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Masters Degrees (System Safety)

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This MSc course has been developed for the Jaguar Land Rover Technical Accreditation Scheme. The course is available on a part time basis, taking typically four years to complete. Read more
This MSc course has been developed for the Jaguar Land Rover Technical Accreditation Scheme.

The course is available on a part time basis, taking typically four years to complete. Students take 12 Assessed Modules over 3 years, 5 of which are Core (C) and 7 Optional (O), plus a project on a SSE topic within the automotive domain (over the final year). See the Project tab for more details.

This modular MSc is designed to prepare students for work in the demanding field of Safety Systems Engineering (SSE) by exposing them to the latest science and technology within this field. In the core module phase, the course focuses on the principles and practices in SSE across a range of domains, including automotive. In the optional module phase, the course focuses on specialist SSE and automotive topics. The projects are also designed to consider SSE topics within an automotive context.

The discipline of SSE developed over the last half of the twentieth century. It can be viewed as a process of systematically analysing systems to evaluate risks, with the aim of influencing design in order to reduce risks, i.e. to produce safer products and services. In mature industries, such as aerospace and nuclear power, the discipline has been remarkably successful, although there have been notable exceptions to the generally good safety record, e.g. Fukushima, Buncefield and the Heathrow 777 accident.

Various trends pose challenges for traditional approaches to SSE. For example, classical hazard and safety analysis techniques deal poorly with computers and software where the dominant failure causes are errors and oversights in requirements or design. Thus these techniques need extending and revising in order to deal effectively with modern systems. Also, in our experience, investigation of issues to do with safety of computer systems have given some useful insights into traditional system safety engineering, e.g. into the meaning of important concepts such as the term hazard. The optional modules allow students to investigate such areas as the contribution of software, human factors or operational factors within an automotive engineering context in more depth.

Learning Outcomes
The course aims to provide participants with a thorough grounding and practical experience in the use of state-of-the-art techniques for development of safety critical systems, together with an understanding of the principles behind these techniques so that they can make sound engineering judgements during the design, deployment and operation of such systems. Graduates completing the course will be equipped to participate in safety-critical systems engineering related aspects of industry and commerce.

New areas of teaching will be developed in response to new advances in the field as well as the requirements of the organisations that employ our graduates.

The course aims to equip students with knowledge, understanding and practical application of the essential components of System Engineering, to complement previously gained knowledge and skills. A York System Safety Engineering with Automotive Applications graduate will have a knowledge and understanding of the essential areas, as represented by the core modules, knowledge and understanding on a number of specialist topics, as represented by the optional modules. and an ability to identify issues with the safety process in a particular project, identify responses to this gap and evaluate the proposal, as represented by the project.

Transferable Skills
Information-retrieval skills are an integrated part of many modules; students are expected to independently acquire information from on-line and traditional sources. These skills are required within nearly all modules.

Numeracy is required and developed in some modules. Time management is an essential skill for any student in the course. The formal timetable has a substantial load of lectures and labs. Students must fit their private study in around these fixed points. In addition, Open Assessments are set with rigid deadlines which gives students experience of balancing their time between the different commitments.

All students in the University are eligible to take part in the York Award in which they can gain certified transferable skills. This includes the Languages for All programme which allows students to improve their language skills.

Projects

The MSc System Safety Engineering with Automotive Applications project for part-time students is 60 credits in length:
-Literature survey on a subject to determine the state of the art in that area
-A gap in the state of the art identified in the first part is addressed, a proposal made and evidence provided for the proposal. This project is completed in September of a student's fourth year

The Project(s) enable(s) students to:
-Demonstrate knowledge of an area by means of a literature review covering all significant developments in the area and placing them in perspective
-Exhibit critical awareness and appreciation of best practice and relevant standards
-Investigate particular techniques and methods for the construction of safe systems, possibly involving the construction of a prototype
-Evaluate the outcome of their work, drawing conclusions and suggesting possible further work in the area

The project(s) address(es) a technical problem concerned with real issues in the automotive domain. It should, if possible, include the development and application of a practical method, technique or system. It is a natural progression from the taught modules, and builds on material covered in them. It addresses the problem from an automotive system safety perspective, including hardware, software or human factors. It will typically have an industrial flavour, students are encouraged, with the help of their managers and academic staff, to select a project which is relevant to their own work.

The project begins at the start of the Autumn term after completion of the taught modules, and lasts 12 months part-time. There are three weeks attendance at York during the project, for progress assessment and access to library facilities: in October near the start of the project; and in the following January and July.

