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Masters Degrees (Technical Communication)

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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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The MA in Professional Communication (MAPC) provides the knowledge and training for superior oral, written, and visual communication skills. Read more

The MA in Professional Communication (MAPC) provides the knowledge and training for superior oral, written, and visual communication skills. Our program is designed for people who seek the techniques and knowledge required to be communication specialists in a wide range of fields in an ever-shifting 21st century workplace.

The program features small class sizes, personal attention and opportunities for applied research and professional engagement.

• The program’s convenient schedule of late afternoon and evening courses appeals to full-time graduate students and enables professionals to work while completing their degree.

• The MAPC includes courses that meet both on-campus and in a hybrid (on-campus/online) format for flexibility and convenience, while providing engagement with cutting-edge technology.

• Offering three concentrations, the program creates a community of professional communicators who have varied career interests.

You can request more information on our website

Concentrations

Strategic Communication

Strategic communicators work as planners, designers, and leaders to develop and disseminate messages both within and outside of organizations. Students enrolled in this concentration analyze how organizations interact internally and externally with the public, industry and media. Students also gain practical communication skills that give them a competitive edge in the workplace.

Technical Communication

Technical communicators use communication skills to translate complex scientific, engineering or technical information into content that users can understand and utilize. Students enrolled in this concentration learn how to communicate to the user while ensuring that the product or service has a competitive advantage. As technology grows in a variety of fields, the demand for such skilled, user-centered and agile technical communicators has never been greater.

Health Communication

This concentration equips students with the theoretical and practical communication tools needed to effectively and ethically impact public and personal health literacy. From creating health awareness campaigns, improving patient relationships, working with regulations, and explaining health care policy, Health Communication professionals are critical to the facilitation of understanding health care issues as a basis for informing, influencing and motivating diverse audiences about health and medical issues.

You can request more information by visiting our website

Career Opportunities

Graduates from the program bring a thorough knowledge and skill set of advanced communication to careers in a range of sectors — including technology, government, finance, health services, academic, and many other sectors where communications skills are highly valued.



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Communication and the technologies for message creation and dissemination are at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. Read more

Program overview

Communication and the technologies for message creation and dissemination are at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. The master of science degree in communication and media technologies is an interdisciplinary advanced program of study combining liberal arts courses in communication with course work in an applied or professional program. Graduates will be adept at the analysis of communication problems, the development of solutions, and the creation of messages as a result of their combined training in the social sciences, humanities, and applied technologies.

Communication courses rooted in the humanities and social sciences provide students with the opportunity to gain a broad, historical understanding of issues in communication, including the ethical, legal, and social dimensions. Additional courses give students advanced guidance in the creation of written and visual message content. Courses in applied technologies or professional programs provide opportunities for implementation and application. The required thesis combines knowledge, practice, original research, and application under the guidance of a graduate advisement committee. Graduates are prepared for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, and government, as well as for graduate work toward a doctoral degree.

Plan of study

The degree requires the completion of 36 credit hours of graduate course work. The program consists of five required courses, three communication electives, three applied professional or technical courses, and a thesis or project.

Graduate committee

Full-time students create a graduate advisement committee by the end of their first semester of study. The committee will be comprised of at least one faculty member from the department of communication and one faculty member from outside the department. The outside member should have a terminal degree. The committee advises and guides the student's elective course selection and course sequencing. With the guidance and approval of the graduate advising committee, students design and conduct a thesis or project appropriate to their course of study and their career goals.

Master's thesis/project

A thesis or project is an option for all students in the program. The topic should complement the student's academic graduate interests and scholarly training. Topic selection and methods for implementing the thesis/project occur in consultation with the student's graduate advisement committee.

Comprehensive examinations

Comprehensive examinations may be taken in lieu of a thesis or project. Students are eligible to take these examinations after all coursework has been completed. The Graduate Committee chooses the Exam Committee members from two areas: Theory and Methods. The student selects a specialty area within the communication elective courses with the consent of the faculty member who taught the course and will administer and grade the exam question(s). Specialization areas include the following: Electronic, Visual, International, Electronic, Strategic, and Education. Exams will take place at two times: Intersession and June. If students fail any portion of the exam, they get one rewrite.

