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This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview ) taught at our Orkney Campus. Read more

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview ) taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead. The MSc programme is completed with a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Distance Learning

The Marine Renewable Energy MSc/Diploma is also available for independent distance learning. For distance learners, the main difference is that you will undertake the Development Project alone rather than as part of a group. You can still obtain the full MSc in Marine Renewable Energy, or you can opt to study fewer courses, depending on your needs.

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Marine Renewable Energy. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

Programme content

The Diploma and MSc degree course involves studying the 8 taught courses outlined below. If a student can demonstrate that they have already mastered the subject, they may undertake a Development Project instead of one of these courses.

- Energy in the 21st Century
This course is designed to give you a broad understanding of the environmental, political and socio-economic context for current developments in renewable energy. The course examines the extent of current energy resources and how energy markets function. It covers some energy basics you will need for the rest of the programme (e.g. thermodynamics, efficiency conversions) as well as environmental issues associated with energy use, climate change and the political and policy challenges involved in managing energy supply and achieving energy security.

- Economics of renewable energy
This course gives an understanding of the economic principles and mechanisms which affect energy markets today. It covers price mechanisms, the economics of extracting energy and the cost-efficiency of renewable energy technologies. You will learn about economic instruments used by policy-makers to address environment and energy issues, economic incentives to stimulate renewable energy development and about environmental valuation.

- Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Oceanography & Marine Biology
This course is designed to give you an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources. You will also learn about marine ecosystems and how these may be impacted by energy extraction and about the challenges and impacts associated with carrying out engineering operations in the marine environment.

- Marine Renewable Technologies
You will gain an understanding of renewable energy technologies which exploit wind, wave and tidal resources. The focus is on technical design issues which developers face operating in the marine environment, as well as the logistics of installation, operations and maintenance of marine energy converters.

- Renewable Technology: Integration
This course explores the technical aspects of generating renewable energy and integrating it into distribution networks. You will learn about the electricity grid and how electrical power and distribution systems work. You will find out about different renewable fuel sources and end uses, and the challenges of energy storage.

- Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital asses, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project
This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Dissertation
This research project (equivalent in assessment to 4 taught courses) allows you to focus on a specific area of interest, with opportunities to collaborate with businesses and other stakeholders. You choose your dissertation subject, in discussion with your supervisor.

- Additional information
If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including guest lectures and practical sessions which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and other involved in the renewable energy industry.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Distance learning students

Please note that independent distance learning students who access their studies online will be expected to have access to a PC/laptop and internet.

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview

Visit the Marine Renewable Energy MSc/Diploma page on the Heriot-Watt University web site for more details!

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This is a 12 month full-time Masters degree (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-renewable-energy-development-red-/ ) course taught at our Orkney Campus. Read more

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time Masters degree (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-renewable-energy-development-red-/ ) course taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses and completing a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Distance learning

The Renewable Energy Development MSc/Diploma is also available for independent distance learning. For distance learners, the main difference is that you will undertake the Development Project alone rather than as part of a group. You can still obtain the full MSc in Renewable Energy Development, or you can opt to study fewer courses, depending on your needs.

Programme content

- Energy in the 21st Century
This course is designed to give you a broad understanding of the environmental, political and socio-economic context for current developments in renewable energy. The course examines the extent of current energy resources and how energy markets function. It covers some energy basics you will need for the rest of the programme (e.g. thermodynamics, efficiency conversions) as well as environmental issues associated with energy use, climate change and the political and policy challenges involved in managing energy supply and achieving energy security.

- Economics of renewable energy
This course gives an understanding of the economic principles and mechanisms which affect energy markets today. It covers price mechanisms, the economics of extracting energy and the cost-efficiency of renewable energy technologies. You will learn about economic instruments used by policy-makers to address environment and energy issues, economic incentives to stimulate renewable energy development and about environmental valuation.

- Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Environmental Processes
Particularly for those without a natural science background, this course provides a broad overview of the environmental processes which are fundamental to an understanding of renewable energy resources and their exploitation. You will study energy flows in the environment, environmental disturbance associated with energy use, and an introduction to the science of climate change. You will also learn about ecosystems and ecological processes including population dynamics and how ecosystems affect and interact with energy generation.

