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Masters Degrees (Technology In Education)

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The Education. International Perspectives (Technology in Education) MA allows you to study how the nature of teaching and learning is changing in a highly connected environment. Read more
The Education: International Perspectives (Technology in Education) MA allows you to study how the nature of teaching and learning is changing in a highly connected environment.

Learners are increasingly relying on each other and the Internet for their learning and metacognition resources. As an educator you need to understand your role in such an environment and how to use Information, Communication and Educational Technology effectively for achieving your objectives.

On the course you will cover:
-Self-organised learning environments
-Why pedagogy matters
-The impact of technology on education
-The latest innovations in educational technology

This course will be useful for educators. Through developing knowledge of this subject your teaching skills will be strengthened and employability will improve. The course will also be of interest to people with an IT background who are keen on developing or supporting technology enhanced learning.

The course builds on a strong research base in three research centres in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences:
-The Centre for Learning and Teaching
-The EG West Centre
-SOLE Central

The course also draws on the expertise of a number of highly regarded academics. These include:
-Professor Sugata Mitra
-Professor David Leat

The Education: International Perspectives (Technology in Education) MA is one of a suite of courses. You may also be interested in:
-Education: International Perspectives (Leadership and Management), MA
-Education: International Perspectives (Teaching and Learning), MA

These MAs are flexible in nature and you will have the option to study modules across the three different courses.

Delivery

The majority of taught modules are offered in the first semester, including some sessions which are run in the early evening and on Saturdays. During the year there is a development to a greater element of self-study and semi-independent research and project work.

You complete the course with a research project focusing on a topic of interest to you.

There is an extended induction programme that provides you with support for advanced study, including assignment writing and information and communications and technology (ICT) training.

Placements

You will have the opportunity to carry out a placement as part of your taught modules. Your placement will be in an educational setting such as a local primary or secondary school. This is enjoyable and useful in contextualising your understanding of learning theory.

You also have the option of taking a longer placement outside the UK, adding to the international perspectives nature of the course.

Facilities

As a student in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences you'll have access to facilities and a growing collection of online resources, including:
-A well-stocked Education Resource Centre
-Language Analysis Lab
-A phonetics lab
-An audio-video lab
-A recording studio

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice. Read more
Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Through online delivery of content, our Higher Education MA offers you the flexibility to create a programme that suits your professional development needs in the field of university teaching, and is offered on a part-time basis over five years.

The programme allows you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules. You will do this by engaging with the explicit pedagogic framework that underpins the programme, emphasising the connections between concepts, theory and practice, teaching and research, disciplinary methods, and teachers and students.

On the programme you will analyse issues relating to your everyday teaching practice, share practice and explore solutions with your fellow participants and tutors.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied over three academic years and is part-time via distance learning. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

On successful completion of the PGDip in Higher Education and a review of a portfolio of work via an accreditation panel, participants may apply to become a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (subject to accreditation). The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Teaching in Your Own Discipline
-Researching in Higher Education
-Research Dissertation
-Signature Concepts in Higher Education
-Evaluating Educational Research
-Assessment and Feedback
-From Student Voice to Co-Enquiry
-Peer Observation of Teaching
-Moving into Academic Leadership
-Designing Technology Enhanced Learning
-Exploring Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Clinical Teaching
-Technical and Professional Skills Teaching in Veterinary Education

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Contribute to the development of participants' theoretically informed understandings, and teach in ways that support epistemological access for a diverse student body
-Respect participants' disciplinary backgrounds, and encourage participants to interrogate the nature of their own disciplines and relate this to ideas presented in the programme
-Promote reflective practice, requiring critical engagement based on evidence and theory with the roles and practices of higher education teaching, rather than having as its goal the teaching of a set of generic skills and techniques
-Disrupt participants' existing beliefs about teaching and learning

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes. The overarching programme learning outcomes are to:
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Knowledge and understanding
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Professional practical skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Key / transferable skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature
-Further details of the programme’s pedagogic framework is available by contacting the programme team. The programme is aligned to the requirements of the UK Professional Standards Framework at D3 which relates to Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

Initial enquires should be directed to Dr Dawn Morley -

STUDENT EXPERIENCE

As part of induction to the programme, you will have a discussion with a personal tutor to help you make the appropriate choices for your professional learning journey based on your previous teaching and learning experience in the higher education context and your developmental aspirations.

A personal tutor will work with you to develop a personalised plan to ensure you get the most from the programme by developing your professional knowledge and skills.

REGISTRATION

As we recognised that you will be working within your own higher education institutions while you study, the programme is offered as part-time registration. It is anticipated that the Diploma would be completed within two years of registration and the Dissertation would normally be completed within an additional year.

