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The MA by Research (Hispanic Studies) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Hispanic Studies) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your own choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focused, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/mahispanicstudiesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

You will get the opportunity to:
- Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support

- You will follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture

- Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium

- Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies

- Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one core taught course and complete a dissertation.

- Core course units:

Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This course is the core taught course for all students and is taught across two terms. It provides y knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines students' theoretical understanding and provides the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if they so wish.

Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-to-one support from your supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline.

- Learnt to undertake focussed research, developed written and oral presentation skills, and honed their skills in critical analysis.

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a visiting examiner and includes a viva voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism, translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics. Read more
This course will provide you with the opportunity to carry out an independent research project under the supervision of our leading academics.

You will receive training in research methods and take a taught course unit in a relevant subject area. The research topic for your project is agreed with a supervisor in advance and can be in any area of the expertise in the department research groups. The project outline will be developed in consultation with your supervisor and project work is carried out in parallel with the taught courses, becoming full-time during the third term.

This Master’s by Research will provide you with a suitable background to work as a research assistant or as the grounding for further study towards a PhD.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/earthsciences/coursefinder/mscearthsciencesbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This course is ideal for graduates in geology and related sciences who wish to carry out independent research over a shorter time period than is possible in a doctorate (PhD) programme. It allows you study at Master's level an aspect of the geological sciences which may not be catered for by specialist MSc programmes.

- You will be involved at every step of the research project - from planning and sample collection, laboratory work, result analysis, to writing your dissertation.

- It is ideal preparation if you are interested in studying for a PhD, but would like to have further preparation and training.

- In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), the Department of Earth Science’s research was ranked equal 6th in the UK with 70% rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour.

- The Department has up-to-date computer interpretation facilities, a full range of modern geochemical laboratories including XRF, quadrupole and multicollector ICP Mass Spectrometry, atmospheric chemistry and a new excimer laser ablation facility, excellent structural modelling laboratories, palaeontology and sedimentology laboratories.

Course content and structure

The course consists of the following three components:

A Research Study Skills Course Unit
- Personal research skills (e.g. safety, time and project management, teamwork)
- IT skills (e.g. literature retrieval, web authoring, databases, modelling)
- Data analysis skills (e.g. statistical methods, GIS systems, sampling techniques)
- Communication skills (e.g. posters, oral presentation, writing papers, web pages)
- Subject-specific skills and techniques. These amount to 55% of the research skills assessment, and for example may include parts of specialist taught courses (see below), a training course on the theory and practice of chemical and isotopic analysis, or other training arranged by the project supervisor. This will include training for research in the general field of the research project, not solely what is needed to carry out the project.

A Specialist Taught Course Unit
You will choose an advanced taught course unit relevant to the subject area of your research project. The following taught units are currently offered:
- Applied Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
- Pollution Sources and Pathways
- Oceans and Atmospheres
- Risk and Environmental Management
- Geographical Information Systems
- Environmental Inorganic Analysis
- Contaminants in the Environment
- Advanced Igneous Petrogenesis
- Seismic Processing and Interpretation
- Geodynamics and Plate Tectonics
- Interpretation of Structural Settings
- Coal Geology
- Petroleum Geology and Evaluation
- Terrestrial Palaeoecology
- Palaeoclimates

Research Project
The project may be on any topic which is within the broad research themes of the Department. You will be linked to a potential supervisor at the application stage and, in consultation with the supervisor, you will develop a detailed project outline during the first half of the first term. Project work is then carried out in parallel with taught courses during terms one and two, becoming the full-time activity after Easter. A bound dissertation is submitted for examination in early September.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- an advanced knowledge and understanding of a variety of analytical, technical, numerical, modelling and interpretive techniques applicable to the specific field of earth sciences

- the articulation of knowledge and the understanding of published work, concepts and theories in the chosen field of earth sciences at an advanced level

- the acquisition of knowledge from published work in the chosen area of earth sciences to a level appropriate for a MSc degree.