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Upgrade is possible to the Diploma SCSE and MSc SCSE courses. This modular postgraduate Certificate course is designed to prepare students for work in the demanding field of Systems Safety Engineering (SSE) by exposing them to the latest science and technology within this field. Read more
Upgrade is possible to the Diploma SCSE and MSc SCSE courses.

This modular postgraduate Certificate course is designed to prepare students for work in the demanding field of Systems Safety Engineering (SSE) by exposing them to the latest science and technology within this field. The discipline of SSE has developed over the last half of the twentieth century. It can be viewed as a process of systematically analysing systems to evaluate risks, with the aim of influencing design in order to reduce risks, i.e. to produce safer products. In mature industries, such as aerospace and nuclear power, the discipline has been remarkably successful, although there have been notable exceptions to the generally good safety record, e.g. Fukushima, Buncefield and the Heathrow 777 accident.

Various trends pose challenges for traditional approaches to SSE. For example, classical hazard and safety analysis techniques deal poorly with computers and software where the dominant failure causes are errors and oversights in requirements or design. Thus these techniques need extending and revising in order to deal effectively with modern systems. Also, in our experience, investigation of issues to do with safety of computer systems have given some useful insights into traditional system safety engineering, e.g. into the meaning of important concepts such as the term hazard. The optional module allows students to investigate such areas as the contribution of software, human factors or operational factors to SSE in more depth.

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to provide participants with a preliminary grounding and practical experience in the use of state-of-the-art techniques for development of safety critical systems, together with an understanding of the principles behind these techniques so that they can make sound engineering judgements during the design and deployment of such a system. Graduates completing the course will be equipped to participate and in safety-critical systems engineering related aspects of industry and commerce.

New areas of teaching will be developed in response to new advances in the field as well as the requirements of the organisations that employ our graduates.

The course aims to equip students with knowledge, understanding and practical application of the essential components of System Engineering, to complement previously gained knowledge and skills. A York System Safety Engineering graduate will have a preliminary knowledge and understanding of the essential areas, as represented by the core modules.

Transferable Skills

Information-retrieval skills are an integrated part of many modules; students are expected to independently acquire information from on-line and traditional sources. These skills are required within nearly all modules.

Numeracy is required and developed in some modules. Time management is an essential skill for any student in the course. The formal timetable has a substantial load of lectures and labs. Students must fit their private study in around these fixed points. In addition, Open Assessments are set with rigid deadlines which gives students experience of balancing their time between the different commitments.

All students in the University are eligible to take part in the York Award in which they can gain certified transferable skills. This includes the Languages for All programme which allows students to improve their language skills.

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"The course structure and the core modules cover the fundamentals of system safety in such depth and breadth as to be applicable to any safety standard, for example the ISO 26262. Read more
"The course structure and the core modules cover the fundamentals of system safety in such depth and breadth as to be applicable to any safety standard, for example the ISO 26262. I chose the modules Human Factors for Safety Critical Systems and Computers and Safety and believe this to be a very good combination for anybody working in the automotive industry. Unlike previous degree courses I refer to my York notes a great deal since they are extremely relevant to my day to day safety activities.”
Robert, Jaguar Land Rover

“As a clinician, I have found this course to be absolutely essential. I would recommend that anyone working in healthcare with an interest in patient safety should take the Foundations of System Safety Engineering module at the very least. For those who have a more focused safety role, particularly in healthcare technology, the University offers a number of modules to choose from, working up to the award of a Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or MSc Safety Critical Systems Engineering.”
Beverley, Department of Health Informatics Directorate

The discipline of SSE has developed over the last half of the twentieth century. It can be viewed as a process of systematically analysing systems to evaluate risks, with the aim of influencing design in order to reduce risks, i.e. to produce safer products. In mature industries, such as aerospace and nuclear power, the discipline has been remarkably successful, although there have been notable exceptions to the generally good safety record, e.g. Fukushima, Buncefield and the Heathrow 777 accident.

Various trends pose challenges for traditional approaches to SSE. For example, classical hazard and safety analysis techniques deal poorly with computers and software where the dominant failure causes are errors and oversights in requirements or design. Thus these techniques need extending and revising in order to deal effectively with modern systems. Also, in our experience, investigation of issues to do with safety of computer systems have given some useful insights into traditional system safety engineering, e.g. into the meaning of important concepts such as the term hazard. The course therefore has a number of optional modules looking at software safety.

