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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study English Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study English Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in English Literature offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in English Literature

The MA in English Literature allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA in English Literature is openly structured. As a student enrolled in the English Literature programme, you define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

As a MA in English Literature student, you develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The full-time English Literature course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing in English Literature. Part-time study is available for the MA in English Literature.

Students of the MA in English Literature will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in English Literature typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advnaced Research Skills

• ‘The Unsex’d Females’: Women Writers and the French Revolution

• Women Writing India

• The Romantic Sublime

• Gender and Culture: An Introduction

• The Modernist Novel: James Joyce

• Angela Carter

• Dylan Thomas and the Idea of Welsh Writing in English

• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives

• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic

• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Fin’Amor and Marriage in the Medieval English Secular Lyric

• Gender and Humour in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

• Lost in Europe: History, Biography, Ideology through the Short twentieth Century (1914-89)

• Neo-Victorian Mutinies: Gender & Racial Trauma in Neo-Victorian Fiction (& Film)

• Writing Poetry

• Writing the Self

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for English Literature graduates. Our Graduates enter careers in education, professional and creative writing, publishing, global marketing and advertising, media, international and national recruitment, heritage and tourism, and relief/humanitarian organisations. Some Graduates go on to pursue further postgraduate study leading to a PhD and a career in Academia.

Research Interests

The Department of English Language and Literature is home to three research centres and groupings:

• the Centre for the Research in the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW)

• the Centre for the Research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS)

• the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO)

All staff in the Department are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. Books published by staff in recent years include studies of medieval women’s writing, William Blake, Dylan Thomas, American fiction, Walt Whitman, narratives of the European border, Angela Carter, contemporary English language studies and many other areas. Regular research seminars

and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

"The MA in English Literature at Swansea offers students a unique opportunity to expand their intellectual horizons in an environment that brings people together from across the globe. I've had the chance to study with people from Ireland, England, America, and Germany and the differing views and experiences that each of us bring to our classroom discussions have been an invaluable part of my education here. One of the other enormous benefits of studying in Swansea is its location. In few other places can a student read a poem by Dylan Thomas or William Wordsworth and then walk through the same streets and countryside that inspired that poet. At Swansea University a student can find a learning experience that breaks free of the confines of the classroom and that may lead them out into all the beauty and history of the city and its surrounding areas. To top it off the small class sizes create an intimate and informal atmosphere where passionate professors challenge you to make the most of your love of literature. In all I'd describe my time here at Swansea as an experience that has both deepened my love of literature while allowing me to come to view it from a more global perspective."

Robert Tretin, English Literature, MA



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This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration. Read more
This programme provides professional development for English language teachers, and focuses on the theory and practice of teaching the English language in a variety of contexts, drawing on innovative research carried out by members of the School of Humanities, which includes work on Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL), corpus linguistics, Academic English and telecollaboration.

A distinctive feature of the programme is that you will have opportunities to observe English Language classes in higher education and undertake microteaching practice. You will also develop digital expertise with state-of-the-art e-learning tools and focus on specific English Language issues relating to your own educational contexts.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Students on the programme state that staff provide them with excellent academic and pastoral support and that their learning experience is very positive (evidence from module and course evaluation questionnaires). The course also focuses on the future world of work and students may apply for part-time paid teaching opportunities and work placements within Coventry University, including placements overseas.

The assessment on the programme is varied and includes essays, reports, presentations, digital learning object design, microteaching and seen in-class tests. The course also offers extra-curricular activities, such as participation in lectures and workshops with renowned visiting applied linguists andeducation experts.

There also is a free field trip relevant to the curriculum. In 2014 for example we went to the British Museum in London and then designed intercultural teaching tasks based on the objects viewed at the museum (activity linked to the mandatory module on materials design).

You will moreover be offered other field trips at competitive rates as they are supported by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities and by the Centre for Global Engagement.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

You will:
-Discuss theory and practice of English language learning and teaching
-Develop skills in the evaluation and design of teaching materials for a variety of settings
-Explore the role played by new technologies for learning, teaching and communicating
-Analyse English as it is spoken and written in the UK and in the rest of the world
-Have the opportunity to practice teaching and observe experienced teachers in a variety of face-to-face and blended-learning settings

The mandatory modules are:
-Theories, Approaches and Methods of Language Learning and Teaching
-Developing Language Teaching Materials
-Analysing Written and Spoken Discourse
-Grammar and Phonology for the English Language Teacher
-Teaching English in Higher Education
-Computer Assisted Language Learning: Theory and Practice
-Dissertation in ELT/Applied Linguistics

In addition, you will choose three of the following optional modules:
-Business English;
-Sociolinguistics and English Language Teaching
-Teaching English Through Literature
-Corpus Analysis and Pedagogy
-English for Academic Purposes Course Design and Language Testing
-Understanding Academic English

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

The full-time, face-to-face, programme runs over three semesters. There are two entry points: September and January. Students normally take four 15-credit modules in semester 1, four 15-credit modules modules in semester 2, and complete a Dissertation in semester 3.

Modules are taught face-to-face with lectures, workshops, laboratory sessions and seminars. All students are asked to submit a diagnostic task on arrival (normally a short essay). One-to-one support is available for students who need practise in academic English writing.

The delivery of all modules is supported by an online learning environment that is used, for example, to display content material, to submit assignments and provide electronic feedback, to discuss seminar topics (discussion forums), to design student-centred glossaries and to engage in online assessment and practice.

Students are also offered the opportunity to discuss English language teaching and analyse the English language with dedicated e-learning platforms for specific purposes (e.g. Corpus Linguistics tools, Computer Assisted Language Learning and Mobile Assisted Language Learning platforms).

Staff teaching on the programme also make use of the new learning spaces in the Disruptive Media Learning Laboratory in the Lanchester Library, to encourage students to practise English teaching in a variety of settings.

A part-time programme is available for UK/EU applicants, and can be tailored to the needs of each applicant.

HOW WILL I BE ASSESSED?

A variety of assessed tasks have been integrated into this programme, offering you a stimulating assessment experience and to enable you to reflect on your work, as the programme is designed to train teachers who will assess work themselves. Each module will normally have two assessment tasks and you will receive feedback on the first task before you submit the second one. The assessment tasks include seen examinations, presentations, essays and reports, corpus-based syllabus and course design, microteaching, reflective test design, e-learning object design in group and peer observation reports.