Assessment

Research Study Skills: this is assessed by coursework and theory examination and will include short written assignments, a seminar, worksheets and practical tests. These assessments contribute 12.5% of the course marks.

Specialist Taught Course Units: these are mostly assessed by a written, theory examination and coursework. The unit assessment contributes 12.5% of the course marks.

Research Project: the project dissertation must be submitted in early September. It will be marked by both an internal and an external examiner, and will be defended at an oral examination with both examiners. The project assessment contributes 75% of the course marks.

Employability & career opportunities

Subject to agreement and suitable funding, MSc by Research students can transfer to the MPhil/PhD programme at Royal Holloway. They may use the research carried out for the MSc towards the PhD, and count the time spent towards MPhil/PhD registration requirements, provided that the MSc research forms a coherent part of the PhD, and that the transfer is approved prior to submission of the MSc research dissertation.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA by Research (Italian) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Italian) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your own choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focused, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/maitalianbyresearch.aspx

Why choose this course?

• Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support
• Follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture
• Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium
• Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies
• Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one core taught course and complete a dissertation

Core course units:
- Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This course is the core taught course for all students and is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines students’ theoretical understanding and provides the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if they so wish.

- Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-one-one support from a dedicated supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline.

- Learnt to undertake focused research, developed written and presentation skills, and honed your skills in critical analysis.

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a visiting examiner and includes a viva voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism, translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This intensive summer programme enables graduates with one modern or community language to develop a second modern language (French) which can then be taught with confidence and accuracy to pupils during Key Stage 3. Read more
This intensive summer programme enables graduates with one modern or community language to develop a second modern language (French) which can then be taught with confidence and accuracy to pupils during Key Stage 3.

All SKE programmes in priority subjects are funded by National College for Teaching & Leadership (NCTL). Training bursaries are also available to eligible candidates.

More about this course

The course is a full-time, intensive face-to-face course running from the end of May to mid-to-late August. The course consists of whole group communicative language classes, supplemented by a mixed programme of films, small group conversation classes, cultural input and tutorials.

Integrated self-study, including London Metropolitan University's own online French programmes and virtual learning environment, will be a vital component of the course. You'll be expected to undertake 15 hours a week on this.

There is continuous assessment throughout the course.

To successfully complete the course you must:
-Attend fully and punctually
-Complete all self-study tasks set (including a weekly extended writing task)
-Complete in-class progress tests and end-of-course skills tests
-Compile a portfolio of work showing progress throughout the course and evidence of independent learning

By doing the above, students should aim to demonstrate CEFR B1/B2 (target level) in all four skills by the end of the course.

Modular structure

This is a full-time, intensive, face-to-face 12-week course running from end of May to late August, Monday to Friday, 10am-3.30pm.

The course consists of whole group communicative language classes (morning), supplemented by a mixed afternoon programme of films, small group conversation classes, cultural input and tutorials, as well as self-study.

Language level: Progression from CEFR A1/A2 to B1/B2.

After the course

Students are all expected to proceed to ITT and subsequent teaching careers in Secondary Modern Foreign Languages (MFL).

"I am currently teaching a lot of French in my Secondary School (The Heathland School). I teach nine lessons a week to students from KS3 and KS4 (this year taking Y11 for the first time). I teach classes in Year 7, Year 8, Year 9 and Year 11, so a range of ages. Without the French Extension Course, I 100 per cent would never had found the time or effort to improve my French to an ability to teach it. Therefore, without it, I definitely wouldn't be teaching it as much as I do now (if at all). I believe that it is a great way for trainee teachers to get themselves another language to be able to teach (at least to KS3)." Lewis Dodge, The Heathland School. French Extension Course 2009. PGCE St. Mary's University College 2010/11.

