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Masters Degrees (Talking Therapies)

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Our PGDip Psychological Intervention programme is a well-established course offering high-quality training to individuals working within psychological therapy services. Read more

Our PGDip Psychological Intervention programme is a well-established course offering high-quality training to individuals working within psychological therapy services.

The programme addresses real-world challenges with teaching on relevant service issues, clinical presentations and input from service users themselves.

Master-classes from leaders in the field of cognitive behavioural therapy form a key component of the training curriculum, and are complemented with lectures, workshops, video role-plays, debates, trainee presentations, experiential and self-reflective sessions.

After completion of the programme, students will be qualified to deliver high-quality and NICE-compliant cognitive behavioural therapy to adults with common mental health problems, including depression and anxiety disorders.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year.

The trainees will spend two days a week at the University, the remaining three days a week occur at their place of work where they undertake supervised clinical practice. Six block weeks will be provided across the year, at the start of each module.

On successful completion of the programme trainees may apply for BABCP accreditation as a practitioner.

Example module listing

Teaching approaches

The course modules are delivered across two academic semesters with attendance at the University of Surrey required on Thursday and Friday.

There are also five week-long blocks of intensive workshops during the year. In addition to regular lectures, skills-based competencies will be developed through an innovative range of learning methods including experiential workshops, debates, presentations and video role-plays.

Weekly clinical group supervision for training cases will also be provided by members of the course team. Trainees will be expected to undertake self-directed study and will have access to the University Library and online resources.

Who should apply?

To become a High Intensity CBT Trainee you will need to have had a minimum of two years’ post qualification mental health experience and a relevant Core Professional Training in applied psychology, psychiatry, nursing, counselling, psychotherapy, occupational therapy or social work. You will be registered with a professional, regulatory body.

The minimum eligibility criteria are outlined on the BABCP website.

Applicants who do not have a core profession can meet eligibility criteria through the BABCP Knowledge, Skills and Attitude (KSA) pathway. Please see the BABCP website. These applicants will be required at interview to produce a KSA portfolio to demonstrate that they meet the BABCP eligibility criteria for sufficient knowledge, skills and attitude that demonstrate equivalence to a Core Professional Training.

The KSA portfolio can be completed using the template sheets below:

Equal opportunities

At the University of Surrey we are committed to equality of opportunity in access to training. The University welcomes and provides support as needed for trainees with special needs.

Values

We have a values-based recruitment approach. The High Intensity IAPT training programme at Surrey promotes the NHS values which are enshrined within the NHS constitution. The programme team is dedicated to recruiting graduates whose individual values and behaviours align to those of the NHS.

Educational aims of the programme

  • Enable trainees to achieve the indicative content as laid down by the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) National Curriculum for high intensity Cognitive Behaviour Therapy course, in conjunction with the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy requirements for Level 2 course accreditation
  • Ensure that trainees are prepared to practise safely and effectively, and in such a way that the protection of the public is assured, adhering to BABCP code of conduct
  • Enable the trainees to utilise, integrate and evaluate the evidence base available for the delivery of CBT
  • Enable trainees’ achievement of knowledge, understanding and skill acquisition as well as the development of critical thinking, problem solving and reflective capacities essential to complex professional practice
  • Enable trainees to select the relevant psychological theory and research that will be appropriate to the service contexts in which it is delivered
  • Trainees to be committed to the maintenance, development and delivery of high intensity clinical practice
  • Trainees to be committed to consultation/collaboration with service users and carers
  • Trainees to be able to function effectively, professionally and responsibly within Increasing Access to Psychological Therapy services
  • Trainees to be aware of, responsive to, and able to represent the changing needs of the Profession
  • Trainees to be sensitive and responsive to difference and diversity in clients
  • Trainees to be able to understand, and effectively communicate, with clients
  • Trainees to be able to integrate a scientist practitioner/reflective practitioner approach in their work
  • Trainees to be aware of the need to foster their own personal and professional development and to look after their own emotional and physical well-being

Professional recognition

The course is BABCP accredited and part of the Department of Health ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ programme (IAPT), which aims to improve access to evidence-based talking therapies in the NHS and any other qualified healthcare providers (AQP) through an expansion of the psychological therapy workforce and services.



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Applications to this course must be received by the 31st March. Any applications received after that date will be placed on hold and will be considered if places become available. Read more
Applications to this course must be received by the 31st March. Any applications received after that date will be placed on hold and will be considered if places become available. Late applicants will also be offered the opportunity to have their application considered for September 2018 entry.

Counselling is an activity and profession that provides emotional support for people experiencing problems in their lives. Studying counselling at a post-graduate level involves developing theoretical understandings, practical skills and a high level of personal awareness and resilience.