Curriculum

Communication and media technologies, MS degree, typical course sequence:
-History of Media Technologies
-Communication Theories
-Communication Electives
-Professional Core
-Research Methods in Communication
-Media Law and Ethics
-Communication thesis/project

View website for more information on the different electives and professional/technical courses available.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have a minimum cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.0.
-Submit three letters of reference from academic advisers, major professors, and/or supervisors or managers.
-Submit a writing portfolio consisting of at least three writing samples, such as academic papers written for class, work-related brochures and pamphlets, or newspaper or magazine articles, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88-89 (Internet-based) are required on the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required on the IELTS. This requirement may be waived for students who submit undergraduate transcripts from American colleges and universities.

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Summary. The purpose of this programme is to enable both practicing and aspiring professionals in the business, communication and information technology sectors to better understand how to leverage digital media technologies and platforms to achieve competitive advantage. Read more

Summary

The purpose of this programme is to enable both practicing and aspiring professionals in the business, communication and information technology sectors to better understand how to leverage digital media technologies and platforms to achieve competitive advantage.

About

In contrast to traditional methods of communication, digital media channels facilitate greater consumer interactivity and empowerment. In a highly competitive and connected global marketplace the unique properties of digital media communication can therefore present both opportunities and challenges for firms. Increasingly, communication professionals are expected to embrace digital media to encourage customer and partner engagement. Equally, professionals in technical roles are now required to apply their knowledge of digital media more strategically to drive business value.

Recognising the vital role of digital media for effective organisational and business communication, and the growing importance of open, collaborative working practices, this course combines expertise from both technical and communication disciplines to provide an enriching and multidisciplinary learning environment.

Specifically, this course will provide you with the opportunity to:

  • critically assess the changing communication and technology landscape to establish strong foundations and confidence in decision making in an ever changing digital environment
  • compare and contrast a variety of online digital media communication tools and techniques
  • apply the latest online digital media communication tools and services to achieve business communication objectives in support of organisational goals.

Attendance

Full-time students normally complete between two and three modules per semester. Modules are normally delivered in intensive block sessions, from 1.00pm until 9.00pm. The maximum number of intensive block teaching days per module is 4 (although not always on consecutive days), plus approximately 2 days x 3 hours seminar attendance. You will also be expected to engage in group and team work in some of your modules and so will need to have further meetings outside of class time. In addition, you are also expected to dedicate adequate time for independent study. Part-time students normally complete between one and two modules per semester.

Career options

This course enables both practicing and aspiring professionals in the business, marketing, communication and information technology sectors to better understand how to leverage digital media technologies and services to achieve competitive advantage.

Key aspects of the course that will help to equip you for a career, or support your continued professional development in the communication or information technology sectors include:

  • Ongoing input from leading practitioners, ensuring exposure to the experiences and insight of professionals working in the digital arena.
  • The use of case studies, enabling the identification of real-world business problems, and the design and defence of appropriate solutions.
  • Enhanced ICT skills, through first-hand experimentation with a range of online digital media tools.
  • Activities and assessment which require the application of learning to an employer or an equivalent organisation.
  • The opportunity to learn in a multidisciplinary setting indicative of today’s more integrated and collaborative corporate culture.




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Visual Communication as a discipline is undergoing a major shift in both its vocational positioning and intellectual relevance. Read more

Visual Communication as a discipline is undergoing a major shift in both its vocational positioning and intellectual relevance. At the Royal College of Art, the programme has a long history that has radically examined the place of visual communication in relation to culture and society, while championing the importance of an interdisciplinary approach. The programme offers three pathways of study: Experimental CommunicationGraphic Design and Illustration.

The pathways are interrelated and structured around the discipline of visual communication to facilitate well-informed risk-taking and experimentation from a grounded position of subject knowledge and understanding. Pathways are delivered in subject clusters (critical thinking) supported by shared workshops (critical making) and delivered by staff who are either advanced practitioners, or active researchers engaged in both the core and margins of communication practice.

As noted by our students, the necessary critical discourse around what it means to be a ‘visual communicator’ today opens up possibilities about the process and contexts of communication; and in doing so shows that our skillset is transferable beyond the confines of the purely visual. The programme provides an environment within which students aim to expand and explore new notions of traditional subjects – graphic design and illustration – and question existing practice, while doing so from a position of being well informed.

We recognise that ensuring that our graduates are at the forefront of our subject means considering new technologies alongside traditional ones, understanding the changing relationship between the creative practitioner and society, and balancing critical and strategic thinking with making. 