The external examiners have commented very positively on the variety, innovation and appropriateness of the assessment tasks on this programme. For example in 2013-2014 the External Examiner commented in his annual report: 'The assessment tasks are of good quality - well conceived, often imaginative, and in many cases appropriately practical, matching well with intended learning outcomes. I commend this.'

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

English looks likely to continue as the international language for the foreseeable future, and this MA programme leads to a variety of career destinations in teaching the language and/or in education management. Qualifications of this kind are often seen as important for access to senior management posts in both private and state educational institutions around the world. In addition to classroom teaching you will be well equipped to perform roles such as materials developer, resource manager and examiner.

Graduates from the MA in ELT are currently employed as professors in Jordan and China, as Pre-sessional Programme Coordinators in the UK and China and as Academic English Consultants for both the private and public sector, just to provide a few examples.

WORK PLACEMENTS

You will be provided support to find a work placement by dedicated staff in the careers office and in the Centre for Global Engagement.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR AN INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

You will be offered the opportunity to take part in the global leaders programme (additional fees apply, see further details below) that includes international experiences. There will also be international trips organised by the School in collaboration with the Centre for Global Engagement. As English is a global language, international perspectives on learning and teaching English are fully embedded in the curriculum.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study English Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study English Literature at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of English Language and Literature can offer supervision in most areas of literature from the middle ages to the present. We have particular strengths in gender, Welsh writing in English, American Literature, medieval, Renaissance, eighteenth and nineteenth-century writing and culture, modernism and postmodernism, Irish poetry, contemporary literature and critical and cultural theory.

Key Features of MA by Research in English Literature

An MA by Research in English Literature gives you the chance to pursue a project inspired entirely by your own particular enthusiasms in English language and literature. The qualification would be a good preparation for proceeding to doctoral work. Alternatively, the proven ability to conduct independent research in English Literature will boost employment prospects outside academia (for example, in the media, publishing, the Civil Service, or education).

As a student of the MA by Research in English Literature programme, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in English Literature are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. English Literature students give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. MA by Research in English Literature degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in English Literature would suit those wanting the freedom to explore a topic of their choosing in English language and literature under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes; an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered; the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset. Research proposals are invited on any topic in English Literature for which staff can provide supervision.

Postgraduate Research in the Department of English Language and Literature

About 70 of the postgraduates currently studying at Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature [ELL] are researchers working on an MA, MPhil or PhD thesis. Each is supervised by two members of staff, 60% of whose own research publications were rated ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world-leading’ in the 2008 REF exercise. We supervise interdisciplinary projects as well as traditional areas of the discipline - in language studies, creative writing, literature (from medieval to the present) and critical and cultural theory. If you have an idea for a research project in English Literature, do get in touch and discuss it with us informally before applying.

Postgraduate students including those of MA by Research in English Literature, often join a research centre, e.g. the Centre for Research into Gender and Culture (GENCAS) or the Centre for Research into Welsh Writing in English (CREW) where they work alongside other students and staff in dedicated research rooms. Students present their work in the friendly environment of our Research Institute’s annual postgraduate conference, Swansea University’s Department of English Language and Literature (ELL)’s fortnightly research seminars, and the monthly workshop of the Creative Writing Programme. Our research environment was judged 100% ‘internationally excellent’ by the 2008 REF, and research students help staff organize a lively programme of conferences, readings and performances on campus and in the city’s arts centres. As well as being inducted into academic research and dissemination, doctoral students have the opportunity to undertake undergraduate teaching to prepare them for an academic career. We provide study stations with computers and postgraduate common-rooms, research training and the services of a research officer and subject librarian.

REF 2014

What the Research Excellence Framework 2014 had to say about Postgraduate research in the Swansea Department of English Language and Literature …

The environment in the Department of English Language and Literature is ‘conducive to producing research of mostly at least internationally excellent and at its best world-leading quality’

‘Arrangements for postgraduates were deemed of world-leading quality’

‘There is clear evidence of the development of a research culture into which research students are fully integrated’

‘Recruitment is strong’

‘There are excellent arrangements for support, training and employability’.

Summing up: ‘The unit makes an outstanding contribution to the health of the discipline’.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Welsh Writing in English offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in Welsh Writing in English

The MA allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA is openly structured. You define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

You develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Welsh Writing in English course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. There are three core modules and three optional modules. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing.

Part-time study is also available.

Welsh Writing in English Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to Welsh Writing in English.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of Welsh Writing in English.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Welsh Writing in English typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advanced Research Skills

• Dylan Thomas and the Rise of Welsh Writing in English

• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives

• Women Writing Modern Wales

• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic

• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Welsh Writing in English graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as education; publishing; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Welsh Writing in English from an English or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to early modern history.

Research Interests

The Centre for Research into the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW) is directed by Dr Kirsti Bohata, alongside Professor Daniel Williams who during the past decade has developed comparative approaches to the literatures of Wales. He took over from Professor M.Wynn Thomas OBE, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the English Association. Kirsti Bohata’s areas of specialism include Postcolonial Studies, Women’s Writing and the Production History and Culture of the Book. Professor

Dai Smith is Raymond Williams Chair of Welsh Cultural History within CREW, Dr John Goodby is a poet, leading scholar of post-war Irish poetry and specialist in Dylan Thomas, while Peter Lord, the leading historian and interpreter of Wales’s visual culture, is the Centre’s Research Fellow who recently published an edition of the Winifred Coombe Tenant Diaries. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through CREW and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.



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An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by. Read more
An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension from undergraduate study in that it goes beyond a “baseline” BA qualification by:

--offering students an anticipated edge in the professional job market;

--enhancing applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset;

--providing necessary postgraduate experience for students who intend to continue their study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;

--providing a year of literary study for those who wish to take a career break.

Intended to meet the needs of students who have a passion for English literature and wish to extend their undergraduate study by engaging in further fast-track study leading to a Master’s qualification, our MA is designed as a one-year full-time programme. (In some years a part-time route may be available-please check our website for details).

The MA timetable has been designed to enable concentration of seminars within two days (Monday and Tuesday) to offer flexibility with students’ other commitments.

Our MA offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. Students, therefore, enrol on one of three pathways.

