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The study of terrorism and political violence has long been an important area of academic research. Read more
The study of terrorism and political violence has long been an important area of academic research. Since the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001, and the resulting US-led 'war on terror', this subject to the forefront of the debate on security and international conflict for academics, policymakers, and popular debate. The nature, evolution, causes and normative justifications of what is called terrorism and other aspects of political violence are now a central issue in current foreign and security policy.

The core module is entitled Political Violence, Terrorism and Islamism and is concerned with the phenomenon of political violence in the 20th and 21st century which form the central themes of this programme. It covers key aspects of political violence, terrorism such as the politics and strategies of terrorism; the structure and dynamic of terrorist groups/terror group operations; technologies and tactics of terrorist groups; state vs. non-state terror, insurgencies and counterinsurgency strategies.

It looks at terrorism and national liberation movements during the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict and terrorism in the Middle East, urban terror in Western Europe and radical Islam. The emergence of Al Qaeda, global terror networks and the threat of weapons of mass destruction are discussed alongside the efforts to counter terrorism and the US led ‘war against terror’. This cutting-edge MA programme should appeal to students interested in careers in foreign services, security, some non-governmental or intergovernmental organisations, and many areas of the private sector.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/political-violence-and-terrorism-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

This course is taught in Peace Studies — the largest centre in the world devoted exclusively to the study of peace and conflict.

Modules

Core modules
-Political Violence and Terrorism
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Regional and Global Security Politics
-Dissertation (Political Violence and Terrorism)

Option modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy
-Cities in Conflict
-African Security Studies
-African Study Visit
-Religions, Conflict and Peacemaking
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more
An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences.

Why this programme

-This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
-The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
-All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include:
-Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
-The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
-Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
-Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include:
-Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
-The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
-Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
-Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.

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The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. Read more
The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. It should be of interest to a wide range of individuals concerned both academically and professionally with contemporary security issues, challenges and problems. The course is taught by academics specialist in their field and who contribute to current legal and policy debates. It has been set up in such a way as to allow a flexible and contextual approach to the topics discussed.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Teachings and Learning is predominantly through weekly synchronous and asynchronous online workshops. The learning ethos is to draw on the range and experience of our diverse student cohort

Our extensive e-law library facility gives access to many legal and academic sources from within and outside the jurisdiction.

Modules are assessed by coursework which comprises of a 1000 word essay plan which feeds into a 3000 word essay. This method of assessment has proved very popular with students as it provides useful feedback for their final submissions.

The course is supported by the University’s web-based Blackboard facility with ICT an integral part of the programme. The University subscribes to extensive electronic legal data bases and journals while all students are registered users of UCLan’s network with a dedicated network space accessible remotely.

GRADUATE CAREERS

As well as international career prospects, this LLM also offers excellent domestic career prospects such as central and local governments; social work, probation, youth and community work; and the police, prison and immigration services. Security litigation is also a growing area of legal practice.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

FURTHER INFORMATION

This LLM will introduce students to the substantive doctrine, values and policies of international criminal law by looking at different academic perspectives on international criminal law (ICL) and national, regional and international security as well as the nature, sources and rationale for ICL. Consideration will be given to the institutions of ICL: UN, ICJ, ICTY, ICTR and ICC as well as the history and development of the ICC (International Criminal Court). The 1998 Rome Statute, ICC Jurisdiction, internal organisation, and the first completed trials will be covered and students will be asked to critique the ICC using constitutional and political arguments for and against its creation and maintenance. Core offences under ICL such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression and torture will be examined alongside the defences to ICL charges. There will be a detailed case study of the legal prohibition of incitement to genocide and associated racism demonstrating the challenges to regional and international security.

Transnational police and security cooperation such as Interpol, Europol and Eurojust will be considered as well as the transnational legal dimensions to “national security” including within the context of the European and international human rights law and policy.

Students will develop an understanding of how international law functions in the maintenance of maritime security and peaceful uses of the oceans. The general legal framework, the UN Law of the Sea Convention and IMO Regulations will all be considered. Piracy and maritime terrorism and the freedom of the seas and navigational rights will be examined as well as the proliferation of security initiatives, maritime interdiction and maritime boundary disputes.

