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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. Read more

Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. We aim to equip you with wide-ranging skills, knowledge and critical awareness to meet your career aspirations in sectors in which moving images play a central role. Our curriculum incorporates an exciting variety of learning and teaching activities designed to foster your capacity for researching and rigorously analysing different aspects of film, television and moving images. You will have the opportunity to develop key skills for communicating about and with moving images across a range of contexts and platforms. You can choose to have a broad-based learning experience in film, television and moving image, or you can specialise in moving image curation and screenwriting via our suggested pathways.

The core teaching team consists of members of the Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design. The course has close links with the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), the leading research centre in the UK for arts and design, whose members include internationally renowned filmmakers, film and television theorists and historians, and moving image artists and curators. We combine research-enhanced teaching with classes delivered by film and television industry and moving image art professionals, in order to make sure that you develop the skill sets and the full range of critical awareness that is in demand and to deliver an exciting learning experience for you.

The course combines core and optional taught modules. The design and delivery of our taught modules draw on CREAM’s research excellence in documentary, Asian and European cinema, moving image curation, and television history. The coursework requirements for some modules are research essays or a combination of research essays and research-informed blog posts and presentations. Other modules require a broad range of research-informed professional modes of writing such as a screenplay treatment, a curatorial proposal or an exhibition review. You will also undertake a substantial piece of independent research as a major part of your MA studies. In order to provide you with the flexibility to undertake a piece of independent research suited to your career aspiration, the final project module offers you the choice between writing a traditional dissertation or completing a theoretically-informed professional project such as a curating a film programme, writing and producing a series of themed blog posts, or writing a long-form screenplay.

Course structure

The course is taught in two modes: full-time and part-time.

Full-time Postgraduate students study 180 credits per year. For the award of MA in Film, Television and Moving Image, you must complete two core taught modules, four optional modules and a 60-credit final project module, for a total of 180 credits.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course

Core modules

Core modules provide you with a set of key skills for the theoretical, critical and reflective understanding of moving images.

  • Final Project (core)
  • Key Concepts in Film, Television and Moving Image (core)
  • Contemporary Issues in Moving Image and Screen Studies (core)

Optional modules

Optional modules give you the freedom to choose areas of specialisation. The course leaders can advise on which modules best fit your interests. You have the choice to pursue specialised interests through your choice of optional modules and coursework assignments. If you are not sure which optional modules to choose or fit your interests best, or which types of final project work to produce to best develop your area of specialisation, you should discuss this question individually with the course leaders and you should aim to do so early on in the academic year.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

  • Cinema Distribution and Exhibition
  • Documentary Aesthetics, Sites and Spectatorship
  • Film Programming and Moving Image Curation
  • Introduction to Scriptwriting
  • Longform Screenplay Preparation and Short Documents
  • Modern and Contemporary European Cinema
  • Researching Histories in Asian Cinema
  • Television Art: Aesthetics and Quality

Industry links

We have strongly developed links with key London exhibition and research venues such as the BFI SouthbankICALux and Close-Up, as well as key critics, theorists, curators and festivals. We offer field visits to these sites as well as festivals like the Rotterdam Film Festival.

Career path

Our graduates have found employment in small- and large-scale film and television companies as filmmakers, producers, distributors, and exhibitors. Others have gone on to organise film festivals, or to work in film-related magazines and journals as well as in international arts and culture sectors. Some of our recent graduates have gone on to pursue academic careers as researchers or doctoral students at the University of Westminster and elsewhere. As the UK’s longest-running postgraduate programme in film and television several of our alumni are pioneers of the discipline of film and television studies.



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The new MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. Read more
The new MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. As the industries of film and television become increasingly interconnected, the course considers their shared stylistic and contextual relationships.

The MA in Global Film and Television is innovative in engaging with comparative close readings of US film beyond Hollywood, of World Cinema, and of contemporary television. The course leads the way in employing cutting-edge advancements in Film and Television Studies, such as the audio visual essay and digital curation. The course’s online delivery means that you will benefit from greater flexibility, innovative teaching and learning strategies via the latest developments in social media and digital technology.

Why choose this course?

With the University of Hertfordshire’s innovative online distance learning programme, you can study for a MA Global Film and Television at your own pace, without ever having to set foot on campus.

You will benefit from:
-Flexible study- fit your degree around your work and life commitments
-Support from experienced and well qualified tutors
-No campus-based exams – assessment is by coursework and online tests
-Pay as you study and possible tuition fee loan eligibility (UK/EU students only)
-Being part of a dynamic and supportive online community of like-minded students
-No travel or student accommodation costs

The degree is for those who wish to advance their skills and knowledge in the area of Film and Television Studies at postgraduate level. The course will provide the opportunity to develop an understanding of film analysis beyond Hollywood, and to engage in close readings of films and television programmes from around the world.

