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Masters Degrees (System Thinking)

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APPLY BY 3 MAY 2018!. Interaction Design.  is one of the most rapidly developing creative fields today. The ongoing revolution of information technology has increased our need for new and enhanced experiences, systems and products. Read more

APPLY BY 3 MAY 2018!

Interaction Design is one of the most rapidly developing creative fields today. The ongoing revolution of information technology has increased our need for new and enhanced experiences, systems and products. Interaction designers aim to create services and products that add value to people’s lives by focusing on humans, their needs and their emotions.

What is Interaction Design?

Interaction Design (IxD) is a theme that has emerged to address the ongoing advancements in technology and the way it relates to people. Designers are constantly facing challenges that can be answered by developing products, services, and systems that have deeper connections and more dynamic relationships with humans. The behavioral qualities of products, services and environments have became more and more important in today’s world, and Interaction Design is playing a key role in addressing this shift. We keep a broad view on Interaction Design and cover more areas than what is related to digital technology.

How do we teach design?

Here at Estonian Academy of Arts we learn design by doing! Our program is project-based and we will work on real projects together with our industry partners. In our projects, we involve the design community, industry professionals and general public. We will go out, do research, and develop concepts to design products, experiences, services, and environments.

Program structure:

Semester 1:

  • Introduction to People-Centred Design
  • Visual Interaction Design
  • Digital Product Design
  • Design Storytelling

Semester 2:

  • Emotional Design
  • Tangible Design
  • Business Design
  • Service Design

Semester 3:

  • Immersive Experiences
  • Advanced Prototyping
  • Design for Social Innovation
  • Design for Emerging Themes

Semester 4:

  • Degree project

What will our graduates do?

You can shape the future. You will graduate with a portfolio, training and craftsmanship that industry is seeking. You will be an interaction designer focused on developing the next generation of products and services. You will be a User Experience Designer helping companies build meaningful products. You will join a startup team or an established company to help design the next big thing or to make the exciting experiences better. You may work as:

Employment profiles for IxD graduates:

  • Interaction designer
  • UI/UX designer
  • Service designer
  • Design manager
  • Design team leader

We focus both on Interaction Design Thinking and Skills. We believe interaction designers need to be strong Thinkers as well as skilful Doers. The design challenges in today’s world can not only be addressed using craft, but rather need system thinking and an understating of the bigger picture.

More information: https://www.artun.ee/masters/interaction-design/ and http://ixd.ma/



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Our MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Business Performance provides in-depth knowledge and understanding of practices, trends and issues in logistics and supply chain management with a focus on the models and methodologies that measure and monitor business performance in order manage the performance of the organisation in this context. Read more
Our MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Business Performance provides in-depth knowledge and understanding of practices, trends and issues in logistics and supply chain management with a focus on the models and methodologies that measure and monitor business performance in order manage the performance of the organisation in this context.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Eight are studied (four in semester 1 and four in semester 2):

Strategies for Managing Supply Chains
Demand and Inventory Planning
Global Purchasing & Supply
Supply Network Design & Optimisation
Freight Transport and Warehouse Management
System Thinking and Analysis
Measuring & Managing Performance
Research Philosophy and Practice

The MSc dissertation is them undertaken between May and August.

ACCREDITATION

The MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Business Performance is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport UK (CILT). This means that students who successfully graduate from degree will receive an exemption from the academic requirements for membership at either Chartered Member or Member level of the CILT. There may also be a reduction in the length of experience that they would require.

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There is a growing demand for graduates who have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement business performance measurement and management systems across different socio-technical settings. Read more
There is a growing demand for graduates who have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement business performance measurement and management systems across different socio-technical settings.

This programme will build knowledge in the field of business performance management and develop expertise in the frameworks, methods, tools and techniques that are commonly used in practice. It will cover both the technical and social aspects of managing the performance of organisations from across the industrial, commercial and public sectors.

Students will develop a critical understanding of the traditional and emerging organisational models and social trends, and develop an understanding of leadership and communication for effective business performance management.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Six core modules are taken over semester 1 and semester 2:

Fundamentals of Lean Six Sigma
System Thinking and Analysis
Leadership
Project Management
Measuring & Managing Performance
Research Philosophy & Practice

Two further modules from a wide range of relevant optional subjects such as competitive strategy, HRM, organisational culture, and marketing are also taken.

The MSc dissertation is then completed between May and August.

ACCREDITATION

The MSc Managing Business Performance is accredited by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI).

