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Masters Degrees (Technical Writing)

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Why Surrey?. Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production.

Teaching is research-led, so you benefit from the individual expertise and passion of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published authors and academics, including our Poet in Residence and Distinguished Writer in Residence.

Programme overview

The MA Creative Writing programme will hone your research and writing skills to produce critically informed prose or poetry, and creative criticism. We will help you to locate your work in its literary and cultural context, and you will have the chance to reflect on your creative process and the finished work.

You will have access to a yearly calendar of events hosted at the University created to broaden your thinking, and develop your writing skills such as the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture, the annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and the Surrey Poetry Festival.

The MA in Creative Writing provides a strong foundation to embark upon a career in writing, communications, publishing, marketing, advertising, journalism or teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended portfolio.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The MA Programme in Creative Writing will prepare graduates to undertake a PhD programme in the relevant field.

It will also provide students with the transferable skills of creative writing, critical thinking, textual analysis and communication that are attractive to a wide range of employers, from the cultural industries to marketing and advertising to tourism and leisure to the civil service and public/private partnerships.

It is designed to build confidence and technical ability in a variety of modes of imaginative writing, and to provide students with a clear-eyed grounding in contemporary and historical contexts of text production and circulation, including practical advice on the workings of the publishing industry.

Devoted to assisting students to understand and meet the challenges of producing high quality creative writing in poetry and prose, the programme also provides advanced understanding of the contexts, theoretical paradigms, methodologies and modes of interpretation that are vital in a full understanding of literary production.

The main aims are to:

  • Produce work that reflects a high level of technical ability and engages productively with its historical, cultural and literary contexts
  • Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of literary criticism
  • Reflect on their own practice as literary critics and how this can help to improve their own creative practice

As a Master’s level programme, it also aims to instil in students the capacity for carrying out independent research.

Academics and events

As a student on this Masters, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published academics and authors.

You will have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include:

Novelists

  • Iain Sinclair
  • Monica Ali
  • Jaspreet Singh
  • Nikita Lalwani

Poets

  • J.H. Prynne
  • Robert Fitterman
  • Allen Fisher
  • Gilbert Adair

Critics

  • Rod Mengham
  • Bernard O’Donoghue
  • Barbara Hardy

Each year’s cultural activities begin with the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and Surrey Poetry Festival – both affiliated with the Creative Writing programmes at the University of Surrey – aim to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involve readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and more.

This graduate program is delivered by the University's Creative Writing team, all of whom are published authors and poets:

  • Dr Paul Vlitos, Lecturer in Creative Writing
  • Dr Holly Luhning, Lecturer in Creative Writing
  • Dr Stephen Mooney, Lecturer in Creative Writing and former Poet in Residence
  • Dr Angela Szczepaniak, Lecturer in Creative Writing

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The Aberystwyth MA in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. Read more

About the course

The Aberystwyth MA in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. You will be exposed to a range of contemporary writers of both prose and poetry, so that your own creative approach may be stimulated and develop in confidence and maturity. You will also engage in discussions about technique and undertake an exploration of the wider issues related to the practice of writing, such as the significance of genre and the mechanics of publication.

You will receive individual tuition from the excellent Departmental staff, all of whom are published creative writers. Under their guidance, you will produce a substantial portfolio in the form of a collection of poetry or an extended piece of prose fiction. In addition, you will develop a host of key transferrable skills that will benefit you in a range of academic or employment contexts.

This degree will suit you:

- If you want comprehensive training in advanced methods of creative writing
- If you want to develop your creative vision and writing skills to the highest levels
- If you are looking for a detailed and constructive critique of your work
- If you want to work within a dynamic and supportive environment while producing a portfolio of creative writing

Course content and structure

You will study two core modules together with four option modules from the Department’s portfolio of MA provision or other relevant study areas, including Literary Studies. The core modules will equip you with the research skills and subject-specific knowledge required to master a range of practical and theoretical approaches to writing; and the option modules will enable you to direct your study into areas of specific interest. Each module comprises ten weeks of study with a weekly two-hour group meeting and provision for tutorial consultation. This framework for learning will inspire you to widen your artistic horizons and push you to develop your abilities within a constructive critical environment.

The centrally important component of the course is your Writing Portfolio. This piece, to comprise either prose or poetry, will be accompanied by a critical commentary explaining the work in its context and in appropriate analytical terms. We will take great care in assigning a supervisor to guide you whose interests will be as closely matched to your own as possible.

Core modules:

Research Skills
The Writing Portfolio
Writing and Publication

Optional modules:

Writing Fiction: Methods and Techniques
Writing Poetry: Rhymes and Reasons
Understanding Creativity
Writing Fiction: Wider Explorations
Writing Poetry: Modes in Contemporary Poetry

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: portfolios of prose and poetry, including critical commentaries and annotated bibliographies; a case study of a research project; and a study of a particular publisher of creative writing or type of publication. In the third semester, each student will complete a Writing Portfolio of creative writing with a critical commentary. The Portfolio can be in the form of poetry (30 pages plus 6,000 words) or prose fiction (14,000 plus 6000 words), but not a combination of the two.

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research abilities. This course will help you to master key skills that are required in wide variety of workplaces. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, and confidently present robust projects to the scrutiny of a group. Your MA in Creative Writing will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism or many other fields.

