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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation MAPT (previously Translation with Language Technology) is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

The MA in Professional Translation belongs to the European Master's in Translation Network which currently has 64 members throughout Europe with Swansea University being the only EMT member in Wales.

At the core of the MA in Professional Translation lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Professional Translation degree also includes opportunities to develop specialised skills in Public Service Interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Course Content

Part One – Full-time Professional Translation students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are three compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, and one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above. Professional Translation students then choose three optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, History and Theory of Translation, one or two modules in Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time Professional Translation students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

- Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Professional Translation student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“After graduating from Swansea University with a First Class Honours BA Translation degree, I decided to study the MA in Professional Translation (previously Translation with Language Technology) and I also set up a translation business, Veritas, with a fellow graduate. Our business was successful from the outset, and we have experienced high rates of growth year on year. Veritas has won numerous awards, including the HSBC International Business Award in 2010, and we work with companies such as the British Red Cross, Nokia and the NHS. We now employ 9 members of staff and are still growing rapidly. Companies love to work with us, as they can see our passion for language and communication with other cultures. For me, it was a dream to study near the sea, and I loved Swansea so much that I made it a permanent home for my family”.

Rachel Bryan, Professional Translation, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting (MATI) is a specialised variant, with special emphasis on interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation. It is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Translation and Interpreting

At the core of the MA in Translation and Interpreting lies advanced translation work on general, administrative and technical text types, interpreting (in one or two of the following environments: local government, health, police and court), and training in industry-standard Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools. Part 1 of the Translation and Interpreting degree also includes opportunities to develop further specialised skills in interpreting, audiovisual translation, machine translation (MT) and software localization, terminology management, video making or digital publishing, while in the Translation Work Experience module students form simulated translation companies, working with local translation businesses, and undertake real commissions to professional standards and deadlines.

These different skills come together in a choice of Part 2 projects: either two Extended Translations of the student’s choice, or an academic Dissertation, or a 13-week Internship in a translation company, in the UK or abroad.

Translation and Interpreting Course Structure

Part One – Full-time Translation and Interpreting students take three 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in each of two academic semesters, while part-time students can distribute the same work flexibly over four semesters. There are four compulsory modules: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, Translation Tools, one Advanced Translation module from the range of language pairs listed above, and one of the three Interpreting modules. Translation and Interpreting students then choose two optional modules. These include: a second Advanced Translation module, a second module in Interpreting, History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Audiovisual Adaptation (subtitling, dubbing, audio description), Terminology Management, Translation Work Experience, or (subject to numbers) Video and Documentary Making, or Visual Communication and Media Design. There is also the option to study a new language intensively (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or to pick up again at intermediate level a language (French, German, or Spanish) not studied since secondary school.

Part Two - An individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) which full-time students undertake over the summer (by 15 September), while part-time students have up to a further year. The project can take three forms:

Two Extended Translations with commentary. These are chosen by the Translation and Interpreting student and offer the opportunity to develop domains of specialisation. At least one must be technical and must be performed using a major CAT tool; or

Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words). This can be, for instance, on a topic in Translation or Interpreting Studies, a comparison of two or more published translations, terminology research in a specialised domain, or an investigation into aspects of translation technology. The dissertation offers excellent preparation for PhD work, but can also be a valuable indicator of professional expertise (e.g. in terminology or CAT tools); or Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata). This is the most vocational option and can be undertaken either in the UK or abroad. We make our extensive list of professional contacts available to students but they must make their own application to companies and pass admissions tests. A successful internship may turn into a first job.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

“My experience so far of the programme I have studied has been very useful and constructive. Above all, I have been able to practice interpreting at an advanced level with professional and real life criteria. The Translation and Interpreting programme, on the whole, offers a wide variety of both theoretical and practical modules which have reinforced my knowledge on the related fields (i.e. translation and interpreting). Teaching meticulously planned (especially the interpreting modules), good interaction and supplementary opportunities to put language knowledge into good use (extra sessions and lectures). I expect my course to be of great value and hope it will help me achieve my professional goals for, I consider, it has provided me with the necessary skills to help me build a future career.”

Maria Chaikali, Translation and Interpreting, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Professional Translation (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Professional Translation is an integrated programme designed to turn entrants with proven excellence in foreign languages into successful and marketable professional linguists.

Key Features of MA in Professional Translation

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs

- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

Specialisation options:

Interpreting, further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

Language pairs (subject to demand):

- From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh

Modules

Modules on the MA in Professional Translation typically include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Part One – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1).

Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), History and Theory of Translation, Interpreting, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Student Quote

‘After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme in Professional Translation gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green, Professional Translation, MA



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Translation and Interpreting (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Translation and Interpreting is a specialised variant, emphasising interpreting skills, of our established MA in Professional Translation.

Key Features of MA Translation and Interpreting (Extended)

Core skills:

- Advanced Translation in 1 or 2 language pairs

- European-recognised training in Computer-Assisted Translation (CAT) tools

- Public Service Interpreting (Local Government, Health, Police and Court).