Careers

Graduates are equipped for a variety of careers including those traditionally open to Masters Graduates in the Arts and Humanities: teaching, the Civil Service, Local Government, journalism, marketing, film curation and exhibition, and publishing as well as for further study at postgraduate level.

Teaching methods

-Style and Meaning in Film and Television (30 credits)
-Screen Curation (30 credits)
-Global Screen Violence (15 credits)
-Thinking Images: Philosophy in Film and Television (30 credits)
-Research Methods 1: Critical and Theoretical Debates (15 credits)
-Research Methods 2: Advanced Research Skills (15 credits)
-Dissertation/Extended Project (60 credits)

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The MLitt in Film & Television Studies, taught in Scotland’s media capital, offers the opportunity for the critical study of film and television. Read more

The MLitt in Film & Television Studies, taught in Scotland’s media capital, offers the opportunity for the critical study of film and television. This well-established programme aims to provide an advanced understanding of the approaches and methodologies in Film & Television Studies and to equip you with core research skills for advanced study in this field.

Why this programme

  • You will be studying in Glasgow, one of the leading media cities in the UK, and be based at our Gilmorehill Centre, with its own cinema as well as extensive collection of video, DVD and digital resources.
  • The Gilmorehill Centre is home to the international journal Screen and hosts the annual Screen conference every summer, attracting leading names in film and television studies from across the world. You will have the opportunity to participate in the conference as well as to engage with guest speakers from the academy and media industries throughout the year.
  • The Masters is designed for those with some background in film, television, media or communication studies (or related fields) who are contemplating, or developing, a career in media research or criticism. It is particularly relevant as preparation for further postgraduate research in film and television.

Programme structure

This programme will encourage advanced level study of specific aspects of film and television, via the exploration of research strategies appropriate to the two mediums. The curriculum is designed to establish the full focus of Film and Television Studies as a discipline and to suggest some of the ways in which its boundaries are being re-drawn by new screen cultures and technologies. 

The programme consists of three components (please see core and optional courses information for more details):

Component 1: Core Course (60 credits)

Semester 1: History of Critical Writing (30 credits)

Semester 2: Research Methods and Preparation (30 credits)

Component 2: Three additional courses (60 credits)

Advanced Topics in Film Studies (20 credits) - compulsory

Advanced Topics in Television Studies (20 credits) - compulsory

(The above two courses will run in semester 1 and 2 in alternate years)

A third option course (20 credits, semester 1 or 2)

Component 3: Dissertation (60 credits)

You will research and write your dissertation over the summer (May to Sept). It will be 15,000 words in length and on a topic chosen in consultation with your tutors and the programme convenor.

Career prospects

The programme provides an excellent foundation for an academic career in this field and we provide support and guidance on PhD applications and funding opportunities if you are considering this path.

As an MLitt student, you will have plenty of opportunity to meet and work with our PhD students – for example, through the annual postgraduate conference – and find out about the range of research projects in which they are involved: from AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Projects with industry partners (BBC Scotland, the Glasgow Film Festival), to personally-conceived projects on filmmakers, genres, periods, or themes within film and television studies.

While the MLitt is a good training for PhD study, graduates go on to a range of careers in the media and creative industries including film education, festival management and programming, and arts administration as well as to research roles in television, academia, or the public sector.

Positions held by recent graduates include Celebrity Management Consultant, Director and University Teacher.



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Would you like to direct a rock band in our new multi-camera 4K TV studio? Would you like to create hit formats like Big Brother, Strictly-Come Dancing, The Apprentice and Gogglebox? Then the Directing & Producing Television Entertainment MA course is for you. Read more
Would you like to direct a rock band in our new multi-camera 4K TV studio? Would you like to create hit formats like Big Brother, Strictly-Come Dancing, The Apprentice and Gogglebox? Then the Directing & Producing Television Entertainment MA course is for you.

The Directing & Producing Television Entertainment course is the only one of its kind in the world. It is recognised for its high standards and its ability to fast-track students into the Television Entertainment Industry.

In recent years’ students have sold entertainment formats to Warner Brothers Television and ITV and student graduation shows have won prestigious awards from the New York Television Festival and the Royal Television Society.

• The only Television MA course of its kind in the world
• Direct & Produce entertainment programmes in our professional 4K TV studio
• Be taught by industry professionals
• Unlike other schools all production costs are met by the school
• Work placements with the BBC, ITV and leading entertainment production companies like Hat Trick, (Have I Got News for You), Studio Lambert (Gogglebox) and Love Productions (The Great British Bake Off)
• Take a fast track into the Entertainment Industry

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course.

