and to reflect on these processes as part of their own personal development.

- Dissertations test students’ ability to carry out independent research and communicate findings in an extended piece of written work following recognised academic standards of presentation.

Marks are awarded for summative assessments designed to assess students’ achievement of learning outcomes. Students are also assessed formatively to enable them to monitor their own progress and to assist staff in identifying and addressing any specific learning needs. Formative assessment is not formally marked. Feedback, including guidance on how students can improve the quality of their work, is also provided on all summative assessments and more informally in the course of tutorial and seminar discussions.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This stimulating and demanding 36-week training programme will provide you with the skills and experience you need to teach Physics across the full 11-18 secondary age range, with complementary courses in Chemistry and Biology. Read more
This stimulating and demanding 36-week training programme will provide you with the skills and experience you need to teach Physics across the full 11-18 secondary age range, with complementary courses in Chemistry and Biology.

You will learn to make your knowledge accessible and interesting to students by implementing a range of teaching approaches and techniques for managing activities in the classroom.

The PGCE Secondary programme refreshes and extends students’ subject knowledge and provides them with the opportunity to achieve Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) and make a difference to young people’s lives and ambitions.

The programme is divided into university and school/college-based sections. The 12-week university-based section is taught by highly respected staff with extensive experience of secondary school provision.

Our tutors will introduce students to various aspects of teaching, including lesson planning, resource preparation and selection, teaching approaches for examination courses, class management and control, and assessment of attainment.

Trainees will spend the other 24 weeks gaining Professional Teaching Experience (PTE) on two placements at our established partner schools/colleges located across the South Wales region from Pembrokeshire to Monmouthshire. On both these placements, an experienced teacher will act as mentor and will keep in close contact with university tutors to ensure the smooth development of the trainee’s teaching competences. Placements will be available in either English or Welsh-medium secondary schools.

The programme involves four written assignments, while the PTE will be assessed through teaching observations by both experienced placement mentors and university tutors against the QTS.

Entry Criteria

You will be expected to hold a good honours degree (2:2minimum) and be a graduat of a university, polytechnic or college of higher education approved by the University of Wales. If you wish to teach in Secondary schools then your degree should be closely linked to the subject that you wish to teach.

For the September 2015 entry all PGCE applicants in Wales will need a B grade at GCSE in English and Mathematics and if you intend to follow your course through the medium of Welsh, a C grade in Welsh.

If you hold a C grade in GCSE English Language or Mathematics and are successful in other aspects of the selection process you will be given the opportunity to sit an equivalency test. If you are successful and you accept your place to study with us then you can start your programme as planned. Attendance at the workshops prior to the test is a compulsory part of the equivalency testing programme.

What are GCSE Equivalency Tests?

Successful completion of a GCSE equivalency test will enable you to proceed on to a PGCE course if you do not hold a GCSE B grade in English or Maths, the test is only available to students that have gained a grade C at GCSE level.

If you hold a C grade in GCSE English Language or Mathematics and are successful in other aspects of the selection process you will be given the opportunity to sit an equivalency test. If you successfully complete your equivalency test and you accept your place to study with SWWCTE then you can start your PGCE programme as planned.

Will I get any support before the test?

Yes. You are required to attend a one day workshop which is designed to help prepare you for the test with face-to-face support. On the day of your test you will also attend a half day workshop in the morning. In addition to our face-to-face workshops, we recommend that you consult one or more of the following revision resources:
Mathematics:

BBC Bitesize (Welsh)

BBC Bitesize (English)

http://www.conquermaths.com

GCSE Mathematics Revision Video (Welsh) by Gareth Evans, Ysgol y Creuddyn available on http://www.hwb.wales.gov.uk

GCSE Mathematics Revision booklets (available in Welsh and English) from bookshops, Amazon and WJEC (http://www.wjec.co.uk)

English:

BBC Bitesize (English)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise

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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission. Read more

State Authorizations

Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission.

Visit the website http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=184

Transfer of Graduate Credit for MSN:

Acceptable graduate credit of up to twelve credit hours, earned in a regionally accredited institution in which the student was enrolled in that institution’s graduate school, may be transferred and applied to the requirements for a master’s degree if approved by the CCN and Graduate School.