The first year of this programme begins with an introduction to counselling and practical training in the application of helping interventions, so from the outset you are engaged in skills learning. This foundation year provides counselling skills, and the experience needed to undertake a practice placement.

The subsequent two years involve a combination of teaching in theory, research, practice and professional issues, and self-development, all of which are directly linked to practice placement.

This part-time programme requires one day per week attendance.

This programme includes three exit points, these are
-End of first year: Postgraduate Certificate in Counselling Skills
-End of second year: Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling Studies
-End of third year: Masters (MSc) in Counselling

Why choose this course?

This is currently the only UK programme that provides comprehensive training in the Pluralistic framework for counselling and psychotherapy integration. A key benefit of this approach is that you will train in a wide range of theories and interventions, and learn how best to adapt your counselling approach to the needs of your clients.

Abertay University has a long tradition of providing training in counselling and counselling skills. Our counselling teaching staff are respected within the profession as leaders in their field, and in coming here you will join a vibrant community of practitioners of past and current students.

We have a strong research orientation, and the Tayside counselling research centre is based on campus. There are opportunities for you to be involved in projects that are influencing and developing the role and effectiveness of counselling interventions in modern society.

As a postgraduate student you are part of our Graduate School, a dedicated facility specially designed to promote integration and inculcation of interdisciplinary working in our next generation of researchers.

What you study

The course offers a comprehensive selection of topics on talking therapies, interventions and professional practice.

The core areas include:
-The pluralistic approach to counselling and psychotherapy
-A range of theoretical approaches to counselling, such as Person Centred and Experiential, Psychodynamic, Transactional Analysis, Existential, and Cognitive Behavioural Therapies
-Practice skills in working with clients, and professional skills for working in counselling contexts
-Personal development and self-awareness
-Evidence-based practice and research methods
-Ethical and professional issues in counselling

These core areas are covered in increasing depth over the three years of the programme. In addition you will have the opportunity to take part in workshops to introduce and develop your understanding of mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, addictions, and eating disorders, along with specific approaches such as solution-focussed therapies, and mindfulness.

In combination with the one day a week attendance on campus, in year 2 and 3 you will take a placement as a counsellor as an essential part of your professional training.

Assessment is through a range of methods including case-studies, theory essays, literature reviews, practice observations, and reflective accounts, along with reports from supervisors and practice placement.

Assessment tasks are integrated in to the course and spread through the three years.

Formative assessment is ongoing and the programme team provide feedback on practice skills and activities in class.

Further info

By providing both foundational and professional training in a single programme Abertay are giving you the opportunity to undergo a three year part-time degree as a direct entry in to a counselling career.

Our graduates have moved on to work within the field of counselling, psychotherapy, social care, research and education. Some graduates choose to enter private practice, while others remain in the voluntary sector. In addition it is possible to go on to train in counselling supervision.

An MSc in Counselling also provides transferable skills, and can considerably enhance career prospects for people working in health, education, the church, criminal justice, human resource management, and the voluntary sector.

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Why Surrey?. Our stimulating MSc in Psychological Intervention. IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want to become qualified Interpersonal Psychotherapists. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our stimulating MSc in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want to become qualified Interpersonal Psychotherapists.

Our programme will develop your theoretical understanding of mental health issues, equip you with skills in working with the IPT model, enable you to work effectively with clients, and give you the opportunity to conduct research in the theory or practice of IPT.

This is delivered through a rich range of learning experiences, including the opportunity to integrate theory with practice. This ensures that, as a graduate of this programme, you are able to provide a high quality therapy to service users.

Programme overview

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Intervention MSc programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification who aspire to become qualified practitioner in a NICE-recommended psychological therapy.

The programme meets an identified training need for therapists in this specific approach. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend IPT as a treatment for depression and eating disorders and IPT has also been part of the Government’s provision to increase the availability of talking therapies through the Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT provision).

At present, our programme is the only programme in the UK that offers the opportunity for appropriately experienced individuals with no previous therapy qualification to undertake IPT training.

Programme structure

This programme is studied part-time over three academic years. Students with equivalent/sufficient qualifications/credits will be able to join the programme at year two or three.

The full MSc three year (part-time) programme comprises of nine modules with a total of 180 credits.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

In order to achieve the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) students must complete 120 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The second year comprises of three modules, two of 15 credits each and one of 30 credits. The 30 credit module includes a substantial allocation of student learning time to placement activities.

In order to achieve the Masters in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy), students must complete 180 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The third year comprises of two modules, a 15 credit module in Research methods and a dissertation module of 45 credits.

In order for students to progress they must achieve a minimum average of 50 per cent.

Example module listing

Year one

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Year two

  • IPT Theoretical and Research base: client groups; modes of delivery; adaptations
  • Clinical Practice in IPT
  • Supervision of Client Work: IPT

Year three

  • Quantitative Research methods
  • Statistics and Data Analysis
  • Research project

Teaching

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching. 

