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Masters Degrees (Terror)

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The study of terrorism and political violence has long been an important area of academic research. Read more
The study of terrorism and political violence has long been an important area of academic research. Since the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001, and the resulting US-led 'war on terror', this subject to the forefront of the debate on security and international conflict for academics, policymakers, and popular debate. The nature, evolution, causes and normative justifications of what is called terrorism and other aspects of political violence are now a central issue in current foreign and security policy.

The core module is entitled Political Violence, Terrorism and Islamism and is concerned with the phenomenon of political violence in the 20th and 21st century which form the central themes of this programme. It covers key aspects of political violence, terrorism such as the politics and strategies of terrorism; the structure and dynamic of terrorist groups/terror group operations; technologies and tactics of terrorist groups; state vs. non-state terror, insurgencies and counterinsurgency strategies.

It looks at terrorism and national liberation movements during the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict and terrorism in the Middle East, urban terror in Western Europe and radical Islam. The emergence of Al Qaeda, global terror networks and the threat of weapons of mass destruction are discussed alongside the efforts to counter terrorism and the US led ‘war against terror’. This cutting-edge MA programme should appeal to students interested in careers in foreign services, security, some non-governmental or intergovernmental organisations, and many areas of the private sector.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/political-violence-and-terrorism-ma-part-time

Why Bradford?

This course is taught in Peace Studies — the largest centre in the world devoted exclusively to the study of peace and conflict.

Modules

Core modules
-Political Violence and Terrorism
-Introduction to Peace Studies
-Regional and Global Security Politics
-Dissertation (Political Violence and Terrorism)

Option modules
-Fragile States and the Security-Development Nexus
-Conflict Resolution Theory
-International Politics and Security Studies
-The Authoritarian Challenge to Democracy
-Cities in Conflict
-African Security Studies
-African Study Visit
-Religions, Conflict and Peacemaking
-Sustainable Tourism Development

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. Read more
The LLM in Law and International Security will offer a unique overview of how different types of law, including international law, define and regulate a range of different security issues ranging from terrorism and war crimes through to maritime security. It should be of interest to a wide range of individuals concerned both academically and professionally with contemporary security issues, challenges and problems. The course is taught by academics specialist in their field and who contribute to current legal and policy debates. It has been set up in such a way as to allow a flexible and contextual approach to the topics discussed.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Teachings and Learning is predominantly through weekly synchronous and asynchronous online workshops. The learning ethos is to draw on the range and experience of our diverse student cohort

Our extensive e-law library facility gives access to many legal and academic sources from within and outside the jurisdiction.

Modules are assessed by coursework which comprises of a 1000 word essay plan which feeds into a 3000 word essay. This method of assessment has proved very popular with students as it provides useful feedback for their final submissions.

The course is supported by the University’s web-based Blackboard facility with ICT an integral part of the programme. The University subscribes to extensive electronic legal data bases and journals while all students are registered users of UCLan’s network with a dedicated network space accessible remotely.

GRADUATE CAREERS

As well as international career prospects, this LLM also offers excellent domestic career prospects such as central and local governments; social work, probation, youth and community work; and the police, prison and immigration services. Security litigation is also a growing area of legal practice.

The programme offers excellent career prospects for those wishing to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation of American States, the African Union and the Arab League.

FURTHER INFORMATION

This LLM will introduce students to the substantive doctrine, values and policies of international criminal law by looking at different academic perspectives on international criminal law (ICL) and national, regional and international security as well as the nature, sources and rationale for ICL. Consideration will be given to the institutions of ICL: UN, ICJ, ICTY, ICTR and ICC as well as the history and development of the ICC (International Criminal Court). The 1998 Rome Statute, ICC Jurisdiction, internal organisation, and the first completed trials will be covered and students will be asked to critique the ICC using constitutional and political arguments for and against its creation and maintenance. Core offences under ICL such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, crime of aggression and torture will be examined alongside the defences to ICL charges. There will be a detailed case study of the legal prohibition of incitement to genocide and associated racism demonstrating the challenges to regional and international security.

Transnational police and security cooperation such as Interpol, Europol and Eurojust will be considered as well as the transnational legal dimensions to “national security” including within the context of the European and international human rights law and policy.

Students will develop an understanding of how international law functions in the maintenance of maritime security and peaceful uses of the oceans. The general legal framework, the UN Law of the Sea Convention and IMO Regulations will all be considered. Piracy and maritime terrorism and the freedom of the seas and navigational rights will be examined as well as the proliferation of security initiatives, maritime interdiction and maritime boundary disputes.