- Renewable Technology I: Generation
This course explores how energy is extracted from natural resources: solar, biomass, hydro, wind, wave and tide. It examines how to assess and measure the resources, and the engineering solutions which have been developed to extract energy from them. You will develop an understanding of the technical challenges and current issues affecting the future development of the renewable energy sector.

- Renewable Technology II: Integration
This course explores the technical aspects of generating renewable energy and integrating it into distribution networks. You will learn about the electricity grid and how electrical power and distribution systems work. You will find out about different renewable fuel sources and end uses, and the challenges of energy storage.

- Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital assets, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project
This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Optional design project
For students who can demonstrate existing knowledge covered by one of the courses, there is the option of understanding a design project supervised by one of our engineers.

- Dissertation
This research project (equivalent in assessment to 4 taught courses) allows you to focus on a specific area of interest, with opportunities to collaborate with businesses and other stakeholders. You choose your dissertation subject, in discussion with your supervisor.

- Additional information
If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including guest lectures and practical sessions, which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and others involved in the renewable energy industry.

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Renewable Energy Development (RED) MSc. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Distance learning students

Please note that independent distance learning students who access their studies online will be expected to have access to a PC/laptop and internet.

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-renewable-energy-development-red-/

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This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology. Read more
This course combines the schools’ expertise in criminology and sociology and explores the sociological context of issues in criminology.

A broad range of criminology and sociology subjects are studied which develop knowledge and understanding of broad spectrum of topics within this field including; crime, organisations and administrations in the field of criminal justice, the social causes and consequences of crime, social change and social structures, culture and identity and related issues.

The broad yet specialised nature of this degree allows students to develop advanced and specialised knowledge and skills in criminological and sociological research.

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

Demonstrate advanced, specialised knowledge and skills across a range of criminology and sociology applications, including an understanding of community cohesion and social identities, of criminal behaviour, its causes and consequences, its prevention and the response by criminal justice agencies.
Conduct empirical research projects. Students will have developed specialist research skills and critical thinking across a range of criminological and sociological areas and an understanding of the complex contexts in which criminologists and sociologists work.
Demonstrate the ability to problem solve and reason scientifically, even in complex contexts using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including identifying, formulating and solving social problems and problems related to crime. Students will have the ability to create, evaluate and assess a range of options, and apply ideas and knowledge to a range of situations.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level theories and empirical evidence concerning crime, its causes and consequences, including the definition of deviant behaviour, public opinion, the media and fear of crime, political reactions to crime, support for victims, offender management and related topics.
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of advanced level sociological theories and sociological findings, related to topics like the functioning of public sector organisations, social stratification, political and social movements, social values, consensus and conflicts, culture, community and identity, the social function of law.
Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities
Course Sturcture
A full MA is valued at 180 credits, a Diploma at 120 credits and Certificate at 60 credits.

The first 120 credits are achieved by following a programme of taught courses. The final 60 credits will be achieved through dissertation, after successful completion of the taught part of the course.

The course employs a wide range of teaching and learning strategies, both formal and informal. These include: lectures, individual study – some of it involving assigned readings - interactive discussion of case studies in class, small group work and essay writing. The MA Criminology and Sociology very much employs the concept of “active learning” by students.

The programme is offered on a full-time and part-time basis.

Full Time Study:

In full-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of twelve months. Taught courses are undertaken September – May, and the dissertation completed from May to September.

Part Time Study:

In part-time mode, the course normally lasts for a period of two and a half years. Taught courses are undertaken from September to May over a period of two years, and on successful completion of the 120 credits of taught courses, the dissertation may be undertaken. Lectures are concentrated on one day per week for part-time students.

Taught Modules
Compulsory Modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences and addresses the principles of research design and issues of data collection.

Key Issues in Crime and Justice: This module focuses on four main themes: comparative criminology, comparative criminal justice, comparative victimology, and criminological perspectives.

International Case Studies in Criminology: This module provides an internationally comparative perspective on key areas of criminological concern. These include questions of crime and deviance, criminological theory and the operation of systems of criminal justice.

Sociology Modules (choose 2):

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes.

Case Study: Case Study introduces students to sociological analysis by selecting a topic of joint interest to students and lecturer.

Social Theories of Culture: Social Theories of Culture introduces students to the sociological study of culture by introducing and assessing theories.

MA students take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Dissertation
The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will in their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation. Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation.

