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If you’re a native speaker or you have substantial training in Chinese, Japanese or Thai, this programme will prepare you for a career in research with an area specialism. Read more
If you’re a native speaker or you have substantial training in Chinese, Japanese or Thai, this programme will prepare you for a career in research with an area specialism.

Half of the programme will give you a solid foundation in East Asian studies and research methodologies, equipping you with a range of subject knowledge, consolidating your language skills and preparing you to conduct independent, theory-driven research. In the other half, you’ll apply all of this to your own research project comprising 50% of the MRes, supervised by a member/members of the Faculty.

You’ll study in a stimulating research environment with plenty of opportunities to attend research events and conferences, as well as our regular Tea and Talk events.

Our tutors are conducting world-class research in diverse fields across East Asian Studies, and you’ll benefit from teaching that’s informed by their own work. It’s a great opportunity to prepare for a career in academic or professional research.

East Asian Studies at Leeds is a leading centre for research in the region, with over 50 years of history. In addition to the academic strengths that we have accrued over this time, we have developed an extensive and active international network of alumni. Leeds is also home to very substantial and world-renowned specialist library collections.

Course Content

The programme is divided in half, with 50% advanced research training and 50% independent research on a specialist topic of your choice.

Advanced methodological training will cover the key stages of the research process and equip you to conduct independent research informed by a sound theoretical understanding. You’ll also practice skills such as writing abstracts, papers and proposals as well as verbal presentations and group discussions, preparing you to present and share your research.

The remainder of the programme will be spent working with a supervisor in the faculty on your own research project, focusing on a topic that interests you perhaps laying the foundations for future academic research.

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Our MA Education programme focuses on educational practice using methods of practice-related inquiry. Read more
Our MA Education programme focuses on educational practice using methods of practice-related inquiry. Building on our recognised excellence in postgraduate teaching and research, this programme offers a structured pathway for professional development and scholarship in general education or one of three subject specialisms: Early Childhood Studies, Mathematics Education, or SEN and Inclusion.

Key features

-Take the opportunity to research through a specialised pathway, tailored sustainability and outdoor learning modules, or your own area of interest.
-Benefit from Saturday, weekday and evening face-to-face provision and tutorials offering flexibility for professional practitioners.
-Learn from experienced educators who have first-hand familiarity with the challenges and possibilities of educational practice.
-Further develop your expertise in specific educational issues of interest to you.
-Develop the ability to undertake systematic inquiries and the capability to respond to ethical issues through critical analysis and decision making.

Course details

The programme provides a clear framework for study, designed to suit both professional practitioners and those interested in the scholarship of education. Classes are either on campus or delivered through our Digital Learning Environment. The general MA Education route and modules are available as distance learning. All students take the Researching Education Practice in Context module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Our specialist and optional modules are designed to allow you the opportunity to pursue your own areas of interest, supported by knowledgeable and research-active academics. All of our general MA Education modules run every year, but subject-specialist modules may depend on demand. Practice-related inquiry modules are a special feature of the programme, where you negotiate a topic of study, supervised by one of the teaching team.

Core modules
-MAED702 Masters of Arts in Education Dissertation

Optional modules
-MASE741 Critical Perspectives on Inclusive Education, Disability and Diversity
-MAED701 Researching Education Practice in Context
-MAME731 Understanding Contemporary Mathematics Education
-MAED711 Thinking About Contemporary Education
-MAME732 Understanding Teaching and Learning in Mathematics
-MLS705 Global Education: Theory and Practice
-MAEC721 Enabling Learning in Early Childhood
-MLS703 Ecological and Sustainability Literacy
-MAEC722 Developing Leadership Skills in Early Childhood Settings
-MASE742 Researching Theory and Practice of Inclusive Education, Disability and Diversity
-MAED717 Practice Related Inquiry 1
-MAED718 Practice Related Inquiry 2
-MLS710 Alternatives in Education and Society
-MLS711 The Experience of Outdoor Learning

The modules shown for this course or programme are those being studied by current students, or expected new modules. Modules are subject to change depending on year of entry.