Consideration of credit does not guarantee transfer. Evaluation of credit for transfer will not be made until after the student has enrolled in the Graduate School of The University of Alabama.

Further information can be found in the UA Graduate Student Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/academics/doctoral.html#credit).

Admission Requirements for MSN:

Admission requirements are consistent with those of the Graduate School. Applicants for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) will be considered on a competitive basis.

- Nurses who are interested in the Case Management Program, NP Concentration, and CNL Program are encouraged to contact the Capstone College of Nursing (CCN) Graduate Recruitment and Retention Liaison. Currently only residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for the Nurse Practitioner Concentration.

Note: Currently, only baccalaureate prepared registered nurses who are residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for admission to the NP concentration. There is no post-master’s certificate option. Please check this site in the future for changes in the residency requirement.

Application Process for MSN:

Enrollment into the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is available for fall semester each year. Your completed application must be received by the April 1st deadline.

MSN Application Process

1. Begin your graduate application at the Graduate School’s Application Center.

2. Request transcripts following the Graduate School’s transcript instructions.

3. Submit supporting documents. Within 48 hours of submitting the initial part of your application, you will receive an e-mail with your Campus-Wide Identification (CWID) number. It is very important that you safeguard this number. Once you have received this e-mail, you will need to submit the following documents through Manage Supporting Documents.

- Statement of purpose
- Resume or curriculum vitae
- Contact information for two references – The references should be professionals who can provide insight regarding your potential for success in the doctoral program. The Graduate School will contact these references via e-mail.
- Copy of active RN license from every state in which you are licensed. Note: Licensure must be maintained throughout the program.

Additionally, we may require the following:

- Official MAT or GRE score – If your grade point average (GPA) is lower than a 3.0, based on a 4.0 sytem, either overall or in your last 60 hours, an acceptable Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or must be submitted by the testing service to the Graduate School, Box 870118, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. Test scores may not be older than 5 years of the application date. Use school code 1012 for MAT and 1830 for GRE.

- English proficiency exam score – Whether an international or a permanent resident, if your first language is not English, you must submit an official score report from one of the following proficiency examinations: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or Pearson Test of English (PTE).

Upon admission, you will receive written notification of admission from the Dean of the Graduate School. You will also receive a letter from the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at CCN outlining requirements for entry into the MSN program.

Documents Required Prior to Registration (after admitted)

Documents below should be completed and signed where appropriate and sent to Christina Horen at or faxed to 205-348-6674. A hold will be placed on your student record until all documents have been received. You are responsible for keeping all documents current throughout enrollment including annual health requirements (see CCN Graduate Student Handbook).

- Current RN license verification
- Current CPR certification for healthcare professionals
- Program of Study
- OSHA Training for Infection Control, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Safety
- HIPAA Privacy and Security Training
- Information Literacy for the 21st Century Training
- Nursing Student Health and Physical Exam Form
- Graduate Student TB Test and Immunization Form
- Substance Abuse Policy and Drug/Alcohol Testing Policy
- Academic Dishonesty Form
- Progression Policy
- Consent to Release and Disclose Form

MSN Degree Requirements:

The MSN will be awarded to the student who has met the following requirements:

- GPA of 3.0 or higher
- Good standing at the time of graduation
- Successful completion of the required coursework

In addition for CNL only:

- Completion of CNL Self-assessment Exam and CNL Certification Exam

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more
The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

- The Research Master's program in Language and Communication is a two-year course of study offered jointly by Radboud University Nijmegen and Tilburg University. Both universities combine leading-edge research with excellent education. This program, with its strong emphasis on empirical study, is unique in the Netherlands.
- In this programme, students explore language and communication as an integrated whole. Communication in face-to-face and multi-modal interactions at work is a central theme. Other topics include understanding how the use of language shapes institutional, cross-cultural, and international interaction.
- The current partnership between the Faculties of Arts at Nijmegen and Tilburg intensifies fifteen years of collaboration in the Centre for Language Studies (CLS), which is closely linked to the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Baby Research Centre. Students can profit from these partnerships with state-of-the-art education and individual research opportunities.