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This programme is unlike many other Master's programmes as it places much more emphasis on original research and the contribution to knowledge, than on taught courses. Read more
This programme is unlike many other Master's programmes as it places much more emphasis on original research and the contribution to knowledge, than on taught courses: a major part of the award is based on the dissertation, which makes up two-thirds of the credits required. In this sense, it provides you with a more critical and rigorous exploration of your particular subject area than may be found in a more vocationally orientated Master's programme.

The taught courses support your research: they introduce you to research design and methods, both quantitative and qualitative, appropriate to research in business and economics. At the heart of the programme is the learning contract between you and the research supervisor. The supervisor is an expert in your chosen area and will guide you through the process of: defining the aims of your research project, and its expected deliverables; outlining a suitable programme of work, monitoring its realisation, and helping you to keep your commitments; guiding you to obtaining ethical approval to realise your research programme, if your planned study requires it; identifying any further taught courses and training events (in addition to mandatory ones) to be attended in support of your research project. The supervisor is your first point of contact in the Faculty.

At the end of this degree, you may wish to register for a doctoral programme, since this MA provides a useful taster of research training and experience if you are considering this route.

Students are likely to be brilliant graduates in business or economics, or practising professionals who wish to return to academia and develop advanced research skills applicable to their area of expertise.

The aims of the programme are:

- To develop your research skills in business and economics

- To provide the foundation for future research at MPhil/PhD level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/busresma?utm_source=findamasters&utm_medium=pg%20listing&utm_content=ma%20by%20research&utm_campaign=business%20sch%20findamasters

Business and Management

With a strong commercial focus and academic rigour, our business programmes have a well-rounded focus to help students develop the key business skills needed in work environments. Students will be prepared and develop skills in decision making, project management and leadership. These skills are key requirements from employers today, so this course aims to mix a comprehensive knowledge of business environment and organisational behaviour.

What you'll study

- Research Methods (15 credits)
- Advanced Research Methods (15 credits)
- Quantitative Methods (15 credits)
- Qualitative Methods (15 credits)
- Research Dissertation (120 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Students are assessed through submission of their thesis and an oral examination. They also have to pass a small number of preparatory training courses.

Career options

This programme prepares students for a career in research, whether in academia or in the research and development departments of businesses or government bodies.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/645365/Business-MA-by-research-P11728x.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The Masters in Data Science provides you with a thorough grounding in the analysis and use of large data sets, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the Big Data and IT industries. Read more
The Masters in Data Science provides you with a thorough grounding in the analysis and use of large data sets, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the Big Data and IT industries. As well as studying a range of taught courses reflecting the state-of-the-art and the expertise of our internationally respected academic staff, you will undertake a significant programming team project, and develop your own skills in conducting a data science project.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾The School is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance: SICSA. This collaboration of Scottish universities aims to develop Scotland's place as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾We currently have 15 funded places to offer to home and EU students.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Data Science include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Big data
◾Data fundementals
◾Information retrieval
◾Machine learning
◾Research methods and techniques
◾Text as data
◾Web science
◾Masters team project.

Optional courses

◾Advanced networking and communications
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Algorithmics
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Big data: systems, programming and management
◾Computer architecture
◾Computer vision methods and applications
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Distributed algorithms and systems
◾Enterprise cyber security
◾Functional programming
◾Human computer interaction
◾Human computer interaction: design and evaluation
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾IT architecture
◾Machine learning
◾Mobile human computer interaction
◾Modelling reactive systems
◾Safety critical systems.
◾Software project management
◾Theory of Computation

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Industry links and employability

◾The advent of Big Data tools in recent years has facilitated the large-scale mining of voluminous data, to allow actionable knowledge and understanding, known as Data Science. For instance, search engines can gain insights into how ambiguous a query is according to the querying and clicking patterns of different users. Data Science combines a thorough background in Big Data processing techniques, combined with techniques from information retrieval and machine learning, to permit coherent and principled solutions allowing real insights and predictions to be obtained from data.
◾The programme includes a thorough grounding in professional software development, together with experience of conducting a development project. The programme will prepare you for a responsible position in the IT industry.
◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe, Red Hat and Bing.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

The Data Lab

We work closely with The Data Lab, an internationally leading research and innovation centre in data science. Established with an £11.3 million grant from the Scottish Funding Council, The Data Lab will enable industry, public sector and world-class university researchers to innovate and develop new data science capabilities in a collaborative environment. Its core mission is to generate significant economic, social and scientific value from data. Our students will benefit from a wide range of learning and networking events that connect leading organisations seeking business analytics skills with students looking for exciting opportunities in this field.