Areas of staff practice and research range from, and beyond, archeoacoustics, cultural practices, design criticism, design for society, design history, design writing, drawing, education design, feminism, free/associate discussion, graphic design, graphic information design, group learning, expanded cinema, independent publishing, intercultural communication, illustration, memory, moving image, narrative, participatory practice, sound, structural film, non-Latin and Latin typography, visible language, visual identity and visual research.

Noted strengths of the programme as viewed by graduates, students, commentators and critics are its interdisciplinary nature, quality of advanced and specialist practice, exposure to alternative modes of practice, opportunities for collaboration, cross-subject studio culture, peer-learning and the opportunity to experiment while supported by access to College technical resources.

The programme has a network of successful practitioners including a long list of notable alumni who have gone onto transform communication praxis and include Åbäke, Brave New Alps, Daniel Eatock, FUEL, Graphic Thought Facility, James Goggin, James Jarvis, JULIA, Le Gun, Tom Gauld, Sara Fanelli, Troika, Jonathan Barnbrook, Phil Baines, Morag Myerscough and Why Not Associates.

The programme has a long-standing reputation for providing students with the foundation and thinking in order to initiate, reframe, expand and advance their individual practice. We welcome applicants from different and diverse contexts and backgrounds; this enriches and enlivens our community. We genuinely believe and evidence that it is the people that make a place.



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The evolution of wireless communication systems and networks in recent years has been accelerating at an extraordinary pace and become an essential part of modern lifestyle requirements. Read more

About the course

The evolution of wireless communication systems and networks in recent years has been accelerating at an extraordinary pace and become an essential part of modern lifestyle requirements.

The effects of this trend has seen a growing overlap between the network and communication industries, from component fabrication to system integration, and the development of integrated systems that transmit and process all types of data and information.

This distinctive course, developed with the support of industry, aims to develop a detailed technical knowledge of current practice in wireless systems and networks. You will study the fundamentals of wireless communication systems and the latest innovations in this field.

You will study the fundamentals of wireless communication systems and the latest industry innovations and needs. The MSc programme incorporates theory and practice and covers all aspects of a modern communication system ranging from RF components, digital signal processing, network technologies and wireless security and examines new wireless standards.

This course is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Aims

The sharp increase in the use of smartphones, machine to machine communication systems (M2m), sensor netowrks, digital broadcasting networks and smart grid systems have brought tremendous technological growth in this field.

It has become a global phenomenon that presently outstrips the ability of commercial organisations to recruit personnel equipped with the necessary blend of technical and managerial skills who can initiate and manage the introduction of the new emerging technologies in networks and wireless systems.

By studying Wireless Communications Systems at Brunel, you will be equipped with the advanced technical and professional skills you need for a successful career either in industry or leading edge research in wireless communication systems.

Course Content

Typical Modules:

Advanced Digital Communications
Network Design and Management
DSP for Communications
Wireless Network Technologies
Communications Network Security
Research Methods
Radio and Optical Communication Systems
Project Management
Project & Dissertation

Teaching

The course blends lectures, workshops, seminars, self-study, and individual and group project work. You’ll develop communication and teamwork skills valued by industry through carefully designed lab exercises, group assignments, and your dissertation project.

In lectures, key concepts and ideas are introduced, definitions are stated, techniques are explained, and immediate student queries discussed.

Seminars provide the students with the opportunity to discuss at greater length issues arising from lectures.

Workshops sessions are used to foster practical engagement with the taught material.

The dissertation project plays a more significant role in supporting literature review in a technically complex area and to plan, execute and evaluate a significant investigation into a current problem area related to wireless communication systems.

Assessment

Taught modules are assessed by final examinations or by a mix of examination and laboratory work. Project management is assessed by course work. Generally, students start working on their dissertations in January and submit by the end of September.

Special Features

The course is taught by academics who are experts in their fields and have strong collaborative links with industry and other international research organisations. Some well-known textbooks in this area are authored by members of the course team.

The course is fully supported with computing and modern, well-equipped RF laboratories. As a student you will enjoy working on the latest and advanced equipment.

Electronic and Computer Engineering at Brunel supports a wide range of research groups, each with a complement of academics and research staff and students:

- Media Communications
- Wireless Networks and Communications
- Power Systems
- Electronic Systems
- Sensors and Instrumentation.

Our portfolio of research contracts totals £7.5 million, and we’ve strong links with industry.