Specialisation options: Further technologies, terminology, multimedia, new/intermediate language.

Part 2 options include internship and year abroad.

- Language pairs (subject to demand): From English into: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Welsh.

- Into English from: French, German, Italian, Spanish, Welsh.

Translation and Interpreting (Extended) Course Structure

Part One of Translation and Interpreting – F/t: six 20-credit (10 ECTS) modules in two semesters (p/t in four):

Compulsory: Foundations of Translation and Interpreting, CAT Tools, Advanced Translation (pair 1), Interpreting (1).

Optional: Advanced Translation (pair 2), Interpreting (2), History and Theory of Translation, Translation Technologies, Subtitling/dubbing/audio description, Terminology, Simulated Translation Company, Digital publishing. Study a new language (French, German, Italian, Mandarin or Spanish), or post A-Level language (French, German, or Spanish).

Part Two of Translation and Interpreting – Two elements totalling 120 credits (60 ECTS), taken in either order:

1: A choice of individual project of 60 credits (30 ECTS) (can be done over the summer):

- Two Extended Translations with commentary;

- Dissertation (15,000-20,000 words);

- Internship (13 weeks full time, part time pro rata).

2: 60 further credits (30 ECTS) of Part 1 modules, or a second project.

Unique Part 2 alternative: METS year abroad. Students take 50 credits (25 ECTS) at two partner translation schools, with a 20 credit (10 ECTS) report for Swansea, leading to a double award: Swansea MA plus METS Diploma.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Translation and Interpreting include:

Foundations of Translation and Interpreting

Advanced Translation

Translation Tools

Public Service Interpreting (Local Government Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Health Option)

Public Service Interpreting (Law Option: Police and Introduction to Court Interpreting)

Interpreting- Business Option (Spanish and Madarin only)

Translation Technologies

Translation Work Experience for MA Students

Terminology Management

Beginners' Language

Intermediate Language

Extended Translations

Translation/Interpreting Internship

Student Quote

"After the internship that I completed through my European Master's in Translation with Language Technology [the original title of the extended MAPT] at a small translation company in Swansea, I took on a sales position with them. After three months as a sales executive, a project management role opened up in the company and I took it. As this role was in the certified translation department, I was able to build on the legal translation knowledge I had gained through my European Master's in TLT. My role involved completing some small translations in-house when time permitted and also reviewing the work of freelance translators and interns. I was also able to complete freelance translation work. After eighteen months, I moved to SDL to start an in-house translation role.

The MA programme gave me a solid basis from which to develop my translation career. I still refer back to notes I made during my degree, particularly from the advanced translation and language technology module. Breaking into the translation industry can be difficult but I feel that I had an advantage over graduates from other universities in that I had completed the translation work experience module, extended translation projects and an internship as part of my European Master's in TLT. Having a focus on CAT tools was useful as I was able to practice applying the skills I had learnt in the language technology module in different translation situations. My knowledge of CAT tools was valuable to the operations management team during my project management role and it is now vital for me as a translator at SDL International. I would recommend this course to anyone looking to enter the translation industry."

Jennifer Green



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This accredited course provides a complete walkthrough of the PRINCE2® terminology as defined in Managing Successful Projects with PRINCE2®, the official manual of the method published by the Cabinet Office (CO) in 2009. Read more
This accredited course provides a complete walkthrough of the PRINCE2® terminology as defined in Managing Successful Projects with PRINCE2®, the official manual of the method published by the Cabinet Office (CO) in 2009.

The CO's website explains: "Projects bring together resources, skills, technology and ideas to achieve business objectives and deliver business benefits. Good project management helps to ensure that risks are identified and managed appropriately, and objectives and benefits are achieved within budget, within time and to the required quality."

At the end of the course a one-hour multiple choice test takes place, which leads to the official PRINCE2® Foundation certificate.

Course content

The Foundation course is designed to introduce the basics behind the PRINCE2® process-based method and to prepare for the test that leads to the PRINCE2® Foundation certificate.

The course begins by exploring the increasing importance of projects in today’s world before discussing what a project is, why projects fail and what the role of the project manager is. The structure of PRINCE2®, which consists of its principles, themes, processes and the idea of tailoring the method to its environment, is then introduced before each one of these elements is expanded and explained in turn.

The topics covered include:
-What is project management
-The PRINCE2® principles and themes
-Starting up a project
-Initiating a project
-The business case
-The project organisation
-Project planning
-Risks and quality
-Controlling a stage
-Managing product delivery
-Change and progress
-Directing a project
-Closing a project

Teaching and assessment

The course requires a first pass of all the material in the official manual, so it is important that students do some reading before the course starts. All students are provided with pre-course material that explains what reading is expected prior to beginning the course.

The course consists of a series of interleaved lectures and seminars. The lectures are designed to introduce the method’s terminology, which is then discussed in the seminars where exercises based on case studies explain how to use the method in practice. A comprehensive course handbook, containing all the course slides is handed to each student upon arrival. At the end of each day multiple choice questions are used to remind us of the day’s learning and to prepare us for the certificate examination.

