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Masters Degrees (Technical Writer)

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(Why this course?). The translation industry is on the rise with specialist translators being highly sought after. The integration of business knowledge and translation/interpreting skills will give you a more competitive edge in the job market, opening up a broader range of career opportunities. Read more
(Why this course?)

The translation industry is on the rise with specialist translators being highly sought after.

The integration of business knowledge and translation/interpreting skills will give you a more competitive edge in the job market, opening up a broader range of career opportunities.

The skill-focused and practical nature of the course allows you to gain invaluable industry experience and proficiency in translation and interpreting, which potentially greatly improves your employability.

Our lecturers are qualified translators and interpreters with industry experience.

The practical translation and interpreting sessions will include industry-based tasks.

Glasgow is the economic centre of Scotland, where you can expect to experience a rich cultural and social life.

(What you’ll study)

Your classes will include:
■Text Typology & Translation
■Professional Interpreting Practice
■Translation and Language Technology
■Interpreting for Business and Commerce
■Business Translation
■Translation & Interpreting Studies
■Dissertation/Translation project

Facilities

Our translation labs are equipped with translation software, highly desired in the translation industry, such as SDL Trados.

Guest lectures

Guest speakers will be invited to cover a range of subject areas related to translating and interpreting. As well as covering academic and research-related topics, the focus of these talks will be on the practical issues of working as a translator and interpreter, or employing the skill sets of both for different careers.

Course Content:

Semester 1: Test typology & Translation ; Translation & Interpreting Studies; Professional Interpreting Practice

Semester 2: Translation & Language Technology; Interpreting for Business & Commerce; Business Translation

Learning & teaching

Lectures, tutorials, workshops, lab practice and regular seminars from in-service professional translators and interpreters.

Assessment

Assessment will be delivered through written assignments, practical interpreting scenarios, practical translation tasks, team and/or individual projects, and final examinations.

Careers

Students gain professional proficiency in translation and liaison interpreting, specialising in business and commerce, which will open up a broad array of potential career paths from within the translation industry to global commerce and media. Job titles from both the public and private sectors could include, but not necessarily be restricted to, translator, interpreter, technical writer, international communication specialist (in advertising, marketing, media, and public affairs), educator, administrator, etc. Equipped with new business skills, you could also work freelance or establish your own translation and interpreting agency or business. This MSc is also a stepping-stone to pursue a PhD in the field of translation and/or interpreting.

How can I fund my course?

Dean's International Excellence Award

The Dean's International Excellence Award recognises academic achievement. It offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Scholarship search

http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/
Our scholarship search has a range of scholarships.

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The Communications - Professional Writing program prepares you to work as a versatile communications professional. Read more
The Communications - Professional Writing program prepares you to work as a versatile communications professional. With a focus on assessing audience needs and delivering thoughtful and relevant content, combined with effective project management techniques, you develop the skills you need to write and produce copy for a variety of professional settings and styles.

The innovative Communications - Professional Writing courses encompass a wide range of communications disciplines and vocational skills, including:
-Web copywriting
-Technical writing
-Proposal writing
-Writing for social media
-Content marketing
-Presentations and speech writing
-Content management
-Information design and data visualization
-Digital storytelling

As a student of the Communications – Professional Writing program, you have the advantage of creating a diverse and professional portfolio that includes training modules, complex visual aids (such as infographics), and compelling layouts for many different print and virtual platforms (brochures, newsletters, websites and more). Thanks to your well-rounded training, you will be able to launch a writing career that can go the distance, taking on a variety of roles in both the profit and non-profit sectors.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-The Content Bootcamp, an intensive two-week workshop at the beginning of the first semester, builds on your academic writing skills, polishing your writing for a professional audience.
-A vocational program at its core, Communications – Professional Writing prepares you for a writing career with longevity. As such, every course has you producing professional quality work so that you graduate with a polished and diverse portfolio.
-Unique second-semester course components include creating training modules, implementing training programs, and leading virtual or live training sessions to complement the content and documentation created in first semester courses.
-The Digital Storytelling course, a standout feature, encourages you to think critically about the future of communications, and its role in business, technology and society in general. You have the opportunity to collaborate on a creative communications project, exploring what it means to be a communicator in a digital world.
-A field placement opportunity in the final semester provides you with valuable experiences in a variety of industries. Program faculty works with you to place you in an organization relevant to your long-term career goals.

​​Career Outlook
-Technical writer
-Communications coordinator
-Social media officer
-Editor
-Web copywriter
-Proposal writer
-Instructional designer
-Report writer/business analyst

Areas of Employment
-Arts and culture
-Retail and e-commerce
-Government and non-profit
-Finance
-Marketing
-Software development and IT
-Medicine
-Science
-Web design

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Explore your own original ideas in a specialist environment of feedback and critique from academics, novelists, playwrights and poets. Read more
Explore your own original ideas in a specialist environment of feedback and critique from academics, novelists, playwrights and poets. Housed within The Liverpool Screen School you will produce a body of creative work and gain an in-depth knowledge of your craft.

•Course runs on a biannual basis - next intake 2017
•Masters degree available to study part time (two years)
•Learn from practising and published writers
•Study on a unique programme providing training in e-publishing and detailed peer critique workshops
•Strong links with Curtis Brown, Blake Friedman, The Society of Authors, the Royal Literary Fund, NAWE, Hodder and Stoughton, Parthian, Salt, Everyman Theatre, Byte the Book, Tindall Street, BBC Radio, Comma Press and Faber & Faber
•Taught in the £38million Redmonds Building in the heart of Liverpool city centre

The part-time MA Writing programme is ideal if you want to develop your writing talent with tutors who are practicing and published writers.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

Foundation: Reading as a Writer

Develop your creative, formal, research and technical skills appropriate to writing at masters level, in particular the techniques of contemporary writers and you will relate your own reading to your writing

Writers Workshop 1

Work towards achieving presentation to professional standards and further an original and creative voice as a writer by fostering close reading and constructive criticism

Defining a Writer's Identity: New Technologies and the Marketplace

Deepen your understanding and develop your creative formal and technical skills by acquainting yourself with the technological side of the writing industry and developing the relevant skills

Writers Workshop 2

The module will further develop the creative, formal, and technical skills of drafting and editing

Portfolio and Critical Commentary

You will show creative, formal and technical skills appropriate to creative writing at masters level - your finished portfolio will consist of a substantial piece of creative work negotiated with your tutor

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

The programme explores the process of writing from first inspiration to final draft and publication and reflects the need for writers to keep up-to-date with rapid advances in the new technologies of contemporary publishing. You will benefit from the close study of writerly techniques and strategies, develop your work to a professional standard and gain access to professional practitioners, such as visiting novelists, poets and screenwriters as well as editors, agents and publishers. In this way your work will be able to thrive in the wider world.