Quote from external assessor

"My opinion about the London Metropolitan University French Extension course remains totally unchanged: it is a highly effective, high quality motivational course. The course team does not rest on its laurels. Directors, tutors and language assistants strive to offer students a better and better product. The team's clarity of purpose, its organised approach to the implementation of the plans, its caring monitoring of students' progress, achievements and needs, its good relationships with the students (as a group and as individuals), its willingness to hear and to respond to needs, all contributes to a course of high quality". Michèle Deane, external assessor

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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In partnership with Aardman, this intensive 3 month Certificate in Character Animation is aimed primarily at graduates and is taught by industry professionals within Aardman studios here in Bristol. Read more
In partnership with Aardman, this intensive 3 month Certificate in Character Animation is aimed primarily at graduates and is taught by industry professionals within Aardman studios here in Bristol.

The course is led by Loyd Price, Head of Animation at Aardman (Chicken Run, Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, Flushed Away, Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists and Nightmare Before Christmas) and taught by Inez Woldman (Wallace & Gromit, Shaun the Sheep, Morph, Creature Comforts) with the aim of bridging the gap between education and industry and enabling students to develop the core practical skills needed to become competent professional animators and to create believable characters through acting and performance.

The course has an incredibly successful track record with over 80% of graduates now working in the industry at Aardman and at studios such as Animortal, Factory Transmedia, Blue Zoo, Isle of Dogs and Traveller’s Tales. This year we are delighted to announce Factory Transmedia are formally supporting the course.

Students will also benefit from one-to-one feedback sessions and masterclasses with industry professionals, past speakers have included Turner, Passion Pictures, Blue Zoo, Factory Transmedia, Traveller’s Tales, Animortal and DreamWorks outreach.

Following on from a busy 2016 with the production of Early Man, the latest stop frame feature film from Academy Award® winning director Nick Park in full swing and a Shaun the Sheep Movie sequel in pre-production, Aardman are delighted to announce the new course dates for 2017. This year’s 3 month Certificate in Character Animation course will run from 25th September to 15th December and we are now accepting applications.

The course is open to both CG (Maya) and Stop Frame with a maximum of six students in each discipline. Course fees are £4500 which include free lunches and a two week paid internship in Industry after graduation.

COURSE OVERVIEW

This course will take place at Aardman’s studio in Bristol and will be taught by practicing Aardman animators who have worked on many productions including Wallace and Gromit, Chicken Run, Flushed Away, The Pirates! and the Shaun the Sheep Movie. There will also be additional support from other industry professionals from both the stop frame and CG animation disciplines including Factory Transmedia who we are delighted to announce will be formally supporting the course this year.

The course is short but very intensive with the main aim being to produce students with the level of animation skills needed to allow them to get jobs as animators within this competitive industry. While this is no guarantee of future success, to date over 80% of former students have become animators within the industry.

The course is open to a maximum of 6 Stop Frame and 6 CG students, with the students working in either CG (using Maya) or Stop Frame (using Dragon-Frame). Students will be taught in small groups to enable maximum contact time with staff and other visiting tutors. The course will be taught in a series of weekly assignments, each focusing on a key aspect of animation performance. Students will be encouraged to repeat and finesse each assignment during the week. The course will be based on learning technical and practical skills, providing a foundation on which students can become technically proficient animators and thereby enable them to bring their characters to life. The course is structured to build from simpler exercises towards a short sequence demonstrating character-based performance, which will be animated within scheduled production deadlines.

The course runs from 9.30 – 6pm Monday to Friday. The course fee also includes free weekday lunches and a two week paid placement after graduation in a studio in the U.K. Past placements have included Factory Transmedia, Blue Zoo, Animortal, Isle of Dogs – Wes Anderson Feature, Aardman, JellyFish, and Travellers Tales.

On completion of the course students will:
-Have improved technical animation skills
-Be able to deliver convincing character acting and performance
-Produce their work to a deadline
-Understand the role of an animator with a production
-Have benefited from masterclasses with key industry professionals
-Have completed an industry placement

CURRICULUM

This is a 12 week full time intensive and practical course based at the Aardman studio’s in Bristol. The majority of the course is practical with students working on animation exercises to improve their skills, knowledge and experience.