Associated careers

Project management is a modern career that is so generic it is applicable to any business sector. The presence of PRINCE2® certification has now become a minimum requirement for many CVs. For many, the certificate is a career-changing opportunity that leads to project management or consultancy work in one of the large UK or international government or non-government organisations.

The following sought after skills will become part of your CV: PRINCE2® Foundation, Product Based Planning, Risk Management

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Conference Interpreting is one of three specialisations within the MA Degree Programme in Applied Linguistics and is designed for all graduates interested in becoming professional conference interpreters. Read more
Conference Interpreting is one of three specialisations within the MA Degree Programme in Applied Linguistics and is designed for all graduates interested in becoming professional conference interpreters. Our programme provides the tools and academic skills you need to compete – and remain competitive – in the challenging field of multilingual communication. You will learn to interpret at a professional level by:
• analysing language transfer problems
• developing solutions and strategies
• applying appropriate methods and tools

Your professional future

In our globalised world, multilingualism plays an increasingly important role. As a result, experts in multilingual communication are indispensable and so are qualified conference interpreters. Professional conference interpreters work:
• for government offices
• for national and international parliaments and organisations
• in private industry and business
• for trade unions, political parties, professional associations, etc.

Your MA programme

Apart from background studies and theory-based courses in linguistics and translation studies, the programme includes practice-oriented courses in:
• simultaneous and consecutive interpreting
• note-taking, memory training, public speaking and voice training
• terminology management
• professional skills

You have the opportunity to gain a direct insight into professional practice by:
• visiting potential clients / employers
• interpreting at simulated conferences
• practising in “dummy booths” at conferences
• interpreting in real-life settings

Our international team of lecturers are recognised experts from the academic world and/or professional practice. Our low teacher-student ratio in taught classes allows us to pay close attention to individual needs.

Language combinations

For details please click here:
https://www.zhaw.ch/storage/linguistik/studium/master-angewandte-linguistik/factsheet-conference-interpreting.pdf

Please note that German must be one of the languages you study.

Interpreting preparation course

We offer a preparation course in interpreting techniques and skills to prepare students for the aptitude test. This course includes:
• sight translation
• note-taking and memory training
• introduction to consecutive interpreting
• liaison interpreting
• key terminology for business and economics
• background studies

Related MA/BA programmes at the School of Applied Linguistics

We offer two more MA pathways:
• Professional Translation (please visit http://www.findamasters.com/search/CourseDetails.aspx?CID=25381)
• Organisational Communication

Our MA Degree Programme is based on the following undergraduate programmes:
• BA in Applied Languages with Specialisations in Multilingual Communication, Multimodal Communication and Technical Communication
• BA in Communication with Specialisations in Journalism and Organisational Communication.

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Geared both to philosophy graduates, as a pathway into research in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry, and medical (and other) graduates, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques in the Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry. Read more

Geared both to philosophy graduates, as a pathway into research in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry, and medical (and other) graduates, to introduce them to key concepts, arguments, texts and techniques in the Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry.

The course provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry. They will also have the opportunity to study other areas of Philosophy, selected from a broad range of modules, covering all areas of the subject. 

Key benefits

  • Offers a pathway into the Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry, particularly well suited to students whose undergraduate background is in medicine.
  • Offers a wide selection of optional topics, both current and historical, covering the entire philosophical spectrum from aesthetics to logic and everything in between.
  • Located in the heart of London. 

Description

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge, understanding and skills in Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry. They will also have the opportunity to study other areas of Philosophy, selected from a broad range of modules, covering all areas of the subject. If you are converting from other subjects at undergraduate level, you will be strongly encouraged to take our 'General Philosophy' module as one of your options which will introduce you to key theories and arguments, concepts and terminology, and classic texts from right across the philosophical spectrum. Whether you are a philosophy graduate or studying the subject with us for the first time, our course will provide a firm foundation for subsequent doctoral research. 

Over the course you will be required to study modules on the Philosophy of Medicine and The Concept of Mental Disorder, each worth 20 credits.

You will also write a dissertation of around 10,000 - 12,000 words, on a topic in the philosophy of medicine, worth 60 credits.

Aside from this you are free to choose around four modules from the Department of Philosophy's master's courses. One of these modules can be chosen from outside the department with permission. 

Course purpose

The programme is geared equally to students who already have some training in Philosophy, Medicine, or Psychiatry and to those who wish to convert into the field of Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry after pursuing another subject at undergraduate level (which may be, but need not be, Medicine). It will enable the former students to consolidate their existing knowledge and to augment it with a close focus on issues in the Philosophy of Medicine & Psychiatry. The latter students will normally be expected (though not strictly required) to take a special ‘General Philosophy’ module, which will introduce them to key theories and arguments, concepts and terminology, and classic texts from right across the philosophical spectrum. For students of both kinds, the programme will provide a firm foundation for subsequent doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through lectures and seminars. Typically, each optional module will take 2-4hours a week.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a combination of examination and coursework, as well as a dissertation.