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Our MSc Operations Management will develop a critical understanding of the role of operations management in relation to organisational performance and competitiveness. Read more
Our MSc Operations Management will develop a critical understanding of the role of operations management in relation to organisational performance and competitiveness. It will build knowledge of operations management principles and concepts, and how they can be applied, across different organisational functions including finance, sales, marketing, human resource management and design. It will also develop expertise in the use of various quality, process and supply chain management tools and techniques for analysing and improving operations in a wide range of industries including manufacturing, services, the public sector and the third sector.

Graduates will be able to identify, conceptualise and define new problems and issues and have the ability to contribute towards the competitiveness of any organisation.

PROGRAMME CONTENT

Six core modules are taken during semester 1 and semester 2:

Global Purchasing and Supply
Quality Management & Engineering
Operations Management
System Thinking & Analysis
Strategies for Managing Supply Chains
Research Philosophy and Practice

Two further modules from a wide range of relevant options such as leadership, project management, green and sustainable logistics are also taken.

The MSc dissertation is then completed between May and August.

ACCREDITATION

Our MSc Operations Management is accredited by the Institute of Operations Management (IoM).

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This course provides an essential foundation for future leaders in organisations who wish to optimise the value in-use and cost in-use for long-life engineering assets such as planes, trains, ships, vehicles, power-plants, machine tools, buildings etc. . Read more

This course provides an essential foundation for future leaders in organisations who wish to optimise the value in-use and cost in-use for long-life engineering assets such as planes, trains, ships, vehicles, power-plants, machine tools, buildings etc. 

Many of the premier UK industrial organisations are increasingly dependent upon Through-life Engineering Services (TES) to compete, gain market share, generate revenue and profit. This course offers through-life thinking to enable change leaders in organisations to embrace new and integrated approaches to develop superior through-life support capability to meet shareholder and stakeholder demands.

Who is it for?

Developed by Cranfield University in conjunction with Rolls-Royce and Bombardier Transportation, this MSc has been designed for individuals at organisations where there is a growing emphasis on revenue being derived from providing the services that keep products operating effectively, rather than the design, manufacture and delivery of original equipment (hardware). The individual will be engaged in a discipline related to through-life management, support, asset management, and/or maintenance. The course is relevant to TES dependent organisations, engineers, business administrators, logistics, finance and commercial practitioners. 

We aim to enhance your skills, and address the need for highly trained individuals involved in the support of complex equipment and systems. The skills gained in the course is expected to contribute to the achievement of competitive advantage for your organisation. The course is structured to allow maximum benefit from learning with minimum time away from the working environment.

Focused on educating leaders in the fields of through-life engineering services systems, design and planning, maintenance assessment and operations management, engineering and technology including condition-based maintenance and health management, standards and regulation, information technology, contracts and policy, life extension and obsolescence management, cost modelling and control.

Informed by Industry

Our courses are designed to meet the training needs of industry and have a strong input from experts in their sector. In particular the guidance provided by the TES Council (including organisations such as Rolls-Royce, MoD, BAE Systems, Babcock International and Leonardo) have been instrumental in making the course cutting edge. Students who have excelled have their performances recognised through course awards. The awards, presented on Graduation Day, are provided by high profile organisations and individuals, and are often sponsored by our industrial partners.

Accreditation

The MSc in Through-Life System Sustainment is subject to ratification by Institute of Engineering & Technology (IET), Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) & Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting for the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer following an accreditation assessment in March 2015. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

Please note accreditation applies to the MSc award. PgDip and PgCert do not meet in full the further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Course details

The MSc course comprises eight assessed modules (in the form of six assignments and two exams), in which students gain an understanding of world-class business practice, an industry led group and an individual project. Students are also supported through individual coaching and an online learning platform. 

The current fee for the MSc is £18,400 over two years. This is composed of: £2,000 per year registration fee and £1,800 per module (eight in total). If a candidate completes in three years there will be an additional years’ registration fee to pay.

Group project

The group project gives a team of students the opportunity to take on responsibility for a consultancy type project working for an industrial sponsor. The group project is determined in collaboration with the sponsor organisation and will aim to solve real-world problems. Note: A dissertation can replace the group project.

The project details an investigative research project on the subject of the Digital Twin. The project reviews a wide range of literature to identify the state of the art and also conducts a survey to provide detailed insight. The concept of a Digital Twin is defined and a potential Digital Twin is mapped using systems engineering techniques. This definition and system map is then used to assess the potential benefits of the Digital Twin to an in-service product. The paper describes the development of a use case on an HP Turbine blade to demonstrate how the Digital Twin can improve decision making. The paper concludes with a Roadmap which defines the capabilities, requirements and benefits which will be necessary to develop a full scale Digital Twin.

