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Masters Degrees (Teaching English As A Foreign Language)

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Our MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a 12-month full-time taught MA programme designed for students who plan to teach English as a second/foreign language in the UK or internationally or to do research on the teaching, learning or assessment of English as a second/foreign language. Read more
Our MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a 12-month full-time taught MA programme designed for students who plan to teach English as a second/foreign language in the UK or internationally or to do research on the teaching, learning or assessment of English as a second/foreign language.

The programme is designed primarily for people with little or no prior experience of English language teaching, but who have a relevant first degree (English Language/ Linguistics or Education with a substantial English component) and who intend to be an English teacher or researcher.

The MA TESOL is an academic programme of study and not a teacher training course. Therefore, it provides a foundation in Applied Linguistics, Approaches to English Teaching and Research Methods on which later training in practical teaching can build. Theories of language acquisition and language teaching are explored, with the emphasis on how such theories may be practically applied; however, there is no teaching practicum as part of this programme.

The programme aims to:
-Provide an introduction to current issues and key trends in language learning and teaching in a global context
-Develop students' knowledge of Applied Linguistics and approaches to language teaching that will facilitate better teaching practice
-Provide basic research skills that students will need in order to (1) be able to engage critically with the language teaching and learning literature they read, and (2) carry out their own research project
-Help provide the knowledge and skills for those who want to conduct doctoral research in TESOL, Applied Linguistics or related areas

Content

Term 1
-TESOL Methods (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Language Learning and Teaching (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 options (20 credits). These may include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship Education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse analysis & language teaching
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and Teaching Second Language Reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-English Linguistics (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 options (20 credits). These may include:
-Approaches to English language teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-The practice of English language teaching
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). These classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3

The third term and the summer is devoted to writing a dissertation based on a small-scale research study (60 credits), to be submitted by early September.

Teaching

The MA in TESOL programme is proud of its international standing and attracts high quality students and experienced academics from the UK and around the globe. With this experience, we are ideally suited for supporting our home and international students alike.

Learning is maximised through the use of a variety of teaching approaches which are student-centred and research informed, including lectures, small group seminars, tutorials, and through the use of our online virtual learning environment. The Education Department also has a vibrant guest speaker programme and students are encouraged to attend and participate in lectures and presentations from many key researchers in the field of Language Education and TESOL. Students are also able to take advantage of additional English language lessons and study skills workshops should they need them.

Students are assigned a personal supervisor who they will have on-going contact with throughout the duration of the course through face-to-face meetings and through email contact. The supervisor provides academic and pastoral support throughout the course. The Department of Education is highly regarded within the university for its teaching and supervision and has won many awards at university level to reflect this.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Many become English language teachers all around the world, in private language schools, state schools, universities and other organisations requiring English language instruction.

Others find employment opportunities in areas of course and syllabus design, and materials writing in large and small scale publishing houses.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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There is an increasing demand for teachers of English worldwide, and the sector is no longer dominated by native English speaking teachers. Read more
There is an increasing demand for teachers of English worldwide, and the sector is no longer dominated by native English speaking teachers. The MA in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching programme is aimed at students with little or no teaching experience, who want to improve their understanding of linguistics as applied to English Language teaching.

This programme will enable you to join the English language teaching community around the world in higher education, in private language schools and colleges, and, with an appropriate teaching qualification (dependent upon the regulations of the country in which you wish to teach), you may also be able teach in state schools.

On this MA programme, you will learn the basic methods and theories of language teaching and language learning, which will provide a base from which you can then specialise in a number of areas according to your interests: optional modules allow you to specialise in curriculum design and materials evaluation, to focus on educational technologies and software, to explore the teaching of English in professional and academic contexts, or, for those with a non-language undergraduate degree, to work on some of the fundamentals of English language, grammar and vocabulary.

- You will be encouraged to reflect on language learning strategies, in a real context, by becoming a learner yourself: as part of the programme, you are required to learn a foreign language for one semester.
- You will be provided with opportunities to observe experienced English language teachers teaching in real classroom situations, and to reflect on best practice.
- You will receive a thorough grounding in the theoretical aspects of language teaching and learning.
- You will have opportunities to apply these theories by micro-teaching in a peer based environment.

Why study your MA with us?

Queen Mary consistently ranks highly in the National Student Survey. In 2011, our undergraduate language courses were ranked in the top ten across the country for overall student satisfaction. In addition:

You will have many opportunities to participate in extra-curricular events both in the College and in London; this includes a series of guest lectures from English Language Teaching professionals, the Language Centre Reading Group, and participation in BALEAP (the Global forum for professionals involved in English for Academic Purposes).

- You will obtain a University of London degree from a prestigious Russell Group institution, recognised internationally as a guarantee of quality.
- All your lecturers in this programme are also practitioner teachers and therefore you will benefit from the most up-to-date expertise in English language teaching.
- You will profit from London's international English-speaking environment to perfect your own language skills and to interact with students and staff in an exciting multicultural environment.