Terrorism has been a significant challenge to international peace and security for many years: especially since the advent of Islamist terror groups such as Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan in the late 1990s, culminating in the “9/11” atrocities of 2001. The train bombings in Madrid in 2004 and in London in 2005 and more recently the rise of Islamist terror groups in the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa serve only to remind us of the serious threat terrorism poses to international security.

This LLM examines incidents of international terrorism and the obligations states have to protect themselves from acts and threats of terrorism. Transnational legal responses to terrorism will also be considered together with an assessment of the rights of individuals suspected of terrorism in the pursuit of protecting human security.

The programme will provide students with expertise, analytical and reflective skills. The programme aims to provide a learning experience that will enable students to develop their academic ability, to further develop their careers and to assist them in making a positive contribution to the wider, global and national community.

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This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century. Read more

This programme will allow you to take a broad approach to African, Indian, American, British and European history from the early modern period to the 21st century.

A core module will allow you to sharpen your research skills, and you’ll choose from a wide range of optional modules spanning nations, continents, periods and themes to explore topics that interest you. You could study black internationalism alongside early modern Europe, the Spanish state, Stalinism, political violence in India or apartheid.

You’ll be taught by leading researchers as part of a large and diverse School of History and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, supported by active research groups and extensive library resources. Our research interests range from social history and identity to political history, nationalism and internationalism, meaning this flexible programme offers plenty of opportunities to gain important skills while focusing on issues that suit your interests.

You’ll study in a supportive environment with a wide range of resources. The world-class Brotherton Library has one of the best history collections in the UK, ranging from monographs and journals to conference papers, theses and over 100 digital databases of primary sources and other materials for fundamental research. The Brotherton also has its own special collections including the Leeds Russian Archive and the Feminist Archive North.

The Alf Mattinson Collection is full of printed works and papers related to the history of the Labour Party, and the Romany collection and Liddle Collection offer insights into Romany culture and the First World War respectively.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

You’ll study one core module in your first semester, introducing you to different research methodologies in history and allowing you to develop your skills. You’ll also select from a wide range of optional modules throughout the year, allowing you to pursue topics that interest you such as the history of Yorkshire, the European Enlightenment or issues surrounding global security.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ module.

This programme will equip you with in-depth subject knowledge, as well as high-level skills in research, interpretation and analysis. You’ll be able to demonstrate these when you complete your dissertation on a modern history topic of your choice, which you’ll submit by the end of the programme.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (History) 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Secrecy and Espionage in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Approaches to Contemporary European History 30 credits
  • 'The continuation of war by other means? : Case Studies in Wartime Diplomacy 1931-1945 30 credits
  • Coolies, Convicts and Concubines: Slavery and 'Unfree' labour in India and the Indian Ocean World 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • International History and its Challenges: European Foreign Policies in the Age of Imperialism 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • Stalinist Terror 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Patriotic Protest: Social Movements and Political Dissent in the United States of America 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • The War on Terror 30 credits
  • Guns and Global Security 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • The Fragility of the Spanish State: Identity, Conflict and Resistance, 1808-1939 30 credits
  • The British Settler Colonies in Africa - From Colonial Conquest to the Present Day 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Modern History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences. Read more
An understanding of war, for good or ill, is of vital importance. This programme offers the opportunity to study the theory and practice of war in a wide range of aspects, from the Middle Ages to the present day, and from causes to consequences..

Why this programme

◾This MLitt aims to challenge, educate and engage by exposing you to a wide range of different ideas about war. It is specifically designed to broaden and deepen your understanding of the nature of war in theory and practice, and its place in history.
◾The University of Glasgow is home to the Scottish Centre for War Studies. You will be able to participate in regular research seminars on critical themes related to conflict as well as to related conferences.
◾All courses are designed to expose you to detailed research topics, source criticism and current debate, and are led by internationally acknowledged experts.

Programme structure

You will spend the first semester studying on the degree’s core course which covers both the major thinkers on warfare and the practice and conduct of war.

Core topics may include
◾Jomini, aggressive warfare and the Confederate States of America at war
◾The evolution of Military Thought between the two World Wars
◾Europe’s ‘small wars’, 1800–present
◾Vegetius and ‘Vegetian strategy’ in medieval warfare.

In the second semester, you will take three optional courses which delve in greater detail into a particular aspect of military or strategic history.

Optional courses may include
◾Chivalry and warfare in later medieval Europe, 1300–1450
◾The American way of warfare; from the Revolution to the War on Terror
◾Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
◾Western intelligence in an age of terror.

You will complete the programme by writing a dissertation based on your own research. This requires you to engage in original research guided by an expert in the field.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

Positions held by recent graduates include Development Director, Professor, Correspondent, and Freelance Journalist.