Prizes
Rohde and Schwartz best in RF Prize
Criteria for award: Best overall PG student on MSc Wireless Communications Systems with a relevant RF dissertation
Composition of prize: RF books and Certificate

Women in Engineering and Computing Programme

Brunel’s Women in Engineering and Computing mentoring scheme provides our female students with invaluable help and support from their industry mentors.

Accreditation

The MSc in Wireless Communications Systems is fully accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

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Conference Interpreting is one of three specialisations within the MA Degree Programme in Applied Linguistics and is designed for all graduates interested in becoming professional conference interpreters. Read more
Conference Interpreting is one of three specialisations within the MA Degree Programme in Applied Linguistics and is designed for all graduates interested in becoming professional conference interpreters. Our programme provides the tools and academic skills you need to compete – and remain competitive – in the challenging field of multilingual communication. You will learn to interpret at a professional level by:
• analysing language transfer problems
• developing solutions and strategies
• applying appropriate methods and tools

Your professional future

In our globalised world, multilingualism plays an increasingly important role. As a result, experts in multilingual communication are indispensable and so are qualified conference interpreters. Professional conference interpreters work:
• for government offices
• for national and international parliaments and organisations
• in private industry and business
• for trade unions, political parties, professional associations, etc.

Your MA programme

Apart from background studies and theory-based courses in linguistics and translation studies, the programme includes practice-oriented courses in:
• simultaneous and consecutive interpreting
• note-taking, memory training, public speaking and voice training
• terminology management
• professional skills

You have the opportunity to gain a direct insight into professional practice by:
• visiting potential clients / employers
• interpreting at simulated conferences
• practising in “dummy booths” at conferences
• interpreting in real-life settings

Our international team of lecturers are recognised experts from the academic world and/or professional practice. Our low teacher-student ratio in taught classes allows us to pay close attention to individual needs.

Language combinations

For details please click here:
https://www.zhaw.ch/storage/linguistik/studium/master-angewandte-linguistik/factsheet-conference-interpreting.pdf

Please note that German must be one of the languages you study.

Interpreting preparation course

We offer a preparation course in interpreting techniques and skills to prepare students for the aptitude test. This course includes:
• sight translation
• note-taking and memory training
• introduction to consecutive interpreting
• liaison interpreting
• key terminology for business and economics
• background studies

Related MA/BA programmes at the School of Applied Linguistics

We offer two more MA pathways:
• Professional Translation (please visit http://www.findamasters.com/search/CourseDetails.aspx?CID=25381)
• Organisational Communication

Our MA Degree Programme is based on the following undergraduate programmes:
• BA in Applied Languages with Specialisations in Multilingual Communication, Multimodal Communication and Technical Communication
• BA in Communication with Specialisations in Journalism and Organisational Communication.

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Professional Translation is one specialisation within the MA in Applied Linguistics and is designed for all graduates interested in becoming professional translators. Read more
Professional Translation is one specialisation within the MA in Applied Linguistics and is designed for all graduates interested in becoming professional translators. Our programme provides the tools and academic skills you need to compete – and remain competitive – in the challenging field of multilingual communication. You will learn to translate at a professional level by:
• analysing translation problems
• developing solutions and strategies
• applying appropriate methods and tools

Your professional future

In our globalised world, multilingualism plays an increasingly important role. The need for experts in multilingual communication – and therefore for qualified professional translators – is growing all the time. Professional translators work:
• for specialised language service providers or translation agencies
• as staff translators for major national and international companies
• as freelancers
• for government authorities, foundations, etc.

Your MA programme

Apart from background studies and theory-based courses in linguistics and translation studies, the programme includes practice-oriented courses in:
• specialised translation
• CAT tools and language technology
• rewriting, editing, proof-reading
• translation management
• terminology management and
• professional practice

By taking part in realistic or real-life projects, you learn to use the latest technology, acquire skills in deadline and quality management and gain experience in customer service.

Our international team of lecturers are recognised experts from the academic world and/or professional practice. Our low teacher-student ratio in taught classes is one of our great advantages and allows us to pay close attention to individual needs.

Language combinations

For details please click here:
https://www.zhaw.ch/storage/linguistik/studium/master-angewandte-linguistik/factsheet-professional-translation.pdf

Please note that German must be one of the languages you study.

