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Masters Degrees (Terror)

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This cutting-edge MA programme explores the sources and consequences of political violence and terrorism, as well as the crucial ethical questions involved. Read more

This cutting-edge MA programme explores the sources and consequences of political violence and terrorism, as well as the crucial ethical questions involved. It should appeal to students interested in careers in foreign services, security, some non-governmental or intergovernmental organisations, and many areas of the private sector.

We offer a flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome).

In the Department of Political Science and International Studies we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School. 

Course details

This cutting-edge MA programme explores the sources and consequences of political violence and terrorism, as well as the crucial ethical questions involved. It should appeal to students interested in careers in foreign services, security, some non-governmental or intergovernmental organisations, and many areas of the private sector.

Issues and topics examined include:

  • The sources and nature of political violence and terrorism
  • Debates regarding the prevention of terrorism, counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency policy
  • The politics, legality and ethics of the 'war on terror' and the balance between public security and individual freedom
  • The circumstances under which armed resistance and revolution can be permissible
  • Whether democracies can justify or excuse the use of torture in combating terrorism 

One of the real strengths of our masters programmes is the wide range of available modules, giving students the ability to tailor their course of study to their own academic interests.

More information on: International Relations MA (with specialist pathways)

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop the above-mentioned skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

Our lecturers and tutors will ensure you have all the resources you need to make the transition from A levels to the more rigorous demands of a degree.

Skills gained

You will gain specialist knowledge of the following:

  • The sources and nature of political violence and terrorism
  • Debates regarding the prevention of terrorism, counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency policy
  • The politics, legality and ethics of the ‘war on terror’ and the balance between public security and individual freedom
  • The circumstances under which armed resistance and revolution can be permissible

You will also have the opportunity to learn about other fields within the broader disciplines of political science and international relations through your choice of optional modules.

Learning and teaching

Learning and teaching methods are based centrally on:

  • Seminar teaching: students engage in weekly two-hour seminars in which they participate in debate, discussion and other activities led by specialists from POLSIS. Readings are set for each session.
  • One-to-one dissertation supervision: students develop a specialist research project for their dissertation, working with one member of staff in particular who acts as supervisor during the concluding part of the programme.

Assessments vary according to module but may involve a combination of essays, presentations and written examination.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Enhancing your student experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Some of these are targeted to help you build skills and experience for your CV, others are more open events designed to expose you to high-level speakers on current debates relevant to all Government and Society students.

Read more of our students' experiences and profiles on the school website.



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This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century. Read more

This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century.

A core module will allow you to sharpen your research skills, and you’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules spanning nations, continents, periods and themes to explore topics that interest you. You could study black internationalism alongside early modern Europe, the Spanish state, Stalinism, political violence in India or apartheid.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers as part of a large and diverse School of History and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, supported by active research groups and extensive library resources. Our research interests range from social history and identity to political history, nationalism and internationalism, meaning this flexible programme offers plenty of opportunities to gain important skills while focusing on issues that suit your interests.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with a wide range of resources. The world-class Brotherton Library has one of the best history collections in the UK, ranging from monographs and journals to conference papers, theses and over 100 digital databases of primary sources and other materials for fundamental research. The Brotherton also has its own special collections including the Leeds Russian Archive and the Feminist Archive North.

The Alf Mattinson Collection is full of printed works and papers related to the history of the Labour Party, and the Romany collection and Liddle Collection offer insights into Romany culture and the First World War respectively.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

You’ll study one core module in your first semester, introducing you to different research methodologies in history and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also select from a wide range of optional modules throughout the year, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you such as the history of Yorkshire, the European Enlightenment or issues surrounding global security.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ module.

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge, as well as high-level skills in research, interpretation and analysis. You’ll be able to demonstrate these when you complete your dissertation on a modern history topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Secrecy and Espionage in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Approaches to Contemporary European History 30 credits
  • 'The continuation of war by other means? : Case Studies in Wartime Diplomacy 1931-1945 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • Stalinist Terror 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • The War on Terror 30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Guns and Global Security 30 credits
  • Britain and the Slave Trade 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • The Fragility of the Spanish State: Identity, Conflict and Resistance, 1808-1939 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more

An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences.

Why this programme

  • This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
  • The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
  • All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include

  • Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
  • The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
  • Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
  • Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include

  • Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
  • The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
  • Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
  • Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.



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As a leading global power, the United States and its foreign affairs have a significant impact upon international relations, both in terms of policy and academic scholarship. Read more

As a leading global power, the United States and its foreign affairs have a significant impact upon international relations, both in terms of policy and academic scholarship.