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Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. Read more

About the course

Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. International agencies, governments and NGOs are working more intensely than ever before to deliver appropriate policies and interventions.

Anthropology has played a key role in the emergence of new perspectives on humanitarian assistance and the livelihoods of populations caught up in extreme circumstances such as famines, natural disasters and wars.

On the one hand, this has led to a radical re-thinking of what has been happening, but on the other hand, it has led to anthropologists sometimes playing controversial roles in agendas associated with the "war on terror".

This course examines these contemporary issues and debates, and explores their implications. It also sets them in the context of anthropology as a discipline.

The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including: anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. It is suited for those interested in critically assessing the policies and practices of international development and humanitarian assistance to war-affected regions from an anthropological perspective.

It will provide the necessary training to enable students to seek employment with NGOs (such as Oxfam and Save the Children Fund), international agencies (such as the World Health Organisation and the World Food Programme) and the civil service (such as the UK Department for International Development).

It will also provide a useful stepping stone for those seeking to undertake doctoral research in international development.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

You will discover how the apparent insights and skills of anthropologists have a long history associated with ethnographic work on economics, education, health, deprivation and conceptions of suffering dating back to the origins of the discipline.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Anthropology of International Development
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Optional

Dept. of Social Sciences, Media and Communications (Anthropology)
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Dept of Politics, History and Law
Globalisation
Dept of Clinical Sciences
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Young Lives in the Global South
International Development, Children and Youth
Brunel Law School
Minority and Indigenous Rights
The United Nations Human Rights Regime
Theory and Practice of Human Rights
The Migrant, the State and the Law
Brunel Business School
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Anthropology of International Development
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Year 2

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Special Features

While its approach is anthropological, this degree offers genuine multi-disciplinary possibilities by drawing on modules from Politics, Health Sciences, Law and Business.

Students will have the opportunity to explore the multiplicity of issues arising from critical shifts in global policy across the following key themes:

The ways in which economic anthropologists have enhanced our understandings of livelihoods in ways that are dramatically different to dominant approaches in economics.
The hazards and limitations of relying solely upon biomedical interventions to alleviate suffering and sickness.
The ostensibly positive relationship between education and development, and the role of education as a vehicle for eradicating illiteracy and lowering fertility and mortality rates.

An exploration of such themes together will make it possible for students to think and engage in new and critical ways about the relationship between anthropology and development.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay and practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise). A final dissertation of approximately 15,000 words based on fieldwork in the UK or abroad, is also required. There are no examinations.

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This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. Read more
This multidisciplinary Master's programme explores debates on 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality. It explores connections between histories of empire and contemporary social formations and inequalities in the UK, and considers how local debates on 'race' and racism are shaped by the global geopolitics of the twenty-first century.

The programme explores debates on empire and the formation of modern Britain and contemporary transnational political communities, social identities and urban cultures. The MA aims to draw connections between interlocking colonial histories across the globe and our ordinary, local, everyday life here in contemporary Britain.

The programme focuses on subjects such as histories of colonisation, systems of slavery, the concept of 'race' and the invention of 'the West'; colonial cultures, class, nationalisms, 'respectability' and the invention of 'whiteness'; histories of criminalisation and imprisonment; human rights; 'the war on terror'; diaspora, place and belonging; psychoanalysis and 'race', 'hybridity', 'mixedness', 'whiteness', 'race' and 'beauty' and 'race', gender, sexuality and desire. It offers the opportunity to study a wide range of different subjects in this broad multidisciplinary area.

The MA is convened by academics who have interests in racialisation, postcoloniality, urban multiculture and psychoanalysis. You can also choose from a range of option modules convened by other academics in other departments across the College.

This innovative, interdisciplinary postgraduate programme will be of interest to those who want to develop careers in social research, education, law, journalism, youth and community work, urban planning, housing, politics, the arts and cultural industries, health and social care, and numerous other areas. It will also be of interest to those who wish to pursue an academic career in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, psychosocial studies, or in the social sciences or humanities more generally and to those who simply wish to develop an advanced understanding of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