CURRICULUM

Our intensely practical and pioneering Television MA course aims to train the entertainment directors and producers of tomorrow. Students are taught by NFTS staff and visiting Industry professionals.

Other crucial areas covered include how to pitch original programme ideas to broadcasters and how to set up an independent production company. Students also undertake a two-day long module on business and legal affairs supervised by top Industry lawyers Lee & Thompson.

Placements with leading production companies like Hat Trick, Studio Lambert and Maverick or broadcasters like the BBC and ITV are an integral part of the course.

By the time students graduate they have the craft, skill and confidence to direct and produce both in the studio and on location. They also have a thorough understanding of the television production process encompassing everything from the creative to the technical and the business aspects.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition, student teams are given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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This innovative course examines the different ways in which broadcasting is organised around the world. It has a particular emphasis on the production techniques of British television, approaching them through a comparative international lens. Read more

This innovative course examines the different ways in which broadcasting is organised around the world. It has a particular emphasis on the production techniques of British television, approaching them through a comparative international lens.

The course has regular visiting lectures from leading figures in the UK's television industry, including the department's own VIsiting Professors James Quinn (Commissioner for Sky Arts) and renowned producer, director and writer Tony Garnett. In the past, we've had visiting lecturers including Alex Graham (Executive Producer of Who Do You Think You Are), James Quinn (Documentary Commissioning Editor, Sky) and Karen Mullins (Project Manager for London Olympics, Rugby World Cup).

You'll study a major BBC drama series from conception through to scripting and production, such as the series Casualty, with time to visit the production base in Cardiff. You'll study with scholars with experience of TV industries around the world, and hear from guest lecturers from London's TV industry.

  • Take control of your own short TV or radio programme, creating something at the expected UK professional standard of such productions.
  • Make use of our exclusive 24-7 media labs and post-production rooms, complemented by our impressive range of professional location filming equipment, TV and sound studio facilities, supported by our committed and approachable technical team.
  • Becomefully conversant with the nature of television as a medium: scheduling, genres, formats – and the more up-close narrative techniques of TV series arcs and character development.
  • Learn how TV shows are traded around the world, how broadcasting is put together and regulated, and how the industry changes from place to place. Giving you practical skills and insight into media scheduling and budgeting. 

Course structure

Core modules

Structures of Broadcasting

In this module you will develop an understanding of public service and commercial models of broadcasting. You will look at the organisation of broadcasting, considering the differing markets for TV programmes, and commission and production regimes around the world. You will examine the nature of global flows in programming, the market system that enables them, and the major broadcasting organisations. You will also explore the structure of the global programme sales and co-production markets.

Television as a Cultural Industry

In this module you will develop an understanding of the interrelation between the organisational forms of broadcasting and the programmes that they produce. You will look at the structuration of broadcasting texts and what makes them distinctive, and examine the major genres of TV production through international examples. You will also consider the nature of innovation in programme making.

Production Study

In this module you will develop an understanding of the key challenges of producing a long running, high-volume, British television drama series. You will look at the role such series play in the television landscape, and examine the organisation, management, funding, budgeting and scheduling of drama productions. You will explore audience profiles and see how these fit within the economic and cultural priorities of television. You will also have the opportunity to meet writers and directors from an ongoing drama series, and learn to use production software packages such as Final Draft Scripting, Movie Magic Budgeting and Movie Magic Scheduling.

Production Practice Dissertation

You will produce a short video or radio piece to UK industry-standards. You will will create work which communicates with its intended audience, and manage all aspects of the production process, including self-direction and the direction of others. On completion, you will refect on your production, using knowledge gained in other areas of the course to analyse its success.

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including:

  • seminar presentations
  • written essays
  • research portfolios
  • project work
  • self-assessment documents

Your future careers

Televsion continues to be one of the most dominant global media forms, continuing to attract huge audiences and leading creative talent around the world.

You'll leave our course understanding television in different cultures and contexts and you'll be in a perfect place to find employment in those countries where the TV industry is rapidly growing - backing up your portfolio with knowledge of how programmes are marketed and sold, and how important they are to the creative industries.

We're based near London, so you'll have privileged insight into the UK television industry. You'll have the chance to get familiar with London production businesses – we have regular guest lecturers from production and management. Students from our department have gone on to work in independent television and film production, for broadcasters like the BBC and ITV in the UK as well as international media agencies such as CCTV and Hunan, and for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.



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About the course. The MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. Read more

About the course

The MA in Global Film and Television is an online course, offering a range of distinct critical and theoretical approaches. You will be asked to explore the dynamic relationship between visual style and social commentary in work of film and television from around the world. As the industries of film and television become increasingly interconnected, the course considers their shared stylistic and contextual relationships. 