Terrorism has been a significant challenge to international peace and security for many years: especially since the advent of Islamist terror groups such as Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the late 1990s, culminating in the “9/11” atrocities of 2001. The train bombings in Madrid in 2004 and in London in 2005 and more recently the rise of Islamist terror groups in the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa serve only to remind us of the serious threat terrorism poses to international security.

This LLM examines incidents of international terrorism and the obligations states have to protect themselves from acts and threats of terrorism. Transnational legal responses to terrorism will also be considered together with an assessment of the rights of individuals suspected of terrorism in the pursuit of protecting human security.

The programme will provide students with expertise, analytical and reflective skills. The programme aims to provide a learning experience that will enable students to develop their academic ability, to further develop their careers and to assist them in making a positive contribution to the wider, global and national community.

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Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. Read more
Containing 60 percent of the world’s population, Asia is the setting for many of the most important political issues in the world today. These issues include the rise of China and India, economic dynamism of the Asian-Pacific area, regional integration (ASEAN, SAARC, Shanghai Cooperation Organization), security hotspots (Korean Peninsula, Taiwan Straits, India-Pakistan, the ‘global war on terror’), democratic transition and consolidation, the survival of non-democratic regimes, and identity conflicts of ethnicity, religion and language. To understand these and other political processes, this MSc programme draws upon the concepts and methods of the sub-disciplines of comparative politics (political sociology and political economy) and international relations. The evidence from Asia will also reveal the relevance and limitations of the concepts and methods derived from North American/European settings and suggest ways in which they may be modified. The expertise available in the Department enables students to concentrate on one of the sub-regions of Asia, (East Asia. South Asia, Southeast Asia and Central Asia) should they choose to do so. Alternatively, they may follow a more comparative approach by selecting a mixture of units covering different sub-regions.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscaspol/

Programme Specification

MSc Asian Politics Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 191kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscaspol/file80041.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

- SOAS Library

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Department of Politics and International Studies

The Department’s academic staff are leading and highly-regarded scholars in their fields and most have knowledge of one or more languages of their regions of interest, in addition to their disciplinary specialism.

Staff members conduct cutting-edge research on the politics of the Global South, with expertise in nationalism, urban politics, political violence, security, migration and diaspora mobilization, Islamic political and intellectual history, transitional justice, politics of multiculturalism, international relations theory, gender, comparative political economy, human rights, and the study of ideologies.

View Degree Programmes - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Examine real-life case studies to piece together the inner workings of serious crime, and the methods used to police it. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge needed for many careers in criminal justice, such as the Police, youth justice, the Home Office or border agencies. Read more
Examine real-life case studies to piece together the inner workings of serious crime, and the methods used to police it. You’ll gain the skills and knowledge needed for many careers in criminal justice, such as the Police, youth justice, the Home Office or border agencies.

Overview

Focusing on serious crime, you’ll explore the practice and theory of criminal activities, including how crime is detected and policed, methods of social control, and sanctions.

By examining different theoretical standpoints, you’ll form an understanding of various Western legal and social traditions and how they compare to each other.

You’ll investigate issues such as organised illicit trade and criminal enterprise, using case studies of criminal activities including financial crime, human trafficking, and violence prevention.

Our modules will let you specialise in other areas of interest too, such as the nature of violence, terrorism, and policing transnational crime.

Most of your teaching will take place in research-seminar format to allow you to develop critical thinking, but your learning will also be supported by lectures, guest speakers and debates. You’ll have a chance to contribute to our research seminar series, and take part in our annual criminology study trips abroad.

And if you need advice, our experienced teaching staff will always be available to help you.

Teaching times: Mondays and Thursdays from 3-5pm (full-time); trimester 1 Mondays 2-5pm and trimester 2 Thursdays 2-5pm (part-time, September starts) or trimester 2 only Thursdays 2-5pm (part-time, January starts)

Course duration: 1 year full-time or 2 years part-time (September starts); 15 months full-time or 28 months part-time (January starts)

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/criminology

Careers

This course will prepare you for many criminal justice-related careers, such as the immigration and border agencies, the Police, the Prison Service, the National Probation Service, youth justice, the Home Office, the court system, violence prevention or social policy and research.