MA IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
The MA in English Literature pathway enables students to select from a range of modules and work in a variety of areas either not covered in their undergraduate choices, or which they desire more deeply to examine. Contributing tutors are acknowledged experts in their specialisms.

MA IN ENGLISH: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
The MA in English: Children's Literature focuses on key areas within children’s literature and draws on the department’s long-established reputation in this field. Our 1981 introduction of an undergraduate module in Children’s Literature made us one of the earliest English departments, nationally or internationally, to offer modules in this rapidly expanding and popular field of study.

MA IN ENGLISH: LITERATURES VICTORIAN AND MODERN
The MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern attends to specific genres, types, and sub-periods of literature within the consistently popular Victorian and Modern periods. It differs from period-based MAs in other institutions by offering modules in specific literary types rather than generalist or panoramic treatments of period.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
All MA students complete “Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research” 1 and 2, four option modules, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation. Taught modules run for one term each. The dissertation is completed during Term 3 and the summer.

MANDATORY ELEMENTS:

MLS4ISM1: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 1

MLS4ISM2: Issues, Scholarship and Method in Literary Research 2

MLS4DIS: Dissertation

OPTION MODULES:

MLS4CMCL: Classics of Modern Children’s Literature *#

MLS4NCCL: Nineteenth-century Children’s Literature *#

MLS4VCF: Victorian Crime Fiction #

MLS4LFS: Literature of the Fin de Siècle #

MLS4LWTC: Literature and War in the Twentieth Century #

MLS4LYAF: Young Adult Fiction *#

PATHWAY REQUIREMENTS
Students taking the MA in English Literature pathway can choose any four options and may write their dissertation on an approved topic in any area of English literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Children's Literature pathway must take at least two of the modules marked * over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in children’s literature.

Students taking the MA in English: Literatures Victorian and Modern pathway must take at least two of the modules marked # over the course of the year and complete their dissertation on an approved topic in Victorian and/or Modern literatures.

Please see our website for further details. The Programme Convenor welcomes enquiries about any aspect of the programme.

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Why American Studies in Nijmegen?. The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Read more

Why American Studies in Nijmegen?

The world loves American culture, but is deeply distrustful of American power and politics. At Radboud University, we offer critical insights into what America means. Our Master's program gives students the opportunity to become experts in the concept of ‘America' in a variety of fields: US history, literature, culture (including popular culture, film, theatre, political history, foreign policy, constitutional law, religion and social science. Radboud University's programme distinguishes itself from other's by emphasizing the cultural and political relations between the United States, its neighbours and Europe.

The open classroom experience is what teachers and researches of the Master`s program “North American Studies” want to create for their students. For an example of the experience, in the project “Politics & Culture of Liberation” students and teachers worked closely with the National Liberation Museum in Groesbeek, the Regional Archive in Nijmegen and the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The project resulted in an exhibition on the impact of American culture on Europe and the Transatlantic World. This is only one example of the many creative seminar projects that students realize in the Master`s program.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Specializations

Specialisations in the Master's in North American Studies. The Master's programme in North American Studies offers two specialisations:

1. Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

2. Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

America's cultural icons are the world's cultural icons. From Walt Disney to the Statue of Liberty, from Hollywood to Time magazine, and from Jack Kerouac to Philip Roth, the influence of American culture and literature around the world is huge. Our program allows students to critically explore the significance of American culture in countries around the globe. Aside from studying the variety of meanings assigned to American cultural products abroad, students will explore the diversity of the American cultural expressions themselves.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks beyond national borders. In this program you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States within, outside and at its borders. Central themes are the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe, and related issues in the field of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

Study American issues with an interdisciplinary view

True to the tradition of American Studies, our program teaches students to approach issues from different angles and to think in multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary ways. We also offer excellent internships, thanks to our global network. Furthermore, we are the only university in the Netherlands to teach oral communication skills in the American language throughout our Bachelor's program, so that students who go on to study for a Master's degree have near-native language abilities.

High level of communication in American English

In Nijmegen, you will find yourself in a dynamic learning environment where the level of scholarship and communication in (American) English is extremely high. This is one of the reasons why our program is so popular. Another reason is the choice the University offers between two fascinating fields within which you can create your own custom-made program: ‘Literatures and Cultures of North America in International Perspective' and ‘Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society.'

Program outline

Within the program in North America Studies, you can choose from the following two specialisations. Each specialisation comprises of a one-year, 60 EC program including a 20 EC Master's thesis project. For more information about program outline, structure, and courses, please click on the links below.

Literature and Cultures of North America in International Perspective

All students enrolled in this Master's specialisation take compulsory foundational courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is an elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include courses on Native Americans, African-American literature and the American borderlands.

Transnational America: Politics, Culture and Society

If you follow this specialisation, you will take several obligatory foundation courses. In addition, students take a compulsory Master's Thesis Colloquium and participate in Master's Thesis Workshops to help them structure their Master's Thesis research and support their writing process. There is a small elective space in the specialisation to allow students to engage in an internship or engage in further courses. Options for elective courses include a special course on the Beat Generation, one of America's most influential avant-garde movements; Native Americans; African-American Literature and Culture; American Borders: Contact Conflict and Exchange; or American Constitutional Law (taught in Dutch).

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require. Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Read more

Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.

Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Immigrants frequently exhibit pathology different to natives. How can this be? And how do you deal with this? This Master’s specialisation focuses on the diversities in youth care. Diversities in the area of ethnicity, religion, gender and social-economic class. You will develop an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look differently at care giving and welfare policies. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people. You will broaden your vision. How come fewer immigrants accept (certain forms of) help? How can you make homosexuality a subject of discussion in certain cultures? You will look beyond your own values and differentiate between your own ethical beliefs and cultural values and universal beliefs.

Upon graduating you will be an expert in the area of diversities in youth care. Besides plenty of knowledge, skills and – if you want – experience abroad, you will have a dose of cultural relativism. Why do we do it like that? How could we do it differently? You can use this in your work as remedial educationalist or policy maker. After graduating you will be able to work in and outside of the Netherlands at (development) organisations and institutions in the fields of youth care, education, adoption and refugee relief.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Why study Diversities in Youth Care at Radboud University?

- You may pick electives from different Master’s programmes like Religious Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Management Science. These electives fit in well with the programme Diversities in Youth Care. More information can be found on the programme outline page.