Career prospects

Our graduates usually continue to further research, but many have also entered into the fields of teaching, management and the financial or the public sectors.



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The Master in Middle Eastern Studies (MIMES) is specifically tailored for graduates of various disciplines and backgrounds, who are interested in obtaining a better knowledge of the Middle East region, taking into account its social-historical complexity and cultural plurality. Read more

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies (MIMES) is specifically tailored for graduates of various disciplines and backgrounds, who are interested in obtaining a better knowledge of the Middle East region, taking into account its social-historical complexity and cultural plurality. The program aims to offer solid historical, political and institutional perspectives of the current domestic, regional and international dynamics affecting the stability of the region, as well as a critical outlook on current debates over the Middle East.

Learning objectives

MIMES aims to guide students across this diverse and fascinating region, which, since decades, is at the center of the geostrategic interest of the international system. The program mainly focuses on the contemporary period, through a multi-disciplinary approach ranging over international relations, geopolitics, conflicts and security, economy and energy. Nonetheless, specific sections are devoted to the analysis of the historical and religious foundations of the modern Middle East, from the birth of Islam to the evolution of Islamic thought, law and economy. A dedicated course will offer a linguistic analysis of the political and juridical terminology and a glossary in Arabic. MIMES analyses in details infra-regions and inter-regions peculiarities and relations, from Maghreb to Central-Southern Asia, encouraging a comparative and holistic area studies approach.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

MIMES provides graduate students with a detailed, comprehensive knowledge of the wider Middle East, beneficial to under-take a number of different careers, consistently with their previous training and experience, within international institutions, private companies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), research centers and area studies, media networks, etc.

Curriculum

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies is articulated in five complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and cross-fertilization, integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Propaedeutic Phase: history, power and institution. The conceptual foundation of the Middle East

● Methodological introduction: debates on the Middle East

● History of the Middle East

● Religion, society and thought in the Islamic Middle East

● Islamic law and economy

● Study of political and juridical terminology - glossary in Arabic

● Middle East within the 20th century international order

2nd level - In-depth Analytical Phase: sub-regional contexts

● Maghreb

● Mashreq

● Sub-Saharan Africa

● South-West Asia and the Gulf

● Central-Southern Asia

3rd level - Thematic and Contemporary Issues

● Politics in contemporary Middle East and the current International Relations context

● Global security: jihadism, violent activism, conflicts and nuclear proliferation

● Post-conflict institution-building and human security

● Gender, ethno-religious diversity and pluralism in the Middle East

● Energy and geopolitics of resources

● Contemporary economic trends

4th level - Project Work

Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to Middle Eastern affairs, under the supervision of a MIMES professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience.

5th level - Internship (or Arabic/ Persian/ Turkish language course)

The Master is completed with an internship in Italy or abroad within an institution whose mission and activities are consistent with the Master’s program. This gives students the invaluable opportunity to test and strengthen the competencies acquired during the Master and it usually lasts three months. As an alternative, students who do not carry out an internship may choose to attend an Arabic language course. Students will receive support and tutoring for their internship research.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in Middle Eastern Studies offers high quality training to students from all over the world. They will take part in team projects with the guidance of important scholars and leading professionals from the Middle East as well as from Europe and the U.S.

Faculty:

● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - MIMES Director

● Prof. Paolo Branca - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Marina Calculli - American University, Beirut

● Prof. Massimo Campanini - Università degli Studi di Trento

● Prof. Martino Diez - Fondazione OASIS and Università Cattoli- ca del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Wael Faruq - American University, Cairo

● Prof. Ersilia Francesca - Università degli Studi di Napoli l’Orientale

● Prof. Elisa Giunchi - Università degli Studi di Milano

● Prof. Mehran Kamrava - Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service

● Prof. Bahgat Korany - American University, Cairo

● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Maurizio Martellini - Landau Network Centro Volta and Insubria Center on International Security

● Prof. Massimo Papa - Università di Roma Tor Vergata

● Prof. Vittorio Emanuele Parsi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Paola Rivetti - Dublin City University

● Prof. Mahmood Sariolghalam - Shahid Beheshti University of Tehran

● Prof. Oktay Tanrisever - Middle East Technical University

● Amb. Roberto Toscano - Barcelona Center for International Affairs

● Mr. Franco Zallio - consultant

ASERI - a center of excellence

This Master has been created thanks to the experience of ASERI in the field of graduate education and training. Università Cattolica’s Graduate School of Economics and International Relations combines quality courses with strong connections to the business world. Courses are taught by academic professors, professionals and leaders from all over the world. The high quality of this training is ensured by the presence of an international faculty composed by renowned professors and experts, coming from both Middle East and US/EU universities and research centers.

Theory & practice

The strong theoretical basis is combined with a solid knowledge of the contemporary issues, in order to provide students’ with a specific understanding of one of the most important region in the international scenario and help them to convert their knowledge in professional skills.