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The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Read more
The two-year MA Advanced Chinese Studies offers comprehensive language-based training across a wide range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

Students on the programme take four taught courses at SOAS during their first year, including a team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts. In addition, students take a text-reading seminar, allowing them to integrate their Chinese reading skills into their disciplinary studies, or an approved language-based course. Further courses can be selected from available disciplines including Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Cinema, Cultural and Regional Studies, Economics, History, Law, Literature, Music, Politics, and Study of Religions.

In their second year, students will undertake an extended period of study at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London.

The programme is aimed at students pursuing careers in the academic world, business, government and the media that require a skill set which encompasses disciplinary rigour, comprehensive area knowledge and cultural and linguistic fluencies. Applicants should have at least intermediate-level proficiency in modern Chinese (HSK Level 4). The language element of the training will be tailored to meet the needs of students’ existing language skills. Alternative elements are available for applicants not in need of further Chinese language training, such as native speakers of Chinese.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/ma-advanced-chinese-studies/

Structure

In the first year at SOAS students on the programme take the team-taught core course provided by a range of SOAS China experts Approaches to Chinese Studies - 15PCIC001 and two taught courses (2 Units) from the list given below. In addition, students take a Reading Seminar in Chinese Studies - 15PCIC003 (1 Unit) or an approved language-based course (1 Unit).

In their second year, students will undertake a Period of Postgraduate Study in China (15PCIC004) at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, where they will follow a tailor-made bilingual programme in Chinese Studies. Options for short-term internships with local companies will be made available. The second half of the second year will be taken up with the writing of the dissertation under close supervision back in London (Extended Dissertation in Chinese Studies 15PCIC999).

These courses should be chosen in close consultation with the programme convenor.

MA Advanced Chinese Studies - Programme Specification 2014/15 (pdf; 207kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/china-institute/courses/file93666.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

Lectures and Seminars
Most courses require students to attend two or three hours of classes each week. This time will be spent in lectures, seminars, tutorial discussions and student presentations: the exact mixture of activities varies somewhat from course to course. At Masters level there is a particular emphasis on students’ contributions and presentations, and students are also expected to read extensively and prepare for each class in advance.

Language courses typically involve more hours of contact time, especially at elementary level, and regular homework.

The assessment on most courses consists of two or three coursework essay assignments and an unseen written examination, sat in April or May. However, some courses are assessed purely on the basis of coursework, including essays and reaction papers.

Dissertation
A 20,000-word dissertation will be written by each student on this programme after his/her return from China, for submission in September of the second year. The dissertation will be on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources. The China and Inner Asia collection consists of approximately 200,000 volumes and 5,000 periodicals.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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You will study at EPCC, the UK’s leading supercomputing centre. EPCC is the major provider of high performance computing (HPC) training in Europe with an international reputation for excellence in HPC education and research. Read more

Programme description

You will study at EPCC, the UK’s leading supercomputing centre. EPCC is the major provider of high performance computing (HPC) training in Europe with an international reputation for excellence in HPC education and research.

Our staff have a wealth of expertise across all areas of HPC, parallel programming technologies and data science.

This MSc programme has a strong practical focus and provide access to leading- edge HPC systems such as ARCHER, which is the UK’s largest, fastest and most powerful supercomputer, with more than 100,000 CPU cores.

Data science involves the manipulation, processing and analysis of data to extract knowledge, and HPC provides the power that underpins it.

You will learn the multidisciplinary skills and knowledge in both HPC and data science to unlock the knowledge contained in the increasingly large, complex and challenging data sets that are now generated across many areas of science and business.

Programme structure

This MSc programme takes the form of two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation project.