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree
The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills
The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics
Students who did not follow physics in their high school curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentiation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

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Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions. Read more

Our MSc in Communications, Networks and Software covers the key aspects of the changing Internet environment, in particular the convergence of computing and communications underpinned by software-based solutions.

Some of our students undertaking their project are able to work on one of our wide range of testbeds, such as internet technologies, wireless networking, network management and control, and internet-of-things (IoT) applications.

We also have specialist software tools for assignments and project work, including OPNET, NS2/3, and various system simulators.

Read about the experience of a previous student on this course, Efthymios Bliatis.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months or part-time from 24 to 60 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme 

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:

  • Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
  • Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
  • Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
  • Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
  • Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
  • Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc Programme should:

  • Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin communications, networks and software
  • Be able to analyse problems within the field of communications, networks and software and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
  • Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
  • Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within communications, networks and software
  • Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
  • Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
  • Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
  • Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Facilities, equipment and support

We have a full range of software support for assignments and project work, including:

  • Matlab/Simulink, C, C++ and up-to-date toolboxes, systemsview, OPNET and NS2/3 (you will be able to access system simulators already built in-house, including 3GPP, BGAN, DVB-S2-RCS, GSM, UMTS, DVB-SH, WCDMA, GPRS, WiMAX, LTE, HSPA and HSDPA)
  • Our Rohde and Schwartz Satellite Networking Laboratory includes DVBS2-RCS generation and measurement equipment and roof-mounted antennas to pick up satellites (a security test-bed also exists for satellite security evaluation)
  • A fully equipped RF lab with network analyser, signal and satellite link simulations
  • A small anechoic chamber for antenna measurements (a wideband MIMO channel sounder is available for propagation measurements)
  • SatNEX is a European Network of Excellence in satellite communications, and a satellite platform exists to link the 22 partners around Europe (this is used for virtual meetings and to participate in lectures and seminars delivered by our partners)
  • A fully equipped UHF/VHF satellite ground-station facility is located on campus, which is being expanded to S-band and is supported by the ESA GENSO project (at present, the station tracks amateur satellites and CubeSats)
  • Our wide coverage experimental wireless network test-bed is based on IPv4, and IPv6 for testing new networking protocols for mobility, handover, security, cognitive radio and networking can be carried out (most networking protocol projects use this test-bed, with the help of PhD students and staff)
  • We are the only university in the UK that has an IP-Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) test-bed for developing and experimenting with advanced mobile/wireless services/applications – you can use this to carry out your services and application-based projects for mobile multimedia, such as multi-mode user interface, service mobility, service discovery and social networking services
  • Our wireless sensor test-bed is unique; advanced routing protocols, middleware architectures, air interface and networking protocols for wireless sensor networks can be developed and tested

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time. this is a general outline.). Read more
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time: this is a general outline.)

- Business English
- Meetings & Negotiating
- Business Communication
- Business Correspondence
- Business Role Play
- Business Presentation Skills
- Business Texts
- Business Vocabulary
- Management
- Case Studies
- Management Readings
- Management project work (where appropriate)

English Examinations
The Management English course prepares students for the IELTS test, and students can sit this test in Sheffield. Students wishing to enrol for a course of academic study in Sheffield (a Masters degree, for example) will be entered for the University of Sheffield English Proficiency Test, which is accepted as equivalent to the IELTS test by both Sheffield University and Sheffield Hallam University.

Commercial Visits
Visits to British businesses and organisations are arranged. The visits provide a chance to meet British business people in a work situation. Students are encouraged to ask questions and to extract relevant business information from these situations. Students broaden their general knowledge of western business practice and gain insights into their own special areas.

Examples of visits are:

- a steel company
- a hospital laborartory
- Sheffield Chamber of Commerce
- Meadowhall shopping complex management suite

Length of Course
The course runs throughout the year, and students may join the course at any time. Details of term dates and entry requirements are shown on the application form. There are approximately 22 hours of tuition per week (including commercial visits).

Maximum Class Size
The maximum class size for English Language is 15 students.