Facilities

Multimedia Language Resource Centre

You will have access to the Language Learning Centre, which has three computerised multimedia language learning laboratories. Each is equipped with Televic AVIDA net Tenjin systems, satellite TV at every workstation and Smart board interactive whiteboards. The Centre also has two mini labs equipped with similar systems, which are ideal for small group tutorial work and intensive practice. This hi-tech teaching facility is here to support you in your language teaching and learning and also provides a multimedia self access centre where you can pursue your own learning goals.

Students have free access to the superb collections of the University of London Library at Senate House. The many other specialist libraries of the institution, such as the libraries of the British Film Institute, the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes or the social sciences library at the LSE, provide additional breadth. The vast resources of the British Library are close at hand, while London's cultural resources facilitate research in our specialist fields.

Graduate students can also attend interdisciplinary training workshops offered throughout the year by the Faculty, on such topics as writing journal articles, research ethics, preparing for an academic career, enterprise skills, and knowledge transfer.

Core modules

Approaches and Methods in English Language Teaching
Second Language Acquisition
MA Dissertation

Optional modules

Curriculum Design and Materials Evaluation
Description of Language
Technology in Language Education: Theory and Practice
Teaching English in Professional and Academic Settings (TEPAS)

Students choose two optional modules and may also be offered a number of carefully chosen MA Linguistics options.

Career prospects

Students who graduate with this degree will be able to join the community of English language teachers around the world in higher education, in private language schools and colleges, and, with an appropriate teaching qualification (dependent upon the regulations of the country in which you wish to teach), you may also be able teach in state schools. In addition to teaching, students will also be able to develop more specialist careers in syllabus design, education technology, and consultancy.

This degree also prepares students to continue to doctoral study if they so wish.

Continuing onto further research

Upon completing this programme, graduates can choose to pursue a wide variety of research in the broad areas of:

- Second language acquisition
- English Language Teaching
- Second language teaching methodology
- Teaching English for special purposes (academic, business, law, aviation, etc)
- Curriculum design
- Syllabus development and planning
- Educational technology

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Studying for your Masters in TESOL is the key to unlocking international career opportunities in a sector that is enjoying impressive sustained growth. Read more

Studying for your Masters in TESOL is the key to unlocking international career opportunities in a sector that is enjoying impressive sustained growth.

We will help you to master the main theories and principles of language learning and teaching so that you can apply them with confidence and imagination in your own teaching practice.

A range of optional modules will allow you to specialise, while the dissertation will enable you to undertake in-depth research into a topic of particular interest to you.

This course is a great complement to a teaching qualification, opening up opportunities to become an active member of the international academic and professional English Language Teaching community.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

This programme is designed for students who have little or no previous language teaching experience or training but who have a strong interest in English language teaching and who are planning a career in the sector.

It's main aim is therefore to provide a sound academic basis in English language teaching through the exploration of major issues in language teaching and learning, including how practice is informed by theory, thereby determining the methods/approaches as well as the materials teachers use and their impact in ESOL classrooms.

The programme thus combines the study of the major principles of, and scholarly approaches to, TESOL with opportunities for application and practice. Specifically, the programme aims to:

  • Advance students’ knowledge and understanding of the grammatical, lexical and phonological structures and stylistic registers of English and how they work together in producing effective communication
  • Introduce students to theoretical issues in TESOL through an exploration of scholarly writing in the field and to the application of these theories within the ESOL classroom
  • Promote critical engagement with concepts, theories and practices associated with English language teaching through reflection and evaluation
  • Provide a theoretical and methodological framework within which students can take responsibility for their own learning and formulate and address their own research questions
  • Provide opportunities for students to create and carry out a project of significant complexity in the field of TESOL
  • Foster reflective practice

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Describe and explain the underlying grammatical, lexical and phonological structures of the English language
  • Demonstrate understanding of the way communication is constructed, maintained or repaired through English
  • Evaluate theoretical issues relevant to second language acquisition and learning
  • Critically assess the principles underpinning curriculum design, language teaching methodology and materials selection
  • Demonstrate understanding of the main issues relevant to testing and assessment of language learning
  • Apply the principles which underpin the design and implementation of research projects in English language teaching

Intellectual/cognitive skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate high level learning and problem-solving skills
  • Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies and practical classroom practice
  • Formulate and address research questions relating to the field of study
  • Create and carry out a project of significant complexity in the field of TESOL
  • Critically appreciate and evaluate theories of language acquisition and learning, curriculum design, teaching methodologies and apply this

Professional practical skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in TESOL
  • Critically assess the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various TESOL context
  • Apply appropriate English language teaching methodologies in various TESOL contexts
  • Evaluate and apply appropriate methods of assessment and testing in language teaching
  • Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, conducting independent research

Key/transferable skills

Following completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
  • Manage learning self-critically
  • Critically evaluate research using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
  • Organise and manage a research project of significant complexity

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. Read more
This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Arabic as a Foreign Language. These awards have contributed substantially to the professionalising of Arabic teaching in the UK and elsewhere and to the recognition of the expertise of teachers of Arabic as a Foreign or Second Language.