Examiners attest to the programme’s national standing, scrupulous assessments and high quality of teaching and student work. In the national 2014 Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey (PTES), the programme rated 100% satisfaction for most aspects of the course.

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The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Read more
The MA in Creative Writing is an exciting new programme at Durham University. Taught by award-winning writers Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Vidyan Ravinthiran, this is an academically rigorous programme that will develop students’ practical knowledge of writing poetry and prose fiction. Students will receive structured support through writing workshops and one-to-one tutorials in order to develop their own ideas. Students will also study a broad range of literature from the 20th and 21st centuries, and produce new work in response.

Core Modules

Creative Writing Poetry OR Creative Writing Prose Fiction
Each student will take one of these writing-workshop modules. In these modules students will write longer pieces within their chosen literary discipline, sharing their work and giving and receiving feedback and suggestions from the module convenor and the other students. There are few if any writing exercises. Each student can expect to have their work scrutinised closely in a workshop setting several times. These modules are assessed via a portfolio of ten pages of poetry plus 2,000-word self-critique, OR a 6,000-word portfolio of prose fiction plus 2,000-word self-critique.

Reading as a Writer
This seminar module brings poets and prose writers together, and (unlike any of the other core modules for Creative Writing) is also open to English Studies students. Each week we discuss some key poetry and prose from across the twentieth century, focusing on the technical innovations introduced by the writers studied, and the ways in which writers learn from one another, both within their medium and beyond it. The module combines breadth and depth of coverage, offering students an advanced understanding of a range of writers, schools, and styles in order to broaden their research interests, and help them to identify and research a topic of their own choosing with guidance from a subject specialist in the extended essay part of the Research Project. It is assessed via two 3,000-word essays.

Reading as a Writer: the Workshop
This is very much a companion module to Reading as a Writer, and is a writing-workshop module focussing on short, directed writing assignments and their discussion. The focus will be on formal and technical experiments, stretching students’ technical facility via assignments inspired by the texts studied on Reading as a Writer. Prose writers and poetry students will once again work side by side, sharing work and ideas, learning to appreciate literary conventions and their subversion. Each student can expect to have their work workshopped several times, though these engagements will not be as formal or thorough as those in Creative Writing Prose Fiction or Creative Writing Poetry. Assignments might include adapting syntactical techniques; investigative creative non-fiction; experimenting with poetic forms; creative translation; writing an opening paragraph; or trying out editing methods. It is assessed via a portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000 words of prose fiction, plus 2,000-word self-critique.

Research Project
The Research Project provides students with the opportunity to produce a 6-8,000-word extended critical essay on a subject of their choosing. Students choose their own extended essay titles, with guidance from the module convenor and subject to the approval of the English Studies Board of Examiners. Focusing on depth rather than breadth, the essay is independently researched and builds on the work covered in the taught elements of the programme. Students will be expected to choose a research topic with particular bearing on their own creative practice, and to reflect on how their critical and creative work have informed one another, either in the main body of the essay, the introduction, or chapter dedicated to integrative reflection. Students may wish to refer to specific aspects of their own writing when writing this part of the essay. The Research Project also provides the opportunity for students to to produce a final portfolio of creative work: poets will be asked to produce ten pages of poetry; prose writers produce 6-8,000 words of fiction. The portfolio will consist of new work, produced after the completion of the structured workshop-oriented modules. The module is assessed via an extended essay of 6,000-8,000 words and a creative writing portfolio of EITHER ten pages of poetry OR 6,000-8,000 words of prose fiction.

Optional Modules

Creative Writing students would take one module of their own choosing, either from the English Studies MA modules or taking this new optional module:
The Word in the World
This module focuses on the ways in which the students’ writing can be made available to the public. It would take the form of a series of lectures and seminars covering topics such as: how writers make a living; the possibilities and challenges presented by collaborating with other artists; how to adjust teaching methods according to the setting and audience; how to write a pitch letter; how to get a literary agent; submitting work to poetry journals; how to make the most of web resources; how to communicate with an editor; book design, blurbs, jackets; writing copy; formats; sales and distribution channels; publicity and promotion; book reviewing, etc. This part of the module will be taught both in-house at Durham and via visiting speakers such as editors, industry experts. Students would also be invited to either collaborate with a student in another medium (most likely music or the visual arts) or go on a teaching or literary-industry placement that would take place in July. This module is assessed via one 3,000-word essay and one 3,000-word report on the industry placement, teaching placement, or collaborative project.

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The Creative Writing MA course offers you the chance to follow one of three pathways, all distinct but all containing common elements. Read more
The Creative Writing MA course offers you the chance to follow one of three pathways, all distinct but all containing common elements: Fiction Writing; Poetry Writing; and Poetic Practice.

The first two of these options are designed to encourage you to develop and reflect on your work as a creative writer, in the context of contemporary and well-established literatures. Whether you choose the Fiction or the Poetry strand, you will be expected to make the most of your existing experience, but also to discover ways of going beyond the merely personal, and writing with an engaged sense of society. At the same time as you learn to stretch your imagination, you will also be encouraged to develop your technical and analytic skills, and in the process to sharpen you self-criticism. The pathway in Poetry focuses on innovative forms of expressions across many media, including sound, film installation and architecture.

All three Creative Writing pathways are taught in Bedford Square, in the heart of London’s Bloomsbury, in a building which is adjacent to the facilities of the University of London. The Fiction and Poetry pathways have now been running for nearly a decade, and have achieved an extremely high reputation. Many of our graduates have gone on to publish collections of poems, novels and short stories, and also to win awards. In 2012 alone, four of our graduates published their first novels, and one of our poets her first full collection.