You will be registered initially for the MA in Higher Education (180 credits). However, you can choose to step-off at Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or the Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) Level.

You can decide to study for a general MA in Higher Education or a MA in Higher Education with a specialist pathway. Specialist pathways are only available for the MA in Higher Education (not at the award of Diploma).

If you decide, a pathway is right for you, you will need to take 60 credits from the specialist modules and conduct research within the Research Dissertation module on an area relating to the pathway. The following are the three specialist pathways available:
-Academic Leadership
-Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Education

If you decide to take the Academic Leadership pathway, you will be awarded for example, 'MA in Higher Education (Academic Leadership)'.

Postgraduate Certificate
The postgraduate certificate is built around the compulsory module of 'Teaching in Your Own Discipline'. You will choose three optional modules that help builds your own professional pathway and suits your needs.

Postgraduate Diploma
For the Postgraduate Diploma, based on your personal/professional development plan, you will choose three further modules that fulfil your personal and professional aims and which strengthens your activities, knowledge and professional values in your career.

You will also do the compulsory module of 'Researching in Higher Education', which aims to help you to start thinking about how to investigate and explore issues that intrigues and challenges you in the Higher Education landscape.

MA
For the MA in Higher Education, you will have to conduct a piece of independent research as part of the compulsory Research Dissertation module.

This allows you to investigate an issue that you have personally selected that will contribute to your growing understanding of your professional practice.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This course is flexible in that it offers several entry routes, choices for modular study and appropriate academic targets. Read more
This course is flexible in that it offers several entry routes, choices for modular study and appropriate academic targets. Those who have already completed either the BSMS Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Education (or equivalent, if APL requested) or the BSMS Postgraduate Certificate in Simulation Studies, may enter at Postgraduate Diploma Level. These participants would then successfully complete a further three 20-credit optional modules to achieve a Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Education (120 M level credits). Normally these modules would be completed part-time within one academic year.

Participants wishing to progress to Masters level must include Module MDM 10 ‘Research Methods & Critical Appraisal’ in their choice of three. A 16000-word Dissertation (as well as a 3000-word draft paper for publication) in the academic field of clinical education completes the Master of Science degree (180 M level credits). This would normally be completed in a further year, but some students with busy NHS jobs find it can take up to two years to complete.

For those who have not yet taken any ‘M Level’ postgraduate study in this area, the normal route would be to take at least two of the the ‘PG Cert Med Ed’ modules in year 1 (MDM 28/140), and then proceed with the PG Diploma/Masters routes in years 2 & 3, as described above.

Key Areas of Study

The overall aim of the course is to promote knowledge of and research into learning, teaching and communication in a clinical context, together with facilitating a reflective awareness of participants’ related educational skills and their ongoing development.
-Learning, teaching and communication skills theory & practice in clinical education
-Development of the participant’s identity as a teacher and facilitator in educational settings
-Simulation in clinical education
-Feedback & debriefing in educational contexts
-Clinical educational research as an academic discipline and its importance in the praxis of teaching
-Teaching as leadership & facilitation, both face-to-face and through the use of technology enhanced and blended learning

Course Structure

The format of assessment throughout the course is varied: some modules are assessed by more traditional 3,000 word written assignments, centred on a topic relevant to the student’s own practice or in-depth analyses of specific case studies or significant educational events. Others feature the development of specific educational tools (e.g. on–line learning or simulation-based assessment), focussing on more practical aspects of clinical education. Students will also develop a personal educational portfolio of about 5,000 words using an appropriate national professional standards framework i.e. Health Education Academy (HEA) or Academy of Medical Educators (AoME).The Dissertation module involves a personal research project and is assessed by a 16,000 word thesis plus a draft paper for submission for publication in an appropriate academic journal.

MSc
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education
PLUS (2 of 4) Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM148 Principles and Practice of Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services and/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
PLUS
-MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal
PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM96 Medical Education Research Dissertation Mandatory (60 credits)

PGDip
-MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
-MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education Mandatory (20 credits)
PLUS (3 of 5)
-MDM148 Principles and Practice of SimulationAnd/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in SimulationAnd/or Optional (20 credits)
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
And/or
-MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal Optional (20 credits)

PGCert
MDM28 Learning and Teaching in Medical Education PLUS Mandatory (20 credits)
MDM140 Pedagogical Practice in Medical Education Mandatory (20 credits)
PLUS (1 of 6)
MDM29 Advanced Communication Skills and Strategies in Medical Education Optional (20 credits)
MDM148 Principles and Practice of Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
MDM149 Feedback & Debriefing in Simulation and/or Optional (20 credits)
MDM110 Leadership and Change Management in Clinical Services Optional (20 credits)
And/or
MDM162 Technology Enhanced & Blended Learning Optional (20 credits)
And/or
MDM10 Research Methods & Critical Appraisal Optional (20 credits)

Career Opportunities

This course provides health professionals with a firm base to underpin their role as medical educators.