Initially the course will focus on the core animation skills to ensure that students understand the key animation principles such as timing, weight and lines of action. These technical aspects of animation underpin character performance and are essential to enable students to achieve convincing performance.

Further character-based performance exercises increase the understanding of Character Posing, Blocking and Plotting the action within the shot or sequence. Each exercise builds on what has been learned in the previous week and students will have the opportunity to video themselves acting out variations of the exercises to guide and inform their work.

The course culminates in a short character animation sequence - pre-planned and boarded to showcase the skills learnt during the course. This sequence will be created within the parameters of a realistic production schedule and will reflect the pressures of a live production.

To complement the intensive animation training, students will have life drawing sessions, acting workshops as well as industry masterclasses. These give the students invaluable contacts within the industry moving forwards, as well as tips on how to promote yourself and the soft skills needed within a competitive industry. Past speakers have included companies such as Blue Zoo, Lupus, Jellyfish, Passion Pictures, Factory Transmedia, Turner, Richard Williams, Nick Park, MPC, DNeg and Dreamworks.

The course finishes with a graduation screening which is open to industry, giving students the platform to show their work and network with future employers.

Following on from the course we are aiming to secure a small number of paid internships with production companies based here in the UK. On previous courses these internships have taken place at companies such as Factory Transmedia, Blue Zoo as well as at Aardman. In many cases these placements then led to the students being offered jobs as animators.

-Daily tuition from animators currently working within the Industry
-Unique fast-track route into the Industry with many students going on to work as animators for UK animation companies
-Working methods based on Industry practice
-Situated in a professional studio environment at Aardman in Bristol
-Learn from BAFTA and Oscar winning animators
-Masterclass sessions from external industry

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The MA by Research (German) at Royal Holloway is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (German) at Royal Holloway is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your own choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focused, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/magermanbyresearch.aspx

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

Students take one core taught course and complete a dissertation.

- Core course units:
Theories of Literature and Visual Culture
This course is the core taught course for all students and is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines your theoretical understanding and provides you with the methodological tools needed to proceed to PhD research if you so wish.

Dissertation:
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-on-one support from a dedicated supervisor/advisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline.

- Learnt to undertake focussed research, developed written and presentation skills, and honed your skills in critical analysis.

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a Visiting Examiner and includes a viva voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism, translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
The MA by Research (Comparative Literature and Culture) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics. Read more
The MA by Research (Comparative Literature and Culture) is a flexible programme that allows you to undertake in-depth study (both full and part-time), under the supervision of international experts, on a broad range of subjects, including literature, visual or cultural studies or comparative topics.

The core of the MA by Research is a 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choosing, intended to give you the scope to explore your area of interest in real depth and to develop sophisticated critical and analytical research and writing skills.

You will also complete a research-focussed, taught module which will equip you with a range of theoretical and historical approaches to the study of literature, art and culture, enabling you to articulate, refine and persistently test your approach to your chosen topic within this broader theoretical and methodological framework.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mllc/coursefinder/macomparativeliteratureandculturebyresearch.aspx

You will be able to:

• Pursue in-depth, directed research through the 25,000 word dissertation with one-to-one supervision, regular feedback and other departmental support
• Follow a taught course with your peers on theories of literature and visual culture
• Participate in the energetic research culture in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and cultures and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway – libraries, seminars, symposia including the regular postgraduate work-in-progress seminars and our annual Postgraduate Colloquium
• Enjoy proximity to London’s unparalleled facilities, including the British Library, Senate House library, and the Institute of Germanic and Romance studies
• Take advantage of professional and research development training on campus and at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies

Department research and industry highlights

Research drives the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway. Academics in the School all contribute to teaching and are active researchers with international reputations. Our research environment has a basis in our expertise in French, German, Hispanic, Italian and Comparative Studies, and encourages collaboration and exchange across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Our strengths span literature, thought, film and the visual arts from the medieval to the twenty-first century.