This significance has grown in the years since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the subsequent “war on terror” in ways that have been reflected in the development of the academic literature and in the increased level of interest in the subject area. With a high concentration of US Foreign Policy experts among PAIS academics, the department is in a unique position to bring cutting-edge, in-depth knowledge and discussion to postgraduate study in this field.

Programme content

This programme focuses on US foreign policy in the context of national security as well as wider aspects of the country’s foreign policy and its impact in the areas of the economy, international relations, and particularly security. Some of the questions you will tackle include:

  • What are the main sources of US foreign policy making?
  • What is the balance between power and principle in US foreign policy?
  • How important is domestic politics in the making of US foreign policy?
  • What are the main threats to US national security and how are they confronted?
  • Why is the US fighting a "war on terror" and can it ever be won?
  • To what degree do economic imperatives drive US foreign policy?
  • What is the utility of US military force after Iraq and Afghanistan?
  • To what extent should US security policy address issues such as poverty and environmental change?
  • Is the US in relative decline as a world power?


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You will learn how states and their governments communicate in international politics and how they shape long term strategies in a range of fields from military to diplomatic to aid and development. Read more

You will learn how states and their governments communicate in international politics and how they shape long term strategies in a range of fields from military to diplomatic to aid and development. This includes preparing for conflict between states or with insurgent groups, communicating a path during hostilities, transitioning through post-conflict situations and also how states use diplomacy, culture and economics to avoid conflict and engage in treaty and trade negotiations. You will also encounter crisis communications: how to shape strategic responses to natural disasters, terror attacks, and military invasions. To appreciate this complex field from multiple perspectives, students will further discover how insurgent and revolutionary movements think about and put into practice their communications strategies with populations and states.

Along with subject matter expertise, students will develop transferable analytic, research and practical skills in a dynamic and rigorous intellectual environment.

The course is associated with the King's Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC) - a global network of universities, government agencies and alumni.

Key Benefits

  • War Studies is a multidisciplinary department devoted to the study of all aspects of war and conflict and the broad remit of international relations. In the 21st century we need to understand how states and insurgent movements communicate their policies and ideas in these dynamic contexts.
  • Develop skills for in-depth analytical and critical thinking about international politics. Work with the latest, cutting-edge research in your field.
  • Contribute to a vibrant research community. Our world-renowned staff and an international student body come from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds.
  • Work with some of the world’s best academics in your field. Our Department staff publish world-leading research and offer outstanding research-led teaching and training.
  • Work with some of the world’s leading practitioners from governments, international organisations, and strategic communications agencies. We teach not only how to think about strategic communications but how to do it.
  • Build networks. Connect with visiting academics, government ministers, diplomats, soldiers, aid and trade leaders, and journalists who regularly lecture and deliver our seminars.
  • Grow your networks with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policymaking bodies in the UK and globally.
  • Enjoy living and studying right in the heart of London beside the River Thames.

Description

The aim of this course is to enhance knowledge of a broad range of subjects and approaches to engaging with international politics today.

The course is available to both full- and part-time students, and is available as an MA, Postgraduate Diploma, or Postgraduate Certificate. 

The MA course comprises modules that total 180 credits. You will take two 40 credits worth of required modules, and a further 40 credits of optional modules. These credits may be chosen from a wide range of modules available in the Department of War Studies. MA students are also required to take a 15,000-word research dissertation on a topic of Strategic Communications (60 credits).

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Per 40-credit required module, you will typically receive two hours per week over two ten week terms. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or combinations thereof or one lecture followed by a case study. In addition to this you can expect 360 hours of self-study. 

Per 20-credit module optional module, you will typically receive two hours per week over one ten week term. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or combinations thereof. A few options are formatted to run as intensive weekend sessions. In addition to this you can expect 180 hours of self-study. 

Per 40-credit optional module, you will typically receive two hours per week over two ten week terms. This can be split into one lecture and one seminar or one lecture and one case study or combinations thereof. Some options are formatted to run as intensive weekend sessions. In addition to this you can expect 360 hours of self-study. 

For the Dissertation module, you will typically receive 12 hours worth of traning workshops and/or supervision. In addition to this you can expect 588 hours of self-study. 

Typically 1 credit equals 10 hours of work.

Assessments 

Assessment methods will depend on the modules selected. The primary method of assessment for this course is a combination of essays, project work, class participation, and/or exams. The dissertation module assessment will be assessed solely on the dissertation (100%).

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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Introduction. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.

As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate

- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time

- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Timothy Jones

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.

Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.

The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.