Modules

Core modules:
Organised Illicit Trade
Terror as Crime
Major Project

Optional modules:
Violence in Context
International Institutions and Policy
Policing Transnational Crime

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of essays, presentations, case studies and portfolio work.

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Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.
As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.
The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Dale Townshend

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.
Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.
The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.

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The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses (NB this is not an exhaustive list)
-American Way of War
-Approaches to History
-Belief and Conversion in Europe c. 300 – c.1000
-Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective
-Chivalry and Warfare
-Crusading Warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean
-Culture, Politics and Society in Highland Clearances
-Gender and Text
-Gender, Politics and Power
-Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency
-Issues, Ideologies & Institutions in Modern Scotland
-Medieval Palaeography 1
-Medieval Deep Structures of Russia and Eastern Europe
-Scottish Castles and Palaces in European Context, c.1100-1600
-Scottish Radicalism
-Scottish Reformation
-Secularisation and Society: the decline of religion in the west since 1800
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 1
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 2
-Special Topic History 1
-Special Topic in History 2
-The Normans
-The Ottomans in history, 1300–1922
-Thomas Paine as an Enlightenment Revolutionary
-Western Intelligence in an Age of Terror
-Women and Power in Renaissance Italy

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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After the tragic events of 9-11 and the advent of the 'war against terror', studies of violence, terrorism and security are now at the top of the global agenda of politics. Read more
After the tragic events of 9-11 and the advent of the 'war against terror', studies of violence, terrorism and security are now at the top of the global agenda of politics. If you are ready to become part of the debate on these contentious topics and their effects then this is the programme for you!

This programme provides dynamic and critical study in violence, terrorism and international security. It challenges ‘accepted wisdom’ and opens up the debate about the role of violence in relation to political power in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

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This innovative degree stream has been developed in response to the increasing significance of the impact of terrorism in the fields of international security and policing. Read more
This innovative degree stream has been developed in response to the increasing significance of the impact of terrorism in the fields of international security and policing. The programme will provide you with a detailed understanding of the key issues surrounding managing risk and security, policing and terrorism with a focus on global issues and their impact at the local level, particularly in a post ‘9/11’ and ‘7/7’ world.

You will explore the idea of terror as a concept, the history of terrorism and investigate the common myths associated with contemporary terrorism.

You will learn how to critically appraise research as well as conduct and write up you own independent study on a topic of your choice.

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Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including. Read more
At the School of Geography, Politics and Sociology, we conduct research and offer MPhil supervision in all major fields of politics, including: international and global politics, governance and political organisations, and political theory.

We can offer you excellent supervision for your Politics MPhil, in a vibrant and supportive research environment.

We have a Politics Postgraduate Society, which organises:
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, with both internal and external presenters
-Round table discussions on topical issues
-Professional development workshops led by politics staff

You are encouraged to attend conferences to present papers, partial funding for this is available from the School.

Our main research themes are:

The politics of difference

We examine the issues thrown up by the social and political differences of humanity from a variety of perspectives including: analytical and continental political philosophy; comparative politics and international politics; post-colonialism. Our work includes research on:
-Multiculturalism and issues of identity
-Inequality and social justice
-Disability
-Competing discourses of national identity
-Ethnic-nationalism
-Political violence
-Socio-political exclusion and discrimination
-Global norms and cultural difference
-Free speech - toleration and recognition

Popular culture and political communication

Our research addresses various key issues including:
-Representation
-Aesthetics
-Identity
-Cultural political economy
-Memory
-Control

We also assess the processes and depiction of political struggles, such as:
-Armed conflict
-Everyday life
-Political organising and identity formation
-Elections

Political participation and elections

We examine the differing forms of political participation that link society to the political systems of the world. We look at both the formal electoral process and non-electoral politics (social movements, protest groups etc). Our research on the emergence of virtual political participation means that some of our work intersects with popular culture and political communication. We investigate:
-Citizen involvement and (dis)engagement
-Social capital
-Non-participation
-The role of civil society

Political ideologies and political thought

We focus on the history of political thought as well as how these ideas are embedded in programmes for political action. Our research incorporates both historical and contemporary political thought prominent in the Western tradition as well as Asian philosophy and post-colonial thinking. This is an interdisciplinary theme, serving as a bridge between empirical political science and political theory.