Related MA/BA programmes at the School of Applied Linguistics

We offer a second MA pathway specialising in Conference Interpreting
(please visit http://www.findamasters.com/search/CourseDetails.aspx?CID=25379)
and the following undergraduate programmes:
• BA in Applied Languages with Specialisations in Multilingual Communication, Multimodal Communication and Technical Communication
• BA in Communication with Specialisations in Journalism and Organisational Communication.

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Modern information systems continue to transform and progress the ease with which information can be accessed across the globe and to underpin the digital society and economy. Read more
Modern information systems continue to transform and progress the ease with which information can be accessed across the globe and to underpin the digital society and economy.

They depend fundamentally on digital systems of communication, and this programme provides thorough coverage of the speciality to meet the high and increasing demand for digital communications engineers who can manage and develop the technologies of today’s data-driven lifestyle.

This programme is aimed at recent engineering, physics and computer science graduates and/or those with a number of years industry experience in the communications industry, who wish to acquire in-depth knowledge of this key specialism in order to progress their careers.

Core study areas include fundamentals of digital signal processing and information theory and coding, and a research project.

Optional study areas include communication networks, personal radio communications, communication channels, digital signal processing for software defined radio, multimedia over networks, mobile network technologies and intelligent signal processing.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/digital-communication-systems/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
Semester 1
- Fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing
- Information Theory and Coding

Semester 2
- Research project
- Advanced individual project

Optional Modules:
Semester 1
- Communication Networks
- Personal Radio Communications
- Communication Channels

Semester 2
- Digital Signal Processing for Software Defined Radio
- Communication Network Security and e-Commerce
- Mobile Network Technologies
- Intelligent Signal Processing

How you will learn

The course is designed to give both deep understanding of the core technologies which underpin the industry and which are driving the latest advances in performance and capability. It allows you to develop your personal interests via a range of specialised optional modules. The individual research project is often undertaken as part of the School’s internationally respected research portfolio.

- Assessment
Examinations are held in January and May, with coursework and group work throughout the programme. The individual research project is assessed by written report and viva voce in September.

Facilities

Students on the programme have access to laboratories, industry standard software and hardware including equipment provided by Texas Instruments. There is a range of anechoic chambers including the largest microwave chamber at any UK university.

Careers and further study

Job opportunities include both senior technical and managerial activities in the fields of communications engineering including high speed digital design, communication systems engineering, software/firmware engineering, algorithm development and signal processing engineering.

Why choose electronic, electrical and systems engineering at Loughborough?

We develop and nurture the world’s top engineering talent to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. All of our Masters programmes are accredited by one or more of the following professional bodies: the IET, IMechE, InstMC, Royal Aeronautical Society and the Energy Institute.

We carefully integrate our research and education programmes in order to support the technical and commercial needs of society and to extend the boundaries of current knowledge.

Consequently, our graduates are highly sought after by industry and commerce worldwide, and our programmes are consistently ranked as excellent in student surveys, including the National Student Survey, and independent assessments.

- Facilities
Our facilities are flexible and serve to enable our research and teaching as well as modest preproduction testing for industry.
Our extensive laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain crucial practical skills and experience in some of the latest electrical and electronic experimental facilities and using industry standard software.

- Research
We are passionate about our research and continually strive to strengthen and stimulate our portfolio. We have traditionally built our expertise around the themes of communications, energy and systems, critical areas where technology and engineering impact on modern life.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They go on to work with companies such as Accenture, BAE Systems, E.ON, ESB International, Hewlett Packard, Mitsubishi, Renewable Energy Systems Ltd, Rolls Royce and Siemens AG.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/digital-communication-systems/

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The postgraduate programme in applied linguistics and communication began at Birkbeck in 1965, making it one of the oldest and most established linguistics courses in the world. Read more
The postgraduate programme in applied linguistics and communication began at Birkbeck in 1965, making it one of the oldest and most established linguistics courses in the world. It is unique, as it provides students with opportunities to explore many topics in applied linguistics and communication in a comprehensive and interdisciplinary manner. Furthermore, lecturers specialise in various areas of multilingualism and multiculturalism, offering a range of modules to suit individual interests.

You first complete 2 compulsory modules - Introduction to Applied Linguistics and Research Methods and Design - but then you are able to choose from a range of option modules, including, for example: Second Language Acquisition; Bilingualism; International Management Communication; Sociolinguistics; Language, Culture and Communication; Language Teaching and Learning in a Multilingual and Multicultural Contexts; and Linguistic Description and Corpus Application.