The programme introduces you to different historical and political debates and theoretical perspectives in the broad multidisciplinary area of 'race' and racism, multiculture and postcoloniality.
You will participate in a vibrant, stimulating and diverse intellectual environment. There is a Race Forum and several other research institutes at Birkbeck that focus on relevant subject areas.
The programme is flexibly designed for students from all backgrounds to pursue their own particular research and professional interests.
The MA draws from sociology, cultural studies, history, urban studies, literary studies, psychosocial studies, philosophy and politics.
The Department of Psychosocial Studies has a formal link with the University of São Paulo, Brazil. This link enables students on this programme to undertake an optional module at the University of São Paulo as part of their programme of study at Birkbeck.
You will join a flourishing and diverse postgraduate student community and a growing research culture. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and learning resources in sociology, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, psychosocial studies and related disciplines. You will also be able to use the rich research resources nearby including Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (the LSE Library), the SOAS Library and the British Library.
There are also research institutes which focus on relevant subject areas such as the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck Law School Centre for Law and the Humanities and the Centre for Media, Culture and Creative Practice and reading groups such as the Postcolonial Studies Reading Group.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), Sociology at Birkbeck was ranked 13th in the UK.

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Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. Read more
Discover how international relations theory affects real-world events, and develop crucial skills like decision making and debating. With prestigious guest lecturers and visits to key organisations, you’ll gain all the experience you need for a role in global politics.

Overview

This course will give you an understanding of how international relations theory is applied to real-world policy and strategy, and the practical problems involved in this.

You’ll examine the theory and definition of the ‘state’ and relations between different states, and the roles of other institutions and organisations, like multinational companies and transnational crime organisations. All your studies will contain a strong vocational element, with a focus on how theory affects, and is affected, by real events on the ground.

As well as this foundation in general international relations theory and practice, you’ll also have the chance to focus on your own areas of interest. Our optional modules will let you choose from subjects like the global risk society, policing and security, corruption and cross-border crime, war reporting, and terrorism.

To develop your decision-making, planning and debating skills, you’ll take part in interactive sessions, respond to specific scenarios and briefs, and undertake critical analysis. You’ll also receive advanced instruction in research methods, a vital skill both for your studies and your future career.

With a supporting team of lecturers who have academic and professional backgrounds in international relations, you can be sure you’re receiving the latest theory and careers advice.

Careers

Our course will prepare you for a career in many roles relating to international relations, such as diplomacy and the diplomatic services, strategy and strategic planning, public services, the Foreign Office, the UN and other international bodies, local government, NGOs, charities, education, journalism and press agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
International Relations Theory in Context
International Institutions and Policy
Major Project

Optional modules:
War, Peacekeeping and Military Intervention
Policing Transnational Crime
Communication and Conflict
Terror as Crime
Postgraduate Research Methods
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

We offer a range of core and optional modules, with optional modules sometimes changing depending on staff availability.

You’ll demonstrate your progress through a combination of role-play scenarios, briefs, written reports, poster presentations, group projects, dissertation, longer essays, case studies, research proposal, short analyses of global events, short review papers, practical data gathering exercises, and short abstracts of core course readings.

Events and activities

You’ll have the chance to attend cutting-edge lectures and seminars from prestigious guest speakers, practitioners and diplomats, and to visit organisations like the Ecole de Guerre in Paris, UN seminars, EU, UK government bodies, think tanks and media agencies.

Work placements

We’ll help you to arrange internships and placements.

Specialist facilities

Our campus in Cambridge features a mock courtroom for debates and role-playing.

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This degree offers the chance to explore key aspects of East Mediterranean history in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, with a focus on the study of primary evidence. Read more
This degree offers the chance to explore key aspects of East Mediterranean history in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, with a focus on the study of primary evidence.

Special emphasis is put on the causes and consequences of Great Power intervention in the region, such as the world wars, the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli conflict and the war on terror.

The programme comprises a major individual research project, supervised by a specialist in the field of study, and taught elements which provide the context and skills needed to conduct independent research into a region which includes the Balkans, the Middle East and North Africa.

The programme is made up of 60 credits of taught modules and 120 credits achieved through a 20,000 word supervised research project on a topic of your choice.

We recommend that you discuss your proposed research project with a potential supervisor before applying.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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After the financial crisis, are there new fault-lines emerging in international relations? What is/was the war on terror? Is there any prospect of global justice? Has globalisation rendered nation states less relevant?. Read more

OVERVIEW

After the financial crisis, are there new fault-lines emerging in international relations? What is/was the war on terror? Is there any prospect of global justice? Has globalisation rendered nation states less relevant?

If you are interested in finding answers to the big global questions, then this is the programme for you

o The MA in International Relations is concerned with analysing the key theoretical and empirical issues in international relations
o You will discuss the historical significance of globalisation and how it relates to a number of key issues in international relations, including state sovereignty and international order, conflict and war, human rights and the political economy of North-South relations
o You will also undertake a critical survey of the main theories and concepts associated with the study of international politics
o The programme will provide you with a set of cutting-edge analytical skills and knowledge that will allow you to think, talk and write critically about contemporary international issues, as well as providing a firm foundation for further study

Why study with us?