Individual project

The individual project allows students to demonstrate their ability to think and work in an original way and overcome genuine real life challenges. Your sponsor nominates the topic - the individual project is conducted in the workplace.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project (or dissertation) 20%, Individual project 40%

Your career

Successful completion of this course takes you onto careers with higher levels of responsibility, a broader base of skills and capability and a greater level of professionalism.



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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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This. postgraduate course. provides relevant, up-to-date experience of food safety management, which is of vital importance both to organisations and individuals in the food industry, enforcement and education. Read more

This postgraduate course provides relevant, up-to-date experience of food safety management, which is of vital importance both to organisations and individuals in the food industry, enforcement and education. MSc Food Safety Management focuses on the important areas of foodborne disease, food safety hazards and the effective management of food safety through application of the risk management system Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP). An online course, Food Safety Management provides learning units and support materials via a secure website. This includes individual and group activities, including live web-seminars, research tasks and case studies provide practical learning opportunities.  

PROGRAMME AT A GLANCE

Awards: MSc (After one year - PGCert HACCP Development, after two years - PGDip HACCP Audit and Management).

Within the last few years, there has been widespread agreement that to improve the safety of our food and promote consumer confidence in safe food production, a system known as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) is applied throughout the food industry. As a result, European legislation requires all food businesses to implement a system based on HACCP principles.

Challenges for food businesses, include not only development of suitable HACCP-based systems but on-going management and verification to assure HACCP effectiveness

Year 1

  • Foodborne Disease (Double Module)
  • HACCP Development

Year 2

  • HACCP Effective Food Safety Management Systems (Double Module)
  • Research Methods

Year 3

  • Current Issues in Food Safety Management (Double Module)
  • International Food Law (O) or
  • Allergy and Intolerance (O)

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and Understanding

  1. Analyse case studies to determine the causes of foodborne disease and determine preventative strategies to reduce the risk of illness associated with the contamination of food.
  2. Assess a range of designs and methods currently used in research in the study domain.
  3. Identify, investigate and critically evaluate a current issue in food safety by applying selected theory and research techniques developed during the course to the chosen area.
  4. Critically evaluate the national and international legislative and enforcement frameworks in which all sectors of the food industry operate.
  5. Appreciate the range of common food hypersensitivities and evaluate the mechanisms of allergic and intolerance reactions
  6. Critically assess and discuss the epidemiological evidence relating to food allergy and intolerance with reference to methods of detection and diagnosis and consumer perception of food allergy.
  7. Identify and critically evaluate food safety hazards and determine their significance as risks to public health in food operations and products.

Subject-specific skills

  1. Assess surveillance and other relevant epidemiological data and estimate costs associated with incidents of foodborne disease.
  2. Analyse the relationship between prerequisite programmes and HACCP systems.
  3. Apply HACCP methodology to a food operation in order to develop a HACCP plan.
  4. Critically evaluate alternative approaches to HACCP implementation in food operations.
  5. Perform HACCP and food safety management system verification, including design, planning and execution of appropriate verification programmes.
  6. Apply some of the tools and techniques for managing projects and change in the context of the design and implementation of a HACCP project.
  7. Synthesise and apply relevant food safety and/or food standards legislation to different industry sectors and international settings.
  8. Critically assess requirements for allergen labelling and consumer information, including legislative and health protection requirements.

Thinking Skills

  1. Discuss food safety hazards and critically evaluate the suitability of physical and human resources employed in the global food supply chain for production of safe food.
  2. Reflect and critique the process of HACCP and Food Safety Management System verification in relation to current theory/practice literature.
  3. Assess the factors affecting successful implementation and management of a HACCP-based food safety management and discuss practical strategies to overcoming barriers to system implementation.
  4. Evaluate critically the key concepts and theories of managing projects and change in relation to development and implementation of effective HACCP-based food safety management programmes.
  5. Evaluate research methods employed to answer a range of research questions.
  6. Analyse contemporary theoretical and methodological issues in relation to current published research literature in the domain, including appraisal of design, analysis and interpretation of results.
  7. Identify research gaps in the chosen area and determine priority research questions with reference to current food safety theory and practice.
  8. Evaluate the impact of legislation and enforcement on the food industry and consumers, with reference to case law examples.
  9. Reflect and critique the process of effective allergen management in the global food supply chain, with reference to the application of prerequisite programmes and HACCP-based Food Safety Management Systems.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Detailed learning materials are all available online. Each topic of study involves a number of learning activities supported by asynchronous discussions, live web-cast workshops and chat activities. To take full advantage of the course, you will need the following software:

  • Firefox web browsing software.
  • Standard word processing and presentation software, such as Microsoft Word and PowerPoint.
  • Standard electronic mail software, such as Outlook or Hotmail.
  • Acrobat reader software.
  • You will need to have signed up with an internet service provider. Broadband is recommended for full functionality, plus a webcam and headset/microphone.