It is unfortunately not possible to switch from one pathway to another in mid-course, or to mix and match. However, the MA may be studied full-time or part-time.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/english/coursefinder/macreativewriting.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Distinguished writers, including Giles Foden, Susanna Jones, Ben Markovits and Jo Shapcott, contribute to teaching on this course.

- You will benefit from small workshops in poetry and fiction writing of no more than ten people.

- Since launching in 2004 the course has produced many successfully published authors including Tahmima Anam, Adam O'Riordan, Sam Riviere and Kate Williams.

- You will make important contacts through guest lectures by leading figures in the industry.

- All teaching is done in central London, at premises in Bedford Square and Gower Street.

Department research and industry highlights

In the most recent RAE (2008), 90% of the work submitted by the department was judged to be of international standard with 30% assessed as world-leading (4*), 35% as internationally excellent (3*) and 25% as internationally recognised (2*). The department’s performance, in terms of 4* and 3* results, was ranked 11th equal. Overall, the department was ranked one of the top three English departments in London.

We have particular strengths in the following research areas:
- Medieval Studies
- Shakespeare and the Renaissance
- 17th and 18th Century Literature and Culture
- 19th Century Literature
- 20th Century Literature and Theory
- Postcolonialism
- Creative Writing and Practice-based Research.

Course content and structure

In the Autumn and Spring terms, you will meet for a three-hour workshop and a one-and-a-half-hour critical class each week.

Core course units:
- Fiction or Poetry
This is a weekly three-hour workshop,in either fiction or poetry writing, in which your work is discussed, and critical skills are developed. You will be involved in the regular production of new work for this unit.

- Practical Work Project
You will undertake a major writing project (under supervision) and produce a critical and/or theoretical piece of writing reflecting on your work.

- Supplementary Discourses: Core Course
This is a weekly seminar in the Autumn Term. It involves critical and theoretical reading designed to supply you with appropriate critical and theoretical discourse for discussing your own work and others.

- Reading as a Writer
This is a weekly seminar in the Spring Term. You will read a selection of contemporary fiction and poetry from the perspective of a writer.

- Dissertation
You are required to produce a major critical and/or theoretical dissertation relating to your literary interests and your Practical Work Project, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- developed the ability to experiment in their writing and discover new things
- become more ambitious and perceptive about their own work
- broadened their appreciation of traditional and contemporary work, and extended their powers of communication
- a greater knowledge of shaping their work for publication.

Assessment

At the beginning of the Spring term fiction writers will submit a 5,000-word piece of work and poets a portfolio of 12 pages. In addition, they will submit a 3,000-4,000 word essay arising from their work in Supplementary Discourses. They will be given feedback and then, at the beginning of the Summer term, resubmit improved versions together with a second piece of creative work, and a second essay in relation to Reading as a Writer. Part-time students hand their work in at the end of the relevant term instead of the beginning.

At the end of the course fiction students will submit a 15,000 word piece of work and poets a portfolio of 24 pages. In addition, students will write a dissertation of 10-12,000 words, relating to their creative work and to their wider literary interests, to be submitted with the portfolio. Part-time students will make these final submissions at the end of their second year.

Employability & career opportunities

A number of our Creative Writing students have become published authors or found work in publishing and allied professions. In addition, the Department has an impressive record for placing graduates in academic jobs; recently they have secured positions at the Universities of Edinburgh, Sussex and Leeds, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre and the National University of Ireland.

The course also prepares graduates for successful careers in a variety of other fields, such as publishing, teaching, writing and journalism, administration and marketing.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The future for writing and reading is moving towards transmedia and storytelling. Rather than a particular narrative being limited to a book, TV episode or graphic novel, storylines are now being extended into other platforms. Read more
The future for writing and reading is moving towards transmedia and storytelling. Rather than a particular narrative being limited to a book, TV episode or graphic novel, storylines are now being extended into other platforms.

This new MA will equip participants with the creative, professional and technical knowledge and craft skills required by professional screenwriters across a range of media—from interactive narratives, Twitter fiction and blogging to webisodes, mobisodes and movellas, as well as film and television.

Modules studied will include:

Future Narratives: Transmedia Storytelling

Writing for Film and Television

Writing for Interactive & New Media

Writing for Animation

Business Futures for Transmedia Writers

Research Methods: The Screenwriter's Craft & Practice

Masters Writing Project

Possible career routes include (but are not limited to)

scriptwriter, script editor, script reader, script supervisor

researcher

agent

writer-producer or writer-director

technical video scriptwriter

media journalist

teaching

museum, heritage and tourism writer (e.g., virtual/interactive tours)

e-learning developer

On a much broader scale, the programme will also enhance the individual qualities needed for employment in circumstances
requiring sound judgement, good communication skills, personal responsibility, creativity and initiative in the professional environment.

The MA will also provide a sound intellectual and stylistic platform for students to progress on to doctorate level study and a career in higher education.

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MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment. Read more
MA Film & Television at Falmouth University reflects and interrogates the highly fluid nature of the contemporary screen media environment.

Our MA is distinguished from traditional courses in that it specifically addresses the diversity and crossover of today's film and television culture with the aim of producing adaptive thinkers and highly creative practitioners. Our academic focus engages and interrogates film and television's status in the 21st century, which is often defined in terms of the digital age and digital culture.

On the course you will be required to examine, interpret and contest the notion of digital culture historically, socially, politically and artistically through both your research and creative practice. You will interrogate the increasingly blurred boundaries between film and television, art and technology, production and consumption, with the outcome being a fracturing of traditional categorisations. We reflect an era in which screenwriters Aaron Sorkin (Newsroom, The West Wing) and Lena Dunham (Girls, Tiny Furniture) experiment with dialogue and narrative, while conceptual artists Sam Taylor-Wood (Nowhere Boy, Love You More) and Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave, Shame) have shifted from the art gallery to the cinema. Directors such as Ben Wheatley (A Field in England, Sightseers) and companies such as Curzon and Film4 are making use of multi-platform release schedules, and brands including HBO, Amazon and Netflix are shaping the very nature of not only what, but how, we watch. MA Film & Television understands this fundamentally shifting zeitgeist.