The School of Politics and International Relations at Queen Mary was rated amongst the top 20 Politics departments in the UK in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise.

The school has particular strengths in international security, conflict and war, the political economy of North-South relations, international political theory, Middle East politics, and the transition from the Cold War to the contemporary post-Cold War world.

Key features of this programme

o Cutting-edge critical programme - theory included, with a real focus on developing students' critical thinking and analytical skills
o A focus on the traditional geographic areas of international relations as well as emerging areas of interest in the developing world
o This programme is led by research active staff, who are responding to the very latest global events, so content is very timely
o The diversity of our staff and students mean that Queen Mary is a great place to study International Relations


You will undertake your degree through our cutting-edge online learning platform, QMPLUS. You will also have access to Queen Mary's online libraries and databases.

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Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. Read more

Why study International Law & Security at Dundee?

Security and the maintenance and promotion of security are key issues in international law and international relations. There are many career opportunities in these areas ranging from employment with an intergovernmental organisation such as the United Nations, to employment in an international court or tribunal, to advising government and securing a role in the military. If you intend to pursue such a career, then you will need a good understanding of why and how the international community and individual states are to respond to threats to international security. For this, you will need to understand the context in which decisions are made. international law and international relations provide that context.

Our MLitt in International Law & Security provides an overview of concepts and themes relating to the study of international security in the contemporary world, from a legal as well as an international relations point of view. It introduces both traditional and 'new' approaches to defining and conceptualising security and considers the impact of International Relations theories upon the subject. It also examines key issues such as war, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, the privatisation of warfare, energy security and environmental degradation.

Our course will equip you with the necessary analytical tools to understand and evaluate all aspects of security in the contemporary world. The issues outlined above lie at the heart of our course, which provides an opportunity to gain a deep understanding of the interactions of law and international relations and the way they combine to shape the responses of states to threats to security. The course also provides an opportunity to understand how those responses in turn shape international law and international relations.

What's so good about International Law & Security at Dundee?

The University of Dundee runs two parallel masters degree in International Law & Security: MLitt International Law & Security for graduates in International Relations or similar subjects, and LLM International Law & Security for Law graduates.

Each degree has one core module, and you will also be able to choose specialist option modules from the same list. You will also research and write a dissertation in your chosen area of interest, or work on a research project with integrated internship.

Internship opportunity:
The opportunity to undertake an approved internship as a part the programme of studies is an exciting innovation in this area of study which will enable students to gain a unique insight into the application of the materials addressed in taught modules and to gain valuable experience to add to their CV.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, independent research, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

The course is made up of two International Relations modules and two Law modules which are delivered during our two teaching semesters (Sep-Dec and Jan-Apr), and detailed below.

During the summer vacation students normally write a dissertation.

All students take the Law week-long induction in January, plus the first half of the module Legal Research Skills(including the first assessment), usually in your first semester, but can be deferred to your second semester if you don't select any first semester Law modules. You also take the non-credit bearing generic skills training seminars offered by the Humanities.

First Semester (Jan-Apr)

International Security (core module), plus one other taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Summer period (May-Aug)

Politics Dissertation (60 credits)

Second Semester (Sep-Dec)

Two taught 30-credit modules (from the list below).

Part time study

For part-time students the taught modules will be spread out over two years instead of one in a similar format as above, and the Dissertation or Research Project (with integrated internship) will be undertaken during the summer period of the second year of study.

Typical optional modules available

Individual Criminal Liability in International Criminal Law
Transnational Crime and Counter Terrorism
International Dispute Resolution
UN Human Rights Law
Regional Human Rights Systems
Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations
Critical Studies on Terrorism
The Middle East and Terrorism
State Terror
Strategic Intelligence Studies
International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime
Human Rights in International Relations
Russian Politics & Security
Politics and Security in South Asia
Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe
Geopolitics of Natural Resources
Governing and Securing Cyber Space
European Union Security
Explaining and Understanding International Politics

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation (or research project report).

Careers

Graduates from this degree are likely to pursue careers with international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or institutions such as the International Court of Justice. You will also be well placed to pursue a career as a government adviser. Graduates from our Politics & International Relations degrees have successfully pursued careers in politics and diplomacy.

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This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. Read more
This course, with many pathways, aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of terrorism and political violence, counter-terrorism and intelligence pertaining to modern security issues such as responses to terrorism, responses to the use of force and violence generally. It will engage with both the war on terror, but also the response to terrorism, militarily, as well as in the intelligence world.

Why study International Security at Dundee?