Programme design

The programme is designed to offer you maximum curricular choice within a clear structure by asking you to:
-Choose from a limited range of modules in one of the three specialisms or the general education pathway
-Set your own assignment topic related to module content within all modules
-Undertake optional modules in practice related inquiry and negotiate topics of personal interest with your lecturer
-Design your own research project on your chosen aspect of educational practice for your dissertation module

The way we assess work is through carefully constructed assessment modes that will prepare you for the different elements of dissertation work.

Teaching methods

We use a wide range of pedagogies to support inclusion and participation in higher education. The following is a list:
-Onsite whole class or tutorial sessions with module lecturers
-Online contact with lecturers and/or fellow students
-Directed study (specific tasks related to the module and set by lecturers for completion in your own time)
-Self-directed inquiry, research or scholarship (which may include undertaking a project, reading, work with children, work with colleagues, investigation of topic of interests, etc).

Networking and socialising

As a postgraduate student in Plymouth Institute of Education you'll have plenty of opportunities to attend postgraduate conference events and socialise with other masters and doctorate students at tea breaks on our taught Saturdays.

There is an annual conference for masters students, as well as a history of inviting masters dissertation students to attend the annual on-campus Institute of Health and Community/Plymouth Institute of Education postgraduate conference.

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Applied Sport and Exercise Nutrition at Oxford Brookes focuses on the role of nutrition in the optimisation of health and physical performance. Read more
Applied Sport and Exercise Nutrition at Oxford Brookes focuses on the role of nutrition in the optimisation of health and physical performance. Nutrition has profound effects on both human health and athletic performance and this course is based on the latest scientific research and contemporary practice. It is designed to fulfil the needs of students who want to work with a range of populations to improve their health, fitness or sporting performance. Applications are encouraged from graduates who have a background in either sport and exercise science or human nutrition.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/applied-sport-and-exercise-nutrition/

Why choose this course?

- Our research groups and consultancies have strong links with Oxfordshire hospitals, elite athletes and food organisations, allowing students to conduct internal and external research projects and develop potential career opportunities.

- We invite guest speakers from industry, other universities and research organisations to provide you with subject specialist knowledge.

- Our staff come from a wide range of sporting and nutrition backgrounds. Some are actively involved in coaching which means the course is based on the latest scientific research and contemporary practice.

- Small class sizes provide plenty of opportunities for in-depth discussions and practical application of the theory.

- We provide opportunities to work with university and local sports teams as well as individuals seeking personalised nutrition advice.

- Our staff conduct first-class research in sport, exercise and nutrition and bring it to the classroom.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, with each module requiring approximately 36 hours of staff contact time and 200 hours of total student input in each 12-week semester.

The main theme of the teaching and learning aspect of this MSc is to encourage you to develop the necessary skills to understand and communicate advanced theoretical and research-based knowledge of nutrition to people who participate in sport and exercise. Learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics associated with applied sport and exercise nutrition and include lectures, directed reading, workshops, seminars, practical exercises, laboratory sessions and project work. The research project will be supervised on a one-to-one basis.

Student performance in each module is usually assessed by evaluation of the quality of written or design work, and verbal presentations. Assessment methods may include essays, seminar papers, formal written examinations, in-class tests, project case work, design and verbal presentations, workshops, simulations, and practical exercises.

Specialist facilities

- BASES-accredited Human Performance Laboratory.
- Clinical Exercise and Rehabilitation Unit.
- Functional Food Centre.
- Specialist equipment including near-infrared spectroscopy, Qualysis motion capture system, online breath-by-breath analysis technologies and a BodPod.

Field trips

We encourage students to attend relevant industry and academic conferences to further their subject knowledge and take advantage of networking opportunities. When possible, we provide finanical support for students to attend conferences (subject to availability).