Certificate of Successful Attendance
A University of Sheffield certificate of successful attendance will be presented to students who complete their course.

Pre-MBA/MSc Entry Requirements

The following are the recommended minimum IELTS requirements.
Students with higher grades are welcome to join the course at any stage and will be placed in a higher group.
September entry 4.0 IELTS minimum (or equivalent)
January entry 4.5 IELTS minimum
April entry 5.0 IELTS minimum
Mid June entry 5.5 IELTS minimum
July entry 6.0 IELTS minimum with 6 in writing

TOEFL and TOEIC scores are also accepted. Please contact the Course Director for details. Students with 7.0 in IELTS and over are welcome to join the summer course. They will have the opportunity to do more management instead of attending IELTS classes.

Comments on the Pre-Masters course from recent past students

Marie-Helen Zabe (France)
“My overall assessment of the Pre-MBA course is highly positive. The teaching is of a high quality and there is a good professional background link between theory and practice.”

Ms Claudia Loyola (Chile)
“The Pre-MBA English course has been really useful for me in order to develop the necessary skills to face my current MSc in HRS course. The commercial visits are really interesting and offer a real advantage to understand business topics and that has been a real help now.”

Dr Victor A. Pushnykh (Russia)
“This course has enabled me not only to really communicate with my business partners and to understand much more fully the commercial ideas they assume but also to create my own ideas on how to successfully run my business...The tutors were wonderful, hospitable and sophisticated. I highly recommend all managers doing international business to join this programme.”

Read less
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time. this is a general outline.). Read more
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time: this is a general outline.)

- Business English
- Meetings & Negotiating
- Business Communication
- Business Correspondence
- Business Role Play
- Business Presentation Skills
- Business Texts
- Business Vocabulary
- Management
- Case Studies
- Management Readings
- Management project work (where appropriate)

English Examinations
The Management English course prepares students for the IELTS test, and students can sit this test in Sheffield. Students wishing to enrol for a course of academic study in Sheffield (a Masters degree, for example) will be entered for the University of Sheffield English Proficiency Test, which is accepted as equivalent to the IELTS test by both Sheffield University and Sheffield Hallam University.

Commercial Visits
Visits to British businesses and organisations are arranged. The visits provide a chance to meet British business people in a work situation. Students are encouraged to ask questions and to extract relevant business information from these situations. Students broaden their general knowledge of western business practice and gain insights into their own special areas.

Examples of visits are:

- a steel company
- a hospital laborartory
- Sheffield Chamber of Commerce
- Meadowhall shopping complex management suite

Length of Course
The course runs throughout the year, and students may join the course at any time. Details of term dates and entry requirements are shown on the application form. There are approximately 22 hours of tuition per week (including commercial visits).

Maximum Class Size
The maximum class size for English Language is 15 students.

Certificate of Successful Attendance
A University of Sheffield certificate of successful attendance will be presented to students who complete their course.

Pre-MBA/MSc Entry Requirements

The following are the recommended minimum IELTS requirements.
Students with higher grades are welcome to join the course at any stage and will be placed in a higher group.
September entry 4.0 IELTS minimum (or equivalent)
January entry 4.5 IELTS minimum
April entry 5.0 IELTS minimum
Mid June entry 5.5 IELTS minimum
July entry 6.0 IELTS minimum with 6 in writing

TOEFL and TOEIC scores are also accepted. Please contact the Course Director for details. Students with 7.0 in IELTS and over are welcome to join the summer course. They will have the opportunity to do more management instead of attending IELTS classes.

Comments on the Pre-Masters course from recent past students

Marie-Helen Zabe (France)
“My overall assessment of the Pre-MBA course is highly positive. The teaching is of a high quality and there is a good professional background link between theory and practice.”

Ms Claudia Loyola (Chile)
“The Pre-MBA English course has been really useful for me in order to develop the necessary skills to face my current MSc in HRS course. The commercial visits are really interesting and offer a real advantage to understand business topics and that has been a real help now.”