This course is innovative in engaging with comparative close readings of US film beyond Hollywood, of World Cinema, and of contemporary television. The course leads the way in employing cutting-edge advancements in Film and Television Studies, such as the audio visual essay and digital curation. The course’s online delivery means that you will benefit from greater flexibility, innovative teaching and learning strategies via the latest developments in social media and digital technology.

To find out more information about how online study works, please visit go.herts.ac.uk/online, or contact us on 01707 281121 or e-mail .  

Free sample materials!

See how online study works and what kind of learning environment and materials you will access as an online student. Access free sample materials

Why choose this course?

With the University of Hertfordshire’s innovative online distance learning programme, you can study for a MA Global Film and Television at your own pace, without ever having to set foot on campus.

You will benefit from:

  • Flexible study- fit your degree around your work and life commitments.
  • Support from experienced and well qualified tutors.
  • No campus-based exams – assessment is by coursework and online tests.
  • Pay as you study and possible tuition fee loan eligibility (UK/EU students only).
  • Being part of a dynamic and supportive online community of like-minded students.
  • No travel or student accommodation costs.

The degree is for those who wish to advance their skills and knowledge in the area of Film and Television Studies at postgraduate level. The course will provide the opportunity to develop an understanding of film analysis beyond Hollywood, and to engage in close readings of films and television programmes from around the world. 

Careers

Graduates are equipped for a variety of careers including those traditionally open to Masters Graduates in the Arts and Humanities: teaching, the Civil Service, Local Government, journalism, marketing, film curation and exhibition, and publishing as well as for further study at postgraduate level.

Teaching methods

  • Style and Meaning in Film and Television (30 credits)
  • Screen Curation (30 credits)
  • Global Screen Violence (15 credits)
  • Thinking Images: Philosophy in Film and Television (30 credits)
  • Research Methods 1: Critical and Theoretical Debates (15 credits)
  • Research Methods 2: Advanced Research Skills (15 credits)
  • Dissertation/Extended Project (60 credits)


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The Advanced Television and Film – Script to Screen program at Centennial College offers a comprehensive, in-depth and hands-on understanding of what goes into developing and producing quality feature films and TV shows. Read more
The Advanced Television and Film – Script to Screen program at Centennial College offers a comprehensive, in-depth and hands-on understanding of what goes into developing and producing quality feature films and TV shows.

This multidisciplinary, two-semester post-graduate Advanced Television and Film program — facilitated by the School of Communications, Media, Arts and Design in the hub of Toronto's film and television district — is especially beneficial for writers, directors, producers, editors, actors and other film and television craftspeople who want to expand their knowledge of the industry.

The major focus of the program's first semester is on creating, pitching, outlining, developing, drafting and polishing production-ready short film scripts. During the second semester, you have the opportunity to prepare, perform in, shoot and/or post a number of these shows.

Additionally, the Advanced Television and Film - Script to Screen program sees you deconstructing classic films, television shows and scripts of all genres. The program also provides opportunities to receive advanced instruction from industry professionals in your major and minor areas of craft interest along with extensive employment information.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-The Advanced Television and Film – Script to Screen program is unique among the few other post-graduate film and television offerings currently available in the Greater Toronto Area.
-Instead of streaming you into master classes immediately, the first semester ensures that you obtain a solid working knowledge of everyone's role on a film or television production.
-The amount of foundational lessons included in the offering allows you to better collaborate, improvise, problem-solve and empathize with your fellow cast and crew members.
-The program focuses on dramatic filmmaking, comedy and several other genres. The program does not, however, include documentary filmmaking.
-The time and effort devoted to script development in the first semester and production and post-production in the second results in higher quality student films than are customarily produced — at a time when student films continue to be key to gaining a foothold in the business.

Career Outlook
-Director
-Assistant director
-Trainee assistant director
-Personal assistant to the director
-Cinematographer
-Camera operator
-Assistant camera operator
-Lighting and grip department technician
-Lighting or grip assistant
-Dolly grip
-Audio technician
-Assistant audio technician
-Producer
-Associate producer
-Production manager
-Production coordinator
-Assistant production coordinator
-Production assistant
-Location coordinator or assistant
-Office assistant
-Personal assistant to the producer
-Screenwriter
-Script coordinator/story department coordinator
-Trainee/junior story editor/story researcher
-Personal assistant to the showrunner
-Script reader
-Editor
-Assistant editor
-Sound editor
-Assistant sound editor
-Personal assistant to the series lead/star

Areas of Employment
-Production companies
-Broadcast networks
-Other industry-related organizations

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This unique 12 month part-time diploma course delivered in partnership with the Production Guild will equip students with the skills required to foster a successful future career as a Film or Television Production Accountant. Read more
This unique 12 month part-time diploma course delivered in partnership with the Production Guild will equip students with the skills required to foster a successful future career as a Film or Television Production Accountant.