This course uniquely combines the study of terrorism with counter-terrorism, intelligence and international security. It takes an inter- and cross-disciplinary approach, drawing upon politics, history and sociology. Our staff have research expertise in terrorism, intelligence and security, and the programme director, Prof Christian Kaunert, holds the Jean Monnet Chair in EU Justice & Home Affairs Policy.

[What's so good about International Security at Dundee?]]
This course is all about choice, and tailoring your study to match your needs. You apply to MLitt International Security, and can choose a specialist pathway to suit your interests; your choice dictates your core module, and you select an additional three optional modules.

Choose from:
Terrorism
Human Rights
Drugs and Organised Crime
International Relations
European Union
Russia
South Asia
Middle East

You then graduate in a named degree, for example, MLitt International Security: Terrorism.

Who should study this course?

The programme is suitable for people who want to pursue a careers in the security services or in international relations, who have previously studied International Relations or a related subject.

Teaching & Assessment

The teaching team are based in Politics at Dundee, in the School of Humanities. Politics is big enough to have a real international presence, but is still small and intimate enough to offer a friendly and responsive home for students from all backgrounds. This is more than a mere claim - independent surveys consistently rate Politics at Dundee as among the best-received programmes in the country.

The course starts in September or January, each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

The taught part of the course is delivered September - December and January - March. The dissertation is undertaken between April & August. This is the same for students whether they start in January or September. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

What you will study

Each pathway has its own core module (see below), which you must study.

You then choose three more modules from amongst the remainder, all modules are worth 30 credits.

You also undertake the Politics dissertation is worth 60 credits.

MLitt International Security

Core module: International Security

MLitt International Security: Terrorism

Core module: Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in Europe

MLitt International Security: Human Rights

Core module: Human Rights in International Relations

MLitt International Security: Drugs and Organised Crime

Core module: International Security of Drugs & Organised Crime

MLitt International Security: International Relations

Core module: Explaining and Understanding International Politics

MLitt International Security: European Union

Core module: European Union Security

MLitt International Security: Russia

Core module: Russian Politics & Security

MLitt International Security: South Asia

Core module: Politics & Security in South Asia

MLitt International Security: Middle East

Core module: The Middle East & Terrorism

How you will be assessed

By assessed coursework, examination and dissertation.

Careers

Graduates from the MLitt International Security have a wide range of career options. The knowledge and research skills gained are an excellent basis for working in the civil service, journalism, the police and armed forces, politics, policy research (think tanks, research institutes), intergovernmental organisations, and non-governmental organisations. Graduates will be equipped to pursue careers in international organisations such as the United Nations, the European Union, or as government advisers. The distinctive interdisciplinary features and distinctive opportunity to combine theory with practice will be of great benefit to graduates.

This Masters degree is an excellent basis for undertaking further postgraduate study in International Security or International Politics, such as a PhD, with a view to a full-time career in academia or research.

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The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. Read more
The traditional military threats which defined global security matters for the best part of the 20th century have been quickly replaced by new and re-emerging security challenges. This programme offers you the opportunity to examine many of these contemporary threats.

Why this programme

◾You will study research methods within the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School which is one of the top research training centres in the UK and benefits from ESRC recognition for many of its courses.
◾You will combine your research methods training with a range of security focused optional courses from a broad spectrum of subject areas, including politics, sociology, Central & East European studies, war studies, computing science, geography, law, business and education.
◾The programme includes a series of master classes from high profile professionals and academics working in the field of security.
◾You will have the opportunity to take part in special formative learning workshops and training days - working with government officials and policy-makers to simulate the process of responding to major international security crises.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses
◾International security and global politics
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design
◾Thematic issues in global security.

Optional courses
◾British military power since 1945
◾Comparative approaches to warfare and violent conflict
◾Critical perspectives on securities and vulnerabilities
◾Development, postcolonialism and environment
◾Ethics in global politics
◾Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
◾Globalisation and European integration
◾Globalisation and the new security agenda in Central and Eastern Europe
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Insurgency and counter-insurgency, 1800-present
◾International relations theory
◾Post-Soviet Russia: renegotiating global and local identities
◾Social change and social justice: activism, social movements and democracy
◾Society, environment and the concept of sustainable development in post Soviet Russia
◾The American way of war: from the revolution to the war on terror
◾The European Union in international politics and development
◾The global criminal economy
◾The Internet and civil society.

Career prospects

The programme provides a dedicated research training pathway if you are to looking to go onto doctoral study or to seek a career within a social research field.