A multidisciplinary approach

Thanks to the expertise of its faculty, this innovative program combines several perspectives on the Middle East: international relations, history, economics, law, geopolitics, security and energy. The analysis of the current dynamics, debates and most important topics regarding the role of the Middle East at a regional and international level, as well as dedicated modules on its sub-regions and their peculiarities, are strengthened by the theoretical basis provided during the first part of the program.



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The Masters of Arts in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories explores today’s creative practices and works produced since 1970. Read more
The Masters of Arts in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories explores today’s creative practices and works produced since 1970. OCAD University is one of only a few universities in North America that concentrates on current artists and issues. It’s the first program in Ontario to offer a graduate specialization in design history.

In this program you’ll be shaping contemporary art, design and new media scholarship. OCAD University is a unique place to study this exciting field – the program is small, so you’ll get personal attention, have access to top-notch faculty and be studying at Canada’s largest art, design and new media university. You’ll work with the producers of cutting-edge art, design and new media in your studies.

This program is normally completed in two years. Students in this program can take advantage of being located in the heart of Toronto’s cultural district – you’ll have access to the archives of major institutions only a few blocks away such as the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto International Film Festival and the Design Exchange.

You should have an honours, four-year bachelor’s degree in art history, visual culture, communications or a similar program to apply.

What will you learn?

The program comprises the following:

You’ll learn to understand the zeitgeist, current movements and practices in today’s art, design and new media world. You’ll use established conventions of art history, theory and terminology in seminars and engage in independent study.

You can take courses from any of three specializations. You will choose one as your focus:

Contemporary Art History
Design History
New Media Art History

Drawing on the long established discipline of art history and sharing analytical techniques, theory and terminology, these three areas of study are complementary. However, these areas of investigation and specialization bear and retain their own distinctiveness, which is emphasized in field-specific seminars and independent study. While students may take courses in any one of the three specializations, one field will be selected as the focus for the degree.

The MA in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories is a full-time, 7.5 credit program normally completed within two years (five semesters).

Two core graduate courses
Field-specific graduate seminars
Two electives
Individual reading and research
Major Research Paper (MRP) / Thesis writing workshop
MRP or Thesis

Students are required to complete a major research project or thesis. Here are a few recent examples:

Lady Gaga and the Other: Persona, Art and Monstrosity
The Comic’s Heartbeat: Framing Affective Structures in Comics History
Hip Hop as a Tool of Decolonization
New Media as a Platform for Indigenous Self-Representation and Social-Political Activism

You’ll be at the centre of contemporary art scholarship by planning and hosting the CADN Graduate Students’ Conference which is a major conference that attracts students and art historians from across the country.

What will I be able to do with my degree?

After graduating, you’ll be positioned to continue your research in a PhD program in cultural studies or contemporary art.

More and more contemporary art galleries and institutions are opening every day. These spaces want to hire people with their finger on the pulse of contemporary art and how it relates to history. Graduating with this highly prized skill set will give you a leg-up on students coming from traditional art programs.

Graduates from this program work as magazine and journal editors, researchers and curators.

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Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. Read more

Health informatics studies the nature of medical data and the use of information technology to manage health-related information in medical practice, education, and research. With increases in the application and uses of information technology in the medical industry, there is an unprecedented need for professionals who can combine their knowledge of computing and health care to improve the safety and quality of care delivery, as well as to help control costs.

The MS degree in health informatics applies the creative power of information technology to the information and data needs of health care. This includes the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of patient data, as well as access to electronically maintained medical knowledge for use in patient care, research, and education. Professionals in the field require computing expertise; an understanding of formal medical terminology, clinical processes, and guidelines; and an understanding of how information and communication systems can be used to successfully deliver patient information in various health care settings. The program is offered online only.

The program offers two tracks: the clinician track and analyst track.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission into the MS program in health informatics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college (MD, RN, or other professional degree).
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a professional essay describing relevant employment or other experience and career plans (recent undergraduate students without extensive employment experience should discuss their career plans as well as any courses they have completed that are relevant to medical informatics, health care, or information technology).
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who are able to assess the applicant’s potential for success in the program.
  • Have completed at least one year of computer programming in a current object-oriented language or have equivalent work experience.*
  • Have knowledge of medical terminology/vocabulary, clinical processes, and information systems that are used to support health care activities and processes.
  • Have a familiarity with anatomy and physiology, including the major systems of the human body, including the skeletal system, muscle tissue physiology, muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urinary system, and histology.
  • Have completed the equivalent of one statistics course that covers the fundamental statistical principles necessary to interpret data and present results, including descriptive statistics, random sampling, normal distribution, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. (This prerequisite may be completed post-admission if necessary.)
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.

International Applications

  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.
  • Applicants without previous graduate study and with an undergraduate GPA that is less than 3.0 may be considered for admission, but will be required to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Applicants from international universities are required to submit GRE scores.
  • An interview with the program’s admissions committee may also
  • be required.