-A unique course in partnership with Production Guild.
-Equips participants with specialist skills required to work as a Film and Television Production Accountant.
-Gain the expertise to succeed in this demanding role.
-Establish key contacts to move to a career in the film and television sector.
-Work experience placement.
-Access to NFTS's Masterclasses led by major creative figures from film, television and games.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Course fees charged at UK rate.

COURSE OVERVIEW

The National Film and Television School Production Accounting Diploma is ideally suited for those already working in a finance / accountancy role and who are keen to move into the film and television sector.

This course begins in January each year.

Production Accountants calculate finances, work out the cost of a production, communicate with financiers (companies or individuals who provide the funding) and control the cash flow, or spending. This is a demanding role that requires a level head, self-confidence and strong communication skills.

In pre-production, Production Accountants help the Producers and Production Managers to prepare budgets and Estimated Final Cost Reports.

During production, they oversee all payments, manage payroll, petty cash and foreign currency and keep accurate financial records. They help monitor budgets, analyse spending and provide daily or weekly cost reports. They also produce cost forecasts to evaluate the impact of any production changes.

CURRICULUM

The diploma course is 12 months part-time and is delivered in London.

Specifically students will learn about:
-Production set up and implementation of systems
-Budgeting
-Sources of Finance and treatment of funds
-Completion Guarantors
-Cash flow, Forecasting and Cost reporting
-Working with inherited budgets
-Working with multi currency
-Running the project
-Contract and employment law
-Copyright and Licences
-Taxation and insurance.
-Pre production, Production and Post Production
-Production Audits
-Management Skills

PLACEMENT

To graduate each student will complete a minimum of 10 days work experience / production shadowing before the completion of the course.

NFTS BENEFITS

Production Accounting course participants will have full access to our creative masterclasses and clubs, including: Cinema Club, Screen Arts and NFTS Masterclasses - these strands see major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include David Fincher (Director, Seven, Gone Girl), Graham Linehan (The IT Crowd, Father Ted), Abi Morgan (Suffragette, The Hour), Christopher Nolan (Interstellar, The Dark Knight) and Hamish Hamilton (Director, Super Bowl XLVIII).

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This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. Read more

This course provides the opportunity for you to develop as a thinking practitioner of film-making or television programme-making, someone who is able to innovate while questioning and interrogating existing values and traditions. The emphasis is firmly on practical film-making and television production work, underpinned with contextual theory throughout, engaging with contemporary issues and emerging trends in film and television production, as well as established film/television theories and practices.

The first two semesters of study provide a range of modules which will allow you to develop your film/television “craft skills” – this may include work with camera, lighting, sound, editing, directing and producing – while working on short film/TV projects of your own devising. There will be opportunities to collaborate with other students, and you will be encouraged to make contact with, and work with, contributors (e.g. interviewees, actors) from outside of the university. You will also develop your skills as an academic researcher by carrying out research which feeds directly into your film projects.

The course culminates in the Masters Project, where you will be the key creative leader of a film or television production, taking on the role of producer or director.

What happens on the course?

In a typical week, a full-time student on this course will have up to ten hours of class time which will be a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical workshop sessions. Most course modules will blend these different teaching methods within a given timetabled session, so there will be plenty of variety.

In lectures, you will typically be given ‘food for thought’ in relation to your own project ideas. In workshop sessions you will get to practice film-making techniques related to your own project work needs. In seminars you will share ideas and discuss with tutors and fellow students. In tutorials you will have one-to-one or small group discussion about your works in progress.

The general flow of the course for a full time student is to start with production skills, research skills and scriptwriting in the first semester. In the second semester you move on to a small personal project which will combine all that you have learned from these three areas. In the final semester, you bring it all together in a personal film/TV production project which is seen as the culmination of your studies.

Part-time students experience exactly the same course modules and course content, but necessarily broken down into smaller groups of modules.

Opportunities:

The course is built upon negotiated production work, which means you get to propose and develop your own ideas for film and television. The teaching staff are experienced with production across documentary, drama and social action production, and will guide you according to your ambitions, skills and needs.

There is always the opportunity to work on ‘live’ project briefs, which can be used as the basis of a module project, or alternatively as an extra-curricular experience which informs your development on the course and allows you to network with students on related courses.

Why Wolverhampton?