The Certificate in Teaching Arabic is designed:

- to meet the rapidly growing demand in the UK and elsewhere for trained and qualified teachers of Arabic as a foreign language.

- to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills which will enable them to teach Arabic to a broad spectrum of Arabic learners in UK, European and worldwide educational contexts.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Arabic is designed to:

- equip trainees to be able to deal professionally with the teaching of Arabic in different contexts and through the integration of different varieties of the Arabic language.

- familiarise trainees with the theoretical principles underlying the content and design of instructional materials and teaching/testing techniques.

- provide trainees with the knowledge and skills and the supported teaching practice to enable them to teach Arabic using the latest communicative methods.

- show trainees how to create coherent and progressive schemes of work and design effective and efficient lesson plans that are adapted to students’ learning needs.

- show trainees how to analyse empirical data in order to evaluate second language learners’ performance objectively and how to describe achievement and proficiency levels using appropriate terminology.

- enable trainees to fulfil supervisory and pedagogical lead roles such as those of syllabus designer, course co-ordinator, teacher mentor and materials developer.

Graduates will be qualified and well-prepared for teaching Arabic in higher education in the UK, Europe and other parts of the world, for teaching Arabic at private institutions or companies, for fulfilling administrative or consultative roles in educational organisations and for undertaking commissioning and editing in companies which create and market Arabic language courseware.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/arabic/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-arabic-as-a-foreign-language.html

The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in sessions at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The course requires attendance on normally three days per week, depending on assignments set and appointments to observe live teaching which may be on an evening or on a Saturday. The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in session at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The days where no presence at SOAS is required are to be devoted to lesson planning and materials preparation, writing of self-reflections and peer appraisals, readings of theoretical applied linguistics and teaching theory books/journal articles, self-access learning, specified VLE learning activities, guided independent study, assigned homework tasks and completion of formal assessments. The programme is very demanding and students will be expected to spend at least 20-30 hours of study outside of class every week.

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Arabic is equivalent to 3 post-graduate level course units carrying 135 CATS credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate in teaching Arabic is equivalent to 1.5 post-graduate level course units carrying 67.5 CATS credits.
Trainees take compulsory courses in two main areas.

1. Principles and Practice in Communicative Language Teaching for Arabic:
- Arabic Applied Linguistics (0.5 unit)
- Language Awareness, Methods and Techniques in Teaching Arabic (1 unit)

2. Knowledge and Skills for Second Language Teaching:
- Theories of Language Learning and Acquisition (0.5 unit)
- Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching and Language Assessment (1 unit)

Teaching Practice

A key component of the course is the opportunity for live observation of experienced teachers, followed by teaching practice of Arabic with different types of student groups, covering a range of levels. Trainees will observed and assessed in teaching Arabic, including the quality of lesson plans and teaching materials they have created, competencies in using a range of different communicative teaching techniques and ability to create rapport and establish a co-operative learning environment.

All our teacher trainers are expert classroom teachers themselves. Have a look at one of them teaching (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/) and see the kinds of classroom skills you will learn to use yourself.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/arabic/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-arabic-as-a-foreign-language.html

Closing Date for Applications:
Overseas Applicants - Friday 23rd September 2016
UK and EU Applicants - Friday 7th October 2016

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This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language. Read more
This SOAS Language Centre programme of professional development leads to highly sought after and widely accepted post-graduate qualifications (Certificate and Diploma) in teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language. These awards have contributed substantially to the professionalising of Chinese teaching in the UK and elsewhere and to the recognition of the expertise of teachers of Chinese as a Foreign or Second Language.

The Certificate in Teaching Chinese is designed:

- to meet the rapidly growing demand in the UK and elsewhere for trained and qualified teachers of Chinese as a foreign language.

- to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills which will enable them to teach Chinese to a broad spectrum of Chinese learners in UK, European and worldwide educational contexts.

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Chinese is designed to:

- equip trainees to be able to deal professionally with the teaching of Chinese in different contexts and through the integration of different varieties of the Chinese language.

- familiarise trainees with the theoretical principles underlying the content and design of instructional materials and teaching/testing techniques.

- provide trainees with the knowledge and skills and the supported teaching practice to enable them to teach Chinese using the latest communicative methods.

- show trainees how to create coherent and progressive schemes of work and design effective and efficient lesson plans that are adapted to students’ learning needs.

- show trainees how to analyse empirical data in order to evaluate second language learners’ performance objectively and how to describe achievement and proficiency levels using appropriate terminology.

- enable trainees to fulfil supervisory and pedagogical lead roles, such as those of syllabus designer, course co-ordinator, teacher mentor and materials developer.