Key Skills and Competencies

Upon graduating from this MA in Creative Writing, you will have mastered an array of technical and creative skills relating to writing. You will be highly competent in factual research, evaluative writing and problem-solving through the process of writing. You will understand genre and register, narrative viewpoint and voice, and be able to justify your creative choices within your chosen form. You will possess an awareness of your intended readership and identify your place in the wider context of literary fiction and/or poetry. You will also have experience in giving and receiving stringent but supportive criticism within a positive group setting.

Self-Motivation and Discipline

Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

Transferable Skills

The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of academic and employment contexts. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand both particular expertise and strength in breadth. Therefore, as a trained writer with proven creative abilities, you will be desirable to any employer seeking individuals who can balance creative flair and artistic vision with a dependable work ethic and highly adaptable writing skills.

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The Communications - Professional Writing program prepares you to work as a versatile communications professional. Read more
The Communications - Professional Writing program prepares you to work as a versatile communications professional. With a focus on assessing audience needs and delivering thoughtful and relevant content, combined with effective project management techniques, you develop the skills you need to write and produce copy for a variety of professional settings and styles.

The innovative Communications - Professional Writing courses encompass a wide range of communications disciplines and vocational skills, including:
-Web copywriting
-Technical writing
-Proposal writing
-Writing for social media
-Content marketing
-Presentations and speech writing
-Content management
-Information design and data visualization
-Digital storytelling

As a student of the Communications – Professional Writing program, you have the advantage of creating a diverse and professional portfolio that includes training modules, complex visual aids (such as infographics), and compelling layouts for many different print and virtual platforms (brochures, newsletters, websites and more). Thanks to your well-rounded training, you will be able to launch a writing career that can go the distance, taking on a variety of roles in both the profit and non-profit sectors.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-The Content Bootcamp, an intensive two-week workshop at the beginning of the first semester, builds on your academic writing skills, polishing your writing for a professional audience.
-A vocational program at its core, Communications – Professional Writing prepares you for a writing career with longevity. As such, every course has you producing professional quality work so that you graduate with a polished and diverse portfolio.
-Unique second-semester course components include creating training modules, implementing training programs, and leading virtual or live training sessions to complement the content and documentation created in first semester courses.
-The Digital Storytelling course, a standout feature, encourages you to think critically about the future of communications, and its role in business, technology and society in general. You have the opportunity to collaborate on a creative communications project, exploring what it means to be a communicator in a digital world.
-A field placement opportunity in the final semester provides you with valuable experiences in a variety of industries. Program faculty works with you to place you in an organization relevant to your long-term career goals.

​​Career Outlook
-Technical writer
-Communications coordinator
-Social media officer
-Editor
-Web copywriter
-Proposal writer
-Instructional designer
-Report writer/business analyst

Areas of Employment
-Arts and culture
-Retail and e-commerce
-Government and non-profit
-Finance
-Marketing
-Software development and IT
-Medicine
-Science
-Web design

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Unearth and connect the shared skills between writer, editor and publisher. With the Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing, you can gain a globally recognised, vocationally viable qualification designed with the changing nature of the publishing industry in mind. Read more

Unearth and connect the shared skills between writer, editor and publisher. With the Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing, you can gain a globally recognised, vocationally viable qualification designed with the changing nature of the publishing industry in mind.

This program has a practical focus aimed at building your knowledge and skill set across a broad spectrum of writing, publishing and editing, including digital writing and publishing, fiction and non‐fiction writing, print production, advanced editing for books and magazines and writing for young adults.

WHO IS IT FOR?

The Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing is for those who currently work in the creative writing, editing and publishing industry, or have recently completed and undergraduate degree. This qualification is for you if you want to build your project management, research and critical thinking in writing, editing and publishing projects, or develop sound knowledge of the commercial impetus of the global publishing industry.

WHERE WILL IT TAKE ME?

On graduation from the Master of Creative Writing, Publishing and Editing, you will be ready for work in professional fields including:

  • Book publishing
  • Freelance writing
  • Journalism
  • Print production
  • Technical writing
  • Writing and editing for digital media


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The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Read more

The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Students will receive structured support through writing workshops and one-to-one tutorials in order to develop their own ideas. Students will also study a broad range of literature from the 20th and 21st centuries, and produce new work in response.

Core Modules

Creative Writing Poetry OR Creative Writing Prose Fiction

Each student will take one of these writing-workshop modules. In these modules students will write longer pieces within their chosen literary discipline, sharing their work and giving and receiving feedback and suggestions from the module convenor and the other students. There are few if any writing exercises. Each student can expect to have their work scrutinised closely in a workshop setting several times. These modules are assessed via a portfolio of ten pages of poetry plus 2,000-word self-critique, OR a 6,000-word portfolio of prose fiction plus 2,000-word self-critique.

Reading as a Writer

This seminar module brings poets and prose writers together, and (unlike any of the other core modules for Creative Writing) is also open to English Studies students. Each week we discuss some key poetry and prose from across the twentieth century, focusing on the technical innovations introduced by the writers studied, and the ways in which writers learn from one another, both within their medium and beyond it. The module combines breadth and depth of coverage, offering students an advanced understanding of a range of writers, schools, and styles in order to broaden their research interests, and help them to identify and research a topic of their own choosing with guidance from a subject specialist in the extended essay part of the Research Project. It is assessed via two 3,000-word essays. 