The course is taught in the School of Media, which houses a three-camera live television studio, fifteen editing suites with Premiere Pro, After Effects, Final Cut Pro X and other professional software packages, and a sound-recording/foley production suite. It also has an equipment store from which you can borrow all the camera, sound, lighting and other equipment you need to produce your work.

Who will teach you on this course?

The course teaching team includes four active doctoral or postdoctoral researchers – Adam Kossoff, Tracy McCoy, Phil Nichols and Gavin Wilson – whose interests include documentary film, social action video, screenwriting and adaptation, and cinematography. They are all qualified higher education teachers, and have many years of experience of teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. They are also experienced film and programme makers.

Our students and graduates have a track-record of success in competitions and festivals, such as the prestigious Royal Television Society Student Awards, the Midland Movies awards, and the Business Disability Forum's Technology Taskforce Film Festival.

What our students think

Film-maker and editor Andrew Webber has had his films screened at international festivals in the UK, Jamaica and West Africa. He says, “The University has been extremely supportive, through my studies and after graduation.”

Niki Gandy has pursued a teaching career, and now teaches photography and art in a High School. Calling herself a “proud graduate” of our related undergraduate course, she says, “I chose it for its practical content and which helped furnish me with numerous transferable skills necessary to forge my career in teaching. Almost a decade on, my lecturers continue to provide me with support and guidance - I feel certain that my relationship with the university will continue for many years to come.”

Actor and director Brian Duffy, creator of TV series Small World – a comedy series about a group of deaf flatmates which has been shown on TV and online – says, “Studying at the University of Wolverhampton helped me with networking and organisation – especially as filmmakers came to Wolverhampton for Deaffest, the UK’s leading deaf film and arts festival. My lecturer could also sign which was a great help and a huge weight off my shoulders – I could talk to her one-to-one. That’s something I never had the pleasure of pre-university.”

Lauren Shinner has been working in media production ever since graduating. She says, “My time at the University was invaluable, I wouldn't be where I am today without it. The tutors were always helpful and push students to do their best with plenty of support and understanding and the course prepares you well for your prospective career. I've gone on to work as a video editor in education, ran my own media business and have done videos for high end charities and new bands, and am now working in media in another area. Without my degree, none of this would have been possible.”



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From start to finish producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry. They generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the result. Read more

From start to finish producers are the driving force behind the film and television industry. They generate new projects and ideas, secure finance, manage production and strategically market the result. The producer’s role has been transformed by the advent of globalisation, digital technology and the multi-channel environment. Now more than ever, the entertainment industries need creative leadership.

Our Masters offers aspiring producers the opportunity to acquire the creative and entrepreneurial skills required to enter the rapidly changing universe of film and television. You will learn to create script ideas, work with writers and directors, manage a production thoroughly and market across platforms, we'll teach you how to navigate the financial and legal aspects of the industry, too.

The course is taught from our creative hub at Royal Holloway's central London campus, 11 Bedford Square. Our proximity to the media industry means that we can draw upon professionals for outstanding master classes, industry panels and careers events. Students are encouraged to attend The London Film Festival, MIPCOM, Berlin, and Cannes international festivals. You will also try out interning at a production company or work on the crew of a professional production.

You will learn from top talent and practice what you learn by making films, and TV programmes. The ‘Role of Producer’ and ‘Script Development’ courses are taught by Professor Jonathan Powell, one of the UK's most respected and experienced drama producers, having previously worked as Controller of BBC1 and Head of Drama for the BBC. The course leader is award winning producer and executive, Gillian Gordon who brings thirty years’ experience in Hollywood and the UK to teaching ‘Producing Workshop’.

Through master classes, industry internships and alumni partnerships, students are provided with opportunities to network with international talent and expertise, as well as building links with current Royal Holloway students and academic partners.

Course structure

Core modules

The Role of the Producer

In this module you will develop an understanding of the role of the producer as the driving force in creating, managing and selling film and television products. You will look at how the independent sector works, and consider how to programme and pitch ideas. You will also examine approaches to working with creative talent.

Script Development

In this module you will develop an understanding of how to write an industry standard script report. You will learn how to analyse both film and TV scripts, and produce reports that constructively engage writers with the process of script development. You will consider the analysis of structure, character, dialogue, genre, and how to transfer feedback verbally.

Producing Workshop

In this module you will develop an understanding of how to create and pitch ideas to film, television and new media executives and financiers. You will learn the basics of script development, set procedure, scheduling, camera work, audio equipment and post production. You will consider how to develop and identify viable fiction projects and lead and manage the production of a short video, . You will work with creative talent, writers, directors, casting agents, and key craft team members, and examine how to finance and market your short film. You will put together a viable presentation package and pitch to a panel of industry professionals.