- There is plenty of opportunity to go abroad for an elective or an internship. Our network includes a university and relief organisations in Bangladesh, foster homes and orphanages in Romania and the Ukraine and schools in several African countries.

- Radboud University has the only education and research institute in the Netherlands within the field of social sciences which specialises in gender and sexuality: Institute for Gender Studies (IGS). This means you will have access to the latest and most relevant research.

- The programme collaborates with the knowledge centre Sekse en Diversiteit in Medisch Onderwijs (SDMO) (i.e. Gender and Diversity in Medical Education) of Radboudumc. We exchange case studies and give one another guest lectures. You will profit from this exchange of knowledge!

Change perspective

This programme will continually challenge you to adjust your point of view. To look beyond your own values. What is the dividing line between your ethical beliefs and those of the other people? And at what point have universal values been seriously affected?

You are taught to look at it from the point of view of a child growing up in poverty, of a homosexual youth, of someone with a Moroccan father and a Dutch mother, of a child living in a reconstituted family or in a family with strong religious beliefs. You are taught to continually look at issues from someone else’s perspective. In other words, to be flexible when it comes to making judgements and having expectations. Changing your perspective is the very core of this programme.

Career prospects

Upon completing this Master’s specialisation, you will be an expert in youth care concerning diverse backgrounds and personal traits. There is a large need for professionals who know how to deal with homosexual immigrants, with children who don’t speak the local language or youths that have been traumatised by war. Such knowledge and experience are gained in this programme. You will have a flexible view of diverse backgrounds and be critical of your own area of expertise. After graduating you will be a remedial educationalist or policy maker with an expertise that organisations are desperately in need of!

Job positions

As a professional in Diversities in Youth Care you can work in and outside of the Netherlands in the area of youth care and development. You can work as a policy maker or researcher in organisations as Unicef, adoption agencies, the EU, local governments or research institutions. You can also work as a remedial educationalist for mental health care organisations, refugee centres or with specific groups of children like refugees or LGBT children.

Our approach to this field

The political and media interest for problems regarding ethnicity, gender and sexuality is huge. How do you deal with it? How do you develop policies? This requires specialist knowledge. Knowledge that goes beyond the borders of a country, a culture and a set of beliefs. The Dutch have a very individualistic approach to happiness while other cultures believe that a happy family unit is more important for one’s own happiness. You will not learn what is wrong and what is right, but how things can be different. This will ensure that the policies you will develop will also be different.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care will train you to become a specialised caregiver. The programme focuses on social issues in the area of diversity. You can develop a clinical or policymaking approach within youth care and diversities of youth. After graduating you will have knowledge on the role of different backgrounds. Whether it’s about culture, religion or gender, you will be flexible enough to identify various problems and to judge and treat them from the right perspective.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The M.A. Read more

Program Overview

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at the American Graduate School in Paris is a two-year program qualifying you for a broad range of careers in international affairs, from local governance to foreign affairs, to international development, human rights advocacy, global communications, international business, and many other areas involving interaction with different countries and cultures.


:A US-accredited Program in France:

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS combines the wide recognition of an American degree with the unique experience of a Paris-based program. It is accredited in the US as an affiliated program of Arcadia University (Pennsylvania) and taught at the American Graduate School in Paris, a private nonprofit institution of higher education recognized by the French Ministry of Higher Education.

Classes are taught in the heart of Paris. The French capital – which is also one of Europe’s capitals and an international hub – is an ideal location for the study of international affairs. The program takes full advantage of this through guest speakers, site visits, and networking events. These all represent opportunities to get exposed to the international scene and make connections with the many diplomatic missions, intergovernmental organizations, and NGOs that the city hosts.

The language of instruction is English; no knowledge of French is required to enroll. You have the opportunity to learn French through AGS’s partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France.


:Expertise in International Affairs:

The program draws on AGS’s specific expertise in the field of international relations, in which the school has specialized since it was founded in 1994. At the core of this expertise, the faculty of the program is comprised of both accomplished scholars conducting research at the forefront of their discipline, and practitioners sharing their knowledge and professional experience, such as retired Ambassadors or government officials.

See AGS faculty - http://www.ags.edu/about-ags/faculty

The curriculum strikes a careful balance between academic thoroughness and practice-oriented approaches to fully prepare you for the professional arena. It examines the interaction between State and non-State actors at an international level through a multi-disciplinary scope covering political as well as cultural, historical, economic, geographical, social, legal, and humanitarian aspects, all updated to include the most current international issues.

Required courses cover the core subjects of international relations theory, economic policy, international public law, foreign policy formulation, and methodology. A broad rage of electives is available to explore other areas of international affairs such as NGO management, environment policy, gender issues, geopolitics, conflict resolution, and area studies.

See course catalog - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/graduate-course-catalog


:A Multicultural Learning Environment:

A unique aspect of the program is the diversity of perspectives infused in the classroom, with students as well as faculty coming from many different national origins. This combined with the American-style interactive teaching methods, makes for an enriching and mind-opening class experience.


:Master’s thesis:

The program culminates in the completion of a Master’s thesis. Through the in-depth research and writing involved in the thesis process you will form a specialization in an area of your interest, as well as strengthen your ability to plan and complete a substantial project.

The thesis topic is elaborated in coordination with the Academic Committee and faculty advisors based on your area of interest and professional objectives.


:Foreign Policy component:

You may choose to include a foreign policy component in your thesis. This exercise will offer you the opportunity to apply the international relation theories and methods learned to construct new solutions to current international problems, thus leading to concrete solutions supported by solid academic research.

Degree Requirements

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy, you must meet the following conditions:

- Successful completion of the curriculum (42 credits) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 (See curriculum details - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/curriculum)
- Pre-intermediate level of French language by graduation (1 on the ALTE scale, A2 on the CEF scale French Language Proficiency Level Scale - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations/798-french-language-proficiency-level-scale).
- Note : to help you meet this requirement, AGS offers optional French language courses with its partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France (more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses).
- Research and writing of a 25,000 to 35,000-word thesis complying with the academic standards set forth by the school.

Program options

A range of options allows you to tailor the program around your particular interests and career objectives.


:Internship:

While in the Master’s program, you have the opportunity to perform an internship in a Paris-based organization: diplomatic/consular mission, intergovernmental organization, NGO, multinational corporation news media outlet or another type of relevant international institution.