Dr Victor A. Pushnykh (Russia)
“This course has enabled me not only to really communicate with my business partners and to understand much more fully the commercial ideas they assume but also to create my own ideas on how to successfully run my business...The tutors were wonderful, hospitable and sophisticated. I highly recommend all managers doing international business to join this programme.”

Read less
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time. this is a general outline.). Read more
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time: this is a general outline.)

- Business English
- Meetings & Negotiating
- Business Communication
- Business Correspondence
- Business Role Play
- Business Presentation Skills
- Business Texts
- Business Vocabulary
- Management
- Case Studies
- Management Readings
- Management project work (where appropriate)

English Examinations
The Management English course prepares students for the IELTS test, and students can sit this test in Sheffield. Students wishing to enrol for a course of academic study in Sheffield (a Masters degree, for example) will be entered for the University of Sheffield English Proficiency Test, which is accepted as equivalent to the IELTS test by both Sheffield University and Sheffield Hallam University.

Commercial Visits
Visits to British businesses and organisations are arranged. The visits provide a chance to meet British business people in a work situation. Students are encouraged to ask questions and to extract relevant business information from these situations. Students broaden their general knowledge of western business practice and gain insights into their own special areas.

Examples of visits are:

- a steel company
- a hospital laborartory
- Sheffield Chamber of Commerce
- Meadowhall shopping complex management suite

Length of Course
The course runs throughout the year, and students may join the course at any time. Details of term dates and entry requirements are shown on the application form. There are approximately 22 hours of tuition per week (including commercial visits).

Maximum Class Size
The maximum class size for English Language is 15 students.

Certificate of Successful Attendance
A University of Sheffield certificate of successful attendance will be presented to students who complete their course.

Pre-MBA/MSc Entry Requirements

The following are the recommended minimum IELTS requirements.
Students with higher grades are welcome to join the course at any stage and will be placed in a higher group.
September entry 4.0 IELTS minimum (or equivalent)
January entry 4.5 IELTS minimum
April entry 5.0 IELTS minimum
Mid June entry 5.5 IELTS minimum
July entry 6.0 IELTS minimum with 6 in writing

TOEFL and TOEIC scores are also accepted. Please contact the Course Director for details. Students with 7.0 in IELTS and over are welcome to join the summer course. They will have the opportunity to do more management instead of attending IELTS classes.

Comments on the Pre-Masters course from recent past students

Marie-Helen Zabe (France)
“My overall assessment of the Pre-MBA course is highly positive. The teaching is of a high quality and there is a good professional background link between theory and practice.”

Ms Claudia Loyola (Chile)
“The Pre-MBA English course has been really useful for me in order to develop the necessary skills to face my current MSc in HRS course. The commercial visits are really interesting and offer a real advantage to understand business topics and that has been a real help now.”

Dr Victor A. Pushnykh (Russia)
“This course has enabled me not only to really communicate with my business partners and to understand much more fully the commercial ideas they assume but also to create my own ideas on how to successfully run my business...The tutors were wonderful, hospitable and sophisticated. I highly recommend all managers doing international business to join this programme.”

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The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. Read more

Course Description

The Guided Weapon Systems MSc is a flagship Cranfield course and has an outstanding reputation within the Guided Weapons community. The course meets the requirements of all three UK armed services and is also open to students from NATO countries, Commonwealth forces, selected non-NATO countries, the scientific civil service and industry. The course structure is modular in nature with each module conducted at a postgraduate level; the interactions between modules are emphasised throughout. A comprehensive suite of visits to industrial and services establishments consolidates the learning process, ensuring the taught subject matter is directly relevant and current.

Overview

This course is an essential pre-requisite for many specific weapons postings in the UK and overseas forces. It also offers an ideal opportunity for anyone working in the Guided Weapons industry to get a comprehensive overall understanding of all the main elements of guided weapons systems.

It typically attracts 12 students per year, mainly from UK, Canadian, Australian, Chilean, Brazilian and other European forces.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

The course comprises a taught phase and an individual project. The taught phase is split into three main phases:
- Part One (Theory)
- Part Two (Applications)
- Part Three (Systems).