Your studies will have a strong practical focus and you will have access to a wide range of HPC platforms and technologies. You will take seven compulsory courses, which provide a broad-based coverage of the fundamentals of HPC, parallel computing and data science. The option courses focus on specialist areas relevant to computational science. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

Taught courses

Compulsory courses:

Fundamentals of Data Management (Semester 1)
Message-Passing Programming (Semester 1)
Programming Skills (Semester 1)
Threaded Programming (Semester 1)
Data Analytics with High Performance Computing (Semester 2)
Software Development (Semester 2)
Project Preparation (Semester 2)

Optional courses:

HPC Architectures (Semester 1)
Parallel Numerical Algorithms (Semester 1)
Parallel Programming Languages (Semester 1)
Advanced Parallel Programming (Semester 2)
HPC Ecosystem (Semester 2)
Parallel Design Patterns (Semester 2)
Performance Programming (Semester 2)
Courses from the School of Informatics, Mathematics or Physics (up to 30 credits)
Dissertation

After completing the taught courses, students work on a three-month individual project leading to a dissertation. Dissertation projects may be either research-based or industry-based with an external organisation, with opportunities for placements in local companies.

Industry-based dissertation projects
Through our strong links with industry, we offer our students the opportunity to undertake their dissertation project with one of a wide range of local companies.

An industry-based dissertation project can give you the opportunity to enhance your skills and employability by tackling a real-world project, gaining workplace experience, exploring potential career paths and building relationships with local companies.

Career opportunities

Our graduates are employed across a range of commercial areas, for example software development, petroleum engineering, finance and HPC support. Others have gone on to PhD research in fields that use HPC technologies, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, geosciences, informatics and materials science.

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You will study at EPCC, the UK’s leading supercomputing centre. EPCC is the major provider of high performance computing (HPC) training in Europe with an international reputation for excellence in HPC education and research. Read more

Programme description

You will study at EPCC, the UK’s leading supercomputing centre. EPCC is the major provider of high performance computing (HPC) training in Europe with an international reputation for excellence in HPC education and research.

Our staff have a wealth of expertise across all areas of HPC, parallel programming technologies and data science.

This MSc programme has a strong practical focus and provide access to leading- edge HPC systems such as ARCHER, which is the UK’s largest, fastest and most powerful supercomputer, with more than 100,000 CPU cores.

HPC is the use of powerful processors, networks and parallel supercomputers to tackle problems that are very computationally or data-intensive. You will learn leading-edge HPC technologies and skills to exploit the full potential of the world’s largest supercomputers and multicore processors. This is a well-established programme that has been successful in training generations of specialists in parallel programming.

Programme structure

The MSc programme takes the form of two semesters of taught courses followed by a dissertation project.

Your studies will have a strong practical focus and you will have access to a wide range of HPC platforms and technologies. You will take seven compulsory courses, which provide a broad-based coverage of the fundamentals of HPC, parallel computing and data science. The option courses focus on specialist areas relevant to computational science. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

Taught courses

Compulsory courses:

HPC Architectures (Semester 1)
Message-Passing Programming (Semester 1)
Programming Skills (Semester 1)
Threaded Programming (Semester 1)
Software Development (Semester 2)
Project Preparation (Semester 2)
HPC Ecosystem (Semester 2)

Optional courses:

Fundamentals of Data Management (Semester 1)
Parallel Numerical Algorithms (Semester 1)
Parallel Programming Languages (Semester 1)
Advanced Parallel Programming (Semester 2)
Data Analytics with High Performance Computing (Semester 2)
Parallel Design Patterns (Semester 2)
Performance Programming (Semester 2)
Courses from the School of Informatics, Mathematics or Physics (up to 30 credits)

Dissertation

After completing the taught courses, students work on a three-month individual project leading to a dissertation.

Dissertation projects may be either research-based or industry-based with an external organisation, with opportunities for placements in local companies.

Industry-based dissertation projects

Through our strong links with industry, we offer our students the opportunity to undertake their dissertation project with one of a wide range of local companies.

An industry-based dissertation project can give you the opportunity to enhance your skills and employability by tackling a real-world project, gaining workplace experience, exploring potential career paths and building relationships with local companies.

Career opportunities

Our graduates are employed across a range of commercial areas, for example software development, petroleum engineering, finance and HPC support. Others have gone on to PhD research in fields that use HPC technologies, including astrophysics, biology, chemistry, geosciences, informatics and materials science.