Course content and structure

You will take one taught course and complete a dissertation.

- Core course units:
Theories of Literature and Visual Culture (40 credits)
This core course is taught across two terms. It provides you with knowledge of a range of historical and modern theoretical approaches to the study of literature and the visual arts. It refines your theoretical understanding and provides you with the methodological tools to proceed to PhD research if you so wish.

Dissertation (140 credits)
A 25,000 word dissertation on a subject of your choice. You will receive one-to-one support from your supervisor.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- Joined a community of scholars who are working at the cutting edge of their chosen discipline

- Learnt to undertake focused research, developed writtten and presentation skills, and honed your skills in critical analysis

- Gained an understanding and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights in literature, film, cultural studies or the visual arts.

- Demonstrated self-direction and originality and the independent learning and initiative required for continuing professional development

Assessment

The taught course is assessed by essay and presentation. The dissertation is examined by a Visiting Examiner and includes a Viva Voce.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years have entered many different language-related fields including international management, consultancy, sales and marketing, media and publishing, banking, the arts, politics, the Civil Service, teaching, travel and tourism and translating and interpreting. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online.

Read less
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in musicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation or critical edition (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from musicology as cultural history, through musicology and the body, source studies and performance practice, to postcolonial theory and postmodernism. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation or critical edition is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation or critical edition (12,000-15,000 words or equivalent) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources. One of our graduates writes of how the skills she honed at Manchester helped prepare her for her first job as an Editorial Assistant at Oxford University Press: `I use my written/essay skills in text editing (prefaces, composer notes, biographies etc.) and in preparing sales copy; analytical skills are continually employed during the editing process; the discipline of editing and proofing your own work is as important in my job as it was in my studies; the research skills that I developed during my time at Manchester have been useful in source research and in checking the factual accuracy of texts; and general skills such as planning and time management have been helpful preparation for the world of work.'

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This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. Read more
This flexible pathway provides a solid masters-level foundation in ethnomusicology. With a strong focus on theory, methodology and current debates in the discipline, together with appropriate research techniques and presentational styles, it offers excellent preparation for doctoral study and also for applied work. The programme of study consists of four taught course units (each 30 credits) plus a dissertation (60 credits). The combination of core and optional course units allows each student to plot a path that best matches his or her special interests and aspirations. Together, the taught units encompass a wide range of topics and approaches - from gender and ethnicity, music and conflict, music revivals and performance culture, to postcolonial theory and the politics of ethnography. Seminars allow for close collaboration between lecturers and students, with ample opportunity for students to present their own work and receive individual feedback. Discussion and debate forms an important part of most course units.

All students on the MusM Music programme take Advanced Music Studies: Skills and Methodologies as their core unit. Students on the Ethnomusicology pathway also take Studying World Music Cultures: Themes and Debates and, usually, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography . Other optional course units normally include Case Studies in Musicology: Texts and Histories ; and Historical or Contemporary Performance (subject to audition). A maximum of 30 credits may be chosen from another MA programme in the arts or social sciences (subject to availability and approval by the course tutor): possible options include Gender, Sexuality and the Body ; Filming History: Making Documentary Films for Research; and Documentary and Sensory Media . Students may also undertake a Work Placement with a local arts organisation or institution (by prior arrangement and subject to availability).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies of music and society and the cultural study of music, introducing students to a wide range of advanced methodologies, theories, discourses and practices.
-Enable students to refine and develop their individual skills, talents and interests.
-Prepare students for a career, either inside or outside music, where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.
-Foster the skills in critical thinking, argumentation, and effective written and oral communication necessary for further postgraduate study.
-Enable students to gain an expert and detailed knowledge of a specialist topic, and to formulate ideas that can later be pursued within further research programmes.

Teaching and learning

Most taught course units are delivered via weekly seminars and/or tutorials. Full-time students take two 30-credit course units per semester; part-time students take one. The dissertation is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.)