The core module Research Methods and Design aims to equip you with professional and technical knowledge in qualitative and quantitative research methods. It will also prepare you for undertaking your own empirical and/or theoretical research into language and language behaviour in the form of an extended literature review or dissertation.

The programme aims to introduce you to multiple sub-domains and topics that reflect the research interests of staff, e.g. code-switching, first and second language acquisition, intercultural communication, language pedagogy and assessment, language impairment, language policy, language and identity, corpus linguistics, and speech production and perception.

All academic staff are active in state-of-the-art teaching and research. Applied linguistics and communication at Birkbeck enjoys a strong international reputation for its quality teaching and research.

The programme is suitable for people with diverse career goals: those who wish to further their career prospects and professional development, or those who have an interest in doctoral research and aspire to work in higher education. In particular, the programme is beneficial for those who do not have specific research interests at the beginning of their degree, but who intend to identify and focus on an area of research after exploring various disciplines in applied linguistics and communication and immersing themselves in the research and learning culture of a renowned department.

Our students work in a rich research environment that is supported by excellent resources, including a multimedia library and computing facilities. We have a large MPhil/PhD community and this programme offers the opportunity to progress to our integrated PhD programmes in Applied Linguistics, Intercultural Communication, Language Teaching or TESOL.

Our postgraduate students join a vibrant and diverse community supported by the Birkbeck College Applied Linguistics Society, which is student run. There is an annual Postgraduate Student Research Conference which is organised by the Society every summer. In addition, the Research Centre for Multilingual and Multicultural Research hosts a lecture series given by international visiting scholars. Birkbeck also actively collaborates with the larger community of applied linguists throughout University of London colleges. The Institute of Education, School of Oriental and African Studies and University College London are all within walking distance in Bloomsbury, as well as King's College London. The British Library and the British Museum are also a short walking distance away.

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This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. Read more

Why take this course?

This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. It has a strong practical orientation, embracing technology and research skills that are highly relevant to translation as a career.

You can study this as a campus-based or distance learning course.

What will i experience?

On this course you can:

Specialise in translation between English and your choice of language from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian or Spanish
Balance your study between translation skills, technological competence and the acquisition of theoretical methodologies
Follow a programme accredited by the European Masters in Translation network

What opportunities might it lead to?

The MA Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth is an accredited member of the European Masters in Translation Network, and the University is also a member of the OPTIMALE translator training network funded by the Erasmus lifelong learning scheme of the European Commission.

The course includes a strong practical element, as well as a careers element, which enables those who wish to become professionals to understand the basics of staff, agency and freelance translation work.

This course is accredited by European Masters in Translation. The EMT is a partnership project between the European Commission and higher-education institutions offering master's level translation programmes. The project has established a quality label for university translation programmes that meet agreed professional standards and market demands.

Module Details

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block, plus their dissertation. A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Core units

Critical Approaches to Specialised Translation:
For the theoretical strand of this unit, students will be introduced to a series of concepts and theoretical frameworks in linguistics and translation studies. This unit makes substantial use of task-based learning in order to help the students to learn to apply these concepts and frameworks to the analysis of translations by other people and to their own translation practice.

Dissertation:
Students have the choice to complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a translation related topic or an extended translation and commentary. (Taken once core unit and options have been passed)

Options: 2 of the following:

Translation Technologies and Subtitling:
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with software tools which are relevant and in use in the professional world of translation. It will cover both the theory and the practice of glossary development, translation memory/machine translation usage and subtitling.

Technical Communication:
This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems

Translation Project:
The Translation Project provides an opportunity for students to produce an extended translation in a domain of their choice. Students will be required to address a range of practical and professional issues, including market demand, time and resource management and billing, and reflect critically on them.

Professional Portfolio:
The Professional Portfolio is designed as a unit which allows students to profile their studies in a way which is academically or professionally important to them on the basis of previous professional experience, a work placement or internship, or any specific interests they may have in translation.

Professional Aspects of Translation:
This course will provide students with tools to maximise their employability in the sector and to enhance their professional business skills.

Please note: Specialised Translation workshops will run on campus depending on student numbers. Students will join the Distance Learning workshop variant of this unit if numbers for a specific language pathway are low on campus.