Internships are optional and can be pursued either for credit (then counting as a an elective course in the curriculum) or not-for-credit. In all cases, you may benefit from AGS’s guidance and support for internship placement. (Note that in all cases, the student is ultimately responsible for finding his/her internship.)


:Area concentrations:

You may specialize in a particular sector of international affairs and obtain, in addition to your M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, a Certificate of Concentration in your area of specialization. The requirements for this option consist of elective courses in the said area, directed readings, comprehensive exams, and an area-focused thesis.

Area Concentrations Available include:

- African Studies
- Asian Studies
- Middle Eastern Studies


:Dual degree options:

A number of dual program options with partner universities allow you to earn a second degree in a complementary discipline in addition to your US-accredited M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy:

- European accredited Master in Diplomacy and Strategic Negotiation (with Université Paris-Sud, Sceaux, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-diplomacy-and-strategic-negotiation

- European accredited LL.M. in French and European Union Law and Business Ethics (with Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-and-international-law

US-accredited M.A. in Peace and Conflict Resolution (with Arcadia University, USA): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/dual-programs/international-relations-and-diplomacy-international-peace-and-conflict-resolution


:International opportunities:

You may spend one of the semesters of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy program abroad, studying at one of AGS's partner institutions while earning credits toward your AGS degree. Options include the United States (Arcadia University) and Italy (University of Siena). You may also spend the summer at UC Berkeley Extension, completing an additional module in leadership and management.

See more information - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/international-opportunities


:Combined M.A.-Ph.D. program:

AGS offers a combined M.A.-Ph.D. program per the American model. The combined M.A.-Ph.D. program allows you to credit the required courses toward both degrees simultaneously. Ph.D. candidates having successfully completed their M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS would therefore be exempt from taking the required courses, and would only have to take seven elective courses for the Ph.D. program. Note that admission into the Ph.D. program is not automatic after obtaining the M.A.

Timeframe options

Full-time two-year track: the program is designed to be completed in two years on a full-time basis, involving nine to twelve hours of classes per week in addition to readings, assignments, and the research and writing of the thesis.

Accelerated 18-month intensive track: You have the option to complete the program in three semesters instead of four. You would then be required to take twelve to fifteen hours of classes per week.

Part-time track: EU students and other students who do not need to be enrolled on a full-time basis for visa purposes may undertake the program over a longer period of time on a part-time basis. This allows working professionals and other interested candidates to combine the program with other activities.

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Applications have closed to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September. Read more

About the course

Applications have closed to start the MPhil in Sociology and Demography in 2017-18. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September.

The MPhil introduces students to contemporary theories and research methods on the intersection of sociology and demography. This 21-month programme takes a life-course and multilevel approach, aiming to integrate micro and macro issues in analysing social problems and the causes and consequences of population change.

The MPhil Sociology and Demography will prepare you for doctoral work in sociology and demography and research-intense jobs.

The curriculum emphasises:

• population-level analysis and demographic measures
• a life course approach
• sociological analysis as the key approach to explanation
• advanced quantitative methods.

This emphasis is reflected in the compulsory papers. Optional papers and the thesis will reflect either a more specialised topical study (eg gender, family and fertility, migration and integration of migrants, health and mortality, intergenerational relationships) or methodological work.

The MPhil programme has the following components:

• Sociological Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures and seminars, assessed by an unseen examination
• Demographic Analysis paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of examination and assignments
• Life Course Research paper taught in the first year through lectures, seminars and computer labs, assessed through a combination of methods
• Statistical Methods paper taught in the first year through lectures and computer labs, assessed through a combination of a test and assignments
• Research Design paper taught in the first year through lectures, assessed via a combination of methods
• Two optional papers over both years of the MPhil, normally taught through eight weekly classes/seminars for each paper and assessed by unseen examination or appropriate coursework
• Replication project in the second year, comprising a combination of individual and group work and assessed via assignments
• MPhil thesis, a substantial piece of original research (of up to 30,000 words) to be submitted by the end of the second year

Please note that the optional papers available may vary from year to year. For information about the optional papers available in 2016-17 please see http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/course-list?search=course_list&task=search.

Graduate destinations

Graduates often continue with a PhD at Oxford or doctoral studies at highly-ranked US and continental programmes. Others find placement in research-intensive occupations in the public sector (eg national statistical offices, government departments and regional/local authorities), in international organisations, think tanks, and in private sector occupations in which quantitative skills are highly valued (consulting, market research, health research, social research, and insurance companies).

Entry requirements for entry in 2017-18

Academic ability -

Proven and potential academic excellence:

Applicants are normally expected to be predicted or have achieved a first-class or strong upper second-class undergraduate degree with honours (or equivalent international qualifications), as a minimum, in a social science subject.

The department will only consider applicants who have an undergraduate degree in arts, humanities or science subjects if they can demonstrate a strong interest in sociology, as taught at Oxford.

For applicants with a degree from the USA, the minimum GPA sought is 3.7 out of 4.0.

Other appropriate indicators will include:

- References/letters of recommendation

Your references will support intellectual ability, academic achievement, motivation, a demonstrable interest in sociology as it is taught at Oxford.

Academic references are preferred, though professional references are acceptable if you have spent a significant amount of time in work.

- Written work produced by the student

Two pieces of written work of no more than 2,000 words are required. The written work must be in English and preferably about a sociological subject. Extracts from longer pieces should be prefaced by a short note which puts them in context.

This will be assessed for comprehensive understanding of the subject area; understanding of problems in the area; ability to construct and defend an argument; powers of analysis; powers of expression.

The work need not be closely related but it should have some sociological content.

- Statement of purpose/personal statement

The personal statement must be in English and should be approximately 750 words in length.

This will be assessed for:

• your reasons for applying
• evidence of motivation for and understanding of the proposed area of study
• the ability to present a reasoned case in English
• commitment to the subject, beyond the requirements of the degree course
• preliminary knowledge of research techniques; capacity for sustained and intense work
• reasoning ability
• ability to absorb new ideas, often presented abstractly, at a rapid pace.

Your statement should focus on your academic record and interests rather than personal achievements, interests and aspirations.