Seminars feature a range of presentation formats and activities, including presentations by course tutors, student presentations, discussion and debate based on prepared reading or coursework tasks, and workshop-style activities. Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultations during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units are assessed by coursework essays or other tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). The precise nature of the assessment varies according to what is appropriate to the course unit in question. In most cases, a choice of questions or topics is offered. All taught units must be satisfactorily completed. The dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) is based on independent research into a topic agreed in consultation with the supervisor. A Research Outline needs to be presented and approved (usually in February) before students proceed with their dissertation. All coursework is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner. Recitals are heard by at least two internal examiners.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced musical training has been directly relevant include arts management and the culture industries, music publishing, music journalism, librarianship, music therapy and performance. Careers outside of music have included accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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This qualification is for practising health professionals who wish to develop their career in both education, in a practice or academic setting, and in their own services. Read more
This qualification is for practising health professionals who wish to develop their career in both education, in a practice or academic setting, and in their own services. On the course you will become a UK professionally recognised educator whilst gaining the skills, knowledge and behaviours of an effective leader in health education.

This course appeals to nurses, midwives and allied health professionals who have either a educational role in their current practice or are looking to develop into one.

The course is accredited by the Higher Education Academy, and the postgraduate certificate is also the vehicle to achieve successful entry onto the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) as a stage 4 Nurse Teacher.

The skills you will develop, in order to lead both practice and academic focused learning, will be research and evidence based. You will advance your confidence as a skilled educator by engaging with teaching, learning and assessment strategies in different and complex settings. You will design educational initiatives using contemporary resources and reflecting critically on your own experiential knowledge gained throughout the course.

Throughout the course you will be supported by a teaching/learning facilitator who will be appointed at the beginning of the course and an experienced course team of senior health professional academics. As a team we will oversee your progress and provide opportunities to develop your pedagogic practice

Credits from the course can be integral to other masters level study. For international students, the course can be completed alongside other full-time masters-level study.

Course structure

On this part-time course you will achieve 60 level-7 credits over three semesters/one year.

You will attend two induction days.

• Induction to the University of Brighton: School of Health Sciences postgraduate programme.
• Induction day to the Transforming Practice of Health Professionals through Education postgraduate certificate.

You will then complete the following:

• Optimising Learning module – which requires attendance at six taught days.
• Learning Design module – which requires attendance at five taught days and engagement with online resources.
• Leading Learning in Practice and Higher Education module – runs throughout the course, and requires attendance at five taught days and engagement with online blogging and resources.

The course utilises blended learning to achieve the outcomes, so learning within the modules is supported by students engaging with module-specific materials and activities on our VLE (Virtual Learning Environment).

For students seeking a recordable qualification as a teacher, to be entered on the Nursing Midwifery Council register they must have access to a minimum of 12 weeks (or 360 hours) experience as an educator in academic and practice settings.

The teacher student must have this teaching experience with students on an NMC-approved programme (pre or post registration). This may include all aspects of the teachers role such as mentoring, one-to-one support, assessment, course evaluation and curriculum development with 20% of the time supporting student learning in practice. There is the opportunity for these students to extend the portfolio module to allow extra time to gather the evidence to meet this requirement if required.

Modules

You will have opportunities to develop your education practice, leadership skills and confidence for the benefit of students, workforce development, patient services and your own professional and academic development. This will be achieved through the following modules:

• Optimising Learning (HS726, 20 level-7 credits)

This introductory module, delivered in semester one, develops your confidence, skills and knowledge to position yourself as an educator, critique educational theories, facilitate and construct effective learning in both higher education and practice settings through a constructivist collaborative approach. Six taught days.

• Learning Design (HS727, 20 level-7 credits)

This module, delivered in semester two, critically evaluates curriculum design theory, workforce development and strategic educational development through a blended learning approach. You will design and plan a service development educational programme or learning event relevant to your professional background. Five taught days.