Reading as a Writer: the Workshop

This is very much a companion module to Reading as a Writer, and is a writing-workshop module focusing on short, directed writing assignments and their discussion. The focus will be on formal and technical experiments, stretching students’ technical facility via assignments inspired by the texts studied on Reading as a Writer. Prose writers and poetry students will once again work side by side, sharing work and ideas, learning to appreciate literary conventions and their subversion. Each student can expect to have their work work shopped several times, though these engagements will not be as formal or thorough as those in Creative Writing Prose Fiction or Creative Writing Poetry. Assignments might include adapting syntactical techniques; investigative creative non-fiction; experimenting with poetic forms; creative translation; writing an opening paragraph; or trying out editing methods. It is assessed via a portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000 words of prose fiction, plus 2,000-word self-critique. 

Research Project

The Research Project provides students with the opportunity to produce a 6-8,000-word extended critical essay on a subject of their choosing. Students choose their own extended essay titles, with guidance from the module convenor and subject to the approval of the English Studies Board of Examiners. Focusing on depth rather than breadth, the essay is independently researched and builds on the work covered in the taught elements of the programme. Students will be expected to choose a research topic with particular bearing on their own creative practice, and to reflect on how their critical and creative work have informed one another, either in the main body of the essay, the introduction, or chapter dedicated to integrative reflection. Students may wish to refer to specific aspects of their own writing when writing this part of the essay. The Research Project also provides the opportunity for students to to produce a final portfolio of creative work: poets will be asked to produce ten pages of poetry; prose writers produce 6-8,000 words of fiction. The portfolio will consist of new work, produced after the completion of the structured workshop-oriented modules. The module is assessed via an extended essay of 6,000-8,000 words and a creative writing portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000-8,000 words of prose fiction.

Optional Modules

Creative Writing students would take one module of their own choosing, either from the English Studies MA modules or taking this new optional module:

The Word in the World

This module focuses on the ways in which the students’ writing can be made available to the public. It would take the form of a series of lectures and seminars covering topics such as: how writers make a living; the possibilities and challenges presented by collaborating with other artists; how to adjust teaching methods according to the setting and audience; how to write a pitch letter; how to get a literary agent; submitting work to poetry journals; how to make the most of web resources; how to communicate with an editor; book design, blurbs, jackets; writing copy; formats; sales and distribution channels; publicity and promotion; book reviewing, etc. This part of the module will be taught both in-house at Durham and via visiting speakers such as editors, industry experts. Students would also be invited to either collaborate with a student in another medium (most likely music or the visual arts) or go on a teaching or literary-industry placement that would take place in July. This module is assessed via one 3,000-word essay and one 3,000-word report on the industry placement, teaching placement, or collaborative project.



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The complete Masters (MSc) course in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of modern technical textiles, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career. Read more

The complete Masters (MSc) course in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of modern technical textiles, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career.

Graduates of this programme are expected to understand the whole process of converting fibrous materials into the end product and to be able to identify and analyse the appropriate material and production route for a specific end product. You will also have developed the expertise and skill to conduct quality evaluation of textile products.

The complete MSc programme is made up of taught course units and a research dissertation. The taught course units are delivered through a combination of lectures and practical laboratory work.

Special features

The Masters programme in Technical Textiles enables you to develop a high level of understanding of the advanced Technical Textiles sector, preparing you for a career in the textile or related industries as a manager or researcher, or for an academic career.

After successfully completing the programme, you will have gained a thorough grounding and understanding of the whole process of converting fibrous polymeric materials to the end product. This successful delivery to the Technical Textiles sector involves materials performance, Computer Aided Design (CAD), 2D/3D product design and specification, sustainability, effective supply chains and an understanding of diverse product sectors such as textile composites, protective wear, filtration, sportswear, medical textiles and the integration of electronics into textile structures.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed by a combination of exams and coursework. The coursework supports the development of your transferable skills such as literature review and report writing. You will complete your MSc programme with a dissertation project. Your dissertation is an opportunity to apply your learning on a five-month technical textiles project. It also enables you to further develop your knowledge and skill in your chosen field. Your choice of topic, in consultation with your personal tutor, will range in purpose from investigatory and problem-solving work, through studies of state-of-the-art technology and current practice, to experimental and analytical research.

Course unit details

 The taught units are:

  • Textile Materials and Performance Evaluation
  • Yarn Technology
  • Applied Manufacturing Processes
  • Advanced Manufacturing Techniques
  • Technical Textiles
  • Advanced Coloration and Performance Evaluation

Textile Materials and Performance Evaluation

This programme unit provides a wide range of topics in textile materials science, performance enhancement and testing that are fundamental for effective functioning in a technical capacity within any textiles or materials related organisation. 

  • Nature of man-made and natural fibres.
  • Characteristics of fabrics and fabric mechanical properties. Yarn and Nonwovens Technology
  • Principles and applications of KES-FB and FAST fabric evaluation systems. Comfort in garment microclimates.
  • Dimensional stability, surface modification techniques, oil/water repellency, waterproofing, coating, lamination, flame retardants and smart materials.
  • Microscopy and surface analysis.

Yarn and Nonwovens Technology

This programme unit introduces the technologies of producing yarns and nonwovens from staple fibres and continuous filaments and provides knowledge in the quality and quality control aspects of yarn production. 

  • Fibre preparation, ring and other modern spinning technologies, texturing, yarn quality control, fancy yarns, composite yarns and yarn preparation.
  • Nonwovens web forming technology including dry laying, air laying, wet laying, spun-bonding, melt-blowing. Nonwovens consolidation/bonding technologies; mechanical and chemical bonding; thermal bonding; applications of nonwoven products.