Formal credentialing in medical and clinical education is currently being considered seriously at national level in the UK and elsewhere, and the ‘Teaching Excellence Framework’ (May 2016) for higher education institutions in the UK also means that careers in medical or clinical education are likely to be enhanced via the acquisition of formal qualifications in clinical teaching. This course provides an ideal vehicle for participants to pursue an appropriate level of study for their educational commitments and in this national context, should help them in career development.

Any clinician wishing to take a professional approach to their postgraduate studies in medical or clinical education would be strongly recommended to consider this new course.

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The Professional Practice in Higher Education (PPHE) programme is based upon a credit system that enables students to select modules and patterns of study to suit their individual needs and interests. Read more
The Professional Practice in Higher Education (PPHE) programme is based upon a credit system that enables students to select modules and patterns of study to suit their individual needs and interests. All modules are credit rated and lead to the following qualifications:

• MA degree: 180 credits; 120 acquired for the Diploma plus 60 for a Research Project/ Dissertation
• Postgraduate Diploma: 120 credits acquired from any combination of modules
• Postgraduate Certificate: 60 credits acquired from any combination of modules

Students may also take modules that lead to particular awards within the programme:

• Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Learning in Higher Education: 60 credits acquired from a set of three required modules. This qualification is designed primarily for participants who are in their early years of teaching in higher education, though it may also be taken by more experienced staff. Based upon the UK’s Professional Standards Framework for Higher Education, the award qualifies teachers for Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

• Postgraduate Certificate in Research Degree Supervision and Management: 60 credits acquired from a pair of 30-credit modules. This qualification is designed to meet the needs of teachers who are new to research degree supervision and management, though it may also be taken by experienced staff.

The programme enables participants to plan their course of study according to their own needs and interests. Most modules (subject to availability) can be taken in any order and in any combination, though we would advise new teachers to include the ‘Teaching and Learning in Higher Education’ module among their initial options. The Master’s Project or Dissertation should be taken on completion of the PG Diploma. Tutorials will be available to help participants plan their course of studies.

Modules may be selected to create various levels of part-time study. The minimum enrolment is for one 15-credit module per year. The maximum enrolment is for a full-time 180-credit Master’s degree.

Modules

• Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (30 credits)*
• Course Design and Assessment (15)*
• Using Learning Technology in Higher Education (15)*
• Research Degree Supervision (30)**
• Research Management (30)**
• Mentoring and Coaching in Higher Education (15)
• Curriculum Models and Curriculum Development in Higher Education (15)
• The Teacher Practitioner (15)
• Teaching and Supporting Academic Writing in Higher Education (15)
• Quality Management in Higher Education (15)
• Linking Teaching and Research (15)
• Sustainability in Higher Education (15)
• Delivering Effective Outcomes and Change through Teams (15)
• Enterprise and Higher Education (15)
• E-learning, Teaching and Assessment (15)
• E-learning: hardware and software (15)
• E-learning with Web 2.0 (15)
• Designing and Conducting a Pedagogical Research Project (15)
• The Role of Information Literacy in Students’ Learning and Research (15)
• Teaching and Learning within and beyond the Disciplines (15)
• Marketing Matters in Higher Education (15)
• Employability in Higher Education (15)
• Pedagogical Research Project (30)
• Master’s Project or Dissertation (60)

* Modules required for the PGCert, Professional Learning in Higher Education
** Modules required for the PGCert, Research Degree Supervision and Management

Teaching methods and resources

Most modules are delivered through two or three half-day sessions, including mini-lectures, seminars, workshops and presentations, supported where appropriate by online discussions and activities. Sessions are designed to promote the sharing of ideas, expertise and experiences within a professional community of practice, so we will encourage participation and contributions from everyone. One module (‘Teaching and Learning in Higher Education’, for new teachers) includes some teaching observation sessions, and some modules provide opportunities for peer mentoring. Project and Dissertation modules will be largely delivered by individual supervision, and E-learning modules will be held in ICT training rooms.

Throughout the programme, participants will be supported by individual and small-group tutorials, and will be invited to attend occasional professional development lectures and seminars organised by the Centre for Learning and Teaching Development each year.

Learning resources for the programme will be available through the university’s library and information services. Modules have been designed to make the most of the wide range of scholarly material that is now freely available online, and participants will have access to the online resources and learning opportunities afforded by the university’s virtual learning environment (Minerva) which will provide links to key resources for each module.