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The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are… Read more
The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are brought together to deliver a one-year Master’s degree combining an in-depth multidisciplinary scientific programme with a global perspective on the commercial opportunities and business practice necessary for the successful exploitation in the rapidly developing fields of nanotechnology and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

The programme is intended for those with a good first degree in the physical sciences and engineering who wish to develop research skills and a commercial awareness in micro- and nanotechnology. It combines cutting-edge science with business practice skills, giving students knowledge and experience of a range of disciplines. This should enable students graduating from the course to evaluate the scientific importance and technological potential of new developments in the field of the field of Micro and Nanotechnology and provides an unparalleled educational experience for entrepreneurs in these fields.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmne

Course detail

Students will:

- be able to develop a discipline-specific terminology to describe and discuss relevant aspects of Micro and Nanotechnology, as well as Business;
- be able to develop their scientific writing skills through lab reports, literature survey, project dissertation, and scientific communication skills through oral presentations;
- be able to develop independence and critical thinking, as well as project management skills;
- have the opportunity develop team project skills.

Format

The programme is modular in structure and lasts ten months. It is envisaged that students attend all modules, which consist of no more than 16 hours of lectures per module with additional discussion groups and personal study time. The students will be examined on all core modules and may select which elective modules they are examined on. The modules are taught in the first two terms and will be followed by formal examinations. The modules are drawn from Science and Technology, Business Management and Innovation strands and so cover the many complexities involved in the processes of discovery and exploitation.

Written or oral feedback is provided after completion of assessed course work. In addition students must sit a mock exam at the beginning of the Lent Term; detailed individual feedback is provided by the Course Directors, who are also available for consultation throughout the academic year.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words in length (including tables, figure legends and appendices, but excluding bibliography) on a major project, involving (i) in-depth scientific research (following a literature survey in the same scientific field), or (ii) an in-depth case study concerned with a topic in science, business, ethics, law or policy (related to the topic covered during the literature survey). The assessment will include a viva voce examination.

No more than eight essays, each of not more than 3,000 words in length, covering the fields of science, ethics, law, and policy, and the interface of micro- and nanoscience and business.

A literature survey report of not more than 5000 words in length on a scientific topic, to be followed by either a major research project in the same field, or a business, ethics, law, or policy-related case study, concerning the scientific topic.

Course work, which may include written work, group work, and class participation.

Two unseen written examination papers, which may cover all core and elective scientific subjects prescribed in the syllabus.

Five practical assessments.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. Read more

This programme focuses on computer-assisted translation to give you valuable experience of the localisation, project and terminology management tools that are used in professional practice. You’ll also work with students specialising in a wide range of languages to produce multilingual translation projects.

You can specialise in translation between English and one or two languages, including Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. In addition, you’ll be able to choose from optional modules informed by the research of our experts on topics such as audiovisual translations, machine translation and genre analysis.

You’ll be taught by both leading researchers and contracted practitioners through our Centre for Translation Studies, to equip you with a good knowledge base and practical skills to launch an exciting career.

Specialist facilities

We have excellent facilities and resources to support your studies. Our Electronic Resources and Information Centre (ERIC) supports all of our translation programmes, complete with 59 high-spec PCs and a wide range of specialist software for translation and subtitling.

The Centre for Translation Studies is also constantly compiling and updating very large corpora of texts in digital form so you can analyse source texts and produce more idiomatic translations. If you want to try your hand at interpreting, you will have the option to do so in our state-of-the-art conference suites.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months, or as a Postgraduate Diploma qualification.

Course content

You’ll focus on computer-assisted translation throughout this programme using a wide range of professional software tools. A core module will run throughout the year developing your skills through multilingual group projects, which also give you valuable experience of translation project management.

You’ll study another core module introducing you to approaches and research methods in translation studies, then choose optional modules to build your specialist written translation skills between English and one or two languages of your choice. You could also choose from any of the research-led optional modules exploring topics such as audio-visual translation or genre analysis.

Throughout the year, you’ll be sharpening your skills and developing your theoretical and practical understanding of translation. You’ll showcase this in your summer project, which you’ll hand in by the end of the course in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll take fewer modules in each year and study over a longer period. If you take the PGDip, you’ll study the same content but without completing the summer project.

Compulsory modules:

  • Computer-Assisted Translation 45 credits
  • Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies 30 credits 

Learning and teaching

We use different teaching methods to help you develop a range of practical skills as well as a sound theoretical knowledge base. These include lectures and seminars, as well as practical classes where you’ll make the most of our facilities.

In addition, the Centre for Translation Studies runs a regular programme of Research and Professionalisation Talks from visiting speakers, many of whom are actually practicing translators, interpreters, subtitlers or project managers.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a wide range of methods. Translation tests are an important element, as are essays and individual and team projects. If completing the MSc you’ll also be assessed on your individual summer project, which can be either two long translation pieces or one short research project.

Career opportunities

A postgraduate qualification in Applied Translation Studies equips you with valuable skills that are increasingly important in a globalised world. You’ll also develop advanced IT, research, analysis and communication skills that are very attractive to employers across different industries.

Many of our students go straight into practice with their translation skills, whether they work in large organisations, small or medium-sized language service providers or as freelance translators. Others pursue related careers such as project management or administrative roles in language services. They work in organisations such as the UN and affiliated organisations, the European Parliament and European Commission, commercial enterprises and NGOs.