Applied Manufacturing Processes

This programme unit provides a working knowledge of the weaving, knitting and joining processes, types of machinery used, types of fabric structures and associated properties of the product fabrics.

  • Fundamentals of weaving. Shuttle and shuttleless looms; multi-phase weaving machines and other modern developments in weaving technology; warp preparation; technical weaving and braiding.
  • Classification and analysis of knitting techniques and knitting cycles; patterning and shaping; flat bed, circular, Tricot and Raschel knitting machines; modern knitting techniques; cycle of high-speed circular knitting machines; machine performance; yarn performance and properties in knitting; quality and the dimensions stability of the fabric.
  • Fabric joining techniques.

Fundamental Technology and Concepts for Industrial Manufacture

This programme unit provides a working knowledge of concepts of `production for profit', `economy of scale', the importance of the Supply Chain in Textile manufacturing, the importance of pre-competitive research, Design of Experiments(DoE), prototyping and technology transfer and the basics concepts of textile engineering & machine mechanics.

  • The fundamentals of engineering & machine mechanics in order to deal with the Technical Textiles end users in Aerospace, Automotive and other industries, sustainability and recycling issues in manufacturing and design.
  • The nature of the global traditional and technical textiles industry and concepts relating to successful manufacturing and supply chain. Nature of engineering & chemical industry as opposed to the textile industry. Certification requirements (e.g. Aerospace, Automotive, Healthcare, Sportswear), product development in real industrial context, Design of Experiments, quality & inspection, product lifecycles, Sustainable Design. The nature of the research and production environment, individual and team R&D activities.

Technical Textiles - Industrial Applications

This programme unit introduces industrial applications for technical textiles and covers the production and application of textile composites, architectural textiles, geotextiles, automotive textiles, and industrial filtration.

  • Composites: Basic concepts, classification, manufacturing techniques-from fibre to composite, textile composites, composite applications, reuse & recycling; geotextiles: basic classification, main functions of a geotextiles, applications; Architectural textiles, concepts of tensegrity structures.
  • Automotive Textiles: requirements on automotive textiles including tyre cords, air bags, seat belts and seat fabrics, carpets, trims.
  • Principles of filtration, industrial filtration in textile, chemical, food and metallurgical applications.

Technical Textiles - Personal Environment

This programme unit introduces the production and use of technical textiles in human related areas including medical, smart, protective, sportswear, space applications.

  • Medical textile materials and structures; application of compression bandage technology for medical care; integrating electronic sensors into medical textiles; knitted electro-textiles.
  • Protective Textiles: Bullet proof, stab proof vests. Impact protection: impact mechanism and cellular textile composites. Ballistics and body armour.
  • Technical clothing, sportswear, spacewear, sailing equipment.
  • Medical and Smart Textiles

Accrediting organisations

Accredited by the Institute of Minerals, Materials and Mining (IOM 3 ) as meeting the Further Learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.



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This MA allows you to develop your work as a creative writer, going beyond the merely personal and writing with an engaged sense of society and an understanding of the location of your work in relation to contemporary practices. You will take one of three distinct pathways. Read more

This MA allows you to develop your work as a creative writer, going beyond the merely personal and writing with an engaged sense of society and an understanding of the location of your work in relation to contemporary practices. You will take one of three distinct pathways: Fiction Writing, Poetry Writing, and Poetic Practice. In addition, all students take modules in Supplementary Discourses and Reading as a Writer, and all students undertake a Practical Project and a Dissertation.

Fiction:

This course encourages you to develop and reflect on your work as a creative writer. While you learn to stretch your imagination, you'll be motivated to develop your technical and analytic skills, and in the process, sharpen your self-criticism.

Poetry:

If you choose the poetry strand, you'll benefit from the strong focus on individual creative pactice fostered in weeklly workshops, critical classes and tutorials. As with all the Creative Writing pathways, poetry is taught by writers practising at the highest level and the emphasis is on your own needs as a developing poetry student.

Poetic practice:

Poetic Practice is a unique, practice-based pathway that draws upon the Department of English's expertise in contemporary experimental poetry and writing within an expanded field of creative practice.

All three courses are designed to help you develop your work as a creative writer, against the backdrop of literature through history. Choosing the Fiction or the Poetry strand, you'll make the most of your existing experience, stretch your imagination, develop analytic skills, and in the process sharpen how you think about your own work. The Poetic practice pathway draws upon our expertise in contemporary experimental poetry across a wide range of ideas and practices. You will learn how to develop your practice and how to situate your practice in relation to recent and contemporary trends in experimental poetry, including visual poetics, sound and conceptual writing.

Course structure

Core modules

Supplementary Discourses

This is a weekly one-and-a-half hour seminar involving critical and theoretical reading designed to supply you with appropriate critical and theoretical discourse for discussing your own work with others.

Reading as a Writer

The principle aim of the course is to enable you to read as a writer in order to inform your literary composition. You will read a selection of contemporary fiction and poetry from the persepctice of the writer.

Creative Writing Project

You will undertake a major extended fiction, non-fiction, poetry or poetic practice project under supervision.

Dissertation

The principle aim of the Dissertation on Practice is to enable you to demonstrate your ability to reflect critically and theoretically on your own practice and to locate your practice in relation to contemporary writing practices.

Pathways

Fiction Workshop

This module is designed to develop your understanding of, and ability in, fiction writing beyond first-degree level. You will attend a weekly three-hour workshop, in which work you produce will be discussed.