The teaching sessions for some modules will be delivered within a few weeks, some over a period of several months, and some throughout the academic year. Further information about the organisation, dates, times and location of the teaching sessions for each module can be found in the Programme Calendar, available from .

Assessment methods

Assessment for all modules is by coursework, based upon the completion of assignments designed to promote understanding, enhancement and/or application of professional practices in higher education. Each module has its own assessment tasks, usually one or two per module. Forms of assessment include work-based activities, action plans, reports, reflective logs, portfolios, presentations, reviews, case studies, business plans, short essays, action-research documents, and (for the Master’s degree) a dissertation/research project.

Career Opportunities

The PPHE programme is designed to support the development of all academic and professional staff, teaching, managing or supporting HE students, at a time when evidence of professional development is increasingly expected of all staff, not least for new appointments and promotions. A recognised certificate in teaching in higher education is becoming a requirement for all lecturing positions in the UK, and our certificate enables participants to become more effective and confident HE lecturers. The certificate is recognised by the Higher Education Academy: completion of the 'Teaching and Learning in HE' module (HE7001) leads automatically to Associate Fellowship, and completion of 3 modules (HE7001, 7002 and 7003) leads to Fellowship of the HEA. This means that the CPLHE qualification is recognised by other institutions as a teaching qualification for HE and is equivalent to other HEA-accredited postgraduate certificates in HE.

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The international masters in Law and Technology offers students the chance to develop cutting-edge and interdisciplinary expertise within the burgeoning field of technology regulation. Read more
The international masters in Law and Technology offers students the chance to develop cutting-edge and interdisciplinary expertise within the burgeoning field of technology regulation.

Strongly multidisciplinary and incorporating both European and international law, the masters in Law & Technology offers you the chance to develop both multidisciplinary knowledge and an area of specialised expertise within the field of Law and Technology - giving you more options to pursue the career of your choice.

The program is closely affiliated with the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society (TILT), an institute consistently ranked amongst the top in Europe for both research and education by the Legal Research and Education Assessment Committees. The masters in Law and Technology is consistently rated one of the best international masters program within Tilburg Law School.

Learning is informal, highly interactive and closely connected to professional practice, with lawyers from international offices systematically involved in the lectures. Students also have the opportunity to take part in internships during their studies.

Program Law and Technology

The masters in Law and Technology offers education in close relation to innovative research in the field of Law & Technology. It gives students the opportunity to develop their own specialized area of expertise within the field of Law & Technology.

Legal+

The masters in Law & Technology equips you with the multidisciplinary knowledge essential for responding to the possibilities and risks presented by new technologies. Content covers regulatory issues in the public and private spheres, as well as subjects such as comparative law, jurisprudence, ethics and public administration, in addition to traditional legal doctrine. Students develop a broad, contextual awareness of additional modalities of regulation such as social morality and economic self-arrangement.

Specialization

The Law and Technology program offers you the opportunity to develop a specialization in a particular subject area thanks to a curriculum that covers everything from intellectual property law to biotechnology or ICT. You can focus on traditional legal areas such as private law or European law, or develop a broader overview that combines, for example, private law, criminal law and human rights law.

International perspective

Technological developments generally cross borders, with the Internet perhaps the most obvious example. While internationalization offers opportunities and possibilities, it also gives rise to a host of issues from a regulatory perspective. The Law and Technology masters ensures you are well-prepared to operate in an international context by continuously applying an international perspective to the issues at hand.

No background in science or technology required

Prospective students do not require background knowledge in technology or science. Of more importance is your affinity with the social aspects of technology. Students with backgrounds in areas other than law can apply if at least 90 ECTS of the courses in their bachelors were similar to those of the bachelors at Tilburg Law School. A premaster program (currently only in Dutch) is available for students who do not meet this criteria.

Interactive and close-knit learning environment

Learning in the Law and Technology masters is interactive, informal and cross-cultural. You join an international student body, within which students regularly work in international teams, participate in discussions and present their ideas on legal concepts and issues. Students are strongly encouraged to interact with their TILT lecturers, made possible by numerous extracurricular events such as seminars and workshops.

Good practical training opportunities

TILT has excellent contacts with government and semi-government agencies, companies, and law firms. TILT is frequently approached by these professional bodies about practical training opportunities and internships and, together with students, actively endeavors to find appropriate trainee projects for students. You will be taught how to write web policies, position papers, and policy documents as preparation for your future career.

Education coupled with pioneering research

Students learn from scholars from the Tilburg Institute for Law, Technology and Society (TILT) - scientists engaged in innovative research recognized at a national as well as international level. These scholars come together from diverse disciplines including private law, public law, criminal law, international law and human rights, ICT law, social and political studies amongst others. Education is interlaced with academic insights from these new research lines. When possible, TILT actively involves students in its research projects.