International Media Business

In this module you will develop an understanding of the global film and TV business. You will learn how to plan and conceptualise the creation and management of a sustainable media enterprise. You will examine the critical issues affecting the success or failure of film and television businesses, considering the role of financial planning in the life-cycle of visual media projects. You will also explore the wider context of finance in the development, marketing and distribution of film and television to investors, partners and government bodies, with a focus on the challenges faced by business startups.

Production Management

In this module you will develop an understanding of basic production accounting and the line management skills needed for film, TV and transmedia production. You will learn how to set-up a production company and budget, schedule, manage cash flow, and supervise a quality fiction production. You will consider how to manage 'below-the line' deals on a drama production and identify financial issues and their implications for day-to-day management. You will also examine how to manage a film crew and supervise the daily operations of a production team, and manage production costs, equipment and facility deals.

Marketing and Media Law

In this module you will develop an understanding of media marketing and promotion in film and television distribution and exhibition. You will look at social media and new trends in the global marketing of films and media projects, including cross-platform marketing. You will consider the fundamental principles of media law, including contract and intellectual property law, and examine issues of content and regulation.

Dissertation

You will produce a 10,000 word dissertation or media project on topic of your choice. You will carry out an investigation that has a clearly defined aim of study and arrive at a carefully argued set of conclusions derived from original research covering print, internet and first hand interview sources.

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including essays, script reports, treatments, pitching exercises, studio exercises, production papers, practical film-making, business reports and presentations.

Your future career

Our close links to the film and TV production industry make this a practical course – and one that gives you building blocks for your future.

While you're on the course, we'll encourage and guide you into work placements and internships. Past students have secured placements with industry leading organisations including:

  • Disney studios
  • Heyday Films
  • West End Films
  • Paramount
  •  Universal
  • Channel 4
  • Company Pictures
  • Studio Canal
  • Lionsgate
  • Potboiler Productions
  • Sony Music
  • Warner Bros
  • Hanway Films
  • e-One Entertainment

Graduates from the Department of Media Arts have gone on to work in independent television and film production, for broadcasters like the BBC and ITV, for distributors, exhibitors, talent agencies and entertainment lawyers.



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This 15 month course - the only one of its kind in the UK - has been developed in response to film and television industry demands for suitably trained production sound professionals. Read more
This 15 month course - the only one of its kind in the UK - has been developed in response to film and television industry demands for suitably trained production sound professionals. The course is delivered in partnership with the BBC.

-Unique course in UK.
-Location and studio sound recording on real productions.
-Music recording in studio.
-Multi-camera television studio production.
-Fisher Boom training.
-Introduction to post production techniques.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course commences in September each year. The Production Sound for Film and Television Diploma in partnership with the BBC offers an unrivalled opportunity to learn the practical skills required for a career in this field, and covers:
-Location sound recording techniques for drama and documentary
-Sound production for multi-camera television
-Music recording in the studio and on location

Now well-established, the Production Sound Diploma course enjoys an excellent reputation within the Industry and each year’s students rapidly find work on completing the course. Graduates have been employed as sound assistants and boom operators on recent television productions including Ashes to Ashes, Midsomer Murders, Lewis, New Tricks, Holby City, Cranford, Jane Eyre, Gavin & Stacey, Life Begins, Judge John Deed, Downton Abbey, Fresh Meat, Spooks and Merlin.

Graduate work on feature films includes Syriana, Extraordinary Rendition, The Hills Have Eyes II, The Mutant Chronicles, Clash Of the Titans 2, Never Let Me Go, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, World War Z, Sherlock Holmes : A Game of Shadows, The Iron Lady, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2012).

The BBC provide an internship at the BBC for all students. Students on the course are called BBC Sound Scholars.

CURRICULUM

The course starts in September with a term of intensive workshops and exercises that prepare students to record sound on shoots with MA students in the following Spring and Summer terms. Alongside location and studio shoots for both documentary, fiction films and television productions, the programme of workshops and tuition continues throughout the course.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. Read more
This programme offers an exciting combination of both film-making practice and textual and historical approaches to the study of film and television. As a student on this innovative programme, you will be taught the skills of film production, working intensively in small groups to explore aesthetic possibilities and gain insights into the craft and industry of screen media. You will also engage with critical perspectives and develop high-level research and analysis skills.

Optional units offer the chance to specialise in different areas of practical film-making and to gain a greater understanding of specific areas around the history and aesthetics of film and television. At the dissertation stage, you will have the opportunity to undertake a placement in creative industry, to undertake an in-depth study of film and television by means of a traditional dissertation, or to produce a mixed-mode investigation through film practice, either individually or in a team, supervised by one or more academic advisers.