In examining industrial structure and visual form you will theorise the shifting dynamics of an age where anyone with a phone and a laptop has the ability to record, edit and disseminate visual projects. Such 'democratisation' has arguably made both creative uniqueness and clear industry pathways less discernable, but has provided a new and fruitful framework for those who have the ideas, talent, dedication and adaptability to embrace such immense transitional potential. However, despite these multitudinous transformations attributed to digital culture, the ethos of our MA contends that fundamental skills remain the basis of both sound academic work and creative practice. Rather than being fearful of what is to come, or nostalgic for the past, this course gives you the confidence to look at film and television critically, and acquire cutting edge creative skills in order to produce intelligent, innovative and inspirational visual work.

Our philosophy is one of flexibility, so you'll shape the curriculum around your own interests, whether in theory, creative practice, or a combination of the two. Drawn from the fundamentals of history, theory and criticism, our theoretical strand develops tomorrow's cineastes, cultural commentators, journalists and academics. This also underpins our approach to practice. The most successful film and television makers are students of their chosen medium, highly knowledgeable of historical legacy and social-political context. You'll not only learn how to develop, write, produce, shoot, record, direct and edit well, but why, philosophically and creatively, your ideas are worth being made.

Visit the website https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/film-television-ma

How the course is taught

Our passion is reflected both in the teaching and research track record of our academics, our industry connections and visiting speakers, and the quality of our film and television professionals. Crossing disciplinary areas such as cultural studies, sociology, journalism, English, philosophy and, of course, film and television studies, our MA offers academically-minded students comprehensive supervision and guidance for moving onto PhD research.

Industry and academic links

We have a strong visiting lecturer programme with recent guests including critics Dr Mark Kermode, Professor Linda Ruth Williams and Dr Will Brooker. Our practice tutors are active writers, producers, directors, editors, sound designers and cinematographers who create substantive work across all screen media. We have a wide range of contacts and industry specialists who contribute to the course, including Tony Grisoni (writer of Southcliffe, Red Riding, and How I Live Now), Mary Burke (producer of For Those in Peril, Berberian Sound Studio and The Midnight Beast), and James Henry (writer for Campus and Green Wing).

Falmouth University also recently hosted the Channel 4 Talent Day and we are active in developing work placements and internships for our students. We have sent many of students to Warp Films and TwoFour since 2009, and regularly update our webpages with work experience opportunities and jobs. Our graduates have proceeded to further study and jobs across the film and television industry, for HBO, Sky, ITV, Disney and have worked on major feature films, most recently including About Time (Richard Curtis, 2013) The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013), The Double (Richard Ayoade, 2014) and Disney's forthcoming Cinderella (Kenneth Branagh, 2015). Falmouth University's MA in Film & Television is for students who to place themselves at the cutting edge of screen culture.

Course outline

The course is divided into three semesters of 15 weeks. Each semester offers the fundamentals vital to every academic and practitioner, and elective choices so you can shape your own learning.

What you'll do

- Study block 1
Foundation
The first semester consists of three core units, offering a diverse entry point to all aspects of the study of film and television, and the interrelationship of theory and practice:

Theorising Contemporary Film & Television Culture (Theory)

In this module you will explore the theoretical conceptualisations of film and television in the context of contemporary academic thought and popular discourse around the concept of digital culture. We will start from a point of questioning the multi-layered and contested effects of digital culture on film and television as discrete forms. You will consider the interrelationship and fusion between media in terms of production, distribution and exhibition examining the advent of new forms of representation and interaction. But we will also look at how traditional notion of film and television are being preserved and even being popular as a reaction to the effects of the digital. The module will also assess and interrogate the economic and technological developments of a more integrated and interactive media environment in terms of the cross-pollination of form and content, and socio-cultural effects on contemporary audiences.

Film & Television Industry Case Study (Theory/Practice)

In this module you will explore the industrial parameters of contemporary film and television based around the experience and expertise of current professionals. The module will utilise the School of Film & Television's many industry links to bring in guest speakers from the BBC, Channel 4, Sky, TwoFour Broadcast, Warp Films, Sheffield Doc Fest, Cornwall Film Festival, Doc Heads, BFI, Pinewood Studios, Dogbite and EngineHouse VFX. You will then have an opportunity to question these professionals about their respective sectors as a basis for a case study. Alternatively, you can investigate the sector/practitioner of your own choosing, with tutor support. The module will also contain workshops on the fundamentals of creative industry research and methodology. The module is designed so that you learn both the challenges and values of networking, and researching specific job roles and industry backgrounds in order to effectively plot your own career trajectory.

Creative Practices (Practice)

This module will engage you in the production workflow, focusing on how creative, professional and technical roles shape a final film or television project. Your weekly seminars and workshops will guide you through pre-production, production and post-production processes, enabling you to devise, develop and produce a short filmed project as part of a small crew of four to six students. You will, therefore, develop your technical skills and production practices in order to devise and deploy modes of creative practice which may include, but are not limited to, research and development, screenwriting, production management, producing, directing, cinematography, lighting, editing and the recording and design of sound.