• Leading Learning in Practice and Higher education (HS728, 20 level-7 credits)

This extensive module is taught over the whole of the course. The focus of this module is between theory, research and practice learning in the context of transforming educational practice. You will develop your own portfolio of reflective teaching, learning, assessment and leadership practice gathered throughout the course – with the aim of critically applying this to the relevant professional framework. You will also consider educational theories related to leadership, digital learning, resilience and reflective learning. There is a requirement for teaching practice within this module. Five taught days.

Professional accreditation

Throughout the course you will critically apply the relevant professional standards framework to your developing educational practice – enabling you to clearly identify how you meet the following appropriate national frameworks:

• The Higher Education Academy has accredited this course and confirms that it is aligned with the UK Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher Education (UKPSF) and provides participants with the opportunity to be professionally recognised through the HEA Fellowship scheme at D2 – Fellow

• Nursing Midwifery Council (NMC) has accredited this course and confirms that successful participants can be accepted on to the register as a stage 4 Nurse Teacher

The course also adheres to the following professional regulatory bodies:

• Health and Care Professional Council Standards for Education and Training (2009)
• Health and Care Profession Practice Education Guidance (2016)

The course has been mapped to the practice educators’ accreditation schemes of the:

• College of Occupational Therapists (APPLE)
• College of Podiatry (PACE).

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The Swansea Legal Practice Course (LPC) is a professional practical course that develops important practice skills and confidence for a successful career in law in England and Wales. Read more
The Swansea Legal Practice Course (LPC) is a professional practical course that develops important practice skills and confidence for a successful career in law in England and Wales. Consistently rated as excellent by both students and external organisations in support of students, the Swansea Legal Practice Course (LPC) represents the best of innovation in professional legal education. The Swansea Legal Practice Course (LPC) is known for the excellence of its pastoral care and support of students and personal tutors provide best practice guidance for personal development and training.

Key Features

The Legal Practice Course (LPC) is offered full and part-time and is staffed by a dedicated team of friendly and supportive professionals with extensive experience of legal practice. We operate with dedicated teaching facilities and a practitioner Resource Room with full network access to extensive electronic legal practitioner resources. Legal Practice Course (LPC) students at Swansea participate in Street Law and have the advantage of valuable networking opportunities and work experience placements supported by the course team.

Designed for Law and GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law) graduates.

This Legal Practice Course (LPC) is the compulsory course for those wishing to qualify as a solicitor in England and Wales.

Taught by experienced Solicitors and Barristers who bring with them a wealth of experience from practice.

Full time Course – 1 year September – June

Part –Time Course – 2 years September – June in each year

Legal Practice Course (LPC) students at Swansea are encouraged to adopt a professional attitude, become business focused and treat the course as a ‘dry run’ of the first year of their training contract with the professional tutors adopting the roles of supervising partners within the firm of Caswell Clyne set up by the course team. Preparation for practice takes place within a supportive but professional environment with a key emphasis on the development of business awareness and transferable skills.

Careers & Employability

The Swansea Legal Practice Course (LPC) has an established work placement programme and the majority of local firms participate in this with a high number of students securing paralegal positions and training contracts as a result of this scheme.

StreetLaw

Access to legal knowledge does not just mean people obtaining legal representation when they are involved in a dispute or complex legal process. In order for people to understand their rights and responsibilities they must know and understand their legal rights. To address this aspect of pro bono work, Swansea Legal Practice Course (LPC) students have set up a Streetlaw programme.

Under this scheme Legal Practice Course (LPC) students supported by their tutors, work with schools and community groups to identify legal concerns. The students then research the relevant material and ultimately present their findings to the partner groups in a user-friendly form. Through discussion, role-play and other interactive methods, students and the community group members both learn about the law in context.

Student Quote

"Undertaking the Legal Practice Course (LPC) at Swansea University allowed me excellent access to tutors and a studying environment conducive to success. There were many work experience opportunities in a wide variety of areas of law, ranging from high street firms to the Welsh Assembly Legal Services Department".