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught programme from October to June and a research programme, in which the dissertation is written from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. Their dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

The distance learning programme will provide you with online learning materials for the units. These will be supported by asynchronous online discussion with the tutors responsible for the various course units and with other students on the course. You will also be able to communicate with your tutors on a one-to-one basis (e.g. by email, Skype or telephone).

You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor, who will oversee your work throughout the process and you will be encouraged to start thinking about your dissertation from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Assessments include translations, essays and projects. All translation-related assessments provide the opportunity to practise your translation skills and simultaneously to reflect on this practice. Other assignments will evaluate your technical expertise, research skills, ability to read critically and grasp of the principal theoretical concepts relating to translation.

Student Destinations

Graduates of the MA Translation Studies work in a variety of translation-related roles, in the UK and abroad. The course can enhance a specialism that students already have, or can help develop the relevant knowledge and skills for the profession. It is quite common to begin one's in-house career as a project manager, co-ordinating translation commissions before moving on to work as a translator. Quite a few of our graduates also go into freelance translation. A number of our graduates go on to pursue further research in translation.

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This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. Read more

Why take this course?

This well-established programme is a practical, accredited course designed for language graduates and practicing translators, which offers a formal qualification in translating between English and any of a range of languages. It has a strong practical orientation, embracing technology and research skills that are highly relevant to translation as a career.

You can study this as a campus-based or distance learning course.

What will i experience?

On this course you can:

Specialise in translation between English and your choice of language from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Russian or Spanish
Balance your study between translation skills, technological competence and the acquisition of theoretical methodologies
Follow a programme accredited by the European Masters in Translation network

What opportunities might it lead to?

The MA Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth is an accredited member of the European Masters in Translation Network, and the University is also a member of the OPTIMALE translator training network funded by the Erasmus lifelong learning scheme of the European Commission.

The course includes a strong practical element, as well as a careers element, which enables those who wish to become professionals to understand the basics of staff, agency and freelance translation work.

This course is accredited by European Masters in Translation. The EMT is a partnership project between the European Commission and higher-education institutions offering master's level translation programmes. The project has established a quality label for university translation programmes that meet agreed professional standards and market demands.

Module Details

Our campus programme combines the opportunity for traditional classroom-based teaching, with the flexibility of distance learning. A student can complete the programme (excluding the dissertation) through classroom delivery. Alternatively, they can widen their option choices by selecting one or more units from the distance learning and supervised unit ranges.

A full time student will do one core unit and one option in each teaching block, plus their dissertation. A part time student will do a core unit in each teaching block of year one and an option unit in each teaching block of year two (plus their dissertation).

Core units

Critical Approaches to Specialised Translation:
For the theoretical strand of this unit, students will be introduced to a series of concepts and theoretical frameworks in linguistics and translation studies. This unit makes substantial use of task-based learning in order to help the students to learn to apply these concepts and frameworks to the analysis of translations by other people and to their own translation practice.

Dissertation:
Students have the choice to complete a 15,000 word dissertation on a translation related topic or an extended translation and commentary. (Taken once core unit and options have been passed)

Options: 2 of the following:

Translation Technologies and Subtitling:
This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with software tools which are relevant and in use in the professional world of translation. It will cover both the theory and the practice of glossary development, translation memory/machine translation usage and subtitling.

Technical Communication:
This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems

Translation Project:
The Translation Project provides an opportunity for students to produce an extended translation in a domain of their choice. Students will be required to address a range of practical and professional issues, including market demand, time and resource management and billing, and reflect critically on them.

Professional Portfolio:
The Professional Portfolio is designed as a unit which allows students to profile their studies in a way which is academically or professionally important to them on the basis of previous professional experience, a work placement or internship, or any specific interests they may have in translation.

Professional Aspects of Translation:
This course will provide students with tools to maximise their employability in the sector and to enhance their professional business skills.

Please note: Specialised Translation workshops will run on campus depending on student numbers. Students will join the Distance Learning workshop variant of this unit if numbers for a specific language pathway are low on campus.

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught programme from October to June and a research programme, in which the dissertation is written from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. Their dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

The distance learning programme will provide you with online learning materials for the units. These will be supported by asynchronous online discussion with the tutors responsible for the various course units and with other students on the course. You will also be able to communicate with your tutors on a one-to-one basis (e.g. by email, Skype or telephone).