Learning Outcomes

The course aims to provide you with a thorough grounding and practical experience in the use of state-of-the-art techniques for development and operation of safety critical systems, together with an understanding of the principles behind these techniques so that you can make sound engineering judgements during the design, deployment and operation of such a system. On completing the course, you will be equipped to play leading and professional roles in safety-critical systems engineering related aspects of industry and commerce.

New areas of teaching are developed in response to new advances in the field as well as the requirements of the organisations that employ our graduates.

We aim to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and practical application of the essential components of Safety Critical Systems Engineering, to complement previously gained knowledge and skills. As a York Safety Critical Systems Engineering graduate, you will have a solid grounding of knowledge and understanding of the essential areas, as represented by the core modules. The optional modules give you the opportunity to gain knowledge in other areas which are of interest and these are taught by recognised experts in those areas.

Transferable Skills

Information-retrieval skills are an integrated part of many modules; you are expected to independently acquire information from on-line and traditional sources. These skills are required within nearly all modules, are an essential part of project work.

Numeracy is required and developed in some modules. Time management is an essential skill for any student on the course. The formal timetable has a substantial load of lectures and practical sessions. You are expected to fit your private study in around these fixed points. In addition, Open Assessments are set with rigid deadlines, so you must balance your time between the different commitments.

All students in the University are eligible to take part in the York Award in which they can gain certified transferable skills. This includes the Languages for All programme which allows students to improve their language skills.

Projects

For both full-time and part-time students, the project(s) enable(s) students to:
-Demonstrate knowledge of an area by means of a literature review covering all significant developments in the area and placing them in perspective;
-Exhibit critical awareness and appreciation of best practice and relevant standards;
Investigate particular techniques and methods for the construction of safe systems, possibly involving the construction of a prototype;
-Evaluate the outcome of their work, drawing conclusions and suggesting possible further work in the area.

The project(s) address(es) a major technical problem concerned with real issues. It should, if possible, include the development and application of a practical method, technique or system. It is a natural progression from the taught modules, and builds on material covered in them. Ideally it addresses the problem from a system perspective, including hardware, software and human factors. It will typically have an industrial flavour. If you are a part-time student, you are encouraged, with the help of your managers and academic staff, to select a project which is relevant to your own work in industry.

The project begins at the start of the Summer term after completion of the taught modules, and lasts 18 months part-time / 6 months full-time. For part-time students there are three weeks attendance at York during the project, for progress assessment and access to library facilities: in July near the start of the project; and in the following January and July. Full details are provided during the course.

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Public awareness of hazards and risks has enhanced the importance of safety assessment and management in today’s increasingly litigious society. Read more

Programme Background

Public awareness of hazards and risks has enhanced the importance of safety assessment and management in today’s increasingly litigious society. Worldwide the burden of responsibility for health and safety is shifting towards those who own, manage and work in industrial and commercial organisations. Legal reform is tending to replace detailed industry specific legislation with a modern approach in which, where possible, goals and general principles are set and the onus is on organisations to show how they manage to achieve these goals.

The management of safety and risk needs to be integrated into the overall management of the organisation. It should be appropriate and cost-effective without dampening the innovative entrepreneurial spirit of employees with inflexible bureaucratic rules and procedures. An organisation’s exposure to potential hazards needs to be managed so as to reduce the chance of loss and mitigate any effects. Risk and safety issues need to be evaluated in a structured and calculated manner but in the light of an overall organisational strategy.

The MSc/PG Diploma programme in Safety and Risk Management aims to provide students with advanced knowledge of risk assessment techniques, the public and individual perception of risk, and how decisions are made in competitive business markets. The focus is on practical applications of safety methodologies, ergonomics and human factors, and safety and risk management techniques.

All of these skills will be drawn together to undertake complex qualitative and quantitative risk assessments. The core of the programme is the management of safety, but it is set within a broader remit where safety issues are part of a general risk management system with a balance of financial, quality and environmental concerns. The overall aim of the programme is to develop students’ skills and personal qualities to be able to undertake safety studies and manage safety and risk to the best national and international standards.

Professional Recognition

This MSc degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See http://www.jbm.org.ukfor further information.

The MSc and PgDip degrees have also been accredited by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). Graduates are eligible to join IOSH as Graduate members and then undertake an initial professional development process that leads to Chartered membership. http://www.iosh.co.uk for further information.