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The MRes programme provides training in a set of analytical and practical research skills that will thoroughly prepare students to continue on to a PhD. Read more
The MRes programme provides training in a set of analytical and practical research skills that will thoroughly prepare students to continue on to a PhD. The programme is ideal for students who are thinking about continuing their studies to PhD level, but it is a highly flexible course that will be useful for many different career paths. The centrepiece of the program is an independent research project culminating in a dissertation.

The focus of the course is on acquiring the knowledge and skills to design, conduct, evaluate and disseminate psychological research. You will acquire these skills through seminars, independent study, and through hands-on experience in one of the research labs in the Department. The course structure is highly flexible and allows you to either sample research from different fields, or concentrate in a research area of your interest. During the second half of the year you will put these skills to use in designing, running and reporting on your own independent research project. The empirical project is an opportunity for you to provide a scientific answer to your own research question, or to explore an area of research that you may be thinking of taking further in a PhD. Many MRes projects have led on to further PhD research, and several have been published in international peer reviewed journals.

The typical candidate for the programme is a person who already holds an Honours degree in Psychology or a cognate discipline. Many of our students are international and come from countries including China, Hong Kong, India, USA, Canada, and Denmark. All our courses are taught in English but we welcome applications from all countries and there are good support services available for international students.

Many graduates from the programme have moved on to PhD positions. Others are pursuing career paths within clinical psychology or are using their psychological skills in industry.

Course content

The course combines taught courses in research methods and research skills with opportunities to study a wide range of topics at MSc level. Students also undertake a substantial empirical project with a member of faculty, providing them with extensive hands-on research experience.

Optional component
Specialist options and lab placements are selected from a set of available taught courses and lab opportunities offered from the faculty in the department. Taught courses and lab placements are roughly organized in strands, so that you can choose to concentrate in an area of research such as Language, Cognition, Perception and Action, and Social Psychology, if you so wish. This means that you can have a lab placement, a taught course and your dissertation conducted in the same research area, although you can also choose to learn about different fields.

Empirical project
The empirical project enables students to participate in the design and implementation of a theoretically-motivated piece of pure or applied research in Experimental Psychology interpreted in its broadest sense. Many of the projects are published in academic journals.

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Research profile. This programme offers students the opportunity to focus in detail on a chosen area of the subject, while still being able to take some taught courses. Read more

Research profile

This programme offers students the opportunity to focus in detail on a chosen area of the subject, while still being able to take some taught courses. It is intended for those who already have a good background in Linguistics, typically from undergraduate study.

This is one of two MSc by Research programmes offered in Linguistics & English Language. You should choose this programme if you wish to specialise in an area of applied linguistics or sociolinguistics.

Programme structure

Students must write a dissertation, and are advised to take two taught courses (further courses may also be attended, but not for credit).

The final mark for the programme will be determined by a weighted combination of the marks for coursework and the dissertation. In some cases it may be possible to register for a dissertation only.

Teaching will typically be in small groups, and supervision is organised on the basis of one-to-one contact with one or a small number of expert supervisors.

The main part of the programme will involve you writing a dissertation, and you should have an idea of the topic or area that you would like to write about when you apply. Students are given support in developing this topic during the year by an appointed supervisor and by dedicated training in research methodology.

Students are advised to take two taught courses (further courses may also be attended, but not for credit), which are offered from the wide range of subjects taught at Masters level within Linguistics & English Language.

The final mark for the programme will be determined by a weighted combination of the marks for coursework and the dissertation. In some cases it may be possible to register for a dissertation only.

Teaching will typically be in small groups, and supervision is organised on the basis of one-to-one contact with one or a small number of expert supervisors.



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Research profile. This programme offers the opportunity to focus in detail on an area of your choosing in the synchronic or diachronic study of English, while still being able to take some taught courses. Read more

Research profile

This programme offers the opportunity to focus in detail on an area of your choosing in the synchronic or diachronic study of English, while still being able to take some taught courses. It is intended for those who already have a good background in the study of English, typically from undergraduate study.

This is one of two MSc by Research programmes offered in Linguistics and English Language. You should choose this programme if you wish to specialise in an area of English language or English linguistics.

Programme structure

Students must write a dissertation, and are advised to take two taught courses (further courses may also be attended, but not for credit). In this case, the final mark for the programme will be determined by a weighted combination of the marks for coursework and the dissertation. In some cases it may be possible to register for a dissertation only.

Teaching will typically be in small groups, and supervision is organised on the basis of one-to-one contact with one or a small number of expert supervisors.