You will be allocated a dissertation supervisor, who will oversee your work throughout the process and you will be encouraged to start thinking about your dissertation from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Assessments include translations, essays and projects. All translation-related assessments provide the opportunity to practise your translation skills and simultaneously to reflect on this practice. Other assignments will evaluate your technical expertise, research skills, ability to read critically and grasp of the principal theoretical concepts relating to translation.

Student Destinations

Graduates of the MA Translation Studies work in a variety of translation-related roles, in the UK and abroad. The course can enhance a specialism that students already have, or can help develop the relevant knowledge and skills for the profession. It is quite common to begin one's in-house career as a project manager, co-ordinating translation commissions before moving on to work as a translator. Quite a few of our graduates also go into freelance translation. A number of our graduates go on to pursue further research in translation.

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Our MA Graphic Communication is an ideal opportunity to develop your skills and interests by exploring the creative issues and technical aspects of graphic design today. Read more
Our MA Graphic Communication is an ideal opportunity to develop your skills and interests by exploring the creative issues and technical aspects of graphic design today. For designers working in industry, it offers a platform for career development by revising, developing and updating your skills.

The practical element of this masters degree in graphic communication is strengthened by an enhanced critical understanding of contemporary professional design debates, issues and trends, plus a greater understanding of research methodologies and how to apply them effectively.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/130-ma-graphic-communication

What you will study

The MA Graphic Communication includes the following modules:
- Graphic Communication Principles
- Design Research Methods
- Design Masters Project
- Professional Design Practice
- Graphic Communication Major Project
- Graphic Communication Independent Study

Additionally, international students can choose a Design History and Context module to engage with historic and contemporary global design issues.

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Learning and teaching methods

At the University of South Wales, we pride ourselves on providing a creative, friendly and professional environment. Our well-equipped studios include state-of-the art Macintosh computers and PC facilities with industry-standard software packages. Studio and workshop tutorials are supplemented by lectures, seminars, integrated case-study analysis, discussion groups and multimedia presentations. Staff are active in research and/or consultancy, and are often joined by a range of visiting designers and practitioners.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

During the MA Graphic Communication course, you will develop the practical, analytical, technological and problem-solving skills needed to meet the complex and changing role of the graphic designer.

Assessment methods

Learning Through Employment:
Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills.

All postgraduate courses in the Faculty of Creative and Cultural Industries offer students the opportunity to undertake a 60 credit Learning Through Employment Research Project as an alternative to a traditional final dissertation, major project or production.

The focus of the project is an individual, organisational problem solving, knowledge-based approach.

As such, it has been is designed for practising professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefitting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

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Visual Communication explores the mechanisms for conveying messages and meaning through a diverse range of media. From the hieroglyphics of ancient Egypt to the complexity of contemporary app design, the power of visual communication has been harnessed by businesses, organisations and individuals for millennia. Read more

Visual Communication explores the mechanisms for conveying messages and meaning through a diverse range of media. From the hieroglyphics of ancient Egypt to the complexity of contemporary app design, the power of visual communication has been harnessed by businesses, organisations and individuals for millennia.

Our MA Visual Communication course is designed to prepare you for the contemporary professional world, helping you develop a confident design voice and create an outstanding portfolio of work.

On the course

On our course, you’ll be encouraged to develop new skills to strengthen and inform your design practice, and you’ll gain an understanding of the skill sets required for print, motion, and digital design. You’ll also have the opportunity to enhance your practice in the areas needed to become a creative leader and go on to a career within the broad field of visual communication, which includes areas such as print media, interaction design, motion design, web design, exhibition design and advertising.

We believe that the most successful designers are cultural innovators who, through their practice, inform, persuade and entertain. MA Visual Communication is designed to help you develop a voice as an author and innovator and to equip you with the skills and knowledge to identify and solve design problems within cross-disciplinary environments. You’ll learn to approach design as an agent of change – a strategy for positively transforming behaviours in desirable and sustainable ways.

Using our dedicated studio spaces and independent study areas, you’ll develop your own style and design voice. You’ll learn through of a range of lectures, project briefs, workshops, written assignments, group critiques and individual tutorials.

Led by experienced professional designers with connections at the highest level of the industry, you’ll have the opportunity to collaborate on a diverse range of projects with other members of our unique creative community.

Facilities

Our range of equipment and technical support at UCA Canterbury enables specialist and professional-grade work, whilst also encouraging experimental and speculative approaches to making.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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