- Study block 2
Specialisms
The second semester gives you the opportunity to specialise, choosing from a ranging of theory, practice or combination modules. Assessment of combination modules is either through an academic essay or a practice project. Potential optional modules include:

- Cultural Studies to Digital Sociology (Theory/Practice)
- Screen Futures (Theory/Practice)
- Globalisation in Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Factual Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Screenwriting for Film & Television (Theory/Practice)
- Work Placement (Theory/Practice)

- Study block 3
Expertise
Depending on your chosen specialism, in the third semester you'll produce either:

- Dissertation (Theory)
- Film & Production Portfolio (Theory/Practice)
- Conceptual Project (Theory/Practice)

Facilities

The purpose-built film school facilities include:

- 116-seat cinema, with Christie M Series HD projection (as used in Vue cinemas) and 7.2 surround sound

- Equipment store with a range of Blackmagic, Red, Panasonic, JVC, GoPro, Canon DSLR and C100 cameras and lenses, jibs, tracks and dollies

- Digital production suites equipped with Final Draft (screenwriting), Movie Magic (production management) and a range of edit software, including Adobe Creative Cloud/Suite, Final Cut and AVID

- Avid Unity MediaNetwork Edit server

- Recording and sound edit studios equipped with Pro Tools audio editing and Foley traps

- 14x8m TV studio with three studio cameras, full gallery facility, Chromatte grey screen, blue/green screen and full lighting rig

- Centroid 3D (Pinewood-networked) Motion Capture studio/research lab

- Virtual Studio using the latest technology

- 23,500-title TV and film library

Experience you'll get

- Highly flexible, student-focused curriculum

- Mentoring with industry professionals

- Opportunities for placement and work experience

- Creative environment for collaboration

- Using industry-standard software

- A vibrant visiting speaker programme

- Student experience-centred ethos

Assessment

- Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
- Core theory based on written assignments
- Core practice assessed on visual project and accompanying portfolios
- Elective modules all with theory/practice options
- Dissertation and/or major project in final semester

Careers

- Research, teaching or postgraduate study in art/humanities subject areas

- All technical/creative roles linked with direction, production, cinematography, editing, sound, lighting; writing for the screen; film and television criticism; research for film and TV

- Film and TV marketing, distribution and sales – digital and social media content/distribution

- Film festival and arts curatorship – media-based project management

Find out how to apply here - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/apply

Visiting Us

We hold open days throughout the year so you can meet current students and staff, view our campuses and facilities, and find out more about studying at Falmouth.

Find out more - https://www.falmouth.ac.uk/open-days

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Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture. Read more
Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture.

The ability to be a successful fashion journalist requires very specific skills relating to writing, visual appreciation and a technical understanding of fashion which touches on a broad range of influences.

This programme will explore fashion media in the broadest sense, including new digital media opportunities and the rapid growth of international media dedicated to fashion and lifestyle.

Why should I choose this programme?

Magazines and digital media demand well-trained fashion journalists with an understanding of context, history and trends. Journalists, whether digital or print based, need to be informed on both the technical and creative aspects of fashion design. They also need to be versatile writers capable of working across a wide variety of media.

This programme will provide you with the skills and know-how to secure jobs in a demanding but exciting sector, with a strong focus on digital media.

Key skills, aims and objectives

Ideas generation, research interviewing, writing and editing skills
Visual appreciation of fashion
Technical understanding of fashion and its context, history and trends
The ability to work in both digital and print media
Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a career in fashion journalism, both print and digital media.

Typical entry level jobs open to graduates of the programme include:

‌•Junior Fashion Writer
‌•Copy Editor
‌•Web Editor
‌•Social Media Editor
‌•Fashion Assistant
‌•Brand Agency Researcher
‌•Trend Researcher
‌•E-commerce Product Writer
‌•Fashion News Reporter
‌•Features Assistant

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/pg-dip-fashion-journalism.aspx#tab_course-overview

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Our. MA Photography course. approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making. Read more

Our MA Photography course approaches photography as an expanded visual discipline. You'll be encouraged to confidently produce complex and extended photographic projects and engage with experimental and speculative approaches to making.

We offer a dynamic and exciting environment for studying the critical theory of photography, and this course engages with practices of reading and writing about the image. MA Photography also pays close attention to the dissemination, exhibition and publication of photographic work.

We provide specialist digital and analogue facilities for large-format colour and black-and-white exhibition prints.

Our course offers a considered balance of support that develops practical skills and fosters a high standard of diverse critical approaches. You'll take risks, explore and develop your interest, and exchange, debate and discuss ideas. You'll respond to the diverse field of contemporary photography and explore practices of representation that engage with the still and the moving image, as well as performance and installation.

Your studies will be supported by a number of internationally renowned staff in a department that encourages experimentation. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework whilst also being able to communicate to others, both visually and verbally.

We place a strong emphasis on publication, enabling you to find creative ways to disseminate your work beyond the academic context and into the public arena.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support at UCA Rochester enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Industry Partners

Our MA Photography course enjoys extensive links with a number of photographic, media and fine art professionals, curators, publishers, specialist printers and book designers. These connections enrich your experience through visiting lecturer and seminar programmes.

In the last three years, speakers on the course have included photographers and other creative practitioners such as:

-Ori Gersht

-Esther Teichmann

-Margaret Salmon

-Sarah Jones

-Matthew Stone

-Criodhna Costello

-Chris Coekin

-Carey Young

-Lisa Castagner

-Rod Dickinson

-Jo Longhurst

-Jason Evans

-Joseph Walsh

-Eva Bensasson

Additionally, creative professionals and industry links for our course include:

-Benedict Burbridge, editor of Photoworks

-Stuart Smith, book designer at Smith-Design

-Sarah James, writer at Art Monthly and Frieze

-Lucy Soutter, writer at Source

-Clare Grafik, curator of The Photographer's Gallery

-Jennifer Thatcher, Folkestone Triennial

-Jean Wainwright, writer at Art Newspaper

-Terry King, specialist printer

-Emily Pethick, directs The Showroom

-Robert Shore, editor of Elephant Magazine

-Edward Dorrian, organiser of Five Years

-Joyce Cronin, manages the Cubitt Gallery.

Careers

Our postgraduate degree prepares you for your career through professional practice units, talks by visiting artists and portfolio reviews with figures from across the photographic industry. Career opportunities include:

-Freelance photography

-Fine art

-Fashion

-Advertising and editorial

-Post production/digital imaging

-Picture editing and research

-Curating

-Image, arts and community arts management

-Gallery administration

Graduates of MA Photography have gone on to win the Jerwood Photography prize; to exhibit their work in The Photographers' Gallery, Photofusion, ArtSway and the Geffyre Museum as well as publishing their outputs in different venues ranging from The Sunday Times Magazine to monographs with Dewi Lewis Publishing.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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Why Surrey?. Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production.

Teaching is research-led, so you benefit from the individual expertise and passion of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published authors and academics, including our Poet in Residence and Distinguished Writer in Residence.