Careers support

We provide plenty of support to help you reach your career goals. We offer targeted careers advice and professional training throughout the programme, as well as events including workshops arranged with professional national and international organisations.

As a student at Leeds you’ll be able to enter the SDL Certification Program for free and obtain discounts on CAT and subtitling software to help you prepare for your career.

Read more about Careers and Employability



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The MA in Translation and Interpreting Studies (MATIS) aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills for a career in translation and/or interpreting, and/or for other professions which require expertise in cross-cultural communication. Read more

The MA in Translation and Interpreting Studies (MATIS) aims to equip you with the knowledge and skills for a career in translation and/or interpreting, and/or for other professions which require expertise in cross-cultural communication. With its combination of theory and practice, it also provides excellent preparation for further study and research at PhD level.

The translation course units are offered in all language combinations. However, the interpreting course units are offered in specific language combinations (Arabic, Chinese, French, German and Spanish).

Our students come from Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America; each year ten or more different languages are spoken by the MA group - creating a truly multilingual environment in the centre of Manchester.

Launched by The Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies in 1995, the MA in Translation Studies has been one of the longest-running and most prestigious postgraduate degrees offered by a UK institution.

Aims

 The course aims to:

  • equip students with the knowledge and skills for a career in translation and/or interpreting or in other professions which require expertise in cross-cultural communication.
  • equip students for further study and research.
  • provide specialist training in various types of translation and/or interpreting activity, including the use of technology in translation, interpreting and related activities.
  • provide a gradual transition into the world of work through practical, real-life translation and/or interpreting tasks, according to the chosen pathway.

Teaching and learning

On successful completion of the course students will have demonstrated an understanding of:

  • translation and interpreting studies as an academic discipline and the various perspectives from which different scholars have attempted to develop theories of translation and interpreting.
  • the role of translation and interpreting in solving interlingual and intercultural communication problems.
  • the interdisciplinary nature of translation and interpreting studies and the exchange of empirical and theoretical approaches between translation/interpreting studies and other disciplines.
  • research issues in interpreting and translation, including recent approaches, current problems, and potential future developments.
  • the relationship between translation, interpreting and other aspects of language use and communication, including language patterning, textual organisation and the semiotics of verbal and non-verbal communication.
  • specific translation and/or interpreting practices and the role of the translator and/or interpreter in various sectors of economic activity including the audiovisual media, publishing, localisation, commercial and international organisations, depending on the chosen pathway.

Coursework and assessment

All core course units, specialist research-orientated course units and specialist translation course units are assessed by coursework, rather than by written examination. Specialist interpreting course units are assessed by a combination of assessed coursework and examination (see individual course unit descriptions for more details). The pass mark for MA coursework and the dissertation is 50%.

All course units are assessed by coursework essays or other assignments. Following two semesters of taught course units, MA students write a dissertation of 12-15,000 words; this can be a traditional research dissertation or a translation/interpreting dissertation. This is based on an extended translation or interpreting assignment plus critical analysis.

Facilities

All postgraduate students in the School can make use of the purpose-designed Graduate School which promotes excellence in Arts and Languages Research. It is an online and physical community where postgraduate students can meet each other, access resources and organise events. As part of our stimulating Graduate School you join a cutting-edge gathering of researchers. You can keep up to date with events, conferences and seminars both in the Graduate School and further afield with our Graduate School Blog  or by following us on  twitter .

In addition to expert teaching and tuition you will be offered excellent training, be able to access great new facilities such as common rooms and workstations, use world-leading library and archive collections, and participate in a thriving academic community. The School has an exceptional record of generating and sharing new ideas, and the quality, breadth and volume of its activity is unparalleled in the UK.

Find out about the facilities available for Translation Studies students.

The University of Manchester Library  is one of the best-resourced academic libraries in the UK and is widely recognised as one of the world's greatest research libraries. We also have one of the largest academic IT services in Europe - supporting world-class teaching and research.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Career opportunities exist in all areas of the translation profession, including translation, revising and editing, terminology, localisation and in project management. Graduates have also entered careers in translator training, international business and publishing.

Read some of our graduate profiles



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Why study at Roehampton. The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • The programme is taught by academic staff and by experts from the industry who bring their professional experience into the classroom.
  • The University has a state-of-the-art language lab with cutting-edge translation software including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS.
  • You will have the option to study the localisation of computer games, equipping you to work in one of the UK’s fastest growing industries.
  • Roehampton’s location in London is ideal, as the city has established itself as one of the main centres for translation in the world.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Complete University Guide 2018) and the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

This programme aims to address the growing demand for translators with skills in translating technical texts.

The programme will familiarise you with the sociocultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise specialised multilingual material. Through working with dedicated software and high-tech industry standard equipment, you will learn the skills you need to enter the professional market and gain the knowledge to pursue further research in this field.

There is a particular emphasis on learning translation tools (in particular SDL Trados) and on localisation, especially for video games. This programme is not limited to specific language pairs. You can work into and out of English and another language of your choice.