Tom Lloyd, Legal Practice Course (LPC)

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The LLM Legal Practice course incorporates the Solicitors Regulation Authority requirements of the Lega Practice Course (the LPC). Read more
The LLM Legal Practice course incorporates the Solicitors Regulation Authority requirements of the Lega Practice Course (the LPC). The course not only bridges the gap between the academic study of law and the vocational stages of training, but also incorporates a masters level qualification.

In order to obtain a Masters, students are also required to complete either a dissertation, a live project or a placement. Following successful completion of the course, you will then need to undertake a two year vocational training contract to be able to practice as a solicitor.

The Course also offers a unique learning experience in the shape of a virtual solicitor's office in the University's virtual town, Shareville.

Our LLM Legal Practice course is taught by an outstanding team of professional staff with extensive practice experience and a friendly, open door policy giving you all the support you need. We place our students at the centre of everything we do.

What's covered in the course?

The LPC section of the course is fully accredited by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. You will cover elements required by the Solicitors Regulation Authority including Property Law, Business Law and Practice and Litigation (including Civil and Criminal Litigation) and choose from a list of Electives available.

Our first-class facilities include two mock courtrooms and a comprehensive law library (with many resources accessible online), and there are extensive opportunities available with a variety of agencies throughout Birmingham.

Our LLM Legal Practice course is taught by an outstanding team of professional staff with extensive practice experience and a friendly, open door policy giving you all the support you need. We place our students at the centre of everything we do.

Why Choose Us?

-Our outstanding facilities include two mock courtrooms and an e-learning suite that can be used to bring study to life
-Competitive course fees - option to pay by instalments over two years helping you to spread out the cost. As an LLM course, you can apply for student finance funding.
-The School of Law has an established record of providing the Legal Practice Course (LPC) and its predecessors since the 1960s.
-All members of the teaching team are qualified solicitors with many years practice experience.
-We provide opportunities for all students on the course to participate in pro-bono activities. Pro-bono will usually involve work for a charity or similar organisation in an advisory capacity which will be invaluable in terms of enhancing your career prospects.
-We have a long running mentoring scheme, supported by the Birmingham Law Society, the Birmingham Trainee Solicitor Society and leading firms in the region. As part of the scheme, you will be assigned a local lawyer who will help with any questions or concerns you may have about your future career development.

Course Structure

The LLM Legal Practice is a demanding course and is a leap forward from your undergraduate study. The emphasis of the LPC element of the course is much more on the practical aspects of law and the aim of the course is to ensure you can enter practice with the skills and knowledge required to hit the ground running. You will be expected to keep up with background reading and class preparation and should expect to treat the course as if you were already handling a client’s case.

The Masters element of the course allows students undertake a piece of disciplinary relevant research at Masters level, which will take the form of either a dissertation, a live project or a placement.

How you learn

The LPC elements of the course are taught face to face. Classes on the full-time course run from Mondays to Wednesdays from 9am to 5pm. Classes on the part-time course run on a Tuesday and Thursday evening from 6pm over two years.

The compulsory subjects and skills taught on the LPC section are prescribed by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Each subject is introduced with a summary lecture providing guidance on difficult topics relating law to practice. The focus of learning is on small group teaching sessions, in the form of interactive workshops that enable you to explore key areas of law and practice in detail.

Small group sessions are also used to involve you in typical transactions encountered in practice. You can expect to carry through tasks as if you were in practice, working in teams, using electronic and other information sources.

The Masters element requires completion of an online Advanced Legal Research module followed by self-directed research. The self directed research is supported by face to face meetings with an individually allocated supervisor.

Employment Opportunities

Graduates will normally proceed to a training contract to complete their qualification as a solicitor. The vast majority of LPC graduates go on to become qualified solicitors in a range of organisations across many specialist areas. Some overseas professional bodies accept the LPC as satisfying their admission requirements to practise as a lawyer.

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