English language requirement:

Applicants whose first language is not English are usually required to provide evidence of proficiency in English at the higher level required by the University - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford/application-guide?wssl=1#content-tab--3

Funding

There are over 1,000 full graduate scholarships available for courses starting in 2016-17. Full scholarships will cover your course and college fees and provide a grant for living costs. Information about the full range of funding available can be found in the Fees and funding section - http://www.ox.ac.uk/node/17098/

For over 70% of Oxford scholarships, nothing more than the standard course application is usually required. If you fulfil the eligibility criteria and apply by the relevant January deadline, you will be automatically considered. Use the Fees, funding and scholarship search to find out whether you are eligible for scholarships which require an additional application. If you are, the tool will include links to full details of how to apply - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/fees-funding-and-scholarship-search

Divisional funding opportunities:

Oxford hosts one of 21 Doctoral Training Centres accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). In 2016 approximately 65 ESRC studentships are available across the Social Sciences. See the Social Sciences Doctoral Training Centre website for details - http://researchtraining.socsci.ox.ac.uk/home-dtc

Costs

Annual fees for entry in 2017-18 - https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/fees-and-funding/tuition-and-college-fees/fee-status?wssl=1

Home/EU (including Islands) - Tuition fee: £8,715; College fee: £3,021; Total annual fees: £11,736
Overseas - Tuition fee: £16,770; College fee: 3,021; Total annual fees: £19,791

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Available across six in-demand language pairings. English and one of French, Spanish, Chinese, German, Russian and Polish. A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies is of the highest value. Read more

Introduction

Available across six in-demand language pairings: English and one of French, Spanish, Chinese, German, Russian and Polish.
A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an opportunity to fine-tune your communication skills and awareness of the wide range of challenges and opportunities that arise every time intercultural dialogue occurs.
Recent research has shown that the fall in the number of language learners over the past decade has come at a big cost to the UK economy. While we may be able to continue to trade and to develop partnerships with countries, regions and companies whose first language is English, we’ve been cutting ourselves off from large swathes of the new markets emerging in East Asia, in Latin America, and in West Africa, to name but three regions. This trend has had an impact even at EU level, according to a recent CFA Skills report. The reasons for this recent decline in language learning are varied, but the tide is turning as Scottish and UK business and industry recognises the benefits of speaking the languages of truly global trade.

Accreditation

We are proud members of the ‌. The ITI is the UK's only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. Our membership of the ITI allows us to help you to keep abreast of the full range of exciting developments and opportunities in the languages services industry.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Certificate, MRes
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Duration: Full-time, MRes: one year, Certificate: nine months Part-time, MRes: 27 months, Certificate: 21 months
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Anne Stokes

Course objectives

The Master’s in Translation Studies has a strong focus on practical translation and on specific situations in which people communicate with one another across different cultures. We offer the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Polish, Russian and Spanish (available subject to demand and availability).
The course provides extensive practical translation work on a theme or topic of your choice. It is structured so that you can have considerable flexibility in choosing what areas of translation you wish to specialise in, as you build up a portfolio of translations with your tutor. You may also choose to undertake an extended translation as part of your final dissertation and will be given an opportunity to examine some of the key topics in contemporary Translation Studies.
Students on the course examine some major debates surrounding the opportunities and problems that arise when people from different cultures communicate and translate, through seminars led by experts in the field of intercultural communication. There will also be some opportunity for work-based study and exercises, as well as a chance to develop your skills using translation software packages.
If you wish to study for a PhD subsequently, you have the opportunity to demonstrate you have attained a level that prepares you for a higher research degree. And for candidates of a suitable level, there is an opportunity to continue in Stirling with a practice-led doctorate involving translation.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. One of the modules in the autumn semester will also feature a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), the portfolio of translation, and the dissertation.

Career opportunities

Our taught MRes in Translation Studies is, first and foremost, a fantastic gateway into a career in Translation, whether you want to work freelance or in-house, and there’s much more that you could end up doing with a qualification in Translation.
In a world of globalisation, criss-crossing travel and trade routes, and multi-lingual, multi-platform media, your translation skills will set you apart from the crowd. Whether you’re interested in developing a career overseas, or working for one of the many international companies with offices in Scotland and the UK, or playing your part in the ever-expanding global economy, this is the course for you.
Here in Scotland, exports increased by £1.6 billion over the course of 2010 according to the latest Global Connections Survey (2013) and the upward trend looks set to continue. For organisations such as Scottish Enterprise, up and coming translators who can expand Scotland’s business partners and look towards new horizons are extremely highly valued. And our course's six, in-demand languages (French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian) are indicators of some of these new horizons towards which the country is turning with an increase of more than 14% in exports to the EU, strong growth in emerging Asian markets, and a marked interest in new, innovative areas such as renewables. And wherever Scottish businesses seek to expand their marketplace, they call on translators to help smooth the path.

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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

School and Local Authorities are increasingly seeking to employ teachers with not only high levels of competence and skill in classroom practice, but practitioners who have advanced subject knowledge for teaching and enhanced knowledge of systems and theories relevant to education. Therefore, the aims of this program are:

to enable student teachers to develop a critical understanding of issues and theories that impact upon classroom practice in teaching, learning and assessment in secondary schools;
to support student teachers in their exploration and critical reflection on their own and others practice in relation to national and regional priorities and policies and current research relevant to the Key Stages for this programme;
to promote student teachers' practical teaching skills and subject knowledge for teaching across the relevant Key Stages for this programme, making links with relevant theory to inform practice.

The programme aims to further develop students' existing transferable skills in communication, literacy, numeracy and critical reasoning. It is suitable for those who wish to gain employment as teachers and who aspire to progress to leadership and management roles in schools or in the wider world of education. It will provide an excellent foundation for progression to either higher academic or advanced professional qualifications.

Course Content

Generic Course Structure and Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.
You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.
You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III

This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:
Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

Mathematics is one of the three core subjects in the National Curriculum along with English and Science. As such, it is accorded a high status and there are ample opportunities for the promotion of good teachers.

Attitudes among pupils to the subject are extremely varied. The challenge for you is to bring Mathematics to life and inspire pupils of all abilities to explore the subject's potential at an appropriate level.

You have to be able to encourage and support pupils who struggle with Mathematics or lack enthusiasm for the subject, and learn how to make it accessible to them. You also have to be able to extend those who enjoy and are successful in the subject.