You will be taught by staff who are leaders in the field of translation and whose work has influenced organisations such as OFCOM. They work closely with industry and bring in key professionals in the field to teach and give talks, thus helping you to make vital industry contacts.

Roehampton boasts state-of-the-art language labs with cutting-edge translation software, including SDL Trados, Swift and WinCAPS. The lab also features a training suite and an open access area where you can work independently.

In recent years our graduates have found work with a broad range of organisations including: media companies and broadcasters such as the BBC, France TV, and RTVE; subtitling companies such as IMS, Deluxe, ITFC; and translation and localisation providers including Pole To Win, London Translations and JF Traduções e Interpretações.

As a Specialised Translation student you will become a member of the Centre for Research in Translation and Transcultural Studies, which promotes excellence in research into translation-related areas including language learning, audiovisual translation, accessibility to the media and other areas of translation.

Content

This course covers the theoretical and the practical aspects of specialised translation. In the compulsory module ‘Technical and Scientific Translation’ you will practice your skills in translating highly specialised documents into your chosen language. During the course you will also address the main theoretical issues shaping translation today and understand how these theories relate to the practice of translation.

IT skills are central to a translator's work so the compulsory module ‘Translation Tools’ will familiarise you with some of the translation tools you will be using in your professional life. These include terminology databases, translation memory tools, and other computer-assisted translation systems. You will be taught how to carry out efficient documentation and make appropriate use of research tools in solving technical and scientific translation problems.

You could also study ‘The Localisation of Video Games’ where you will examine the principles and practices of localisation in the area of multimedia interactive entertainment software. Other optional modules currently include ‘Subtitling: Concepts and Practice’, where you will explore the techniques of subtitle synchronisation using specialised software. MA students will also undertake a dissertation, which will provide you with the ideal opportunity to undertake an in-depth investigation of a translation-related topic that is of interest to you.

Modules

Compulsory modules (MA & PGD)

  • Translation Theory and Practice Module code: AST040L730A 
  • Translation Tools Module code: AST020L734S
  • Technical and Scientific Translation Module code: AST020L737A 

Optional modules (MA & PGD)

  • Economic and Legal Translation Module code: AST020L738S
  • Translation Project Module code: AST020L743S
  • Accessible Filmmaking: Theory and Practice Module code: AST020L744
  • The Localisation of Video Games Module code: AST020L747S
  • Subtitling: Concepts and Practice Module code: AST020L749A
  • Think, Create, Translate: Transcreation in the Creative Industries Module code: AST020L724Y
  • Media Access: Audiodescription, Subtitling for the Deaf and Respeaking Module code: AST020L742S
  • Dubbing and Voice-over Module code: AST020L741S

Compulsory module (MA students only)

  • Dissertation Module code: AST060L775Y

Career options

Specialised translator, subtitler, technical writer, editor, terminologist, project manager or localiser.

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Whether you are interested in learning more about the legal and ethical aspects of your job, recognise the impact a qualification with a legal and ethical basis can have on prospects of promotion, or simply have an interest in healthcare law, this programme is for you. Read more
Whether you are interested in learning more about the legal and ethical aspects of your job, recognise the impact a qualification with a legal and ethical basis can have on prospects of promotion, or simply have an interest in healthcare law, this programme is for you.

Why study Healthcare Law and Ethics at Dundee?

Healthcare Law and Ethics is concerned with how the law regulates certain aspects of healthcare practice, why it does so, and whether it does so effectively, and in accordance with ethical principles.

The programme has been devised to accommodate busy healthcare professionals. Unlike other programmes, this one is not open to law graduates, but has been designed specifically for those whose first degree is in a healthcare subject such as medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, etc.

The programme aims to give you an understanding and appreciation of law and ethics as they apply to professional practice. It will help you understand legal and ethical concepts, terminology and sources of law.

It is offered on a part-time, modular basis with the emphasis being on Distance Learning. This flexibility allows you to study at a time and place of your own choosing and at a pace that is comfortable for you.

"From the beginning of the programme, I was challenged. I was challenged to think, challenged to explore, and challenged to engage more deeply with concepts within the realms of law, ethics and health care that I hadn't previously reflected upon to the same degree. The organization of the course and the quality of the instructors greatly facilitated my understanding of concepts and encouraged me to engage in further readings so as to continue to expand my intellectual horizons."
Ahman B. Haji, graduate

What's great about Healthcare Law and Ethics at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

Who should study this course?

This course is not for those with a law degree, but instead is suitable for graduates holding a medical or dental degree, or another health care subject (including nursing, pharmacy, physiotherapy) with at least 2 years post-qualifying experience, or a minimum of 5 years' practice in a healthcare profession.

Careers

A qualification with a legal and ethical basis can improve your prospects of promotion in the field of healthcare.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

"Completion of all three years has certainly provided me with an excellent knowledge of the critical areas of medical law, such as negligence and consent, as well as more controversial and current issues. It has also taught me to critique and argue with facts (rather than simply recite them) in a cogent and succinct manner"

Douglas Hamilton, LLM 2009

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