Core Modules

- Introductory and Foundation Studies
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 1
- Radar Principles
- GW Propulsion & Aerodynamics Theory
- GW Control Theory
- Signal Processing, Statistics and Analysis
- GW Applications – Control & Guidance
- GW Applications – Propulsion & Aerodynamics
- Radar Electronic Warfare
- Electro-Optics and Infrared Systems 2
- GW Warheads, Explosives and Materials
- GW Structures, Aeroelasticity and Power Supplies
- Parametric Study
- GW Systems
- Research Project

Individual Project

Each student has to undertake an research project on a subject related to an aspect of guided weapon systems technology. It will usually commence around January and finish with a dissertation submission and oral presentation in mid-July.

Assessment

This varies from module to module but comprises a mixture of oral examinations, written examinations, informal tests, assignments, syndicate presentations and an individual thesis.

Career opportunities

Successful students will have a detailed understanding of Guided Weapons system design and will be highly suited to any role or position with a requirement for specific knowledge of such systems. Many students go on to positions within the services which have specific needs for such skills.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Guided-Weapon-Systems

Read less
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time. this is a general outline.). Read more
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time: this is a general outline.)

- Business English
- Meetings & Negotiating
- Business Communication
- Business Correspondence
- Business Role Play
- Business Presentation Skills
- Business Texts
- Business Vocabulary
- Management
- Case Studies
- Management Readings
- Management project work (where appropriate)

English Examinations
The Management English course prepares students for the IELTS test, and students can sit this test in Sheffield. Students wishing to enrol for a course of academic study in Sheffield (a Masters degree, for example) will be entered for the University of Sheffield English Proficiency Test, which is accepted as equivalent to the IELTS test by both Sheffield University and Sheffield Hallam University.

Commercial Visits
Visits to British businesses and organisations are arranged. The visits provide a chance to meet British business people in a work situation. Students are encouraged to ask questions and to extract relevant business information from these situations. Students broaden their general knowledge of western business practice and gain insights into their own special areas.

Examples of visits are:

- a steel company
- a hospital laborartory
- Sheffield Chamber of Commerce
- Meadowhall shopping complex management suite

Length of Course
The course runs throughout the year, and students may join the course at any time. Details of term dates and entry requirements are shown on the application form. There are approximately 22 hours of tuition per week (including commercial visits).

Maximum Class Size
The maximum class size for English Language is 15 students.

Certificate of Successful Attendance
A University of Sheffield certificate of successful attendance will be presented to students who complete their course.

Pre-MBA/MSc Entry Requirements

The following are the recommended minimum IELTS requirements.
Students with higher grades are welcome to join the course at any stage and will be placed in a higher group.
September entry 4.0 IELTS minimum (or equivalent)
January entry 4.5 IELTS minimum
April entry 5.0 IELTS minimum
Mid June entry 5.5 IELTS minimum
July entry 6.0 IELTS minimum with 6 in writing

TOEFL and TOEIC scores are also accepted. Please contact the Course Director for details. Students with 7.0 in IELTS and over are welcome to join the summer course. They will have the opportunity to do more management instead of attending IELTS classes.

Comments on the Pre-Masters course from recent past students

Marie-Helen Zabe (France)
“My overall assessment of the Pre-MBA course is highly positive. The teaching is of a high quality and there is a good professional background link between theory and practice.”

Ms Claudia Loyola (Chile)
“The Pre-MBA English course has been really useful for me in order to develop the necessary skills to face my current MSc in HRS course. The commercial visits are really interesting and offer a real advantage to understand business topics and that has been a real help now.”

Dr Victor A. Pushnykh (Russia)
“This course has enabled me not only to really communicate with my business partners and to understand much more fully the commercial ideas they assume but also to create my own ideas on how to successfully run my business...The tutors were wonderful, hospitable and sophisticated. I highly recommend all managers doing international business to join this programme.”

Read less
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time. this is a general outline.). Read more
English language skills are taught within the classes below. (Precise details of the classes change from time to time: this is a general outline.)