Assessment is done in a number of different ways including a report on an outbreak of foodborne disease, a personal portfolio, critical analysis of papers and case studies. There are no examinations.



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NHS staff from all professions will need to acquire an understanding of analytic tools and techniques that help determine the system deficiencies and approaches to ensuring issues identified can be addressed. Read more
NHS staff from all professions will need to acquire an understanding of analytic tools and techniques that help determine the system deficiencies and approaches to ensuring issues identified can be addressed.

The Improving Safety and Quality in Health Care module will enable you to reflect on the challenges of improving healthcare delivery and specifically enhancing patient safety. The module incorporates the latest thinking relating to improvement models and the contribution of human factors to patient safety.

Module content

Day 1
-Understanding the concept of variation in healthcare, how it can be identified and measured.
-Reflect upon the link between variation in delivery systems and overall system reliability and resilience.
-Explore the connection between variation, system performance and patient safety.

Day 2
-Explore models of improvement, the strengths and weaknesses of various tools and techniques.
-Understand systems thinking from the perspective of improvement and performance.
-Analyse the difference between personal v systems failure in contributing to patient safety.

Day 3
-Measurement of system performance, specifically statistical process control, risk assurance, both qualitative and quantitative data
-Contribution of patient (user input to health system assessment).
-The potential learning from other sectors, notably the nature and contribution of safety cases to improving patient safety.

Day 4
-The nature of error/failure modes and assessment approaches.
-Contribution of human factors, performance influencing factors and organisational culture to improvement and safety.
-Engagement of staff in improvement/safety and sustainability of interventions/improvements.

Day 5
-Matching capacity and demand in healthcare.
-Learning from other industries.
-Assignment planning.

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We worked with industry professionals to develop an MSc Applied Instrument and Control programme that is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC). Read more

We worked with industry professionals to develop an MSc Applied Instrument and Control programme that is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC). It covers both the latest developments in the field and the industry knowledge we've gained through years of experience.

You'll acquire a specialised skillset and expertise that's highly desirable to employers, making you a competitive candidate for rewarding careers in many industries, with oil and gas pathways available. The programme draws on relevant case studies with real-world implications, so you'll gain practical knowledge that you can apply on the job from day one.

The programme also fulfils the Engineering Council's further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

  • Gain a solid foundation in measurement science and control theory
  • Practise data acquisition and instrument networking
  • Study analysis of systems for condition monitoring
  • Investigate fault detection and control system design
  • Complete a hands-on project in the industry for experiential learning

At GCU, you'll find a welcoming community of people like yourself - hardworking, career-focused individuals with the vision and discipline to pursue meaningful work. We'll help you develop the tools to be successful, in your career and in your life.

We hope you'll use those tools to make a positive impact on your community and contribute to the common good through everything you do.

What you will study

The curriculum has been developed in consultation with industry and can be broadly grouped in three areas: the introduction of new facts and concepts in measurement and control; the application of facts and concepts to real measurement problems and systems; and subjects which are of general importance to the professional engineer, for example safety and safety management and management ethics and project planning.

Students complete eight taught modules - four in trimester A and four in trimester B; and a Masters project in trimester C.The MSc project will be carried out at the student's workplace; this can be in an area relevant to the company's production/maintenance function, thus providing maximum benefit to both the company and the individual.

Control Systems

Consolidates advanced classical and modern control design techniques emphasising the practical considerations in applying control design in an industrial environment. The appropriateness and difficulties encountered in applying various design techniques in practice will be explored. In particular system sensitivity, robustness and nonlinearity will be studied.

Data Acquisition and Analysis

Develops the ability to evaluate, in a given situation, the most appropriate strategy for acquiring data and understand the merits of this strategy with respect to other approaches. A range of modern time and frequency domain analysis techniques will also be discussed.

Industrial Case Studies

Following on from the foundation in measurement and instrumentation provided by the Measurement Theory and Devices module, students will now be equipped to study in depth instrumentation in industrial processes. This module will cover aspects of designing sensor systems for industrial measurements, instrument control, system troubleshooting and optimisation in industrial applications.