The main part of the programme will involve you writing a dissertation, and you should have an idea of the topic or area that you would like to write about when you apply. You will be supported in developing this topic during the year by your supervisor and by dedicated training in research methodology.

Students are advised to take two taught courses (further courses may also be attended, but not for credit), which are available from the wide range of subjects taught at Masters level within Linguistics & English Language.

In this case, the final mark for the programme will be determined by a weighted combination of the marks for coursework and the dissertation. In some cases it may be possible to register for a dissertation only.

Teaching will typically be in small groups, and supervision is organised on the basis of one-to-one contact with one or a small number of expert supervisors.



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This MSc Programme is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS in the far north of Scotland - a unique opportunity to study a live marine environment. Read more

MSc Marine Resource Management

This MSc Programme is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS in the far north of Scotland - a unique opportunity to study a live marine environment.

As man increases his demands upon the oceans, their sustainable development will depend on a rational management strategy for the total resource.

The professional working in the marine environment is constantly required to be multidisciplinary, and able to appreciate the conflicts that arise between conservation and development.

The MRM programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-resource-management-mrm-/ ) considers the sustainable development, use, conservation and management of marine resources.

Core themes include:
- Marine environmental systems.
- Resource management and conservation.
- Valuation and project management.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead. The MSc programme is completed with a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses.

Programme content

- Conservation, Sustainable Development & Resource Management
This course takes a broad look at the principles of sustainability and sustainable resource use, including environmental ethics. You will explore the challenges faced by policy makers and marine managers when incorporating these broad principles into policy and practice. You will learn about how sensitive habitats and the species they support are managed and protected, and how impacts from development are mitigated. The course gives an introduction to biodiversity conservation and the biodiversity action planning process, as well as examining issues around the relationship between conservation and science.

- Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Oceanography & Marine Biology
This course is designed to give you an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources. You will also learn about marine ecosystems and how these may be impacted by energy extraction and about the challenges and impacts associated with carrying out engineering operations in the marine environment.

- Resource Development
This course examines the exploitation and use of marine resources (including oil and gas, fisheries, transport, renewables, aquaculture and tourism), issues associated with development in the marine environment (including pollution and waste) and how these activities are regulated. You will learn about marine technologies and the challenges of developing and deploying technologies to exploit resources in the marine environment.

- Introduction to Marine Spatial Planning
This course introduces students to the emerging policy and practice of marine planning (global and regional). It examines political, jurisdictional and rights issues in the introduction of economic activities into the marine commons (the ‘Blue Growth Agenda’). The framework of marine legislation is explained and methods of conflict resolution are explored. A series of international case studies will identify the various tools and techniques being used around the world to manage human activity and balance conservation interests with demands for economic growth.

- GIS
Geographic Information System mapping is a tool which is now widely used by both developers and regulators in the management and development of marine resources. Within the context of Marine Spatial Planning the use of GIS has rapidly become the standard means of collating and analysing spatial information regarding resource use. This course will explain the principles and provide hands-on experience of applying state of the art mapping software in project based case studies.

- Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital asses, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project
This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Additional information
If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including field trips, guest lectures and practicals, which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and others involved in the renewable energy industry.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-resource-management-mrm-/

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This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics. Read more
This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics.

You will receive training in research methods and take a taught course unit in a relevant subject area. The research topic for your project is agreed with a supervisor in advance and can be in any area of the expertise in the department research groups. The project outline will be developed in consultation with your supervisor and project work is carried out in parallel with the taught courses, becoming full-time during the third term.

This Master’s by Research will provide you with a suitable background to work as a research assistant or as the grounding for further study towards a PhD.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscearthsciencesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This course is ideal for graduates in geology and related sciences who wish to carry out independent research over a shorter time period than is possible in a doctorate (PhD) programme. It allows you study at Master's level an aspect of the geological sciences which may not be catered for by specialist MSc programmes.

- You will be involved at every step of the research project - from planning and sample collection, laboratory work, result analysis, to writing your dissertation.

- It is ideal preparation if you are interested in studying for a PhD, but would like to have further preparation and training.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department of Earth Science’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

- The Department has up-to-date computer interpretation facilities, a full range of modern geochemical laboratories including XRF, quadrupole and multicollector ICP Mass Spectrometry, atmospheric chemistry and a new excimer laser ablation facility, excellent structural modelling laboratories, palaeontology and sedimentology laboratories.