Challenging and creative

We encourage Law and Technology students to develop and substantiate their own opinions and ideas on the content presented. Within the program, teaching methods encourage critical debate and active participation.

Career Perspective Law and Technology

Legal experts in the field of law and technology are in high demand within many industries and sectors. Your area of specialization can also prepare you for more specific roles within the field.

A wide variety of future career paths are available to graduates of the masters in Law & Technology. You will be qualified to pursue a leading position as a consultant, researcher, policy-maker, or lawyer specialized in law and technology in various types of centers, including large international law firms, in-house legal departments of large firms, the civil service (including the EC civil service), and transnational organizations (both for-profit and non-profit).

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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert). Read more

About the Course

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

If you are a graduate who would like to motivate and develop children’s computing/IT knowledge and skills and inspire them towards computing/computer science qualifications/career paths, then becoming a Computing/Computer Science teacher is an exciting and rewarding career option.

The Importance of Computing education

Computing education according to the new Computing Programme of Study (DfE, 2013) should enable pupils to: understand and change the world through computational thinking; think logically and with precision and apply underlying principles to understand real-world systems.

It should in general provide a broad understanding of both natural and artificial systems and forge substantial links with the teaching of other curricular subjects such as mathematics, design and technology. Furthermore, it should enable pupils to become digitally literate-so that they are able to use and express themselves through information and communication technology.

Therefore it is both a challenging and exciting time to be able to enthuse and teach pupils about information and computation principles; designing and programming digital systems and the use of IT to create products and solutions.

Our approach

The PGCE Secondary Computer Science and Information and Communications Technology (CS-ICT) Course at Brunel University London, draws on outstanding expertise and experience in Education to build upon your commitment to the teaching profession and the subject area. In a combined effort with our partnership schools we prepare you to teach computing, i.e. computer science, digital literacy and information technology to pupils in secondary school.

We support you in developing skills in planning lessons, adopting and implementing learning and behaviour management strategies, in order that you become an effective Computing/IT classroom teacher. We also encourage critical thinking, exploration and discussions about the new Computing curriculum, its implementation and adoption in schools; the teaching of computing and the challenges and opportunities it presents.

There is also a strong emphasis on collaborative learning/work in the course i.e. students are encouraged to work together and learn from each other.

We promote the use of paired placements to enhance the experience for student teachers, wherever possible. In addition these collaborative skills are developed further and extended through cross-curricular workshops/tasks with other subject-students on the PGCE course and other subject-teachers in schools. In doing so, we work actively to seek ways of promoting the integration and use of ICT across the curriculum.

During the course you will be provided the opportunity to teach in two placement schools enabling you to gain experiences of teaching Computing/IT at Key Stage 3 and 4 and for qualifications at post-sixteen. While the university-based study will consist of seminars, workshops, lectures, demonstrations, peer-led sessions and research activities.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding

Aims

The course will enable you to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people
-Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status
-Understand the relationships between Education and Computing/ICT Education within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people
-Recognise the contribution that Computing/ICT as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of the Computing National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the Computing National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils
-Consider the integration of information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning across the curriculum
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons - in particular the importance and implications of e-safety
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning
-Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Course Content

The course is organised in termly blocks which address both Education Studies and Computer Science and ICT Subject Studies, the understanding of which is developed as the year progresses.

Throughout the course, theory and practice are integrated across all contexts within the partnership. The course is planned and delivered in partnership with Computer Science and ICT colleagues in local schools. The Teachers’ Standards are mapped to every aspect of course provision to facilitate the best possible opportunities to support the process of your professional learning.

In order to support your preparation for the course there are pre-course conditions set for every successful applicant to the course. This includes initial school experience tasks which require you to spend time in both primary and secondary schools.

School Experience
The course also comprises three blocks of school experience, providing the opportunity to work in diverse and contrasting settings, to support you working towards meeting the Teachers’ Standards. School experience, organised in different ways, takes place in partnership schools selected for the quality of teaching and learning and the support offered to student teachers by experienced subject mentors.
Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement
This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will incur a cost, subject to change, and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/423902/PGCert-Secondary-Education-with-QTS.pdf

For more information on the Special Features of the course and Teaching and Assesment, please visit this link http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgce-information-and-communication-technology-secondary

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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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Physical Education is a compulsory part of the National Curriculum from the ages of 5-16. Read more

About the Course

Physical Education is a compulsory part of the National Curriculum from the ages of 5-16. As part of all children's education, Physical Education provides a crucial and exciting contribution to their education, development, competence and confidence in a range of physical activities both as part of the National Curriculum and throughout their life-course.