The PGCE Secondary Mathematics Education course is very popular, drawing on outstanding expertise and experience in Education to
build upon your commitment to the teaching profession and the subject area.

The intensive programme combines courses in principles and methods of teaching with practical school-based teaching placements and students are assessed on both elements.

Throughout the course, theory and practice are integrated in both the University and school contexts. The course is planned and delivered in partnership with Mathematics colleagues in local schools.

The Teachers’ Standards are mapped to every aspect of course provision to facilitate the best possible opportunities to support the process of your professional learning.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list. The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006.

We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.

Learning and Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of Qualified Teacher Status. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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Master's specialisation Philosophical Ethics (Research). This course is about researching the moral conflicts and ethical issues in contemporary Western culture and setting them against the backdrop of continental European philosophy. Read more

Master's specialisation Philosophical Ethics (Research)

This course is about researching the moral conflicts and ethical issues in contemporary Western culture and setting them against the backdrop of continental European philosophy.

There is no philosophical discipline that is more deeply rooted in the current and controversial socio-cultural debates than practical philosophy and more specifically than philosophical ethics. The rejuvenation of the philosophical tradition, when it comes to contemporary issues, is never more necessary or more exciting than in this field of philosophy. The hermeneutical perspective – which is so characteristics of philosophical ethics at Radboud University – combines the precise interpretation of influential texts with a focus on culture philosophical approaches, phenomenological analysis and ethical applications. A unique addition in the ethical discussion is the attention for ethical issues, especially in literary sources.

Key authors for this specialisation are, in chronological order, Aristoteles, Thomas van Aquino, Kant, Hegel, Schleiermacher, Heidegger, Gadamer, Levinas, Ricoeur, Habermas, Taylor and Toulmin.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophical Ethics, you investigate the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). This section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

The department of ethics participates both in the research programme 'The project of a hermeneutic philosophy' as well as in the research programme ‘Ethos, Polis, Religion' (research programme in practical philosophy).

This section of the faculty investigates the moral implications of human actions from the point of view of virtue ethics (Aristotle, MacIntyre), phenomenology (Heidegger, Levinas) and hermeneutics (Gadamer, Ricoeur). For its ethical research it cooperates closely with the Centre for Ethics of Radboud University (in Dutch). The section also runs an international Nietzsche research project.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/ethics

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).

The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).

On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:

- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >90 (internet based)

- An IELTS score of >6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated

An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicant must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, including he ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/ethics



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Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. Read more
Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. We are proud of our team of staff and students whose impressive performance is critical to sustaining and enhancing the national and international reputation created by our distinguished alumni.

Cambridge itself is, from an art historical point of view, a stunning city in which to live and work. We make full use of Cambridge’s unique holdings of art and architecture, including the Fitzwilliam Museum (on our doorstep), Kettle’s Yard and the University Library as well as the College libraries. The Hamilton Kerr Institute at Whittlesford, a department of the Fitzwilliam Museum, is dedicated to the conservation of easel paintings and contributes to our teaching and research.

The MPhil in the History of Art and Architecture is a nine-month course providing advanced study and training in research in specialised areas of the subject. It is intended as a self-contained programme of art-historical study, but also serves as a preparation for students intending to proceed to doctoral research. Please note that this is a research degree with taught methodological elements, not a conversion course for students whose first degree lies in another subject.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to provide teaching and learning to post-graduate students in the history of art and architecture in a range of fields linked to the research interests of the staff;
- to provide high-calibre students with training in relevant research skills and to offer excellent specialist supervision of their individual research in these fields;
- to provide a stimulating environment in which students can reach their full intellectual potential;
- to help students develop a wide range of intellectual abilities and skills which will enable them to make a significant contribution in their chosen careers and walks of life, including academic teaching and research.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ahhamphaa

Course detail

On completion of the MPhil, students should have:

- made the transition in learning style and pace from undergraduate to postgraduate level;
- acquired the necessary research skills in the use of bibliographical, archival and museum resources as relevant to their field of study;
- gained practice in the use of the languages and archival skills relevant to their chosen research area;
- gained confidence in the choice and use of different methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives;
- refined their critical skills in the examination, recording and analysis of works of art and/or architecture, especially at first-hand (through travel and fieldwork if appropriate);
- gained experience in oral and written presentation, and in a sustained piece of research in the form of a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words;
- acquired the proficiency needed to present in writing a coherent and sustained piece of academic research.

Format

Teaching is delivered through a series of seminars held in the Faculty during the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms, focusing on salient critical and theoretical issues in the discipline, and organised into two parallel strands in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the beginning of the Michaelmas Term.

Throughout the course, students are encouraged to undertake independent reading and study, in order to consolidate what is under discussion in the seminars. In addition, they attend the Department’s weekly public Graduate Research Seminar organised by the graduate students, the Department's fortnightly Medieval Seminars and other lectures and seminars in the Department and elsewhere in the University.

The syllabus is as follows:

- Attendance at two selected seminar courses in specialised areas of research, one in the Michaelmas (Autumn) Term and one in the Lent (Spring) Term;
- Attendance at the department's weekly graduate seminars;
- Attendance at classes in skills training and career development;
- Frequent individual consultation with the candidate's supervisor, who will guide the candidate's choice of topics and preparation of individual written work for essays, presentations and dissertation.

Each of the seminar courses runs over two terms (Michaelmas and Lent), with a different emphasis in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the start of Michaelmas Term.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 15,000 words represents 60% of the overall mark and is submitted at the end of May.
- Two essays of not more than 6000 words (one of which may include a literature review). The essays represent 40% of the total mark. One will be submitted at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and one at the end of the Lent (Spring) terms respectively.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD following the course, MPhil in History of Art & Architecture students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to the approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. Read more

Why this course?

The MSW in Social Work is a 2-year, full-time, postgraduate degree course.

The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and it’s expected that in due course it will meet the criteria for recognition in the EU and elsewhere overseas. The course is based on the Standards in Social Work Education (SiSWE) and is to be validated by social work's professional body in Scotland, the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

The course provides a stimulating blend of university-based teaching and agency-based learning opportunities across both years.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/socialwork/

You’ll study

You'll undertake a range of taught modules, a dissertation and assessed placements in a range of social work service settings.

Work towards the Masters dissertation is mostly scheduled for the period beyond Year 2 of the programme. You’ll be told of the arrangements during year 1.