The University of Bristol has more than 40 years of experience in this field and the programme draws on the expertise of world-leading scholars, expert practitioners and industry professionals. The Department of Film and Television hosts a series of research seminars and industry masterclasses that are targeted to enrich your studies. Facilities include a 200-seat cinema, production studio, animation and edit suites, seminar rooms and sound rooms.

Bristol is an excellent city in which to study film and television, with its varied cinema, television and digital media spaces, such as the Arnolfini, BBC Bristol, The Cube and Watershed Media Centre. Bristol's Harbourside is home to an array of film festivals, including the Encounters Short Film and Animation Festival, the Slapstick Festival, and the Afrika Eye Festival.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop skills and knowledge cumulatively, while allowing you the opportunity to tailor your learning to your specific areas of interest.

In the first semester, you will be taught skills and techniques of formal analysis and practical film-making, providing the foundation for optional units across the year, such as Writing and Directing, Screen Histories, Television Forms and Making Short Fiction. Other options include Translation for Subtitling (Chinese-English), Screen Style and Aesthetics, and Making Short Fiction.

In the second semester, you will gain knowledge of research methods relevant to the dissertation stage, which includes the opportunity to undertake a placement in the film/TV industry, write an extended essay or produce a piece of practice (normally a short film) accompanied by individual written reflection.

Careers

Graduates of film and television at Bristol have taken up careers as film-makers, programme researchers, senior academics and broadcasting executives.

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This course aims to provide you with a range of creative, practical and critical skills to apply within and beyond the television industry. Read more
This course aims to provide you with a range of creative, practical and critical skills to apply within and beyond the television industry. You will learn about the developing media landscape and emerging trends and practices. Practical sessions are designed to develop your skills and the techniques necessary to generate, develop and produce TV production ideas.

Why Study Television Production with us?

Television Production is taught at Warrington Campus, which lies between the creative and cultural hubs of Manchester and Liverpool and in close proximity to MediaCityUK.

Our Television Production students have twice won the prestigious Production Award at the BBC’s annual Developing Talent Conference, in addition to other accolades such as Royal Television Society Student Television Awards.

You will be encouraged and supported to make industry connections and undertake work experience. There will also be opportunities to work on ‘live’ briefs and showcase work at the annual Department of Media event.

What will I learn?

The course blends theoretical and practical learning, enabling students to develop a critical understanding of the conventions, techniques and current practices in television production and use this knowledge to produce projects.

Modules aim to develop thinking multi-skilled practitioners; you will engage with the whole production process, from writing 'treatments' to editing, and from production management to editorial decision-making.

How will I be taught?

You will have 24-hour access to professional resources, including digital cameras, edit facilities, a TV studio and the Tower Gallery, which includes a multimedia suite and voice-over booth.

You will learn via a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops, as well as guest lectures from industry professionals.
Approximate contact hours for a full-time student will be up to nine hours per week. The expected individual learning activity for a full-time student will be approximately 32 hours per week.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is through group and individual practical work and written coursework. For the Television Project, you will pursue your particular interests through either a dissertation or research by practice.

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Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs. To stay competitive in today’s market, film and television writers need to be able to work across platforms and genres. Read more

Explore Emerson's Graduate Programs

To stay competitive in today’s market, film and television writers need to be able to work across platforms and genres. Designed with this in mind, our low-residency Master of Fine Arts in Writing for Film and Television emphasizes the art and business of film and television writing, as well as innovative writing for other emergent forms of media, from long- and short-form films to series television and webisodes. By graduation, students will have a complete portfolio of professional-caliber work.

Each semester begins with a six-day residency, alternating between our Boston and LA locations, where students engage in:

  • Master classes
  • Screenings 
  • Intensive workshops
  • Peer group workshops
  • Visits to film and television studios and sets
  • Guest lectures, staged readings, and pitch sessions

At the end of each residency, you will return home ready to begin writing, submitting your work in installments online, participating in online peer/advisor workshops, attending virtual meetings with your advisor, and enrolling in two online topics classes per semester. 

Low-Residency MFA 

Emerson’s MFA in Writing for Film and Television is a progressive two-year low residency program that brings together a community of students for focused, rigorous instruction. Building on Emerson’s long-standing Department of Visual and Media Arts, the low residency MFA program emphasizes practice in film and television writing as well as innovative writing for other emergent forms of media.

Each semester includes:

  • A six-day on-campus residency (alternating between Emerson's Boston campus and Emerson Los Angeles)
  • Online topics classes
  • Screenwriting workshops

Emerson’s campuses offer diverse environments where MFA students will have the opportunity to be closely connected to long-established communities of scriptwriters and filmmakers, as well as the feature film and television and cable industries.



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