The Secondary Physical Education Courses at Brunel University London have a long standing national reputation for high quality Teacher Education.
The PGCE Secondary Physical Education course is very popular, drawing on outstanding expertise and experience in Education to build upon your commitment to the teaching profession and the subject area.
The course will enable you to develop your knowledge and skills, supporting you in becoming an outstanding teacher who will help young people to reach their full potential and improve their mental and physical wellbeing.
The intensive programme combines courses in principles and methods of teaching with practical school-based teaching placements and students are assessed on both elements.

Aims

The course aims are to ensure that you are able to:

-Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people.
Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status.
-Understand the relationships between Education, Physical Education and sport within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people.
-Recognise the contribution that Physical Education as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners.
-Think critically about what it means to be physically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area;
-Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of the Physical Education National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school.
-Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the Physical Education National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression.
-Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses.
-Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum.
-Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils.
-Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in Physical Education.
-Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons.
-Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning.
-Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area.
-Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning.
-Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times.
-Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Funding

Please follow this link https://www.getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/

Course Content

This is a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) course, also known as Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert).

The course is organised in termly blocks which address both Education Studies and Physical Education Subject Studies, the understanding of which is developed as the year progresses.

Throughout the course, theory and practice are integrated in both the University and school contexts. The course is planned and delivered in partnership with Physical Education colleagues in local schools. The Teachers’ Standards are mapped to every aspect of course provision to facilitate the best possible opportunities to support the process of your professional learning.

In order to support your preparation for the course there are pre-course conditions set for every successful applicant to the course. This includes initial school experience tasks which require you to spend time in both primary and secondary schools.

School Experience
The course comprises three blocks of school experience, providing the opportunity to work in diverse and contrasting settings, to support you working towards meeting the Teachers’ Standards. School experience, organised in different ways, takes place in partnership schools selected for the quality of teaching and learning and the support offered to student teachers by experienced subject mentors.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) requirement

This course involves regular access to children and/or vulnerable adults. Where this is the case, students will be required to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) application, previously known as a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. The application will incur a cost, subject to change, and the University will send further instructions as part of the admissions process. For further guidance please email .

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course:
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure
http://www.brunel.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/423902/PGCert-Secondary-Education-with-QTS.pdf

To read more about the Special Features of this course and Teaching and assesment, please follow this link http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgce-physical-education-secondary

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This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 5-11 years and covers all areas of the Key Stage 1 and 2 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Read more
This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 5-11 years and covers all areas of the Key Stage 1 and 2 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. You'll gain 60 Masters level credits and be awarded with a Post-Graduate Certificate of Education.

The programme will give you an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice, equality and diversity to prepare you for a career in London schools. As a part of the programme you will experience different schools and also have an opportunity to work in an Alternative Education Setting. At Masters level you'll have the opportunity to develop a specific area of expertise.

LSBU has a particular focus on social justice and equality that is well matched to the needs of schools in urban and multicultural areas. At LSBU we encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues.

Upper Primary Pathway

From 16/17 this pathway will be available. If you select this pathway, you will gain the knowledge and skills to teach within the primary sector, with a focus on the 7-11 age range (KS2). Your school placements will ensure that you experience a variety of school settings. Your reading placement will be in Key Stage 1, and both your block practices will be in Key Stage 2.

Bursaries

The Government provides the following bursaries to be off-set against tuition fees, via the Training Agency. Tuition fees need to be paid by all students direct to LSBU. Students can use any bursary they receive from the Training Agency for this purpose.

If you have a 1st Class or 2.1 Degree or a PhD you will be eligible for a bursary of £3,000

You do not need to apply for bursaries. Once you have firmly accepted an unconditional offer of a place on a Teacher Training course (and supplied proof of your degree grade) the University will liaise with the Department for Education to put your bursary in place.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/primary-pgce

Modules

H Level Modules:
- Core curriculum
This module covers all aspects of the English, mathematics, science and computing national curriculum at Key Stage 1 and 2.

- Professional studies
This module covers theories of learning, planning, teaching and assessment, classroom management and employment.

- Foundation subjects
This module covers the national curriculum foundation subjects including: history, geography, art and design, music, and design technology.

- School experience
School experience begins in week four of the course. During your Reading Mentor placement you'll be placed in a local school three times a week, gaining experience in the teaching of reading. You'll have opportunities to work with a designated child to develop an in-depth understanding of how teaching relates to pupil learning and progress. Your first block school experience is eight weeks and culminates with you leading a class. School experience 2 is a nine week block, and by the end of this placement you will be expected to teach the whole class for up to three days a week.

- Alternative education setting
In term two you will arrange your own placement following your interests in an Alternative Education Setting. This placement is designed to give you a wider view of education and develop explicit skills that you will then be able to take into mainstream practice. For example you may choose to work in a Special Educational Needs setting or in a Pupil Referral Unit.