Graduates will be qualified and well-prepared for teaching Chinese in higher education in the UK, Europe and other parts of the world, for teaching Chinese at private institutions or companies, for fulfilling administrative or consultative roles in educational organisations and for undertaking commissioning and editing in companies which create and market Chinese language courseware.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-chinese-as-a-foreign-language.html

The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in sessions at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The course requires attendance on normally three days per week, depending on assignments set and appointments to observe live teaching, which may be on an evening or on a Saturday. The overall learning required is full-time, though attendance in session at SOAS is not required 5 days per week. The days where no presence at SOAS is required are to be devoted to lesson planning and materials preparation, writing of self-reflections and peer appraisals, readings of theoretical applied linguistics and teaching theory books/journal articles, self-access learning, specified VLE learning activities, guided independent study, assigned homework tasks and completion of formal assessments. The programme is very demanding and students will be expected to spend at least 20-30 hours of study outside of class every week.

Structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching Chinese is equivalent to 3 post-graduate level course units carrying 135 CATS credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching Chinese is equivalent to 1.5 post-graduate level course units carrying 67.5 CATS credits.
Trainees take compulsory courses in two main areas.

1. Principles and Practice in Communicative Language Teaching for Chinese:
- Chinese Applied Linguistics (0.5 unit)
- Language Awareness, Methods and Techniques in Teaching Chinese (1 unit)

2. Knowledge and Skills for Second Language Teaching:
- Theories of Language Learning and Acquisition (0.5 unit)
- Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching and Language Assessment (1 unit)

Teaching Practice

A key component of the course is the opportunity for live observation of experienced teachers, followed by teaching practice of Chinese with different types of student groups, covering a range of levels. Trainees will be observed and assessed in teaching Chinese, including the quality of lesson plans and teaching materials they have created, competencies in using a range of different communicative teaching techniques and ability to create rapport and establish a co-operative learning environment.

All our teacher trainers are expert classroom teachers themselves. Have a look at one of them teaching (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/) and see the kinds of classroom skills you will learn to use yourself.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecentre/languages/chinese/postgraduate-certificate-diploma-in-teaching-chinese-as-a-foreign-language.html

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching is offered to Chinese students who are interested in pursuing a career in applied language skills, including translating and teaching English or Chinese as a foreign language.

Key Features of Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching MA

The MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching is specifically designed for Chinese students who are first language Mandarin speakers and aims to equip them with languages- specific knowledge and skills in both translation studies and applied linguistics. In particular, the Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching programme attempts to situate the broad area of translation studies in the specifically targeted context, translating between English and Chinese. The MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching also addresses the issue of non-native speakers as English teachers. The Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching programme covers applied language studies, translating and teaching English or Chinese as a second language and is attractive not only to prospective students but to Mandarin teachers to develop appropriate knowledge and skills in applied linguistics theory and practice.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences and you will benefit from this as a student of the MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching programme.

The full-time course structure is split across the year with three modules offered in each academic semester (a total of six modules in part one) and then a professional practice portfolio over the summer (part two). Students study two compulsory modules and four optional modules.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching typically include:

• Chinese Language Studies

• Advanced Translation (English to Chinese)

• Communicative Language Teaching

• Young Language Learners

• Classroom Teaching Practice

• Interpreting - Law Option (Police & Introduction to Court Interpreting)

• Corpus Linguistics

Career Prospects

Career expectations are excellent for MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching graduates. MA degree holders may enter employment in senior or leadership teaching positions, work in syllabus or materials design test writing or teacher training, publishing, public relations and international organisations where advanced knowledge of English or Chinese teaching and the ability to explain and apply this knowledge are expected.

Student Quote

“I chose to study the MA in Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching as it would be helpful for my academic career. After writing one of my essays for an MA module, I decided I would like to continue my study and go on to PhD. I found my ability and critical thinking skills changed a lot. I also studied the interpreting and translation practice MA module which gave me experience if I want to be a interpreter or translator in the future.

I like Swansea University. I have lived in the campus for nearly two years. I have to admit that I enjoy watching the sun shining over the campus and Singleton Park. Lecturers and staff are professional and friendly. They are always happy to help student solve different problems. I would like to continue my academic career here as a PhD student."

Zheng Ma, Chinese-English Translation and Language Teaching, MA



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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. Read more

Introduction

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society.
We investigate how language works, how people use it, what people use it for, where it came from and how it changes. The range of research expertise represented by the three dedicated members of staff teaching on the course are reflected in a comprehensive suite of modules that include cognitive, sociolinguistic, historical, evolutionary, and discourse analytical topics.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time: MLitt-12 months, PG Diploma-9 months, PG Certificate-3 months Part-time: MLitt-27 months, PG Diploma-21 months, PG Certificate-9 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Bethan Benwell | Dr Andrew Smith