Distributed Instrumentation

Develops the ability to evaluate, in a given situation, the most appropriate strategy for acquiring and transmitting data and understand the merits of this strategy with respect to other approaches. A wide range of different instrument communication and networking techniques will be studied. In addition the module provides practical experience of hardware setup and software development, relating to these techniques.

Industrial Process Systems

Identification and system modelling from real data play an important role in this module. This approach thus leads to more complex and realistic models that can be used to design more robust and reliable controllers that take into account problematic physical effects such as time-delays and sensor noise. The module will cover more advanced aspects of control design such as feed forward and multivariable control.

Measurement Systems

A range of advanced measurement systems will be studied in depth. Sensors, signal processing, low-level signal measurements, noise-reduction methods and appropriate measurement strategies will be applied to industrial and environmental applications. The influence of environmental factors and operation conditions will be considered in relation to the optimisation of the measurement system.

Measurement Theory and Devices

Adopts a generalised approach to measurement theory and devices, allowing students to become familiar with the characteristics of measurement systems in terms of the underlying principles. In this way, the students will be able to develop a systems approach to problem solving. They should find this methodology to be a considerable benefit to them when they have to apply their expertise to solving more complex industrial measurement problems.

Professional Practice

Develops the students' ability to select, develop and plan an MSc research project, to research and critically analyse the literature associated with the project and to present research findings effectively, it will also provide students with the ability to apply a competent process of thinking to project planning and give them a critical understanding of safe and ethical working.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC) as meeting the Engineering Council’s further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Graduate prospects

The MSc Applied Instrumentation and Control offers graduates a highly focused skillset that's valuable to an extremely wide range of industries - any business that benefits from the measurement of process variables and environmental factors. For instance, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, optics and optoelectronics, medical instrumentation and more.

Across these industries, you might focus on computer-controlled instrumentation systems, process instrumentation, technical management and sales, process control and automation, sensor development and manufacturing, instrument networking, industrial development or test and measurement systems.

You might also pursue a career with a company that designs and manufactures measurement systems.



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Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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The MS in criminal justice prepares graduates for leadership in management positions in criminal justice and social service agencies, or entry into doctoral study. Read more

The MS in criminal justice prepares graduates for leadership in management positions in criminal justice and social service agencies, or entry into doctoral study. The program places emphasis on the development of skills in critical thinking, communication, and applied research. 

Our program consists of 36 hours: 12 hours of required courses and 18 to 24 hours of electives (18 hours if students complete a thesis, 24 if students take comprehensive exams).  Classes are diverse and include courses in corrections, policing, courts, comparative/cross cultural issues, minorities and gender issues, victimology, white collar crime, terrorism, ethics, and popular culture. Required courses focus on the system as a whole, theory, research methods, and professional development. Students may complete the program in two years if they attend full-time. Part-time students are welcome. All courses are offered in the evening and some are available online and/or in the summer.

Why Major In Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice is an exciting major allowing for a wide range of employment opportunities following graduation. UTC’s Criminal Justice program is no exception. With classes in subjects including Criminology, Policing, Courts, and Corrections, students will build a solid footing in the core of the criminal justice system. Outside of the core, students will be able to explore courses on Drugs and Crime, Serial Murder, Media and Crime, Victimology, and many other more specific topics. The Criminal Justice program also maintains a robust internship program that allows students to experience many of the agencies involved in the criminal justice system. These internships allow for a unique opportunity to interact with criminal justice professionals as they perform their daily duties and help students gain experience in the field. 

Jobs in the criminal justice field are predicted to be steady or growing through 2024 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, while many other fields are in decline. This means that our graduates have good opportunities for employment as they enter the job market. Some of the careers available to our graduates include law enforcement on the state, local, and federal levels, positions in the field of corrections, positions within the court system, and positions in probation and parole. In addition to immediately entering the job market our students receive a foundational education that allows them to apply for law school or graduate program admission. We offer a graduate program where students may choose to work toward their MSCJ degree to continue their education.   



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The MSc course in Microbiology and Immunology was set up to enhance the training of scientists studying the interactions between microbes and the immune system, and for those students wishing to enter a research career and gain high level skills in Microbiology and Immunology. Read more
The MSc course in Microbiology and Immunology was set up to enhance the training of scientists studying the interactions between microbes and the immune system, and for those students wishing to enter a research career and gain high level skills in Microbiology and Immunology.

The course aims to provide training in theoretical and practical aspects of microbiology and immunology, with particular emphasis on molecular biological techniques and the interactions at the interface between microbes and the immune system. Students will gain basic and advanced knowledge of important viral, bacterial and parasitic infections. Alongside this, students will acquire an understanding and knowledge of the immune system and how it detects and responds to pathogens.