M Level Modules:
- Equality, inclusion and citizenship
This module will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context. You'll undertake a small piece of classroom research.

Plus one of the following module options:
- SEND (Special Educational Needs and Disability)
This module discusses and explores how to enable learners with Special Educational Needs and/or Disabilities (SEND) to achieve in their learning. If you select this module your first block school experience will in in a Special Needs school and your Alternative Education Assessment will be in a main stream school.

- Connect, consume, create: ICT in the Primary School
Explore the most up-to-date research, knowledge and understanding that underpins ICT and the Computing curriculum in primary schools.

- Performing Arts
Prepares you to teach the performing arts subjects in a culturally diverse society.

- Raising Achievement in Mathematics (RAiM)
The RAiM module will help you gain knowledge and understanding to successfully teach mathematics with competence and confidence, and begin to develop as a specialist in this area. Part of your Alternative Education Setting placement will be in a mathematics department of a secondary school.

- English: Language, learning and culture
This module focuses on spoken language as a key area of the English curriculum in order to explore culture and deepen learning in the classroom.

Employability

Completion and employment rates for our PGCE are both above the sector norms and we have been identified as a good provider of initial teacher training (OFSTED 2014). Although we pride ourselves in providing teachers for London schools, successful students enter the teaching profession in a variety of schools/nurseries within the UK.

All students entering the course have the possibility of gaining up to 60 credits at Masters level, which can be used by students to count towards the award of full Masters qualifications (such as the LSBU MA in Education) gained via further study after graduation.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

Academics from other institutions and related industries are invited as guest speakers to form part of the Equality Inclusion and Citizenship module. The Alternative Educational Settings placement provides an opportunity for you to experience teaching and learning in a completely different environment, and is one of the unique aspects of our programme. This placement may be related to your choice of Masters Level option module. For further information please see Programme Modules.

Placements

During the course you will undertake placements in at least two schools. Placement schools are chosen to provide different experiences including size, organisation and location. Our partnership works with a wide range schools across London. Placements are allocated as best fit for each trainee, but if you live in outer London or beyond it may require careful planning by you so that you are able to work at assigned schools.

In addition you will undertake a placement in an alternative education setting. The choice of placement will depend on the option you choose and your interest in the education sector. Examples of placements include SEN schools, pupil referral units, hospitals, overseas etc.

A key element of the programme is to prepare you to work in multi-cultural, urban settings. In terms of school experience placements you will normally be required to do at least one practice in an inner or outer London state school.

Teaching and learning

The university based sessions are taught through lectures, workshops, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials. The aim throughout is to encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues, aims and objectives. We aim to provide a learning community that actively challenges inequality and injustice.

In particular, the module on Equality, Inclusion and Citizenship will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context.

You will be encouraged to make links between the theoretical and practical elements of the course. We use an interactive model of teaching and learning and you will be encouraged to think critically about subjects to inform your understanding of effective methods of teaching and learning and how best to apply these in classroom situations.

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This programme offers theoretical and practical support for those embarking on a career in Higher Education (HE). It considers different approaches to teaching and learning, grounded in educational research, and related aspects such as curriculum design and delivery and the principles and purposes of assessment. Read more
This programme offers theoretical and practical support for those embarking on a career in Higher Education (HE). It considers different approaches to teaching and learning, grounded in educational research, and related aspects such as curriculum design and delivery and the principles and purposes of assessment. It enables you to bring these considerations to bear on your own work and experience as a teacher, researcher or practitioner.

The emphasis throughout is on developing an understanding of the HE context, recognising the diversity of provision – universities, Further Education institutions, specialist institutions, professional providers – and practices, for example, in different disciplinary fields.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/239/higher-education

About the Centre for the Study of Higher Education

The Centre for the Study of Higher Education provides a base for postgraduate provision with a distinctive focus on the field of Higher Education. CSHE is also a focal point for research in this area, supported by seminars and events to which all postgraduate students and staff are warmly welcomed.

We offer three taught postgraduate programmes (PCert, PDip and MA in Higher Education) and a PhD in Higher Education. Taught programmes are tailored to different levels of experience and designed for you to select subject matter according to your own professional interests and role. The emphasis throughout is on developing an understanding of the Higher Education context, the diversity of provision and the implications for all aspects of academic work in the 21st century.

The PhD programme, offered on a full-time or part-time basis, is aimed at those with a professional or scholarly interest in any aspect of Higher Education who wish to develop as independent researchers in the field.

Students on our programmes come from a wide range of subject backgrounds and bring a rich variety of experiences to their work, resulting in a lively interdisciplinary dimension to taught modules and opportunities for debate.