Course objectives

Students will be expected to graduate with a knowledge of contemporary linguistic theories, including both generative and cognitive approaches to linguistic description, and the contexts in which these theories arose.
They will also acquire knowledge and understanding in specialist selected areas of study (e.g. Old and Middle English, historical, social and regional varieties of English, language and cognition, discourse analysis and evolutionary linguistics), including critical understanding of research in these areas.
They will be able to apply a variety of descriptive linguistic tools to language data and linguistic theories to selected specialist areas of study within English Language and Linguistics, according to their areas of interest.
They will learn to plan and manage a Research Project under supervision, undertaking independent research, including keeping track of relevant developments in the chosen field(s) and being able to set them in an appropriate context; they will be able to structure and communicate ideas effectively; gather, evaluate and organise information from multiple sources; and engage with other researchers by writing, debating, and delivering oral and written presentations.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

Postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are much sought-after by students across the world, providing a grounding in theories and methods essential for a range of research and teaching careers in disciplines including English Studies, Education, English as a Foreign Language and English for Specific Purposes.
Students with postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are prized for their excellent communication and problem-solving skills, and their ability to analyse and synthesise information rapidly and accurately. They are generally very adaptable and go on to a wide range of careers in all sectors of the economy, such as: private and public sector management and research, marketing and advertising, government administration, journalism, banking and finance, speech therapy.
Former graduates from the MLitt have gone on to, for instance, Linguistics Research (in the Healthcare sector) and further study in Speech Therapy (for which a Master's in Linguistics was a prerequisite).
In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law.

Employability

Your MLitt in English Language and Linguistics will provide you with important transferable skills which you will be able to make use of throughout your career. Our course will help you develop your oral and written communication skills so that you can engage in confident and informed debate with a range of audiences. You will be able to design, plan and manage your own independent research projects; you will develop your skills in collecting, analysing and interpreting information, and will be able to structure, contextualise and communicate your ideas and findings effectively.
You will play an active part in our regular Language Research Group meetings, which discuss articles on important and controversial linguistic topics. You will have the opportunity to introduce articles of your choice to the group and will develop important skills in leading and managing open-ended discussions.

- Skills you can develop through this course
An MLitt in English Language and Linguistics is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively.
Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also require students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently.
Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately, to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of a MLitt in English Language and Linguistics.

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This Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme (TEFL, also known as TESOL in some countries) based in the School of Education, offers a unique opportunity to study for a qualification which links teaching English to wider issues of school-based education. Read more
This Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme (TEFL, also known as TESOL in some countries) based in the School of Education, offers a unique opportunity to study for a qualification which links teaching English to wider issues of school-based education.

The modules will provide you with a strong grounding in theoretical literature as well as appropriate classroom methodology, course design and an introduction to the key research tools. The programme is designed to be practical and you will have opportunities to create bespoke teaching and learning materials as well as visit British schools to observe classroom teaching.

The TEFL programme is aimed at individuals with knowledge and understanding of current debates relevant to the teaching and learning of English as a Foreign Language. The aim is to support you in becoming a reflective TEFL practitioner, a competent educational researcher and an active member of the international academic and professional TEFL community.

There are three core modules for the Teaching English as a Foreign Language programme:

Communicative Language Teaching, Syllabus Design and Assessment
Language, Discourse and Society
Second Language Learning
These modules give you a strong grounding in appropriate classroom methodology, and course design with the opportunity to create your own teaching and learning materials. Other modules provide opportunities to visit British primary, secondary and language schools, and prepare you for your dissertation. The MA Education TEFL Dissertation Prize is awarded annually to the best TEFL dissertations in the School of Education whose work demonstrates significance, originality and methodological rigour.

We offer a wide range of options to choose from, including Curriculum Design in Global Contexts, Leadership for School Improvement, Personal and Professional Skills for Education Management, Online Learning, ICT in Education, Education as an International Issue, and Special Educational Needs of Children with Autism. You will have the chance to participate in events organised by our research centre MOSAIC, such as conferences and popular seminar series with renowned international TEFL researchers.

Please note that the acronym TEFL is mainly used in the UK, whilst TESOL is often used as an acronym in Australia or the USA. TESL is another term you may hear.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This programme explores how people learn new languages and how to teach the English Language most effectively. Read more

This programme explores how people learn new languages and how to teach the English Language most effectively.

Designed for TESOL professionals, you will consider how to analyse and describe the English language for pedagogic purposes, and examine different approaches and principles to teaching the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

You can also choose to specialise in certain aspects of TESOL: for example, teacher education, materials development, curriculum reform, the teaching of grammar and vocabulary, the use of ICT, or language assessment.

MEd TESOL follows the same syllabus as the MA TESOL programme, but asks you to apply a more practical, rather than theoretical, orientation to your final critical study. You will focus upon a professional issue within language education and apply ideas from your reading and a small-scale research study to find solutions to genuine English Language teaching problems.

The Language Education team in the School of Education is nationally and internationally recognised for its range of teaching, research, knowledge transfer and consultancy work in TESOL, ELT, EFL, ESOL, EAL, Modern Foreign Languages, and Applied Linguistics.

We’re one of the largest Language Education teams in the UK. As education practitioners, we have a wide range of experience of teaching and teacher education work in many contexts in the UK and around the world.