In the final year, students will receive individual supervision for the research project during which they will receive one-to one support and guidance in the development of their research skills.

Educational aims of the programme

The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPT (IPC) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues. The second year (PGDip) leads to a full therapy qualification. The third and final year (MSc) is a research year which results in a Master’s qualification

Professional recognition

The course is designed in order to meet the accreditation requirements of a well-known professional counselling body. Because this is a new programme, the accreditation process will take place after the first cohort has completed. If successful, accreditation is awarded retrospectively thus allowing the first cohort of students to become a registered with this professional body.

Recognition is also being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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. Why Surrey?. Our stimulating postgraduate diploma in Psychological Intervention. IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want develop core counselling skills and gain a full therapy qualification. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our stimulating postgraduate diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) offers flexible training for individuals who want develop core counselling skills and gain a full therapy qualification.

Our programme will develop your theoretical understanding of mental health issues, equip you with skills in working with the IPT model and enable you to work effectively with clients.

This is delivered through a rich range of learning experiences, including the opportunity to integrate theory with practice. This ensures that, as a graduate of this programme, you are able to provide a high quality therapy to service users.

Programme overview

Our School of Psychology has a reputation for providing high quality IPT training to therapists who are already in practice and want to add this model to their repertoire.

This Psychological Intervention programme has been designed to be responsive to the needs of people who do not already have a therapy qualification who aspire to become qualified practitioner in a NICE-recommended psychological therapy.

The programme meets an identified training need for therapists in this specific approach. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend IPT as a treatment for depression and eating disorders and IPT has also been part of the Government’s provision to increase the availability of talking therapies through the Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT provision).

At present, our programme is the only programme in the UK that offers the opportunity for appropriately experienced individuals with no previous therapy qualification to undertake IPT training.

Program structure

This programme takes place over one or two academic years, depending on the level of qualification. A third and final research year can be added to result in an MSc qualification.

The first year comprises of four modules of 15 credits each. Each module comprises of 150 hours of learning, including student contact, private study, skills practice either on placement or in the classroom and assessment. In order to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate in Psychological Intervention: IPC (Interpersonal Counselling) students must complete all four modules and complete 60 credits at FHEQ Level 7.

In order to achieve the Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Intervention: IPT (Interpersonal Psychotherapy) students must complete 120 credits at FHEQ Level 7. The second year comprises of three modules, two of 15 credits each and one of 30 credits. The 30 credit module includes a substantial allocation of student learning time to placement activities.

In order for students to progress they must achieve a minimum average of 50 per cent.

Example module listing

Year one

  • Psychological Theory and the Fundamentals of Adult Mental Health
  • The Therapeutic Relationship
  • Introduction to Assessment, Intervention and Ending Skills
  • Supervision of Client Work

Year two

  • IPT Theoretical and Research Base: client groups; modes of delivery; adaptations
  • Clinical practice in IPT
  • Supervision of client work: IPT

Teaching approaches

Specialist knowledge relevant to the subject area will be delivered using a variety of methods, including lectures, experiential workshops, micro skills teaching, audio-recording reviews, clinical supervision, group discussions, and through the interaction of the student with coursework assignments. 

Clinical practice with application of their learning to client work will be supervised closely and students will be required to keep a log of their clinical activity as well as supervisory activity and will be evaluated on their clinical competence.

Students who have access to clients in their ongoing job role whilst studying may incorporate part of this work as their practice placement, subject to agreement with their manager and the University. Otherwise students will be supported to obtain a suitable practice placement.

The strength of this programme lies in the integration of classroom learning and clinical practice learning and development. The personal impact of working with clients presenting with distress will be explored as well as ethical issues. Students will develop their skills in applying theory and technique to real life client situations in supervision sessions at the University via discussion and micro-teaching.

The feedback process is designed to be ongoing, in that comments and reflections from these sessions will provide an escalator of personal learning for the student. At critical points there will be summative learning points to provide a marker for the student as to their progress against the benchmark standards being expected. Formative and summative feedback will be provided as appropriate to help students develop their skills in these areas of practice.

The associated research evidence bases will be integrated into all aspects of the teaching.  

Educational aims of the programme

The first year of this programme will enable professionals to develop core counselling skills in IPT (IPC) to enhance their effectiveness with clients, further their psychological skills and increase their understanding of mental health issues. The second year (PGDip) leads to a full therapy qualification.

Professional recognition

The course is designed in order to meet the accreditation requirements of a well-known professional counselling body. Because this is a new programme, the accreditation process will take place after the first cohort has completed. If successful, accreditation is awarded retrospectively thus allowing the first cohort of students to become a registered with this professional body.

Recognition is also being sought from IPT-UK, the organisation that accredits therapists in this particular model of therapy.



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