- Business English
- Meetings & Negotiating
- Business Communication
- Business Correspondence
- Business Role Play
- Business Presentation Skills
- Business Texts
- Business Vocabulary
- Management
- Case Studies
- Management Readings
- Management project work (where appropriate)

English Examinations
The Management English course prepares students for the IELTS test, and students can sit this test in Sheffield. Students wishing to enrol for a course of academic study in Sheffield (a Masters degree, for example) will be entered for the University of Sheffield English Proficiency Test, which is accepted as equivalent to the IELTS test by both Sheffield University and Sheffield Hallam University.

Commercial Visits
Visits to British businesses and organisations are arranged. The visits provide a chance to meet British business people in a work situation. Students are encouraged to ask questions and to extract relevant business information from these situations. Students broaden their general knowledge of western business practice and gain insights into their own special areas.

Examples of visits are:

- a steel company
- a hospital laborartory
- Sheffield Chamber of Commerce
- Meadowhall shopping complex management suite

Length of Course
The course runs throughout the year, and students may join the course at any time. Details of term dates and entry requirements are shown on the application form. There are approximately 22 hours of tuition per week (including commercial visits).

Maximum Class Size
The maximum class size for English Language is 15 students.

Certificate of Successful Attendance
A University of Sheffield certificate of successful attendance will be presented to students who complete their course.

Pre-MBA/MSc Entry Requirements

The following are the recommended minimum IELTS requirements.
Students with higher grades are welcome to join the course at any stage and will be placed in a higher group.
September entry 4.0 IELTS minimum (or equivalent)
January entry 4.5 IELTS minimum
April entry 5.0 IELTS minimum
Mid June entry 5.5 IELTS minimum
July entry 6.0 IELTS minimum with 6 in writing

TOEFL and TOEIC scores are also accepted. Please contact the Course Director for details. Students with 7.0 in IELTS and over are welcome to join the summer course. They will have the opportunity to do more management instead of attending IELTS classes.

Comments on the Pre-Masters course from recent past students

Marie-Helen Zabe (France)
“My overall assessment of the Pre-MBA course is highly positive. The teaching is of a high quality and there is a good professional background link between theory and practice.”

Ms Claudia Loyola (Chile)
“The Pre-MBA English course has been really useful for me in order to develop the necessary skills to face my current MSc in HRS course. The commercial visits are really interesting and offer a real advantage to understand business topics and that has been a real help now.”

Dr Victor A. Pushnykh (Russia)
“This course has enabled me not only to really communicate with my business partners and to understand much more fully the commercial ideas they assume but also to create my own ideas on how to successfully run my business...The tutors were wonderful, hospitable and sophisticated. I highly recommend all managers doing international business to join this programme.”

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The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course provides a unique preparation for work in the motorsport industry. Read more
The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course provides a unique preparation for work in the motorsport industry. Our location in the heart of UK motorsport valley with close proximity of the majority of Formula 1 teams and their supply chain gives our Department unrivalled access to motorsport companies.This informs and directs development and delivery of the programmes, benefiting from contribution by a range of experts with noteworthy track record in the motorsport industry. It also offers students opportunities to undertake industry-based projects, often in conjunction with our high-standing research based around state-of-the-art automotive test equipment in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Our students also have an opportunity to implement their theoretical knowledge by joining Oxford Brookes Racing, our acclaimed Formula Student team to gain an understanding of racing culture and an environment where winning race cars are built.

Why choose this course?

We are known as a premier institution for Motorsport education - our motorsport legacy is recognised worldwide and many of our graduates progress to work with leading motorsport companies, including all of F1 teams, Formula E and major suppliers to motorsport industry. Our programme has been developed with and delivered in collaboration with the motorsport industry: you will be taught in laboratories that include a four-post test rig, four state-of-the-art engine test cells, analytical and mechanical test equipment and the latest 3D printing technology, in addition to a range of racing cars. Our staff have exceptional expertise in the field of motorsport engineering and include winning F1 race car designers and world-leading sustainable vehicle engineering researchers.

Visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our invited research lectures. You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), mentored by our alumni and visiting lecturers from motorsport industry. They put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website. Regular visits to F1 teams, Formula E teams and major suppliers to the motorsport industry provide students with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get the flavour of activities at our department see 2015 highlights.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and and The Institute of Engineering and Technology as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The Motorsport Engineering MSc is structured around three time periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the end of September.