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The MA in War. History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years. Read more
The MA in War: History and Politics is an interdisciplinary programme that focuses on modern history. It brings together current scholar debates from a range of specialist areas, exploring the causes, experience, effects, and memory of all important wars and conflicts of the last hundred years.

Looking at political, cultural and social history, this MA is for those who want to study war in all its multi-faceted complexity, from the everyday and the personal, to the national and the global. We offer expert teaching and supervision on British, European, American and Middle Eastern modern and contemporary history.

The main conflicts you will cover are: the First World War and the Second World War; the Balkan Wars of the 1910s and the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s; the wars of Decolonization and those of New Imperialism; the Cold War and its ‘side-wars’; the War on Terror and the current conflicts in the Middle East.

Why study with us?

Studying this degree you will acquire expertise on:

• War and conflict studies
• Modern international history
• Interdisciplinary learning and researching

You will be taught in a truly interdisciplinary manner, utilising a number of disciplines: cultural and social history, politics and international relations. You can build the degree structure that suits best your interests and future plans.

You can specialise in particular disciplines, or you can explore a wide range of new methods. You will also have the choice of three different types of elective work (e.g. extended essays or primary-source based seminars). Our students can also use the nearby world-famous Mass Observation archive. They also tend to be involved in the events and research projects run by the University of Brighton’s Understanding Conflict cluster, such as our latest initiative on ‘Contesting Britain at War’.

We offer flexible modes of study for those with personal or professional commitments. After finishing the MA you will be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

Areas of study

There are two Core Modules that you will have to take, one on the forms and one on the legacies of war. ‘Forms of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ examines the lead up to war and what is happening in wartime. It looks at: the political, ideological and wider structural causes of war; the human experience at the home-front and at the war-front; the politics and methods of warfare as they have evolved in time; the different modes of practical, political, and intellectual resistance against invasion and occupation. ‘Legacies of Warfare and Violent Conflict’ looks at the impact of war, at what is left after a conflict: the emotional and personal effects of war; how a conflict continues to exist on material and psychological landscapes; the multiple ways through which personal, collective and global memories of killing and sacrifice are constructed; the politics of what we decide to remember and what to forget; the activist, political and theoretical efforts to stop war from happening again.

Beyond the two Core Modules you can also pick a number of option courses that relate to you interests, for example: Public History and Heritage; Cultural Memory; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity; Globalisation and Global Politics; Conflict, Security and Human Rights; Genocide; International Relations theory; Aesthetics and Philosophy; Cultural Theory; Philosophy and Critical Theory. Alternatively you might want instead to research and write a stand-alone extended essay, or you may opt for a more practical-based unit on teaching and learning higher education, offering you the opportunity to learn more about undergraduate teaching.

You will also take a Research Methods module that will help you develop the academic skills necessary to engage in the 20,000-word Dissertation, for which you are guided by one of our faculty with subject expertise.

Careers and employability

Our graduates are particularly well-equipped to follow career paths in sectors that deal with violent conflicts, their consequences and resolution, such as non-governmental organisations (NGOs), the Ministry of Defence, and international bodies (e.g. United Nations).

Much more broadly our degree opens the path to sectors that value critical research skills and a good knowledge of modern history and politics, such as media and journalism, politics and government, museums and archives, and publishing.

Working in schools and in academia are, of course, standard options. Alternatively, many of our students go on to study for Doctorates with one of the Research Centres in Brighton.

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This MA has two strands. Modernism and Contemporary Literature. These are two areas in which the department has particular research strengths. Read more
This MA has two strands: Modernism and Contemporary Literature. These are two areas in which the department has particular research strengths. The programme has two core courses: one on Modernism, both classic modernism and late modernism, and one on the contemporary. Students take both core courses.

In Term 1, the Modernism core course is ‘Modernism, Modernity and History’, while the Contemporary core course is ‘Contemporary Literature’.

In Term 2, the Modernism strand consists of ‘Modernist Special Topics’ and the Contemporary strand consists of ‘Contemporary Special Topics’. Each of these courses in Term 2 is made up of two five-week ‘Special Topic’ units, each of which reflects a particular departmental research interest.

For 2014-15, the modernist special topics will be ‘1930s, Politics and the Avant Garde’ and ‘Postcolonial Modernism: Crises and Experiments in the African Novel’, while the contemporary special topics will be ‘The City in Contemporary Fiction;’ and ‘Contemporary Women’s Poetry and Poetics’. The special topics are likely to change from year to year.

The course will explore a range of twentieth and twenty first-century British, North American and post-colonial literature and will reflect on some of the historical, intellectual, cultural and technological changes of this era. You will have the opportunity to study with scholars who have international reputations in their fields and develop advanced skills in literary study and research.