Poetry Workshop

You will develop your understanding of, and ability in, contemporary poetry beyond first-degree level. You will be expected to embark on an advanced programme of writing and critical thinking through creative exploration and dialogue with the tutor and other members of the group.

Poetic Practice

You will develop, and reflect on, your own practice in the context of an understanding of contemporary experimental practice in poetry from the UK and North America, and consider how contemporary poetry and poetics intersect with such fields as conceptual art writing, sound art, live art, digital poetics, book arts, installed texts and writing in relation to site.

Teaching & Assessment

At the beginning of the Spring term fiction writers will submit a 5,000-word piece of work and poets on both the Poetry and the Poetic Practice pathways a portfolio of 12 pages. In addition, they will submit a 3,000-4,000 word essay arising from their work in Supplementary Discourses. They will be given feedback and then, at the beginning of the Summer term, resubmit improved versions together with a second piece of creative work of the same length, and a second essay in relation to Reading as a Writer. Part-time students hand in their work for Supplementary Discourses and Reading as a Writer at the end of the Spring and Summer terms respectively; they will submit their portfolios for the pathway at the start of September.

At the end of the course fiction students will submit a 15,000 word piece of work and poets a portfolio of 24 pages. In addition, students will write a dissertation of 10-12,000 words, relating to their creative work and to their wider literary interests, to be submitted with the portfolio. Part-time students will make these final submissions at the end of their second year.

Your future career

A significant number of our Creative Writing students have become published authors or found work in publishing and allied professions. Along with this, we have has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs; recently they've secured positions at the Universities of Edinburgh, Leeds, Sussex and UEA, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland.

This course can also give you an distinctive, creative edge in careers such as publishing, teaching, writing and journalism, administration and marketing. Recent graduates have taken up jobs at the BBC and in art therapy.



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The Critical Writing in Art & Design MA programme in the School of Humanities provides unique opportunities for postgraduate students to develop high-level writing, research and analytical skills in the setting of one of the world’s most dynamic art schools. Read more

The Critical Writing in Art & Design MA programme in the School of Humanities provides unique opportunities for postgraduate students to develop high-level writing, research and analytical skills in the setting of one of the world’s most dynamic art schools. Combining workshop models of teaching and learning, and ‘live’ projects with leading arts organisations, the MA provides the skills required for a successful career in the arts or a research degree. For 2017/8, we are introducing some exciting new areas of specialisation within the programme.

The programme is committed to the idea that writing – of all kinds – is a creative practice that requires imagination as well as good literary skills and expert knowledge. Students on the MA are presented with many opportunities to develop and apply the skills required by various writing formats from the review and catalogue essay, to fiction and other forms of speculation. The unique structure of the programme allows for specialisation and the freedom to explore novel approaches to writing. 

The Critical Writing in Art & Design programme combines lectures, specialist writing workshops and ‘crits’ as well as live projects with external partners. Previous partners have included the Royal Opera House, Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge and Turner Contemporary in Margate. Recognising that the media is undergoing considerable change, the MA also offers opportunities to work with professionals working print and online publishing, broadcasting and podcasting. Students on the programme enjoy opportunities to share classes and to work on shared projects with other students across the RCA including our sister programme, the Critical Practice pathway in the Contemporary Art Practice programme in the School of Fine Art.   

Founded in 2010, the Critical Writing in Art & Design programme will launch a set of new specialisms in autumn 2017: Publishing and New Media; Creative Writing; and Art Theory. Students follow a shared, core programme as well as their chosen specialism. This will enable students to develop focused and expert skills within the RCA’s new 15-month MA framework. The specialisms allow a close focus on the particular needs of individual students, delivered through small group seminar teaching and one-to-one tutorials.

Graduates of the Critical Writing in Art & Design programme have published their MA work as books for publishers around the world including MIT Press, China Machine Press, and Zero Books. Others write regularly for the art press (including titles such as Art Monthly, Frieze and Eye Magazine). Some graduates of the programme have gone on to doctoral study at the University of Oxford, the University of Manchester and Goldsmiths. Others work in editorial positions in art and design magazines, or as curators and programmers in galleries and museums and other arts organisations in Europe, China and North America. 

Critical Writing in Art & Design students have a strong track record of producing ‘live’ publications with the support of the programme. These include the Albertopolis Companion produced by the graduating class of 2015 or ARK: Words and Images from the Royal College of Art Magazine 19501978, an anthology from 2014. Other live projects include Of and For Turner Contemporary, a series of texts exploring a remarkable building on the Kent coast. Students on the programme are encouraged to publish their writing on a dedicated Critical Writing in Art & Design website during their studies.

From 2017, the programme is primarily located in the RCA's newest facilities in White City



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The MSc Technical Architecture provides advanced level study in contemporary technical, environmental and professional issues for architecture. Read more

The MSc Technical Architecture provides advanced level study in contemporary technical, environmental and professional issues for architecture. You work on design-led projects focusing on the creative and technical consideration of architecture, and carry out a range of applied projects to develop professional skills.

Core modules provide key knowledge and skills, which are then applied to design projects. Lectures and projects look at emerging theory and practice in architectural design, technology and construction for new and existing buildings within the UK and global contexts.

All modules address contemporary issues in architecture. There is a focus on environmental and sustainable design and how they are achieved through inventive thinking, creative technical design, scientific understanding and computer aided predictive modelling. You learn to use design software including REVIT, ArchiCad and Ecotect.