Global economic and environmental challenges

We study the importance of political ideas such as sustainable development and globalisation, as well as the struggle to define the core problems that society faces. These challenges pose questions to the nature and reform of global governance, and generate tensions between the state and transnationalising forces in global politics and political economy. Our work has already led to findings on:
-The implications for global justice
-The policy challenge for governments and non-governmental actors
-The empowerment of various actors

Democracy, the modern state and political organisations

Our work examines the role of interest groups, social movements, political parties, third-sector actors and charities, community organisations and postcolonial nationalism in relation to the modern state. We draw from ancient and modern political thought to understand the interpretation of democracy (including democratic rights and the foundations of democracy). Our research interrogates the forms democracy takes, including:
-Elite theories of democracy
-Deliberative democracy
-Cosmopolitan democracy
-Democracy in divided societies

Political economy of development

Our research focuses on the interaction of economic forces and principles with political power in the development of societal economics and welfare, as well as on theories of development and post-development. We cover a range of geographic areas in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia. We explore questions such as:
-The impact of the ongoing financial and economic crisis
-The role of communities and individuals in the face of global political economic forces
-The impact of the emerging economies (for example Brazil and China) on the global political economy

Critical geopolitics and security

Our research focuses on thinking critically about the political dynamics, consequences and discourses of historical and contemporary geopolitics. We cover both historical and contemporary questions of security, including:
-The territorialisation/de-territorialisation of identity and political agency
-Political cartography
-The role of fear and identity in shaping geopolitics
-Sovereignty and nationalism - the role and impact of the military
-Notions of terrorism and the war on terror
-The geographies of international boundaries
-The war on the trade in illegal substances
-The city and security
-The threat of biological weapons and infectious disease
-The vertical dimension in geopolitical and security studies
-Visual culture and world politics
-Technologies and architectures of security and insecurity
-The human body and security

Theory of international relations

We take an active role in the global debate on the units, actors and structures that shape the dynamics of international politics. Our research covers the political consequences of the constitution of the international as a distinct kind of relation. We examine political concepts including:
-The world system
-International diplomacy
-Networks
-Notions of empire
-Regional integration
-Non-governmental actors
-The (nation) state

Governance in Britain and wider Europe

Our research investigates the dynamics driving public policy-making at national, EU and international levels. We focus on the challenges multi-level governance offers for concerns about legitimacy and accountability. This includes the changing relationship between the governing and the governed over matters of politics and policy. Our geographic scope includes the United Kingdom, Western Europe, Eastern Europe and Russia, and the Mediterranean

Global justice and human rights

Our work in political philosophy reflects the increasing need to tackle issues at a global rather than a state-only level. We cover issues such as:
-The formulation and justification of human rights
-The competing claims of relativism, particularism, and cultural diversity
-The extension of ideas of distributive justice from states to humanity as a whole
-Proposals to secure global democracy
-The application of just war theory to modern conflicts and to humanitarian intervention
-Environmental justice, especially climate change

We tackle questions of justice from an issue perspective as well as surveys of nationalism, statism, and various non-cosmopolitan theories of global justice.

Political research and methods

We conduct qualitative and quantitative research reflecting both empirical and critical political methodologies. We use quantitative methods, including rational choice theory and experiments, to make sense of topics as diverse as party systems and transitional justice. Our aim is to push innovation in research methods in ethnography, hermeneutics and discourse analysis. We use concepts that challenge traditional notions of politics to investigate methods for research into new challenges, including:
-The rise of life sciences
-The focus on the relationship between the human body and security
-Emergent forms of subjectivity and politics

Research skills development

The University's Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate School provides a full range of research training in the social sciences, which meets the requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This training includes:
-Bibliographical techniques
-Philosophy of social science
-Quantitative and qualitative methods

The Graduate School also hosts postgraduate events, including open days, and supports personal development.