As researchers, we have a broad range of expertise across the discipline with ongoing research projects in teacher development, language use in migrant communities, learning with digital technologies, and IELTS preparation courses.

Course content

MEd TESOL is a comprehensive programme that will allow you to develop both academically and professionally.

In semester one, you will deepen your understanding of teaching the English Language. You will focus on how people learn languages, how to describe and explain language to learners, and the approaches you can take to teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.

In semester two, you will expand your knowledge of more specialist areas. You will choose from a range of optional modules to suit your own interests and professional contexts: for example, the development of TESOL materials, teaching young learners, or language learning assessment. Alternatively, you could choose modules from another area of the School’s provision: for example, you may want to study digital learning, international educational management or theories of childhood and youth.

In the final part of the year, you will use your newly-acquired knowledge and skills to carry out a small-scale piece of research. Your critical study can be related to your own interests within the field of education. As a condition of the MEd programme, your study needs to have a practical focus and respond to a real-life professional issue in TESOL education.

To support your work on the project, you will take a non-assessed research methods course. Help with your academic writing is available throughout the year.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Learning and Teaching in TESOL 30 credits
  • Investigating Language for TESOL 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Directed Study in Education 1 30 credits
  • Technology Enhanced Language Learning 30 credits
  • The Practice of Supporting Language Teacher Learning 15 credits
  • Learning and Teaching Vocabulary 15 credits
  • Grammar, Learning and Teaching 15 credits
  • Teaching Academic English 15 credits
  • Corpus Linguistics in the Classroom 15 credits
  • Teacher Education for TESOL 15 credits
  • The TESOL curriculum and TESOL change 15 credits
  • Assessing Language Learning 15 credits
  • Materials Development for TESOL 15 credits
  • Teaching Languages to Young Learners 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MEd Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages MEd Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You will generally have around eight to ten hours of classes per week including seminars, tutorials and lectures. However, independent study is an important aspect of this programme, either alone or in a group, as it allows you to develop key research, analysis and communication skills and develop your own ideas.

Assessment

We assess most of our modules through written assignments; you will be able to choose from a range of assignment topics. To help you prepare, you’ll be able to submit a draft to your tutor for comment beforehand.

Career opportunities

Our students frequently find that new career opportunities open up for them, either in their home countries or in new international settings.

Some of our graduates have started work in teacher training, materials creation, or curriculum design. Others have started their own private language teaching business or moved from school to university teaching.

We also encourage students who do particularly well on the programme to consider doctoral level study with a view to an academic career. Students who return to their original classrooms often find they have fresh perspectives and their work becomes more rewarding and effective.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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First taught in 2007, the Master’s Degree in Foreign Language Teaching (SFL/EFL) has now split into its two component specialities. Read more
First taught in 2007, the Master’s Degree in Foreign Language Teaching (SFL/EFL) has now split into its two component specialities: English and Spanish. The resulting Master’s Degree in English Language Teaching aims to train professionals to teach English for both general and specific purposes. The degree is a combination of professional and research tracks, and it is designed for national and international graduates, with or without experience, who wish to work professionally in the field of English language teaching.

Student Profile

The Master’s Degree is designed mainly for students with a background in English studies, and such related fields as modern languages, culture and communication, translation and interpretation, or schoolteachers specializing in foreign languages. Nevertheless, the Master’s Degree is also open to people holding some sort of official university degree (bachelor’s degree, pre-Bologna bachelor’s degree or 3-year diploma), or an equivalent that may not be directly related. In the latter case, students will be required to take a bridging course (see the specific regulations).

Career opportunities

The obvious area in which the graduates from this programme can work is English language teaching at all levels. In general, language teaching provides students with multidisciplinary training in the humanities which prepares them for all sorts of activities involving the transmission of cultural knowledge. The future master’s degree graduates will be qualified to work in the following fields:
-Language teaching
-English teachers in private and state-run language teaching institutions in Spain (Official School of Languages, language services, language academies, adult education, etc.)
-English teachers abroad in both private and state-run institutions
-English teachers for specific purposes in private companies, multinationals and international agencies
-Teachers of other subjects in English for bilingual institutions
-Heads or heads of studies in schools
-English language assistants in foreign universities
-English language teachers in secondary schools
-Language advisors for schools, publishers, or other public and private companies
-University lecturers at graduate or postgraduate level
-Researcher into teaching– learning English
-Author of text books for learning English in publishers and similar companies
-Author of teaching materials – online language learning for publishers and similar companies
-Educational advisor in schools, publishers and other public or private institutions
-Research and knowledge transfer in interdisciplinary research groups
-Language and cultural mediation in public or private institutions
-Tourism
-Translation
-Publishing

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Our MA TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) will help you obtain professional promotion to positions in TESOL where MA qualifications are necessary or desirable. Read more
Our MA TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) will help you obtain professional promotion to positions in TESOL where MA qualifications are necessary or desirable.