There is also scope to work on individual authors, on various topics in literary and cultural theory, as well as a variety of literatures in English for your dissertation.

This course is ideal if you intend to progress to advanced research or simply wish to develop your knowledge of modern literature and your critical skills beyond first-degree level.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/english/coursefinder/mamodernismandcontemporaryliterature.aspx

Why choose this course?

- All members of staff are actively engaged in major research projects: the Department was awarded a 4* rating in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). This commitment to scholarly research means all our postgraduate courses are informed by the latest developments in literary studies.

- The Department has major research strengths in twentieth-century and twenty-first-century literature and in contemporary critical theory.

- The College provides all the IT facilities and training that students need in order to access the burgeoning resources for study on the Internet.

- Our excellent library resources span the full range of English studies and you will also have access to the University of London Library at Senate House as well as the British Library and the many specialist libraries located in central London.

Course content and structure

Full-time students will take 2 courses in each Terms 1 and 2; and write a dissertation in Term 3 and across the summer vacation. Part-time students normally take the 2 course units in terms 1 and 2 of their first year, 2 more in the second and also write their dissertation during the second year.

Course units:
Modernism Strand
Term 1: Modernism, Modernity and History
This unit comprises a series of seminars on such topics as Modernism and the avant-garde; modernity, mass culture and technology; race, gender and primitivism; modernism and politics. You will be introduced to various modernist movements (Futurism, Imagism, Surrealism) and to the ways in which Modernism has been conceptualized in relation to modernity.

Term 2: Modernist Special Topics
The course for 2014 contains two five-week components. The first provides an advanced introduction to the relationship between avant-garde prose and politics in the 1930s. The second will explore the re-appropriation and re-tooling of modernist aesthetic strategies by a range of contemporary African writers to address the crises of the post-colonial state and of post-colonial subjectivity. You will engage with the work of a number of post-colonial theorists and investigate a range of key texts by African writers.

Contemporary Strand
Term 1: Contemporary Literature
The course will address a range of literary works which engage with such topics as globalisation, transnationalism, and global terror as well as magic realism, postmodernism and Conceptual Writing. You will consider contemporary fiction, poetry, post-colonial writing and writing across media as part of an exploration of the contemporary.

Term 2: Contemporary Special Topics
The course for 2014 contains two five-week components on contemporary fiction and contemporary poetry respectively. The first provides an advanced introduction to the fictional writings about globalisation and mobility.

The second provides an advanced introduction to the work of selected contemporary women poets. You will read these texts in the context of current debates in innovative poetics and in relation to modernist strategies of avant-garde practice by previous women writers. You will explore how these contemporary poets have utilised, adapted and/or transformed modernist strategies of practice and to what ends.

Dissertation
You will write a dissertation of 12-15,000 words on an approved topic, during the summer term and summer vacation, with support from a tutor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- achieved an understanding of the intertwined issues of modernity, modernism and the contemporary as they are reflected in literary and theoretical writings in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries

- improved their literary, analytic and research skills at an advanced level

- shown themselves able to work independently on an extended research project

- provided the platform for further postgraduate work, should they wish to undertake it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by essays and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The Department has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs and in prominent positions outside academia. In the field of twentieth-century literature our postgraduates have recently secured positions at Queen Mary, University of London, the Universities of Wales, Nottingham, Lancaster, Newbold College and elsewhere; and have published academic books with Cambridge University Press, Palgrave, Berg and other publishers; as well as popular books on gay studies, music and other topics.

The English Department also prepares postgraduates for successful careers in a variety of other areas, such as teaching, writing and journalism, curating, administration and marketing.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of relevant methodological approaches and the questions and challenges of writing and researching military history. Read more
This programme provides students with a thorough understanding of relevant methodological approaches and the questions and challenges of writing and researching military history. You’ll analyse the role of war in human history from its early beginnings to the present day in a core module which focuses on historiographical debates about warfare. You can then choose to study optional modules about a broad range of topics in the history of war, from medieval and early modern times to today.

You’ll have opportunities to use internationally-renowned collections in your studies, including the Liddle Collection of artefacts and private papers from the First World War in our Brotherton Library, the holdings of the Royal Armouries Museum, Leeds, and material from the Imperial War museum North at Salford. The Second World War experience museum in nearby Wetherby provides a huge collection of private papers from the Second World War.

Course Content

As well as the three compulsory modules, you also choose two optional modules from a selection, for example:

- Making History: Archive Collaborations

- Warfare in the Age of the Crusades

- Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815

- Medicine and Warfare in the19th and 20th Centuries

- The War on Terror

- Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

- Guns and Global Security

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