The course assessments are flexible so you develop your own areas of interest and expertise. Projects can be located in your home country, either in the UK or internationally, or you can explore alternative locations.

The part-time route enables you to work and study at the same time, and you can link your projects to your practice.

In the final stage of the course you produce an original and significant piece of research-led design in the major project module, supported by a research module. This is usually in a subject relevant to your area of architectural interest, technical specialism or practice. You use these concluding modules to identify and develop critical expertise for your chosen career.

The course has a strong professional focus. A key feature is an international field trip as part of the interdisciplinary practice module, which you study alongside students in associated professions such as planning, regeneration, real estate and surveying. Other professional modules allow you to work as a consultant to a real client or to study new or alternative forms of computer aided design.

The course is versatile in its teaching approaches and provides educational and professional development opportunities for a range of applicant profiles. These include UK and international students with architecture, construction or environment related degree qualifications and mature applicants with a proven track record in practice.

You are taught by an expert team of staff that includes experienced architectural, digital and environmental practitioners and academics. We also have teaching links with leading consulting engineers such as ARUP and Price and Myers.

Professional recognition

This programme has been recognised by the Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists (CIAT) as meeting established standards in terms of course content and qualifies the holder for associate membership of the institute (ACIAT).

CIAT recognises Sheffield Hallam University as an accredited Centre of Excellence for learning and teaching in architectural technology.

Course structure

Full time – September start – typically 12 months

Full time – September start – typically 16 months

Part time – September start – typically 36 months

Core modules

  • concepts and design in technical architecture (30 credits)
  • environmental theory and practice for technical architecture (30 credits)
  • fundamentals of building information modelling (15 credits)
  • applied research methods (15 credits)
  • major project (45 credits)

Option modules

  • interdisciplinary practice (15 credits)
  • contemporary digital practice in architecture (15 credits)
  • consultancy project (15 credits)
  • historic environments and design (15 credits)
  • academic and professional portfolio (15 credits). 

Assessment

  • design projects
  • technical and environmental studies
  • digital modelling
  • essays
  • report writing
  • group projects
  • presentations
  • research reports
  • dissertation or major design project

Employability

The course provides knowledge and skills for a range of careers. These can include senior positions in architectural practice, setting up your own company or moving into college or university level teaching.

Specialist careers include • architectural conservation • practice management • digital design • environmental design and consultancy.

You can also use the course to move from your current career into a more architecture-related one. This is particularly relevant if you currently work in areas such as building surveying, construction or some forms of engineering.



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Explore your own original ideas in a specialist environment of feedback and critique from academics, novelists, playwrights and poets. Read more

Explore your own original ideas in a specialist environment of feedback and critique from academics, novelists, playwrights and poets. Housed within the Liverpool Screen School you will produce a body of creative work and gain an in-depth knowledge of your craft.

  • Course now recruiting on an annual basis
  • Masters degree available to study part-time (two years)
  • Learn from practising and published writers
  • Study on a unique programme providing training in e-publishing and detailed peer critique workshops
  • Strong links with Curtis Brown, Blake Friedman, The Society of Authors, the Royal Literary Fund, NAWE, Hodder and Stoughton, Parthian, Salt, Everyman Theatre, Byte the Book, Tindall Street, BBC Radio, Comma Press and Faber & Faber
  • Taught in the £38million Redmonds Building in the heart of Liverpool city centre

What you will study on this degree

Foundation: Reading as a Writer

Develop your creative, formal, research and technical skills appropriate to writing at masters level, in particular the techniques of contemporary writers and you will relate your own reading to your writing

Writers Workshop 1

Work towards achieving presentation to professional standards and further an original and creative voice as a writer by fostering close reading and constructive criticism

Defining a Writer's Identity: New Technologies and the Marketplace

Deepen your understanding and develop your creative formal and technical skills by acquainting yourself with the technological side of the writing industry and developing the relevant skills

Writers Workshop 2

The module will further develop the creative, formal, and technical skills of drafting and editing

Portfolio and Critical Commentary

You will show creative, formal and technical skills appropriate to creative writing at masters level - your finished portfolio will consist of a substantial piece of creative work negotiated with your tutor

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.



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This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Read more
This MA offers a distinctive combination of analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of plays and performance texts. Its historical range is wide and students should be ready to research and trouble-shoot plays from different eras, whether classical Greek and Roman, medieval, early modern or contemporary.

Traditional formats of discussion groups and seminars are coupled with workshops and problem-solving sessions which address all the negotiations involved in transferring words on the page into a fully realised performance. The main emphasis of the MA is on the interpretation of text through the consideration of acting and directing processes, production conditions, historical context, and institutional and cultural politics. The MA incorporates masterclasses by leading theatre professionals which are part of an integrated visitor programme.

The MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance is unique in that it is designed to accommodate both students who may wish to pursue further academic study and students who wish to go into the theatre or media industries. We aim to produce graduates with a sophisticated understanding of how plays in performance work, and to develop high-quality researchers and theatre practitioners who understand the practical dynamics of process and production. Applicants may have a range of academic backgrounds and extensive practical experience is not a prerequisite for the course, but students must be willing to enter into the spirit of practical experiment whatever their particular strengths.