You will:
• develop your teaching expertise and an understanding of many approaches to teaching English as a foreign, second or other language
• become familiar with a wide range of literature about the field of teaching English
• develop an ability to present an argument in an academic context
• learn how to carry out research related to many aspects of TESOL

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/tesol.aspx

Course detail

The course offers:
• a taught first stage, the Postgraduate Diploma TESOL
• a second dissertation stage with an individual tutor
• a chance to exchange views about TESOL with international colleagues on ‘experience’ and ‘non- experience’ routes
• a substantial core of modules and a variety of Elective modules
• if you have appropriate qualifications, the chance to obtain TEFL Q status on the Teaching Practice module
• an excellent combination of theory and practice

The MA/Postgraduate Diploma has two stages:
• Postgraduate Diploma
• MA dissertation (15,000-18,000 words)

Both stages can be completed in 12 months. Part- time students complete the Postgraduate Diploma in two years (taking 60 credits each year) and have 12 months to complete the MA dissertation.

Suitability

The MA/Postgraduate Diploma in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) is a professional development qualification designed for practising teachers of English as a foreign or second language from all parts of the world – the ‘experience’ route.

It is also designed for graduates who wish to begin a career in English language teaching – the ‘non- experience’ route.

It allows both graduates and teachers to develop and further their professional competence alongside an understanding of the theoretical implications of the practice of ELT.

Content

Compulsory core modules (20 credits)
• ELT Methodology and Classroom Investigation
• Language Systems and Appropriate Methodology
• Second Language Learning
• Course Design and Assessment (10 credits)
• Research in TESOL
• Teaching Practice or Practical Project ('experience' route)
• Fundamentals in English Language Teaching ('non- experience') route

Elective modules (10 credits)
Elective modules depend on student demand:
• Young Learners
• Content and Language Integrated Learning
• Cultural Issues in Language Learning and Teaching
• Literature in the English Language Classroom
• Drama in ELT l Language in Use
• Teacher Education
• Using Technology in the ELT Classroom
• Materials and Task Design

Format

Teaching is delivered through lectures, seminars, group work, practical work related to teaching, and guided independent study. Input sessions are generally organised to make the most of the variety of backgrounds and teaching contexts that students bring to the programme, and all are encouraged to share experience and insights.

The programme is in two stages: Stage 1 consists of six taught modules (ELT Methodology & Classroom Investigation, Language Systems & Appropriate Pedagogy, Second Language Learning and Reseach Methods in ELT – each with thirty hours of contact time – and Course Design, Assessment and an Elective module – each with fifteen hours) plus either Fundamentals of ELT - a 40-hour taught module for students on the non-experience route - or Teaching Practice or Practical Project, in which students work independently, with regular meetings and the guidance from an individual supervisor. Successful completion of Stage 1 results in a Postgraduate Diploma.

In Stage 2, students are assigned an individual supervisor and produce a 15-18,000-word dissertation on a subject of particular personal interest. Successful completion results in award of an MA.Teaching staff, including a Professor and Senior and Principal Lecturers in the School of Language Studies and Applied Linguistics, are all widely experienced professionals in the world of ELT, with backgrounds in teaching, teacher training, course design, assessment and ELT management, and a variety of published work and specialist areas of research and interest.

Assessment

Essays, reports, portfolios, practical teaching and an oral presentation, as well as a 15,000­-18,000 word dissertation (for the MA).

What can I do next?

The skills and attributes you acquire will help you obtain professional promotion to positions in TESOL where MA qualifications are necessary or desirable.

For example:
• in primary, secondary or tertiary school management abroad
• as Directors of Studies or Academic Directors in local and national English language schools
• in Departments of Ministries of Education, such as curriculum and syllabus design, materials writing and assessment
• teacher training
• TESOL publishing
• examinations writing
• academic teaching and research posts in TESOL

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The MA TESOL is a specialist degree for aspiring professionals who wish to enhance their career prospects in the field of teaching of English as a second, foreign or additional language. Read more
The MA TESOL is a specialist degree for aspiring professionals who wish to enhance their career prospects in the field of teaching of English as a second, foreign or additional language.

It will provide you with the tools and resources you need in order to develop your teaching skills, reflect upon your professional practice and conduct your own research.

Our programme team all have doctorates in TESOL related areas and extensive international experience.

We place particular emphasis on helping you to develop appropriate methods and materials to suit your social and cultural context.

Upon graduating you will be able to:

- Demonstrate knowledge of the latest practice, theory and policy of international language education.

- Apply your knowledge to the teaching of English in a variety of contexts around the globe.

- Demonstrate an understanding of current issues in the English language teaching profession.

- Critically analyse the role of English as the world’s major international language.

- Use research to inform your daily practice and decision making as a language educator.

- Contribute professionally and academically to the rapidly changing world of international English language education.