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This innovative degree stream has been developed in response to the increasing significance of the impact of terrorism in the fields of international security and policing. Read more
This innovative degree stream has been developed in response to the increasing significance of the impact of terrorism in the fields of international security and policing. The programme will provide you with a detailed understanding of the key issues surrounding managing risk and security, policing and terrorism with a focus on global issues and their impact at the local level, particularly in a post ‘9/11’ and ‘7/7’ world.

You will explore the idea of terror as a concept, the history of terrorism and investigate the common myths associated with contemporary terrorism.

You will learn how to critically appraise research as well as conduct and write up you own independent study on a topic of your choice.

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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This course investigates central issues of global justice. the debate between relativism and universalism, the foundation and content of human rights, responses to global poverty and inequality, cosmopolitan democracy and environmental justice. Read more
This course investigates central issues of global justice: the debate between relativism and universalism, the foundation and content of human rights, responses to global poverty and inequality, cosmopolitan democracy and environmental justice. You develop a deeper and wider understanding of world politics and learn to think critically about these issues.

The course is taught by influential political theorists and philosophers. You gain an advanced knowledge and understanding of:
-Global justice and human rights
-Theories of ethics
-War
-Terror and peace
-International and regional studies

You also develop:
-Knowledge of the more important approaches and methods in social science research and the techniques required to carry out advanced research
-Theoretical and practical research skills, including the synthesis of materials from a variety of primary and secondary sources

We offer rigorous training in global justice and human rights, international relations theory and in theories and approaches to the study of politics. This helps you to develop the specialist knowledge and research skills from which to embark upon a career with significant international dimension or pursue a postgraduate research degree in global justice and ethics studies.

We have a student-run Politics Postgraduate Society which brings together MA and PhD students to organise academic and social events. The Society runs:
-Professional development seminars, led by academic staff
-Seminars delivered by fellow postgraduates
-Round-table discussions with staff and visitors
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, for exciting young external speakers
-A weekly film night during term time

Delivery

Teaching takes place on Newcastle University's city centre campus. Small group seminars, of no more than 15 students, create a highly positive and intimate learning environment.

Facilities

You will enjoy the benefit of most teaching taking place in the Politics building with the Robinson Library next door. This space includes a dedicated postgraduate computer room and a postgraduate common room.

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Introduction. The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. Read more

Introduction

The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. In Semester 2, research methods continues and students take two option modules from a range of choices that focus on the Middle East, Africa, Migration and Resource Conflicts amongst others.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma

- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time

- Duration: Full time - MSc-12 months; PG Diploma-9 months; PG Certificate-3 months Part time - MSc-27 months; PG Diploma-21 months; PG Certificate-9 months

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Matias Margulis

Course objectives

The course looks at the dynamics of international conflict and cooperation in light of major developments such as the end of the Cold War, the 9/11 terror attacks and the Arab Spring. The course takes a thematic approach to conflict resolution and the role of international organisations to focus on the role of conflict prevention and management in specific geographical areas in addition to the development and regulation of conflict in relation to factors such as natural resources and migration.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc contains core modules related to international conflict and cooperation as well as a range of options modules to explore issues in more depth. It also features a research skills module.

Delivery and assessment

Modules will typically be delivered in the evenings by lecture and seminar, although the emphasis will be on student participation and discussion, workshop sessions, as well as a variety of formal and informal presentations. Assessment is by presentations, essays and the dissertation.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the vast majority of the outputs submitted by the History and Politics staff were graded as international quality and a significant proportion was of ‘World-leading’ quality. All staff in History and Politics were assessed, an indicator of how central research is to our activity.

Career opportunities

The MSc in International Conflict and Cooperation is a gateway to employment in government agencies, the NGO sector and international organisations as well as into PhD study, research and academia. The course provides a background in conflict study, the role of international organisations and a thematic and geographical focus on distinct areas and problems as well as analysis of solutions. The academic skills aspects of the course also provide a background to undertake further research.

Employability

Our students learn a variety of skills to enhance their attractiveness to employers such as presentation skills, the ability to undertake research, analysis of complex data, writing skills, team work and communication, in addition to a variety of knowledge associated with international politics in relation to global issues, international organisations, concepts and theories.



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The question of security now dominates contemporary international politics. Issues such as the 'War on Terror', pre-emptive self-defence and humanitarian intervention constitute seminal international concerns that have implications for all states and all peoples. Read more

The question of security now dominates contemporary international politics. Issues such as the 'War on Terror', pre-emptive self-defence and humanitarian intervention constitute seminal international concerns that have implications for all states and all peoples.