Aims

-To promote cutting-edge interdisciplinary thinking and collaboration
-To provide analytical and practical methods for the creative investigation of play and performance texts
-To offer in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the processes of writing, acting and directing
-To provide an understanding of the need to conduct investigation within historical, political, institutional and cultural frames
-To develop high-quality theatre researchers and practitioners

Teaching and assessment

Seminars and workshops
In terms 1 and 2 Directing Early Modern Plays and Case Studies in Writing, Directing and Performance are examined by 2,500 word essays. In Term 1 Writing into Performance is examined by a scriptwriting assignment. In term 2 Directing Modern Plays is examined by a combination of seminar performance and a 3,000 word essay. Storytelling for Theatre, Film and Television is examined by a 3,000 word project in each term. An ambitious programme of masterclasses given by leading practitioners is an important part of the MA.

Screenings
During terms 1 and 2 there will be screenings of relevant film and television material relating to specific performances, plays and productions under discussion.

Dissertation or practical project
In term 3 students prepare for their dissertation or practical project work. Students are assigned dissertation/project supervisors and receive individual supervision through the period of research. Assessment is by 20,000 word dissertation or by a substantial practical project such as a production, performance or piece of creative writing, supported by a 4,000 word essay mapping the project's planning and evolution. All final projects are subject to the approval of the convenors of the MA.

Careers

Because of the innovative emphasis on acquiring a wide range of analytical and practical skills centred around the performance and production of theatre texts, students are highly employable.

An in-depth understanding of narrative structures and their visual, technical, performative and political dimensions is of paramount importance to the entertainment industry and a significant number at the top of these businesses support this programme because it plugs an increasingly serious gap in the skills market. Recent students from the BA and MA Writing and Performance (a forerunner of this MA) have benefited from placements with theatre, film and television companies, and the MA in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance builds on that ethos. Placements have been informally arranged subject to student interest and industry availability from year to year.

Past graduates have gone on to study PhDs and also to conservatoires to continue their practical training. Many are now working as screenwriters, playwrights, actors, directors, designers, producers, technicians, literary managers, dramaturges, and literary agents. A significant number of graduates have set up their own theatre companies. Others work in theatre-in-education initiatives, arts funding organisations, youth theatre, journalism, publishing, and dramatherapy. Past students are also employed by major animation companies, and have gained work as script editors and production assistants.

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The MSc in Translation Studies caters to the increasing need for highly skilled and specialist translators across a wide range of industries and settings. Read more

The MSc in Translation Studies caters to the increasing need for highly skilled and specialist translators across a wide range of industries and settings. It offers ten different advanced languages, and provides an excellent platform to become a professional translator as well as the essential theoretical foundation to progress to research at doctoral level.

Why This Programme

The programme balances Translation studies theory with practical translation work, meaning you will develop both academic and professional skills, preparing you for the translation profession or PhD research in the field.

You will study SDL Trados translation software and hence can complete the MSc with SDL Trados certification.

We offer translation classes in a wide range of languages including Catalan, Czech, French, German, Italian, Mandarin, Polish, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish.

You will have access to our excellent technical resources and to our well-stocked library with over 10,000 items including the latest books, multimedia, audio and video language learning materials, language databases and resources.

The MSc is highly flexible and offers the opportunity to tailor the programme to your specialist interests or skills.

Our workshop and seminar series is second to none, with masterclasses from multi-award-winning translators, presentations from world-renowned scholars and discussion forums with newly qualified freelancers, providing you with plenty of opportunities to network with experts in the field.

The small classes mean you develop new skills very quickly whilst working closely with Translation Studies and language scholars pursuing cutting-edge research.

Within our strong postgraduate community, students contribute to a wide range of activities including the Glasgow University Postgraduate Translation Studies Research Network, a quarterly Translation Studies newsletter, facebook site and twitter feed.

Programme Structure

Core courses

  • Translation Studies in Theory and Practice
  • Approaches to Translation and the Professional Environment
  • Advanced Translation and Language Study (translation between English and at least one other language)

Optional courses may include

  • Marketing and Translation across Media
  • Literary Translation Studies
  • Subtitling Film and TV
  • Additional Advanced Translation and Language Study courses
  • Additional language study at beginner, non-beginner, intermediate or advanced level
  • Relevant undergraduate Honours courses

Career Prospects

Driven by the global economy, the last decade or so has seen a massive growth in demand for expert, specialist translators. You will develop the skills required to work in the industry as well as essential information about setting up as a freelance translator or working for a translation agency.

You will acquire skills relevant to a variety of careers that may involve translation or require advanced language and communication skills. These include:

  • Marketing and public relations
  • Careers in writing, including publishing, journalism or technical writing
  • Language teaching
  • International commerce
  • Government work
  • The creative industries, including TV, film, theatre

Graduates have taken up posts in translation agencies in the UK and overseas, work as freelance translators or for translation software companies. Others have moved into language-related careers in teaching, publishing and global commercial organisations or have decided to study for a PhD.

Those wishing to pursue a career in academia will have studied, discussed and analysed the essential theoretical material required as a foundation for researching in the field of Translation Studies at doctoral level.



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Statistics is the study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation and organisation of data. Read more

About the course

Statistics is the study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation and organisation of data. Statistical analysis and data analytics is listed as one of the highly desirable skills employers are looking for, and with data becoming an ever increasing part of modern life, the talent to extract information and value from complex data is scarce.