Careers

Many sports are becoming increasingly professional in their approach to training and nutrition. For example, many sports clubs now employ full-time nutrition consultants. Career prospects outside sport are perhaps even more exciting. The NHS offers an increasing number of opportunities for students with specialist training in exercise nutrition to support GP referral schemes and other healthy living programmes. The growing awareness of health within society, coupled with misunderstandings about the relationships between physical activity, nutrition and health has led to an increasing demand for graduates who can deliver evidence-based solutions and advice at all levels. Research or teaching within further or higher education also provide potential career opportunities.

Graduates progress to a diverse range of careers including exercise and lifestyle consultants based within hospitals and private practice. Various graduates have secured full time and part time work with professional sports teams as well as the Institutes of Sport in the UK. Graduates also progress to work in major international companies such as GlaxoSmithKline or are employed as industry consultants, dieticians and nutrition counsellors. Graduates have also successfully gained funded PhD positions.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

- Immediate physiological and psychophysical exercise performed at different intensities.

- Effects of restricted fluid intake in people with MS on temperature control, energy levels, balance and cognitive and physical performance.

- Feasibility of supporting people with long-term neurological conditions to exercise in the community.

- Exploring exercise responses in children with physical disabilities with plans to explore delivery of community exercise and sports programmes.

- Exploring novel exercise delivery techniques for people who find it hard to move, including use of mental imagery.

- Effect of fluid and carbohydrate intake on rowing skill and performance.

- Relationship between levels of physical activity and blood levels of neuroactive proteins induced by exercise.

- Green tea effect on competitive cycling performance.

- Effective nutritional strategies for enhancing post-exercise rehydration.

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format. You’ll engage with staff working in the UK’s leading centre in the field and explore a range of landmark texts for young people, from fairy tales and picturebooks to classics and graphic novels. Read more

Summary

This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format. You’ll engage with staff working in the UK’s leading centre in the field and explore a range of landmark texts for young people, from fairy tales and picturebooks to classics and graphic novels.

This programme invites you to explore the exciting and varied world of children’s literature, and to examine how texts aimed at young people convey and challenge ideas about childhood. You will be taught by a team of staff with international reputations and expertise in areas such as philosophy, popular fiction, adolescence, critical theory, landscape, and memory.

As a distance learner you will have access to specialist services, and a wide range of e-books and digitised items from the Children’s Literature Collection at the University Library which contains 3,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals.

As a Children’s Literature student, you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in Britain. The NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children’s Books), and Booktrust. The University is also the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, London’s largest event dedicated to children’s writing. You can stay up-to-date with the NCRCL by following their blog.

Content

This programme asks you to think about children’s literature in new ways. In your first year you will be introduced to essential critical approaches, from feminist theory, psychoanalysis, and reader-response criticism, to new ideas about the child, power and ethics. Using these tools, you’ll study fairy tales such as 'Snow White' and 'Puss in Boots,' classic children’s literature including Kenneth Graham’s The Wind in the Willows and Judith Kerr’s landmark picturebook The Tiger Who Came to Tea, and the contemporary innovations of authors like Melvin Burgess, Shaun Tan and Jackie Kay.

In optional modules you can study the history of British children’s literature from its origins to the present day, as well as texts in translation, and visual and verse forms. Throughout the course you will gain knowledge of literary works produced for children, and the social, cultural and historical contexts of their production. The eclectic and rigorous nature of the programme allows you to contribute original work from a variety of perspectives, particularly in the extended critical Dissertation. The creative writing modules, ‘Writing for a Child Audience’ and ‘Creative Dissertation’ represent exciting additions to the programme, recognising the fact that many of our students have ambitions to write for children.

The Distance Learning MA is taught through a mixture of independent study, tutor feedback, and peer support. Most modules on offer include a course pack, with digital materials and links to an online learning environment. You will work through the materials, undertake learning activities, and discuss ideas with other students through online discussion boards and online seminars. At the end of each module, you will complete a piece of coursework, usually an essay, to demonstrate your understanding of the subject.

This MA can also be studied on site.

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