This course provides you with a detailed understanding of the nature of the contemporary security agenda, its origins, theoretical foundations and future trajectory. You will examine the theories of international security and those key security issues that have dominated security discourse in the post-Cold War era. You will also develop your analytical skills in order to facilitate understanding of the seminal contemporary security issues in a broader theoretical and historical framework.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

You must choose four modules from the list of option modules (one of your options may be an approved free choice module hosted by another Masters course).

Core modules

Option modules

Career development centre

Our Career Development Centre has just been shortlisted for the Best University Careers Service in the National Undergraduate Employability Awards for 2017.

With a growing network of over 3,000 employers around the world and a team of experienced careers consultants, we are here to help you succeed.

In 2015–16, we helped over 1,500 students find work placements across a range of sectors, with 250 employers attending 14 on-campus skills and careers fairs.

As a Westminster student, you’ll have access to our services throughout your studies and after you graduate.

We can help you:

  • find work placements related to your course
  • find part-time/vacation, placement and graduate jobs, including voluntary experience
  • find international opportunities to enhance your employability
  • market yourself effectively to employers
  • write better CVs and application forms
  • develop your interview and enterprise skills
  • plan your career with our careers consultants
  • meet employers and explore your career options at our employer fairs, careers presentations and networking events throughout the year

Find out more about the Career Development Centre.



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This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). Read more

This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). With the rise in the threat to national and global security at unprecedented levels, the time to further study this area is now. You will study many aspects of international criminal law, for example, the balance that is struck between human rights and the threat of terrorism in the UK and internationally and the way in which differing jurisdictions tackle international organised crime.

If you are looking to work for international bodies such as the United Nations or the International Criminal Court, or you are looking to continue your studies within this fascinating field, then this course will be the ideal next move to help further develop your career.

Course content

This course will develop analytical, evaluative and research skills and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the tensions between security and human rights that exist in the contemporary UK, European and international legal frameworks. In particular you will consider how effectively human rights standards are protected both from an EU and global perspective and the response to the threat of terror and international crime in different jurisdictions.

You will also have the opportunity to probe in detail an area of particular interest when you produce your dissertation. You will be supported by experienced lecturers who use a range of innovative teaching methods, which will enhance your overall studies.

To be eligible for the award of LLM International Criminal Law and Security, you must successfully gain 180 credits from the below compulsory modules. If you must successfully gain 120 credits from the below but not including the Dissertation you would be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma, if you gain 60 credits not include the Dissertation you would be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

Course modules (17/18)

-European Crime and Security

-International Organised Crime

-European and International Human Rights

-National Security, Terrorism and the Rule of Law

-Dissertation

-Diversity, Migration and the Law

Module information is quoted for 17/18 entry. Please note that modules run subject to student numbers and staff availability, any changes will be communicated to applicants accordingly.

Methods of Learning

The LLM is offered for full time study over 12 months. The course is also available part time and via distance learning.

You will typically study three or four modules in each semester. This is followed by the dissertation period of 18 weeks.

This course is also available through distance learning, as well as taught at the University of Northampton. The distance learning element of the course delivery will vary module-by-module but typically includes podcasts of lectures combined with weekly or fortnightly online reading, exercises and discussions using a range of platforms, including blogs and discussion boards.

Where appropriate, PowerPoint slides will be available online at the same time as the lecture podcast. The readings will be in the form of links to online documents, case reports, book extracts or similar and will be available through online systems. Formative assessment is carried out regularly so that you can ensure on a regular basis that you are at the right place in the course. You will be allocated a personal tutor and will be able to arrange live one-to-one tutorial sessions using Skype or Google Hangouts as necessary.

Assessments

Formal course assessment is centred on module essays and submission of a dissertation, although the precise method of assessment may vary across modules. In addition, students may be informally assessed in a number of different ways, including individual presentations.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise, with substantial teaching experience on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.

-An enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.

Careers

You will be provided with the skills and knowledge to work in, or continue your studies in modern warfare, security and terrorism. You could also expand your academic knowledge through PhD studies in your chosen field.