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This course investigates central issues of global justice. the debate between relativism and universalism, the foundation and content of human rights, responses to global poverty and inequality, cosmopolitan democracy and environmental justice. Read more
This course investigates central issues of global justice: the debate between relativism and universalism, the foundation and content of human rights, responses to global poverty and inequality, cosmopolitan democracy and environmental justice. You develop a deeper and wider understanding of world politics and learn to think critically about these issues.

The course is taught by influential political theorists and philosophers. You gain an advanced knowledge and understanding of:
-Global justice and human rights
-Theories of ethics
-War
-Terror and peace
-International and regional studies

You also develop:
-Knowledge of the more important approaches and methods in social science research and the techniques required to carry out advanced research
-Theoretical and practical research skills, including the synthesis of materials from a variety of primary and secondary sources

We offer rigorous training in global justice and human rights, international relations theory and in theories and approaches to the study of politics. This helps you to develop the specialist knowledge and research skills from which to embark upon a career with significant international dimension or pursue a postgraduate research degree in global justice and ethics studies.

We have a student-run Politics Postgraduate Society which brings together MA and PhD students to organise academic and social events. The Society runs:
-Professional development seminars, led by academic staff
-Seminars delivered by fellow postgraduates
-Round-table discussions with staff and visitors
-The 'New Voices' seminar series, for exciting young external speakers
-A weekly film night during term time

Delivery

Teaching takes place on Newcastle University's city centre campus. Small group seminars, of no more than 15 students, create a highly positive and intimate learning environment.

Facilities

You will enjoy the benefit of most teaching taking place in the Politics building with the Robinson Library next door. This space includes a dedicated postgraduate computer room and a postgraduate common room.

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The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. Read more

Introduction

The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. In Semester 2, research methods continues and students take two option modules from a range of choices that focus on the Middle East, Africa, Migration and Resource Conflicts amongst others.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full time - MSc-12 months; PG Diploma-9 months; PG Certificate-3 months Part time - MSc-27 months; PG Diploma-21 months; PG Certificate-9 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Andrew Glencros

Course objectives

The course looks at the dynamics of international conflict and cooperation in light of major developments such as the end of the Cold War, the 9/11 terror attacks and the Arab Spring. The course takes a thematic approach to conflict resolution and the role of international organisations to focus on the role of conflict prevention and management in specific geographical areas in addition to the development and regulation of conflict in relation to factors such as natural resources and migration.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The MSc contains core modules related to international conflict and cooperation as well as a range of options modules to explore issues in more depth. It also features a research skills module.

Delivery and assessment

Modules will typically be delivered in the evenings by lecture and seminar, although the emphasis will be on student participation and discussion, workshop sessions, as well as a variety of formal and informal presentations. Assessment is by presentations, essays and the dissertation.

REF2014

In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Rating

In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the vast majority of the outputs submitted by the History and Politics staff were graded as international quality and a significant proportion was of ‘World-leading’ quality. All staff in History and Politics were assessed, an indicator of how central research is to our activity.

Career opportunities

The MSc in International Conflict and Cooperation is a gateway to employment in government agencies, the NGO sector and international organisations as well as into PhD study, research and academia. The course provides a background in conflict study, the role of international organisations and a thematic and geographical focus on distinct areas and problems as well as analysis of solutions. The academic skills aspects of the course also provide a background to undertake further research.

Employability

Our students learn a variety of skills to enhance their attractiveness to employers such as presentation skills, the ability to undertake research, analysis of complex data, writing skills, team work and communication, in addition to a variety of knowledge associated with international politics in relation to global issues, international organisations, concepts and theories.

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The question of security now dominates contemporary international politics. Issues such as the 'War on Terror', pre-emptive self-defence and humanitarian intervention constitute seminal international concerns that have implications for all states and all peoples. Read more
The question of security now dominates contemporary international politics. Issues such as the 'War on Terror', pre-emptive self-defence and humanitarian intervention constitute seminal international concerns that have implications for all states and all peoples.