To qualify for a master degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the dissertation.

Compulsory modules:
-Advanced Vehicle Dynamics
-Advanced Vehicle Aerodynamics
-Laptime Simulation and Race Engineering
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules (choose two):
-Vehicle Crash Engineering
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Materials Engineering and Joining Technology
-Data Acquisition Systems
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management

You also take:
The Dissertation is an individual project on a topic from motorsport engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of motorsport. In addition to developing high level of expertise in a particular area of motorsport, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. Dallara, VUHL, Base Performance, McLaren, AVL), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work, designed to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation. Visiting speakers from business and motorsport industry provide valuable insights.

Careers and professional development

The department’s employability record is consistently above 90%, which is significantly above sector average. Graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in the motorsport industry.

Many of our students go on to work with leading motorsport companies, including directly into F1 teams and their suppliers. Our notable alumni include William Morris, founder of Morris cars (Lord Nuffield) and Adrian Reynard, motorsport driver and entrepreneur whilst honorary graduates include Sir John Surtees, Adrian Newey and Dr Pat Symonds.

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Structural Design aims to provide an understanding of aircraft structures, airworthiness requirements, design standards, stress analysis, fatigue and fracture (damage tolerance) and fundamentals of aerodynamics and loading. Read more

Course Description

Structural Design aims to provide an understanding of aircraft structures, airworthiness requirements, design standards, stress analysis, fatigue and fracture (damage tolerance) and fundamentals of aerodynamics and loading. The suitable selection of materials, both metallic and composite is also covered. Manufacturers of modern aircraft are demanding more lightweight and more durable structures. Structural integrity is a major consideration of today’s aircraft fleet. For an aircraft to economically achieve its design specification and satisfy airworthiness regulations, a number of structural challenges must be overcome. This course trains engineers to meet these challenges, and prepares them for careers in civil and military aviation.

Overview

This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience.

The Structural Design option consists of a taught component and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:
- To build upon knowledge to enable students to enter a wide range of aerospace and related activities concerned with the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft
- To ensure that the student is of immediate use to their employer and has sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression
- To provide teaching that integrates the range of disciplines required by modern aircraft design
- To provide the opportunity for students to be immersed in a 'Virtual Industrial Environment' giving them hands-on experience of interacting with and working on an aircraft design project.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Core Modules

The taught programme for the Structural Design masters is generally delivered from October to March. After completion of the four compulsory taught modules, students have an extensive choice of optional modules to match specific interests.

Core:
- Fatigue Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance
- Finite Element Analysis (including NASTRAN/PATRAN Workshops)
- Design and Analysis of Composite Structures
- Structural Stability

Optional:
- Loading Actions
- Computer Aided Design (CAD)
- Aircraft Aerodynamics
- Aircraft Stability and Control
- Aircraft Performance
- Detail Stressing
- Structural Dynamics
- Aeroelasticity
- Design for Manufacture and Operation
- Initial Aircraft Design (including Structural Layout)
- Airframe Systems
- Aircraft Accident Investigation
- Crashworthiness
- Aircraft Power Plant Installation
- Avionic System Design
- Flight Experimental Methods (Jetstream Flight Labs)
- Reliability, Safety Assessment and Certification
- Sustaining Design (Structural Durability)

Individual Project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place from January to September.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:
- Review, Evaluation and Development of a Microlight Aircraft
- Investigation of the Fatigue Life of Hybrid Metal Composite Joints
- Design for Additive Layer Manufacture
- Rapid Prototyping for Wind Tunnel Model Manufacturing.

Group project

There is no group project for this option of the Aerospace Vehicle Design MSc.

Assessment

Taught modules (20%); Individual Research Project (80%)

Career opportunities

The AVD option in Structural Design is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

Graduates from the have gone onto pursue engineering careers in disciplines such as structural design, stress analysis or systems design. Many of our former graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/AVD-Option-in-Structural-Design

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