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Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. Read more
Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. These issues include the rise of China and India, economic dynamism of the Asian-Pacific area, regional integration (ASEAN, SAARC, Shanghai Cooperation Organization), security hotspots (Korean Peninsula, Taiwan Straits, India-Pakistan, the ‘global war on terror’), democratic transition and consolidation, the survival of non-democratic regimes, and identity conflicts of ethnicity, religion and language. To understand these and other political processes, this MSc programme draws upon the concepts and methods of the sub-disciplines of comparative politics (political sociology and political economy) and international relations. The evidence from Asia will also reveal the relevance and limitations of the concepts and methods derived from North American/European settings and suggest ways in which they may be modified. The expertise available in the Department enables students to concentrate on one of the sub-regions of Asia, (East Asia. South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia) should they choose to do so. Alternatively, they may follow a more comparative approach by selecting a mixture of units covering different sub-regions.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscaspol/

Programme Specification

MSc Asian Politics Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 191kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscaspol/file80041.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Department of Politics and International Studies

The Department’s academic staff are leading and highly-regarded scholars in their fields and most have knowledge of one or more languages of their regions of interest, in addition to their disciplinary specialism.

Staff members conduct cutting-edge research on the politics of the Global South, with expertise in nationalism, urban politics, political violence, security, migration and diaspora mobilization, Islamic political and intellectual history, transitional justice, politics of multiculturalism, international relations theory, gender, comparative political economy, human rights, and the study of ideologies.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Examine real-life case studies to piece together the inner workings of serious crime, and the methods used to police it. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge needed for many careers in criminal justice, such as the Police, youth justice, the Home Office or border agencies. Read more
Examine real-life case studies to piece together the inner workings of serious crime, and the methods used to police it. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge needed for many careers in criminal justice, such as the Police, youth justice, the Home Office or border agencies.

Overview

Focusing on serious crime, you’ll explore the practice and theory of criminal activities, including how crime is detected and policed, methods of social control, and sanctions.

By examining different theoretical standpoints, you’ll form an understanding of various Western legal and social traditions and how they compare to each other.

You’ll investigate issues such as organised illicit trade and criminal enterprise, using case studies of criminal activities including financial crime, human trafficking, and violence prevention.

Our modules will let you specialise in other areas of interest too, such as the nature of violence, terrorism, and policing transnational crime.

Most of your teaching will take place in research-seminar format to allow you to develop critical thinking, but your learning will also be supported by lectures, guest speakers and debates. You’ll have a chance to contribute to our research seminar series, and take part in our annual criminology study trips abroad.

And if you need advice, our experienced teaching staff will always be available to help you.

Teaching times: Mondays and Thursdays from 3-5pm (full-time); trimester 1 Mondays 2-5pm and trimester 2 Thursdays 2-5pm (part-time, September starts) or trimester 2 only Thursdays 2-5pm (part-time, January starts)

Course duration: 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time (September starts); 15 months full-time or 28 months part-time (January starts)

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/criminology

Careers

This course will prepare you for many criminal justice-related careers, such as the immigration and border agencies, the Police, the Prison Service, the National Probation Service, youth justice, the Home Office, the court system, violence prevention or social policy and research.

Modules

Core modules:
Organised Illicit Trade
Terror as Crime
Major Project

Optional modules:
Violence in Context
International Institutions and Policy
Policing Transnational Crime

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of essays, presentations, case studies and portfolio work.

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The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats..

Why this programme

◾You will develop your knowledge of the security challenges impacting our rapidly changing social and political environment at a local, national and global level. These range from terrorism and cyber warfare to disease, migration and climate change.
◾You can combine a broad spectrum of subject areas into your degree, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, archaeology, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in policy development exercises: working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.
◾The programme will also include a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.

Programme structure

You will take four core and selection of optional courses. You will also complete a dissertation as a piece of independent research. In addition to the general degree programme, you have the opportunity to study one of three specialised pathways.

Core courses
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾International security and global politics
◾Research design OR Qualitative methods
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses

Pathways

Cyber security and intelligence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine how cyber issues and information communications technologies challenge the way states and citizens alike attempt to use and constrain information in a range of societies for security purposes. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Human-centred security
◾Information systems and databases
◾Systems and networks.

Social and cultural perspectives (not running in 2017-18)

Provides you with the opportunity to examine global security from a critical perspective, reflecting on social and cultural aspects and constructions of 'security'. Important to this pathway will be an interrogation of the relationship between security, vulnerability and the ethics of care. Specialised courses within this pathway include:
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾A range of related optional courses.

Strategy and defence

Provides you with the opportunity to examine shifts in Western strategic thought in both a historical and contemporary setting. Particular attention will be given to how strategy and defence is currently developing within a new interdependent global context. Specialised courses within this pathway include
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾The American way of war: from Revolution to the War on Terror
◾A range of related optional courses.

Career prospects

You can move into careers such as working with governmental and non-governmental organisations, business and international/transnational organisations. Recent graduates have gone on to work for the BBC, the United Nations, the UK armed forces, a US based research agency and UK based private security and risk analysis companies. Others have gone to undertake a PhD.

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