The new Statistics and Data Analytics MSc is designed to train the next generation of statisticians with a focus on the field of data analytics. Employers expect skills in both statistics and computing. This master’s programme will provide a unique and coherent blend of modern statistical methods together with the associated computational skills that are essential for handling large quantities of unstructured data. This programme offers training in modern statistical methodology, computational statistics and data analysis from a wide variety of fields, including financial and health sectors.

Aims

Statistics is the study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and organization of data. The aim of the MSc Statistics and Data Analytics is to produce graduates that:

- Are equipped with a range of advanced statistical methods and the associated computational skills for handling large quantities of unstructured data
- Have developed a critical awareness of the underlying needs of industry and commerce through relevant case studies
- Are able to analyse real-world data and to communicate the output of sophisticated statistical models in order to inform decision making processes
- Have the necessary computational skills to build and analyse simple/appropriate solutions using statistical Big Data technologies

Course Content

Compulsory modules:

Quantitative Data Analysis
Research Methods and Case Studies
Computer Intensive Statistical Methods
Modern Regression and Classification
Data Visualisation
Big Data Analytics
Time Series Modelling
Network Models
Dissertation

Statistics with Data Analytics Dissertation
Towards the end of the Spring Term, students will choose a topic for an individual research project, which will lead to the preparation and submission of an MSc dissertation. The project supervisor will usually be a member of the Brunel Statistics or Financial Mathematics group. In some cases the project may be overseen by an external supervisor based in industry or another academic institution..

Teaching

You’ll be taught using a range of teaching methods, including lectures, computer labs and discussion groups. Lectures are supplemented by computer labs and seminars/exercise classes and small group discussions. The seminars will be useful for you to carry out numerical data analysis, raise questions arising from the lectures, exercise sheets, or self-studies in an interactive environment.

The first term provides a thorough grounding in core programming, statistical and data analysis skills. In addition to acquiring relevant statistical and computational methods, students are encouraged to engage with real commercial and/or industrial problems through a series of inspiring case studies delivered by guest speakers. Support for academic and personal growth is provided through a range of workshops covering topics such as data protection, critical thinking, presentation skills and technical writing skills.

You’ll also complete an individual student project supervised by a relevant academic on your chosen topic.

Assessment

The assessment of all learning outcomes is achieved by a balance of coursework and examinations. Assessments range from written reports/essays, group work, presentations through to conceptual/statistical modelling and programming exercises, according to the demands of particular modular blocks. Additionally, class tests are used to assess a range of knowledge, including a range of specific technical subjects.

Special Features

The Statistics Group is a growing, highly-research active group, with collaborations across industry and academia, including engineering and pharmaceutical companies, Cambridge University and Imperial College London

Brunel’s Mathematics department is a member of the London Graduate School in Mathematical Finance. This consortium of mathematical finance groups comprises Birkbeck College, Brunel University London, Imperial College London, King’s College London, London School of Economics and Political Science and University College London. 

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Join and contribute to an industry that’s successfully orienting itself around the challenge of digital media. Though the Master of Publishing and Communications you can discover new business models and an expanded digital footprint in areas such as eBooks and apps. Read more

Join and contribute to an industry that’s successfully orienting itself around the challenge of digital media. Though the Master of Publishing and Communications you can discover new business models and an expanded digital footprint in areas such as eBooks and apps.

This program successfully anticipated the developments in the publishing industry and incorporates a digitally focused and internationally oriented curriculum closely connected to the latest publishing practices.

The Master of Publishing and Communications furnishes you with the transferable skills you need to build your publishing career, including editorial, marketing, copywriting, commissioning, business and production skills for print and digital media.

WHO IS IT FOR? 

If you want to develop a contemporary understanding of publishing practices and technologies, as well as how to apply your knowledge, the Master of Publishing and Communications solves these problems through hands‐on subjects in editing, production, marketing, new media and business communications. You can acquire advanced skills in editing, researching, writing and thinking critically about challenges facing the publishing and communications industries. Build a detailed and practical knowledge of effective communications strategies in business and professional contexts. And apply your skills and knowledge through an optional internship placement.

WHERE WILL IT TAKE ME?

On graduation from the Master of Publishing and Communications, you will be ready for work in professional fields including:

  • Book and magazine publishing
  • Editing
  • Marketing and publicity
  • Online media
  • Professional communications
  • Technical writing and editing.


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Communicating science is a challenging topic, where you may need to explain the structure of a leaf to a seven year old one day, and report the very latest research to the world via scientific journals the next. Read more
Communicating science is a challenging topic, where you may need to explain the structure of a leaf to a seven year old one day, and report the very latest research to the world via scientific journals the next.
These both rely on subject knowledge and an ability to effectively communicate complex scientific theories to others.

This MSc will help you to build your subject knowledge of Chemistry while also enhancing your ability to communicate science, with a focus on writing for scientific publication or communication in the media. You’ll gain a Master’s level education in technical chemistry modules and develop key research skills by completing a research project in one of our world-class research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment.

By the end of the course you’ll have advanced chemical knowledge and the skills to prepare you for a career in research, scientific writing, science education or science communication.

Structure

The course spans 1 year, the first 20 weeks are lecture-based, providing you with a diverse toolbox in chemistry and scientific writing and leading onto a 24 weeks research project in chemistry.
Term 1 and Term 2:
-Writing Extended Scientific Articles
-Writing Focuses Scientific Articles and Reports
-Communicating Science to Different Audiences
-Transferrable Skills
-5 other MSc level modules from the wide selection offered by the Chemistry Department
Research Project:
-Immerse yourself in a real research project, supervised by our renowned academics

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