Programme overview

The MA Creative Writing programme will hone your research and writing skills to produce critically informed prose or poetry, and creative criticism. We will help you to locate your work in its literary and cultural context, and you will have the chance to reflect on your creative process and the finished work.

You will have access to a yearly calendar of events hosted at the University created to broaden your thinking, and develop your writing skills such as the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture, the annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and the Surrey Poetry Festival.

The MA in Creative Writing provides a strong foundation to embark upon a career in writing, communications, publishing, marketing, advertising, journalism or teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended portfolio.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

The MA Programme in Creative Writing will prepare graduates to undertake a PhD programme in the relevant field.

It will also provide students with the transferable skills of creative writing, critical thinking, textual analysis and communication that are attractive to a wide range of employers, from the cultural industries to marketing and advertising to tourism and leisure to the civil service and public/private partnerships.

It is designed to build confidence and technical ability in a variety of modes of imaginative writing, and to provide students with a clear-eyed grounding in contemporary and historical contexts of text production and circulation, including practical advice on the workings of the publishing industry.

Devoted to assisting students to understand and meet the challenges of producing high quality creative writing in poetry and prose, the programme also provides advanced understanding of the contexts, theoretical paradigms, methodologies and modes of interpretation that are vital in a full understanding of literary production.

The main aims are to:

  • Produce work that reflects a high level of technical ability and engages productively with its historical, cultural and literary contexts
  • Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of literary criticism
  • Reflect on their own practice as literary critics and how this can help to improve their own creative practice

As a Master’s level programme, it also aims to instil in students the capacity for carrying out independent research.

Academics and events

As a student on this Masters, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published academics and authors.

You will have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include:

Novelists

  • Iain Sinclair
  • Monica Ali
  • Jaspreet Singh
  • Nikita Lalwani

Poets

  • J.H. Prynne
  • Robert Fitterman
  • Allen Fisher
  • Gilbert Adair

Critics

  • Rod Mengham
  • Bernard O’Donoghue
  • Barbara Hardy

Each year’s cultural activities begin with the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and Surrey Poetry Festival – both affiliated with the Creative Writing programmes at the University of Surrey – aim to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involve readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and more.

This graduate program is delivered by the University's Creative Writing team, all of whom are published authors and poets:

  • Dr Paul Vlitos, Lecturer in Creative Writing
  • Dr Holly Luhning, Lecturer in Creative Writing
  • Dr Stephen Mooney, Lecturer in Creative Writing and former Poet in Residence
  • Dr Angela Szczepaniak, Lecturer in Creative Writing

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Explore the creative potential of your narrative constructions, observations of character and the aesthetics of dialogue within the tradition and potentiality of Screenwriting as designed for the next generation of industry writers. Read more
Explore the creative potential of your narrative constructions, observations of character and the aesthetics of dialogue within the tradition and potentiality of Screenwriting as designed for the next generation of industry writers.

•This course runs on a biennial basis and the next intake will be 2016
•Part-time programme that can be completed alongside full-time employment in two years
•The £38million Redmonds Building provides state-of-the-art facilities for the Liverpool Screen School
•Skillset Accredited status ensures an exceptional quality course
•Liverpool Screen School is part of the BBC North Developing Talent Scheme


LJMU’s Skillset Accredited MA Screenwriting programme is designed to prepare screenwriters for the exacting demands of the industry.

The UK film and television industry is enjoying sustained growth and increasing international influence, and the demand for screenwriters with a distinct voice and original vision has never been greater.

Liverpool has established itself as a centre for regional film and television production both in the commercial sector, and increasingly through independent production.

This is a highly participatory course for committed writers of all ages who show originality and talent and is taught by experienced tutors with strong industry connections.

The course emphasises the development of practical screenwriting skills and the production of a portfolio of work, developed to the highest professional standards. An understanding of professional practice, pitching and marketing screenplays, and the critical analysis of films and screen texts are further key elements in the programme.

The course is regularly visited by industry professionals which means you will have great networking opportunities plus the chance to engage directly with leading practitioners in the field.

Throughout the two year programme, you will be engaged in the production of varied and increasingly challenging projects, beginning with short film scripts and culminating in the development of feature-length screenplays. All screenplays are developed in small group workshops.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.


Discovering the Screen as a Writer

Introduces practice creative, formal, research and technical skills appropriate to Screenwriting at masters level, allowing you to gain an understanding of the difference between writing for different mediums

Ongoing Narrative

Introduces the concepts behind writing something that has an ongoing narrative in order to create a dynamic world for stories to occur in engaging, complex characters

Writing the Feature Film

You will complete your first feature film draft and further develop research abilities, in particular, how to broaden your writing craft in order to have dramatic stories with a high level of realism or detail

The Importance of Rewriting and How to Do It

You will develop the ability to reappraise your own work, to enrich you with screenwriting concepts in order to write an accomplished second draft

The Third Act

Continue your growth as a feature film writer, deepening your creative voice and making you a more ambitious writer

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Behind every beautiful fashion shoot is a talented photographer. Be that photographer. As a student of. MA Fashion Photograph. y, you’ll build upon your existing fashion and photography knowledge to identify, develop and manage a Masters project. Read more

Behind every beautiful fashion shoot is a talented photographer. Be that photographer.

As a student of MA Fashion Photography, you’ll build upon your existing fashion and photography knowledge to identify, develop and manage a Masters project.

Throughout the course you’ll have access to UCA’s state of the art photography and participate in a variety of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops, with regular off-campus visits to shoots and exhibitions.

Our MA Fashion Photography course offers you the opportunity to develop your practical fashion photography skills whilst giving you a solid grounding in critical thinking and theory.

Your studies will be supported by a number of internationally renowned staff in a department that encourages experimentation. This will enable you to establish yourself as a rounded professional who can formulate ideas in a sophisticated framework whilst also being able to communicate to others, both visually and verbally.

We place a strong emphasis on publication, enabling you to find creative ways to disseminate your work beyond the academic context and into the public arena.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support at UCA Rochester enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Industry Partners

Our MA Photography courses enjoy extensive links with a number of photographic, media and fine art professionals, curators, publishers, specialist printers and book designers. These connections enrich your experience through visiting lecturer and seminar programmes.