Please note that we are unable to offer tuition or supervision in relation to other phases of education (e.g. schools), or to schoolteacher education.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment is by an essay of 3,000 words or negotiated equivalent for each module.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- assist you to become an effective professional HE teacher informed by scholarship, research and innovation

- assist you to become an effective research worker, supervisor of research students and staff, and manager of projects (where appropriate)

- provide a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the principal institutions, constituents and procedures of a higher education institution

- introduce you to a range of different theoretical approaches to the study of education and develop a critical awareness of education in its historical, socio-economic and political contexts

- enable you to study some selected aspects of higher education in greater depth.

Study support

- Research expertise and resources

The Centre for the Study of Higher Education has members of staff based in all faculties in the University, as well as a core team of Education specialists. Higher Education is a broad interdisciplinary field, and members of the Centre for the Study of Higher Education research and publish on a wide range of subjects. Full details can be found on individual staff webpages. The Centre draws on expertise from a range of disciplines; we offer joint supervision with other academic schools, and can accommodate a wide range of research topics.

The University library houses a growing collection of books and journals on higher education, many of which can be accessed online. You also have access to the extensive training and other resources provided through the Graduate School.

- Research seminars/events

The Centre holds regular research seminars where academic staff and postgraduate students discuss their research and work in progress. Every term we also invite a number of external speakers to give lectures and seminars. Our students have access to lively national and international research networks and conferences through the Centre’s active involvement in the Society for Research into Higher Education, the British Educational Research Association and other scholarly bodies.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Recent contributions include: Journal of Workplace Learning; Discourse; Journal of Further and Higher Education; Teaching in Higher Education; International Journal of Lifelong Education.

- Global Skills Award

All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Research areas

Research on HE at Kent includes work on education policy, the philosophy, economics, management and politics of HE, disciplinary teaching and learning, learning technology, academic practice and sociological perspectives on academic work.

Careers

Our students are higher education professionals at various stages of their careers, ranging from early career teachers to lecturers to experienced senior leaders. Throughout, we aim to enhance students’ understanding and capacity for critical analysis of the contexts and practices of higher education.

The MA in Higher Education further encourages students to reflect upon their own professional experiences through critical engagement with topics of academic interest. After completing the MA, recent graduates have gained promotion within their existing roles, taken up new employment or commenced PhD study.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings. Read more
The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings.
Educators are provided with the opportunity to further their qualifications through professional development. This coursework program aligns with the requirements and specifications of the Australian Quality Framework (AQF) and provides three major areas of expertise relevant to professional educators. The Master of Education does not lead to teacher registration.
The flexible 18 month Master of Education coursework program entails four core subjects, including an enquiry-based project, and provides the opportunity to specialise in up to two majors.

Leadership and Management Major

The Leadership and Management major is relevant to aspiring, expectant and existing leaders wanting to raise their effectiveness and improve their performance in leadership and management. This major is relevant to professionals working in schools, universities (as well as Government), community and corporate organisations.
Interested parties include: specialist generalists, lead teachers, head teachers, subject masters and coordinators, administrators, support teachers, educational consultants and supervisors, human resource management team members, and system supervisors.
If you undertake our Leadership and Management major you will:
*Acquire knowledge of concepts, theories and models which underpin current successful educational leadership and management practices in schools and school systems
*Critically analyse issues and literature concerning school improvement, effectiveness, review and evaluation
*Develop strategies to analyse and refl ect upon human relations issues in contemporary work environments
*Integrate interpersonal skills to develop a clearer understanding of relevant issues
*Employ critical analysis of key work issues in the new economy such as global integration, workplace diversity, and the impact of technology
*Explore and appreciate the impact of these issues on their own individual career management strategies.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Education, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Demonstrate knowledge of research or inquiry principles applicable to the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Investigate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, problems, concepts and theories, at an advanced level, and critically reflect on theory in relation to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Justify, interpret and present theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate advanced speaking, reading, writing, listening, collaborating and advocacy skills for Educational leadership in a field or sub field of Education
*Design, plan and ethically execute a substantial research and/or inquiry-based project with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability in the field or a sub-field of Education.

Award title

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)

Course pre-requisites

Completion of:
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years professional work experience in education; or
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate in education from one of the following JCU courses: Graduate Certificate of Education for Sustainability; Graduate Certificate in Research Methods [Education]; Graduate Certificate in Career Development; Graduate Certificate in Catholic Education; Graduate Certificate in Education (Academic Practice); or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Diploma in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Bachelor Honours Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position; or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position;or
Other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Division of Tropical Environments and Societies as equivalent to the above.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2– Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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