Programme features

- A highly competitive programme that integrates the latest developments in TESOL research and practice.
- Suitable for pre- and post-experience participants.
- Opportunity to share experience with educators from a range of backgrounds and to establish an international network of professional contacts.
- Specialised academic writing and study skills courses for MA TESOL students.
- Credits equivalent to two MA units offered to students who already hold either a Cambridge ESOL Delta or a Trinity College London Diploma in TESOL (DipTESOL).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-teac-engl-to-spea-of-othe-lang-ma-in-teso/

Programme structure

Study commences in September, and lasts for one year.

Semester one:
- Research Methods for Second Language Education 1
- Second Language Acquisition
- Language Awareness

Semester two:
- Research Methods for Second Language Education 2
- Language Teaching Methodology and Curriculum
- Teaching and Assessing English as an International Language

You will also complete a 15,000-word Dissertation for the MA TESOL (you can choose your dissertation topic of research in semester two).

View Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ed/ed-proglist-pg.html#G) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for study skills and discussion.

Methods of assessment

Assessment will be by written assignments. These will include language analysis, learner needs analysis, textbook and test design, and case studies of language learners in institutional settings.

- Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)
If you have studied, but not completed or received an award, for postgraduate units from another institution, you may be eligible to transfer credit for this prior learning.

If you already hold either a Cambridge ESOL Delta or a Trinity College London Diploma in TESOL (DipTESOL) you can receive credits equivalent to two units of study of the MA TESOL programme. This credit must have been obtained within the previous five years.

Careers

Upon graduating, you will be able to contribute academically and professionally to the rapidly changing world of international English language education.

You will be able to apply your knowledge of the latest theory, policy, and practice of international English language education to a variety of global professions, such as:

- English language teacher / lecturer / instructor
- Lecturer in English for Academic Purposes
- Director of Studies / Assistant Director of Studies of a language school or department
- Language teacher trainer
- Trainer in intercultural communication and business communication skills

About the department

The Department of Education is a thriving academic community focused on furthering our understanding of policy, culture, pedagogy and diversity within a global educational context. We hold a strong national and international reputation for our research.

We have an excellent network with a wide range of educational institutions including, schools, colleges, universities, local authorities and government departments, within the UK and also internationally.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Are you interested in a career as an English language and communication coach? Do you see yourself in a professional, competitive environment? Then a Master's degree in Language and Communication Coaching might be just the ticket for you. Read more
Are you interested in a career as an English language and communication coach? Do you see yourself in a professional, competitive environment? Then a Master's degree in Language and Communication Coaching might be just the ticket for you.

You will learn to analyse a client's needs, and how to design the training module to fit those needs. Transferring language and communication skills through interactive methods, adapting quickly to groups of varying sizes and levels, and picking effective teaching methods are part of the course. Your internship as part of your graduation project will allow you to put into practice what you have learnt.

Combination of academic grounding and practical training

The Language and Communication Coaching Master's specialisation offers a unique and rigorous programme combining a solid theoretical basis in the follwing:
- English Linguistics
- Second Language Acquisition
- Business Communication
- Teaching English for Specific Purposes

with challenging opportunities to practise your training and coaching skills:
- Practical, hands-on training and coaching experience
- Peer teaching
- Internship at a language institute or corporate training department

World-leading research

Linguistics research at Radboud University was recently rated number 1 in the world wide university ranking. The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes annual rankings of the best universities world wide. Withing the subject field of Linguistics, our research topped the list. Research and education are closely intertwined in Nijmegen: in lectures and through research internships and assignments, students become familiar with the latest developments in linguistics research.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/linguistics/language

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Linguistics or related area
In order to get admission to this Master's you’ll need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Linguistics. Students with a Bachelor’s degree in specific language, like German, Dutch and such, or with a Bachelor’s degree in Communication and Information Sciences can also apply, provided they took at least 60 ECTS worth of courses in the field of linguistics.

2. Proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- A TOEFL score of >600 (paper based) or >100 (internet based)
- An IELTS score of >7.0
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher
- A Bachelor’s degree in English Language and Culture from a research university.

Career prospects

Why join the Language and Communication Coaching Master's specialisation?
- Worldwide there are roughly 1 billion speakers of English as a foreign language
- Demand for qualified English language and communication trainers and coaches is huge:
- Business men and women, politicians, teachers, academics, students, doctors, office workers, tour guides, lawyers, practically everybody needs to use English in their jobs.
- There is a need for English language trainers and coaches who can quickly and effectively meet the training needs of course participants.


Graduates of the Master's specialisation Language and Communication Coaching work as:
- heads of their own business
- language and communication coaches for a language institute, communication office, teacher training programme, institute for secondary education
- advisors to an education consultancy
- developers of language tests
- policy staff members for international offices
- refresher course developers for English teachers (all levels)
- developers of learning tools (also digital) and curricula (also online) for English
- English editors, text writer (for instance websites in English) or text coach
education quality control officers
- managers or heads of department in language institute, translation agency, etc.
- project researchers (for instance into language acquisition processes, educational efficiency, learning method, specific components of language learning processes (pronunciation, etc.)
- English language specialists or consultants working in business or for the government


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/linguistics/language

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