In the last three years, speakers on the course have included photographers and other creative practitioners such as:

-Ori Gersht

-Esther Teichmann

-Margaret Salmon

-Sarah Jones

-Matthew Stone

-Criodhna Costello

-Chris Coekin

-Carey Young

-Lisa Castagner

-Rod Dickinson

-Jo Longhurst

-Jason Evans

-Joseph Walsh

-Eva Bensasson.

Additionally, creative professionals and industry links for our course include:

-Benedict Burbridge, editor of Photoworks

-Stuart Smith, book designer at Smith-Design

-Sarah James, writer at Art Monthly and Frieze

-Lucy Soutter, writer at Source

-Clare Grafik, curator of The Photographer's Gallery

-Jennifer Thatcher, Folkestone Triennial

-Jean Wainwright, writer at Art Newspaper

-Terry King, specialist printer

-Emily Pethick, directs The Showroom

-Robert Shore, editor of Elephant Magazine

-Edward Dorrian, organiser of Five Years

-Joyce Cronin, manages the Cubitt Gallery.

Careers

Our postgraduate degree prepares you for your career through professional practice units, talks by visiting artists and portfolio reviews with figures from across the photographic industry. Career opportunities include:

-Freelance photography

-Fine art

-Fashion

-Advertising and editorial

-Post production/digital imaging

-Picture editing and research

-Curating

-Image, arts and community arts management

-Gallery administration.

Graduates of MA Photography have gone on to win the Jerwood Photography prize; to exhibit their work in The Photographers' Gallery, Photofusion, ArtSway and the Geffyre Museum as well as publishing their outputs in different venues ranging from The Sunday Times Magazine to monographs with Dewi Lewis Publishing.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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The Aberystwyth MA in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. Read more

About the course

The Aberystwyth MA in Creative Writing will help you develop your creative vision and writing abilities through a balanced programme of reading, analysis and writing workshops. You will be exposed to a range of contemporary writers of both prose and poetry, so that your own creative approach may be stimulated and develop in confidence and maturity. You will also engage in discussions about technique and undertake an exploration of the wider issues related to the practice of writing, such as the significance of genre and the mechanics of publication.

You will receive individual tuition from the excellent Departmental staff, all of whom are published creative writers. Under their guidance, you will produce a substantial portfolio in the form of a collection of poetry or an extended piece of prose fiction. In addition, you will develop a host of key transferrable skills that will benefit you in a range of academic or employment contexts.

This degree will suit you:

- If you want comprehensive training in advanced methods of creative writing
- If you want to develop your creative vision and writing skills to the highest levels
- If you are looking for a detailed and constructive critique of your work
- If you want to work within a dynamic and supportive environment while producing a portfolio of creative writing

Course content and structure

You will study two core modules together with four option modules from the Department’s portfolio of MA provision or other relevant study areas, including Literary Studies. The core modules will equip you with the research skills and subject-specific knowledge required to master a range of practical and theoretical approaches to writing; and the option modules will enable you to direct your study into areas of specific interest. Each module comprises ten weeks of study with a weekly two-hour group meeting and provision for tutorial consultation. This framework for learning will inspire you to widen your artistic horizons and push you to develop your abilities within a constructive critical environment.

The centrally important component of the course is your Writing Portfolio. This piece, to comprise either prose or poetry, will be accompanied by a critical commentary explaining the work in its context and in appropriate analytical terms. We will take great care in assigning a supervisor to guide you whose interests will be as closely matched to your own as possible.

Core modules:

Research Skills
The Writing Portfolio
Writing and Publication

Optional modules:

Writing Fiction: Methods and Techniques
Writing Poetry: Rhymes and Reasons
Understanding Creativity
Writing Fiction: Wider Explorations
Writing Poetry: Modes in Contemporary Poetry

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of: portfolios of prose and poetry, including critical commentaries and annotated bibliographies; a case study of a research project; and a study of a particular publisher of creative writing or type of publication. In the third semester, each student will complete a Writing Portfolio of creative writing with a critical commentary. The Portfolio can be in the form of poetry (30 pages plus 6,000 words) or prose fiction (14,000 plus 6000 words), but not a combination of the two.

Employability

Every MA course at Aberystwyth University is specifically designed to enhance your employability. In addition to developing your writing and research abilities. This course will help you to master key skills that are required in wide variety of workplaces. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, and confidently present robust projects to the scrutiny of a group. Your MA in Creative Writing will place you in the jobs marketplace as a professional writer with highly desirable skills suitable for a career in the arts, literature, journalism or many other fields.

Key Skills and Competencies

Upon graduating from this MA in Creative Writing, you will have mastered an array of technical and creative skills relating to writing. You will be highly competent in factual research, evaluative writing and problem-solving through the process of writing. You will understand genre and register, narrative viewpoint and voice, and be able to justify your creative choices within your chosen form. You will possess an awareness of your intended readership and identify your place in the wider context of literary fiction and/or poetry. You will also have experience in giving and receiving stringent but supportive criticism within a positive group setting.

Self-Motivation and Discipline

Studying at MA level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of Departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your MA degree. This process will strengthen your skills in planning, executing and analysing work projects in ways that reflect standard practice in the world of employed work.

Transferable Skills

The MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of academic and employment contexts. A significant proportion of postgraduate jobs demand both particular expertise and strength in breadth. Therefore, as a trained writer with proven creative abilities, you will be desirable to any employer seeking individuals who can balance creative flair and artistic vision with a dependable work ethic and highly adaptable writing skills.

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The number of industries requiring highly skilled graduates in the biological and biomolecular sciences is rapidly expanding and remains based on the principle that employable graduates should possess a range of key skills. Read more
The number of industries requiring highly skilled graduates in the biological and biomolecular sciences is rapidly expanding and remains based on the principle that employable graduates should possess a range of key skills. The MSc in Biological and Biomolecular Science by Negotiated Learning will afford students the flexibility to broaden their understanding of biological and biomolecular science against a backdrop of learning core technical, methodological and innovation skills relevant to the industry and academia.
Several innovative specialisations are available from a carefully chosen range of modules from the relevant disciplines within the UCD School of Biomolecular & Biomedical Science and the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science. These provide students with an exciting prospect of studying and researching in the interdisciplinary fields of genetics, cell biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology and biodata analysis. This diverse offering aims to enhance and develop a student’s current knowledge and skill base using a wide range of taught components and applied research skills. Guidance from expert faculty is provided to tailor a programme that will meet the anticipated requirements of the student’s objectives and career goals.