Course content and structure

The course consists of the following three components:

A Research Study Skills Course Unit
- Personal research skills (e.g. safety, time and project management, teamwork)
- IT skills (e.g. literature retrieval, web authoring, databases, modelling)
- Data analysis skills (e.g. statistical methods, GIS systems, sampling techniques)
- Communication skills (e.g. posters, oral presentation, writing papers, web pages)
- Subject-specific skills and techniques. These amount to 55% of the research skills assessment, and for example may include parts of specialist taught courses (see below), a training course on the theory and practice of chemical and isotopic analysis, or other training arranged by the project supervisor. This will include training for research in the general field of the research project, not solely what is needed to carry out the project.

A Specialist Taught Course Unit
You will choose an advanced taught course unit relevant to the subject area of your research project. The following taught units are currently offered:
- Applied Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
- Pollution Sources and Pathways
- Oceans and Atmospheres
- Risk and Environmental Management
- Geographical Information Systems
- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
- Contaminants in the Environment
- Advanced Igneous Petrogenesis
- Seismic Processing and Interpretation
- Geodynamics and Plate Tectonics
- Interpretation of Structural Settings
- Coal Geology
- Petroleum Geology and Evaluation
- Terrestrial Palaeoecology
- Palaeoclimates

Research Project
The project may be on any topic which is within the broad research themes of the Department. You will be linked to a potential supervisor at the application stage and, in consultation with the supervisor, you will develop a detailed project outline during the first half of the first term. Project work is then carried out in parallel with taught courses during terms one and two, becoming the full-time activity after Easter. A bound dissertation is submitted for examination in early September.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and understanding of a variety of analytical, technical, numerical, modelling and interpretive techniques applicable to the specific field of earth sciences

- the articulation of knowledge and the understanding of published work, concepts and theories in the chosen field of earth sciences at an advanced level

- the acquisition of knowledge from published work in the chosen area of earth sciences to a level appropriate for a MSc degree.

Assessment

Research Study Skills: this is assessed by coursework and theory examination and will include short written assignments, a seminar, worksheets and practical tests. These assessments contribute 12.5% of the course marks.

Specialist Taught Course Units: these are mostly assessed by a written, theory examination and coursework. The unit assessment contributes 12.5% of the course marks.

Research Project: the project dissertation must be submitted in early September. It will be marked by both an internal and an external examiner, and will be defended at an oral examination with both examiners. The project assessment contributes 75% of the course marks.

Employability & career opportunities

Subject to agreement and suitable funding, MSc by Research students can transfer to the MPhil/PhD programme at Royal Holloway. They may use the research carried out for the MSc towards the PhD, and count the time spent towards MPhil/PhD registration requirements, provided that the MSc research forms a coherent part of the PhD, and that the transfer is approved prior to submission of the MSc research dissertation.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. Read more
The University of London’s postgraduate degree in the History of the Book was inaugurated in 1995 and each year attracts a range of students from many countries. The University’s location in the centre of London, with its unrivalled resources for all aspects of book history within easy reach, together with the expertise that exists in its many colleges and institutes, makes it an ideal place in which to carry out research of an interdisciplinary nature. The history of the book has developed rapidly over the last 40 years as its power to clarify problems in many other disciplines has become evident. Scholars have come to see the study of the book as an aid to understanding literary and other texts and, more recently, as a way of understanding broader social, cultural, and intellectual processes in history.

The programme aims to:

Give students a broad understanding of book history from c. 3000 BCE to 2000 CE

Introduce students to the range of disciplines that make up the subject, including historical bibliography, palaeography, codicology, history of printing, bibliometrics, history of publishing, history of reading, and library history

Provide frequent opportunities to handle archaeological and historical objects relating to the subject

Give students the ability and confidence to deal with primary sources for book history (both manuscript and printed)

In addition, the MRes will:

Provide selected students with a foundation of three appropriately specialised taught courses (60 points in all), which will equip them to undertake a more extensive programme of master’s level research than that offered by the MA

Provide the opportunity for able students to write an extended dissertation (30,000 words) on a subject that requires treatment at a much greater length and depth than the usual MA topic

Offer students a degree programme that satisfies the needs of those who wish