This course provides you with a detailed understanding of the nature of the contemporary security agenda, its origins, theoretical foundations and future trajectory. You will examine the theories of international security and those key security issues that have dominated security discourse in the post-Cold War era. You will also develop your analytical skills in order to facilitate understanding of the seminal contemporary security issues in a broader theoretical and historical framework.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-CONTEMPORARY CONTROVERSIES IN INTERNATIONAL SECURITY: INTERVENTION TERRORISM AND SELF-DEFENCE
-DISSERTATION AND RESEARCH METHODS
-THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Option modules
You must choose four option modules from the following list (one of your options may be an approved free choice module hosted by another Masters course):
-CONTROVERSIES IN UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICIES AND PROCESSES
-DEMOCRATIC POLITICS: KEY DEBATES AND ISSUES
-DEVELOPMENT THEORIES, POLICIES AND PRACTICES
-GLOBAL CHANGE: TOWARD A NEW NON-WESTERN ORDER?
-GLOBAL POLITICS OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Subject to approval)
-GLOBALISATION, DEMOCRATISATION AND POST-AUTHORITARIAN TRANSITION
-GOVERNANCE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION
-ISLAM AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST
-POLICY, GOVERNANCE AND DEMOCRACY: INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES
-POSTCOLONIAL INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: THEORIES AND CONCEPTS
-REGIONAL DIMENSIONS OF ENERGY SECURITY (Subject to approval)
-THE EUROPEAN UNION AS AN INTERNATIONAL ACTOR
-THE POLITICS OF GLOBAL COMPLEXITY: RETHINKING GOVERNANCE, POWER AND AGENCY
-THE STATE, POLITICS AND VIOLENCE

Associated careers

This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world.

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This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). Read more
This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). With the rise in the threat to national and global security at unprecedented levels, the time to further study this area is now. You will study many aspects of international criminal law, for example, the balance that is struck between human rights and the threat of terrorism in the UK and internationally and the way in which differing jurisdictions tackle international organised crime.

If you are looking to work for international bodies such as the United Nations or the International Criminal Court, or you are looking to continue your studies within this fascinating field, then this course will be the ideal next move to help further develop your career.

Course content

This course will develop analytical, evaluative and research skills and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the tensions between security and human rights that exist in the contemporary UK, European and international legal frameworks. In particular you will consider how effectively human rights standards are protected both from an EU and global perspective and the response to the threat of terror and international crime in different jurisdictions.

You will also have the opportunity to probe in detail an area of particular interest when you produce your dissertation. You will be supported by experienced lecturers who use a range of innovative teaching methods, which will enhance your overall studies.

To be eligible for the award of LLM International Criminal Law and Security, you must successfully gain 180 credits from the below compulsory modules. If you must successfully gain 120 credits from the below but not including the Dissertation you would be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma, if you gain 60 credits not include the Dissertation you would be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

Course modules (16/17)

-European Crime and Security
-International Organised Crime
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and the Rule of Law
-Research Methods
-Dissertation
-Diversity, Migration and the Law
-Research Methods

Methods of Learning

The LLM is offered for full time study over 12 months. The course is also available part time and via distance learning.

You will typically study three or four modules in each semester. This is followed by the dissertation period of 18 weeks.

This course is also available through distance learning, as well as taught at the University of Northampton. The distance learning element of the course delivery will vary module-by-module but typically includes podcasts of lectures combined with weekly or fortnightly online reading, exercises and discussions using a range of platforms, including blogs and discussion boards.

Where appropriate, PowerPoint slides will be available online at the same time as the lecture podcast. The readings will be in the form of links to online documents, case reports, book extracts or similar and will be available through online systems. Formative assessment is carried out regularly so that you can ensure on a regular basis that you are at the right place in the course. You will be allocated a personal tutor and will be able to arrange live one-to-one tutorial sessions using Skype or Google Hangouts as necessary.

Assessments

Formal course assessment is centred on module essays and submission of a dissertation, although the precise method of assessment may vary across modules. In addition, students may be informally assessed in a number of different ways, including individual presentations.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise, with substantial teaching experience on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.
-An enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.

Careers

You will be provided with the skills and knowledge to work in, or continue your studies in modern warfare, security and terrorism. You could also expand your academic knowledge through PhD studies in your chosen field.

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