Students who have completed the course will acquire relevant transferable skills such as data management, interpretation and presentation, time management and organisation, and effective verbal and written communication skills. In addition, the students' ability for analytical and creative thinking will also be improved whilst undertaking the course.

The MSc will consist of seven taught modules and a laboratory-based project. Successful completion of the course will necessitate accumulation of 180 credits, 120 of which will derive from the taught modules and 60 from the research project. All of the modules are compulsory. There is an additional non-credit bearing module to provide the students with factfinding networking opportunities with each other and the staff alongside navigation of teaching facilities.

Autumn Semester:

Microbiology and Immunology General Sessions
Introduction to Medical Microbiology
Research Methods in Immunology and Microbiology
Viral Pathogenesis and Infections

Spring Semester:

Bacterial Pathogenesis and Infection
Immunity and the Immune System
Therapeutic Immunology
Innate Immune Recognition
Research Project

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Course overview. Since the publication in 1996 of Lean Thinking (Womack and Jones), ‘Lean’ has established itself as the most effective and most widely adopted improvement methodology for operations in the world. Read more

Course overview

Since the publication in 1996 of Lean Thinking (Womack and Jones), ‘Lean’ has established itself as the most effective and most widely adopted improvement methodology for operations in the world. With roots in the Toyota Production System and in earlier approaches, Lean has expanded vertically into accounting, marketing, HR, IT, design and R&D, and logistics, and horizontally into service, health, government, and banking. Lean is now integrated with other effective approaches including Systems Thinking and Six Sigma. The Buckingham degree is titled ‘Lean Enterprise’ rather than ‘Lean Operations’ . The focus, however, is on integrated operations rather than on learning a range of diverse disciplines or tools.

Whilst today not everyone agrees with the term ‘Lean’, the principles learned in this degree are now ‘mainstream’ in any aspiring operation.

Find out more about our Business School on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/business.

Why Buckingham?

The 22 month, part-time Buckingham MSc is specifically designed for practising managers working, or aspiring to work, in the delivery of services or products. The degree is in ‘enterprise’ because most organisations rely on the integration of employees, customers and suppliers to deliver value. This involves end-to-end value streams from understanding customer requirements, through design and operations and on to product or service delivery. Knowledge of accounting, quality, design, innovation, service are all necessary.

The typical age of participants is 30s and 40s. All participants have considerable experience and are contributors as well as recipients.

Buckingham has an ethos of student support, consistently leading the National Student Survey for student satisfaction. As a private university with a Royal Charter, Buckingham has great opportunities for innovation. The MSc is part of the Buckingham Lean Enterprise Unit (BLEU).

Faculty

The staff of the programme are all experienced Lean, Systems, and Six Sigma practitioners as well as all having years of experience in hands-on Masters-level Lean teaching.

Philosophy

The philosophy of the programme is that Lean can only effectively be learned with hands-on practice. Hence, a considerable part of the programme is held on-site at plant and service locations. By the end of the programme, participants will have taken part in real exercises (not just case studies) in several organizations in several sectors.

Mentoring is an important part of learning about Lean. Detailed mentoring, feedback, and discussion are important incorporated aspects. Networking, of course, is also a valuable aspect that results from the class profile.

The student group is deliberately small to allow both practical hands-on participation and personal interaction with some of the leading practitioners in the UK.

Course outline

During the first 13 months, students take eight 5-day modules, all of which are assessed by assignment. Extensive use is made of electronic meetings and mentoring. An iPad is recommended.

The modules are a set, one flowing into the next, building into an integrated system. Hence there are currently no elective modules. Several staff contribute on more than one module.

Modules on the course are as follows:

  • Foundations and Stability
  • Quality and Systems Thinking
  • Demand, Capacity and Flow – Part 1
  • Demand, Capacity and Flow – Part 2
  • Total Productive Management
  • Leadership and Change
  • Supply Chain
  • Innovation, New Product Introduction, Policy Deployment and Lean Accounting

By the end of the programme participants will have taken part in real exercises (not just case studies) in several organisations and sectors.

Mentoring is a fundamental part of learning about ‘Lean’. Feedback and discussion are all important aspects of the programme. Networking is also a valuable aspect; our class profile and student group is deliberately small to allow both practical participation and personal interaction with some of the leading practitioners in the UK.

In year two, students write a dissertation and regular feedback sessions take place, both face to face at various locations and electronically.