Key Fact

This MSc in Biological and Biomolecular Science is the first of its kind offered in Ireland by Negotiated Learning. This offers students a unique opportunity to combine skills and learning from several related disciplines with guidance from expert faculty staff, and to deepen their knowledge in one of our specialisations.

Course Content and Structure

The course is divided into the following:
•Core Laboratory Research Skills (30 credits) – including techniques such as RT-PCR, western blotting and imaging studies.
•Core Professional Taught Skills Modules (20 credits) – including career development, quantitative tools, science writing and communication skills.
•Optional Taught modules (40 credits) – involves selecting one of the following specialisations and selecting specific modules within
these that meet the student’s learning objectives.

The Specialisations Available:
• Genetics and Cell Biology: investigates cellular signalling, architecture, imaging, trafficking and transport, genetic basis of disease, model organisms, epigenetics, etc.
• Microbiology and Infection Biology: investigates mechanisms of pathogenic micro-organisms, host response to infection, immunopathologies, host-pathogen interactions, development of diagnostics, applied microbiology, etc.
• Biochemistry and Synthetic Biology: investigates metabolism and disease, protein-protein interactions, cell signalling, protein structure and analysis.

Career Opportunities

This programme will enable you to choose from a wide range of careers and areas of postgraduate study. This multi-disciplinary course provides a solid grounding for careers in industry, health and research, such as Quality Assurance, Quality Control, Microbiology, Process control, Technical Transfer, Research and Development, and Regulatory Affairs, Scientific Editor or Writer, Lab Technician or Analyst roles.

An academic staff member will advise you on a specialisation and module choices based on the opportunities you hope to unlock.

Facilities and Resources

Students on this programme will benefit from the use of a research skills laboratory in the prestigious UCD Conway Institute, as well as state-of-the-art teaching and laboratory facilities in the new O'Brien Centre for Science.

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This programme takes a project-led, practice-based approach to studying for an MA in Film Directing (Documentary) which integrates practical film making with analysis of contemporary film practice. Read more

This programme takes a project-led, practice-based approach to studying for an MA in Film Directing (Documentary) which integrates practical film making with analysis of contemporary film practice. Students choose to make a creative documentary or a non -fiction film which defies genre definition and pushes the boundaries of narrative. We develop these through workshops and tutorials. Our students work within an integrated framework that helps them question the form of their films and enables them to find the right language for their storytelling.

The programme encourages ways of working as a film community that foster the important exchange of ideas, with inspiration from international visiting film makers through Scottish Documentary Institute and support from our team of documentary practicioners. All tutors are top professionals currently working within the industry as directors, producers, editors, cinematographers or sound designers. A newly built Avid edit teaching space, and a new screening space helps us encourage a fresh approach to emerging technologies.

Graduate films do well internationally regularly winning BAFTAs, RTS Awards and awards at international festivals. Over the last five years students have received an Oscar nomination for an MA film made here and an Oscar shortlist for a film made by a recent graduate. We work closely with the Scottish Documentary Institute, the University’s internationally-acclaimed research centre in documentary film making.

The aim of the Film Directing programmes at ECA is to:

  • challenge boundaries, encourage original thought, and develop intellectual and critical approaches to making films
  • combine the contemporary energy and discipline of current creative approaches to film practices with the professionalism of industry practices, in order to produce innovative and grounded work
  • facilitate the interrelationship between different cultural traditions, traditional and emerging screen technologies, and classical and non-traditional cinematic genres and conventions.
  • provide postgraduate education in film making that constitutes a clear progression from undergraduate education whilst maintaining distinctiveness from industrial training- that gives scope for taking risks
  • foster filmmakers able to work and compete internationally

Programme structure

This programme is project-led and delivered through workshops and regular individual tutorials. It integrates practical studio work with theoretical and written studies from the Screen cultures course (see separate description) which is run independently from the Film Department.

The first semester, Design Studio is organised round a series of micro-films which lead to a growing awareness of film language and enhancement of technical skills to creatively support filmic vision. Cinematography and sound workshops are delivered by visiting lecturers. Directorial voice is built up also through tutorials in which an idea for a graduating film is developed and evolved. Awareness of current international documentary practice is built through regular seminars and screenings, collaborations with Film Festivals such as Take One Action and also supported by Scottish Documentary Institute. This is also to inspire students to push boundaries in their approach to narrative structure and visual language and not to get locked in conventional approaches. We want to encourage bold work that takes risks. At the end of the first semester all students pitch their films using a trailer or short excerpt from their research material. They also develop a treatment with feedback from tutorials.

Semester two is spent preparing and shooting the graduate film and is backed up with edit tutorials as well as project support from weekly meetings with a tutor. Students also receive seminars in production process including contracts.

Semester three is when the film is edited and finished with input from group crits, tutorials. Students also attend or often volunteer with Edinburgh Film Festival and the Edinburgh Pitch in order to observe and engage with key players from the international documentary world through hearing feedback from commissioning editors.

Alongside the ECA learning structure, students also have a pool of potential collaborators from Screen Academy Napier including the possibility of working with cinematographers, editors and producers.

Career opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of roles, including producer, director, writer, production or location manager, researcher, editor, assistant director, cinematographer, or journalist. Graduates have found work directing for the BBC and making work internationally for top broadcasters and film funds. Related fields include advertising, community films, academia or film development agencies.

Creative Skillset

MA/MFA Film Directing has been awarded the Creative Skillset Tick, the industry kitemark of quality, following a rigorous assessment process by experts working in the Creative Industries. The Creative Skillset Tick is awarded to practice-based courses which best prepare students for a career in the industry. Screen Academy Scotland is one of only 3 Screen Academies in the UK along with National Film School and London Film School.



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