Teaching staff

The School of Social Policy and Social Work has a long and rich tradition of education, research and consultancy in social work. It brings together a staff group with extensive experience in the varied areas of social work practice i.e. children and families, criminal justice social work and community care.

Facilities

The Centre for Excellence for Looked After Children in Scotland (a multi-million pound development funded by the Scottish Government to support research and training in residential child care), the Centre for the Child and Society, and Community Care Works are all based within the School and contribute to teaching in the course as well as to research and consultancy.

Relevant work experience

We normally expect you to have had at least six months full-time work experience, or its equivalent in part-time work, at the point of the application.

We’re more concerned with the quality of experience than whether or not it’s paid. It’s useful to think about experience in three dimensions - duration, range and depth. While longer and more diverse experience is of great value, depth (or quality) is perhaps more important since this is what allows learning and professional development. Often experience is "deeper" in contexts where supervision is offered regularly, allowing for in-depth discussion in practice issues and dilemmas. Undertaking relevant reading and training while working often helps people to "deepen" the quality of their work experience.

- Criteria for work experience
The following indicate the kinds of criteria we look at in considering the relevance and suitability of your work experience:
- does it involve direct contact with people either as service users e.g. individuals, families or groups where the focus is on helping them live with or manage major difficulties in their lives, or in stimulating collaborative ventures to seek social change?

- does it develop critical awareness of the range, depth and complexity of social and personal problems and the variety of individual and agency responses which can address these?

- does it develop basic knowledge of the functions of social work, social care and/or community development agencies?

- does it develop skills in helping other people in difficulty e.g. skills in identifying and assessing problems, jointly planning and supporting a response to them or coping with stress?

- does it provide opportunities to reflect on, and take action to combat, discrimination and oppression in people's lives?

- does it generate an awareness, and an ability to act in the light of the value dilemmas involved in both helping activities and social change activities e.g. reflecting on the tensions between individual rights and freedoms and collective social obligations?

- Relevant work settings:
- work may be undertaken in a wide variety of settings e.g. community-based offices, residential provision, day care services, community organisations.
- work may be carried out with a range of client groups. These will commonly be people who experience various forms of disadvantage.
- it should be supervised by a member of staff of the status and experience to provide a reference indicating suitability for entry to social work education.

Personal qualities

The kinds of personal qualities which we look for in an applicant include:
- the ability to convey genuine warmth and interest in people
- an ability to see strengths and potential in even the most difficult circumstances and people
- a genuine interest in difference and diversity and an obvious ability to adapt and change
- a willingness to question conformity and risk discomfort in challenging attitudes which encourage discrimination and complacency
- the ability to support people who live with difficult, sometimes worsening circumstances
- an ability to help people set and follow their own agendas while being capable of asserting your authority where their welfare requires it
- being level-headed and helpful in the face of people's distress, pain and anger, even when it's turned on you
- a quiet confidence in your own ability and the capacity to argue and defend your views in a constructive way
- satisfaction in helping manage and, where possible, resolve conflict, but never at the expense of sacrificing the interests of vulnerable people
- taking enjoyment from both using your own initiatives as well as working accountably as part of team
- the ability to accept constructive criticism and learn from your mistakes
- a passion to fight for the rights of disadvantaged people

Communication skills

The communication skills which we would expect all applicants to demonstrate would include the capacity to:
- engage appropriately with a wide range of people
- communicate expressively, fluently and convincingly in verbal and written form
- understand, calculate and present accurately, basic numerical and financial information
- possess at least a basic understanding of information and communication technology and be able to acquire sufficient competence by the end of year 1/level 1 of the course

Age

There are no specific age restrictions for undertaking the course although funding bodies may impose an upper limit. Employability on course completion is a factor in selection.

Professional suitability

All entrants must register with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and meet suitability criteria regarding offending history, employment record etc.

Overseas students

As with home students, overseas applicants should be able to demonstrate their motivation, aptitude and preparedness for social work training. You must have substantial relevant paid or voluntary work experience. In addition, you must have a recognised degree or an equivalent qualification.

Application for entry to the course must be made through UCAS. The subsequent selection process is broadly the same as for UK and EC applicants. However, in order to ensure that applications from out-with the UK are given full consideration it is advisable that in addition to applying to UCAS you should send additional information directly to us. This should include:
- detailed information about degrees held and the awarding institution(s)
- where English is a second language please provide information about your levels of proficiency in English
- details of work experience, with particular reference to the aspects referred to in the guidelines on work experience
- a statement about reasons for wanting to study in the UK
- financial arrangements for meeting the cost of tuition fees and living expenses during the two year course
- an indication that you would be available to come to the UK for interview. Applicants who are not able to come for interview may be asked to supply additional written material and/or references.

Learning & teaching

The teaching and learning approach is student-centred and aims to promote reflective learning. Our key approach is problem-based learning which is universally recognised as an effective way of developing the critical thinking and problem-solving skills needed by busy professionals.

The course is taught through lectures, seminar groups, simulations and individual skills rehearsal with a commitment to use interactive e-learning wherever relevant. At the heart of the course is practice learning in social work service agencies with formally assessed placements being undertaken in both years.

Assessment

Our assessment methods consist of regular feedback on specific tasks related to teaching and learning as you work through a module.

Modules are formally assessed in a range of different ways, including essay, report, presentations and peer group assessments.

Careers

Qualified social workers are increasingly valued. Promotion and career development opportunities are excellent. Social workers can be found in:
- Local authorities - from main-grade workers to directorate level. Social workers will be providing, managing, purchasing and organising services to people with very diverse needs across the life span in different settings

- Voluntary organisations - at all levels, usually working in relatively specialist ways with children and young people with particularly challenging needs, as well as vulnerable adults, especially those with learning disabilities and those affected by mental health issues. Settings and contexts vary as widely as in local authorities.

- Private sector - often at senior practitioner and management level with services focusing on home-based support to vulnerable adults and residential services to older people as well as foster care support and services to people with offending histories.

- Central government - experienced social work managers advise and support ministers in monitoring and developing social work services.

- Social work regulation - a range of independent bodies, like the Care Inspectorate and Scottish Social Services Council employ social workers at a senior level to lead and manage registration and inspection of social work services to ensure they meet appropriate standards.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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