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Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world. Read more
Our MSc in Politics provides an advanced grounding in contemporary political science, focusing on empirical and normative democratic theory, political institutions, public policy and citizenship across different political systems and diverse social contexts.The MSc brings together many of the existing strengths of the department in different parts of the world.

The programme can be tailored to specific regional interests through option courses in West Europe and North America, East Europe, Africa, India, and the Middle East. The degree will provide you with a firm academic foundation in the study of comparative politics and a base of knowledge for careers in fields such as policymaking, development, and NGOs.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpolitics.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the Department of Politics and International Relations is a young, vibrant and rapidly-rising department and was ranked in the Top 10 small politics departments in the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE, 2008)

- the course is taught by world-class scholars and informed by cutting-edge research

- offers an advanced grounding in international public policy while allowing you to specialise in particular issues or regions of interest.

- taught by academics, current and retired public policy practitioners

- our international cohort of students will provide you with excellent opportunities to obtain genuinely global perspectives.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Centre for European Politics was officially launched by Lord Mandelson in September 2007, with the mission of producing research in two principal areas: the study of democracy in Europe, and Europe as an actor in world politics. Under the leadership of Co-Directors Dr Alsiter Miskimmon and Dr James Sloam, it has hosted a number of high-profile speakers, including Lord Mandelson, Professor Simon Hix (LSE), Roger Liddle (Policy Network), John Peet (The Economist), Sir Stephen Wall (former European policy advisor to Tony Blair), David Willets MP (Shadow Secretary of State for Innovations, Universities and Skills) and Dr Vince Cable. Recent funded research projects include: a European Union Committee of the Regions consultancy on EU External Relations and European Neighbourhood Policy; an EU-funded Workshop on the Review of the European Union Budget; and Teaching Democracy. Recent publications include, Bendetto and Milio (eds) European Union budget reform: institutions, policy and economic crisis (Palgrave, 2012) and James Sloam, 'New Voice, Less Equal: the Civic and political Engagement of Young People in the United States and Europe', Comparative Political Studies 2012.

- The Centre for Global and Transnational Politics is devoted to the multi-disciplinary exploration of global and transnational processes. Led by its Co-Directors Professor Chris Rumford and Professor Sandra Halperin, its central concern is to theorise and conceptualise the substance of, and connections between and among, political processes that operate at all levels or scales: the local, national, international, transnational, and global. Professor Rumford and Professor Halperin edit the Routledge Series in Global and Transnational Politics and host the Global Studies Association and a BISA Working Group of Global and Transnational Politics in the Centre.

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Prof Andrew Chadwick, Prof Ben O’Loughlin and Dr Cristian Vicarri. Recent publications include Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System (Oxford University Press, 2013) and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin and Laura Roselle, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). As well as hosting a large number of PhD students working in new political communication, Chadwick edited the Oxford University Press Series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal, Media, War and Conflict.

- The Contemporary Political Theory Research Group was founded in October 2009, as a result of the development of political theory at postgraduate level and growth in academic staff numbers having created the critical mass it required. The group organizes its activities collectively, and its work focuses on issues around contemporary pluralism, liberalism, democratic theory and radical politics. It brings together staff working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism, and its postgraduate members include two students on the College’s most prestigious studentship, the Reid Award. The group also has ties to the College’s Philosophy Team and the interdepartmental Humanities and Arts Research Centre

Course content and structure

Core course units:
- The Politics of Democracy You will be provided with a sound understanding of contemporary thinking about democracy and political participation through the analysis of liberal democracy and its political institutions. The unit will draw upon a variety of contemporary and historical sources with particular reference to the political systems of Britain and the USA.

- Comparative Political Executives This unit explores the political executives of established democratic systems, focusing on institutions – presidents, prime ministers, cabinets and so on – and how they function and interact with other parts of the political system. You will gain knowledge of the ‘nuts and bolts’ of the executives in question, and will also gain useful insights into the difficulties of political leadership, the centrality of political executives and the interdependence of executives with other parts of the political system.

- European Union Politics and Policy This course provides students with an insight into the development and governance of the European Union as a political system. Particular attention is placed on the functions of the EU’s executive, legislative and judicial institutions as well as on a number of key policy areas in which the European Union’s sovereignty has developed in recent years. The course provides students with a solid theoretical background in understanding both the institutional politics and public policy of the EU.

- Political Parties
Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be introduced to quantitative methods commonly used in the study of Politics and International Relations. You will acquire the skills to understand, critically analyse, and carry out a range of quantitative techniques, using statistical software packages such as SPSS.
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Politics and International Relations You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting search research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

- Dissertation (MSc only) The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Politics in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12-15,000 words.

Elective course units:
- Internet and New Media Politics Drawing predominantly upon specialist academic journal literatures, this unit focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements.

- Elections and Voting Behaviour

- Social Media and Politics

- Public Opinion and political participation

- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice

- Advanced Quantitative Methods

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments related to public policy, democracy, politics, international relations and governance

- a sound knowledge of the texts, theories and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes and phenomena associated with particular fields of public policy, politics and international relations

- an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods within the disciplines of politics and international relations

- a solid foundation for progression to either a politics-related career, public policy careers, research or continued academic study.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different politics and international relations-related areas, including roles as officials in local government, personnel officers and higher education lecturers. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Do you want to change the world? Our innovation programmes will set you on your way. The innovators of the 21st century will bring together arts, science, engineering, humanities and enterprise to deliver innovative products, services and ways of living. Read more
Do you want to change the world? Our innovation programmes will set you on your way.

The innovators of the 21st century will bring together arts, science, engineering, humanities and enterprise to deliver innovative products, services and ways of living. They will be team players, with a breadth of skills enabling them to work across specialisms and cultures. They will be designers and entrepreneurs, and have a passion for style, efficiency and sustainability. Bristol’s innovation programmes are for people who want to pursue their subject specialism in a way that enables them to apply it: to become innovators who can change the world.

Our aim is to educate a new generation to create and grow innovative companies and social enterprises. The MSc Innovation and Entrepreneurship programme aims to develop the high-level skills and critical competencies needed for successful innovation and entrepreneurship, through a practice-orientated approach based on collaborative teamwork across disciplines and cultures. It teaches students how to apply their subject-specific knowledge to real-world challenges through a range of transdisciplinary units focusing on innovation-led entrepreneurial skills, design and systems thinking, making and testing. Students will be equipped to apply their knowledge and skills to address key issues such as health, education and the environment. Their final project will be their launchpad, when they will create an enterprise, put together a detailed plan and work out how take it forward and raise investment.

Santander Innovation Scholarships

We have five Santander Innovation Scholarships worth £3,000 each, which will be awarded as a one-off payment to the top five students on the MSc Innovation and Entrepreneurship programme at the beginning of their course. These scholarships will be open to both home and overseas students and will be offered based on academic merit for the best innovation pitches (text or video) submitted, as judged by the innovations academic team. Representatives from Santander will meet the student award recipients at an event in September/October, near the start of term, when these scholarships will be awarded.

Programme structure

You will start by learning to work in teams and find out about both design thinking and systems thinking. This combination can deliver a holistic understanding of a genuine problem or need, generate ideas that will transform both the system and lives of users, while ensuring the new system is sustainable. You will work in multidisciplinary teams to take on a series of innovation and entrepreneurial challenges. You will also learn to create innovations to meet real human needs through the In the Wild unit, understanding your target audience and the issues facing them and developing ideas for possible solutions. You will gain insight into the technological, social and political influences on design and innovation, drawing on case studies of success and failure to help you think about future opportunities.

In the second teaching block you will explore solutions for a real-world client, iterating to develop an unexpected range of possibilities and creating prototypes to test with real customers or users. You will learn about different kinds of enterprise and learn how to explore your ideas from a business or social perspective and how to place them in the appropriate context. You will find out how to assess the feasibility, sustainability and desirability of a proposed venture, how to create business plans and how to assess whether your ideas will work, are viable, or whether anyone will want them.

In your final project over the summer, you will work in teams to pull together all you have learned - to create and trial a prototype for an innovative product or service, or a social innovation. Your team may contain staff and external partners, as well as students. You will put together a detailed enterprise plan to accompany your prototype, including market analysis, intellectual property searches, resource profiles, financial plans, user testing and clear opportunities for investment.

Careers

You will still be an expert in your chosen subject specialism and you will still be able to proceed into careers requiring an honours course in that specialism. However you will also be equipped to do much more: to take your subject knowledge and apply it to real-world challenges, to innovate, to work in teams with people from different specialisms, backgrounds and cultures, and to create and implement entrepreneurial plans to take ideas forward. These skills are highly valued by all organisations, large or small, local or global.

You may graduate as a member of a new venture that you and your fellow students have created. Or you may decide you want to create your own enterprise or join an existing one. Whatever you decide, you will be able to hit the ground running, building on your entrepreneurial and innovation experience. You will soon have the satisfaction of seeing your work starting to make an impact – and ultimately changing the world.

You will graduate with a portfolio of work to show what you have been able to do and will have a network of professional contacts to draw on. You will also be able to go on to further study, either in the UK or internationally.

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