Programme Content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Safety, Risk and Management is only available by attendance-free distance learning. The programme comprises eight courses. All courses have written examinations and some have compulsory coursework elements. MSc students are also required to complete an individual project (dissertation).

For the project component of the programme distance learners are likely to develop something based in their country of residence with advice and supervision from staff in the School. This may well include work with a local company or may involve independent study. Individual arrangements will be set up with each student.

For more detailed information on this programme please contact the Programme Leader before applying (see above).

Courses

• Risk Assessment and Safety Management
This courses aims to give students an appreciation of risk from individual and societal perspectives as well as understanding the basic principles of risk assessment and modelling and how safety management works in practice.

• Human Factors Methods
This course will equip students from academic and/or industrial backgrounds with knowledge on, and the means to deploy, a wide range of specialist human factors techniques. The emphasis is on method selection, application, combination and integration within existing business practices. Students will develop a critical awareness of what methods exist, how to apply them in practice and their principle benefits and limitations.

• Human Factors in the Design and Evaluation of Control Rooms
The course will equip students from academic and/or industrial backgrounds with in-depth knowledge on, insights into, and the means to deploy a wide range of specialist techniques relevant to the ergonomic design and evaluation of control rooms. The emphasis is on key areas of control room operations and on actionable ways to deploy theory on human capabilities and limitations in order to improve performance, safety, efficiency and overall operator well being.

• Fire Safety, Explosions and Process Safety
Introduces students to the basic principles of fire safety science and engineering, and develops skills in associated modelling leading to an understanding of principal fire/explosion related issues in process safety.

• Environmental Impact Assessment
Provides the candidate with the knowledge and understanding of the principles and processes of the Environmental Impact Assessment. By the end of the course, the student should be familiar with the European EIA legislation and its translation into the Scottish planning system, and be able to demonstrate an understanding of the EIA process, the tools and the agents involved in an EIA and the possible problems with using EIA as a decision making tool. . It is also intended that the student will be able to appreciate the purpose of the EIA process from a number of perspectives; that of a developer, an EIA practitioner and a policy maker.

• Project Management Theory and Practice
Provides students with an understanding of the concepts and practices of construction project management used to provide value added services to clients within the constraints of time, cost, quality sustainability and health and safety management.

• Learning from Disasters
Gives students an in depth understanding of some of the classic disasters and their consequences by using a range of practical accident investigation techniques. Students will learn to analyse complex histories in order to find the underlying root cause.

• Value and Risk Management.
Aims to introduce the concepts of value and risk management, apply them to strategic and tactical problems and illustrate their tools and techniques through case study.

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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Risk has become a key concept in modern society. Read more

Programme Background

Risk has become a key concept in modern society. Growing concern about the environment and a number of disasters have served to focus attention on the hazards and risks involved in a wide range of activities from offshore oil production to rail and air transport; from the design of football stadia to the operation of chemical plants and environmental protection. Today there is a wide range of techniques available to assess risk and reliability, both in relation to safety and in the wider sense. These techniques now underpin new legislation on safety and have relevance over a broad spectrum of activities, including environmental and other systems, where risk and reliability are key concerns.

The MSc/PG Diploma programme in Safety, Risk and Reliability Engineering is designed to give a thorough understanding of these techniques and experience of their application to a variety of real-world problems. It aims to provide students with an understanding of safety, risk and reliability engineering in both a qualitative and quantitative manner, and to develop the skills to apply this understanding. The programme will also introduce students to recent developments in analytical techniques, e.g. computer modelling of risk, reliability and safety problems.

Professional Recognition

This MSc degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See http://www.jbm.org.ukfor further information.

The MSc and PgDip degrees have also been accredited by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH). Graduates are eligible to join IOSH as Graduate members and then undertake an initial professional development process that leads to Chartered membership. http://www.iosh.co.uk for further information.

Programme Content

The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Safety, Risk and Reliability Engineering is only available by attendance-free distance learning. The programme comprises eight courses. All courses have written examinations and some have compulsory coursework elements. MSc students are also required to complete an individual project (dissertation). This programme has a stronger engineering bias and you should only attempt this if you have done some University level mathematics or equivalent. Otherwise the Safety and Risk Management course might be more appropriate.

For the project component of the programme distance learners are likely to develop something based in their country of residence with advice and supervision from staff in the School. This may well include work with a local company or may involve independent study. Individual arrangements will be set up with each student.

For more detailed information on this programme please contact the Programme Leader before applying (see above).

Courses

• Risk Assessment and Safety Management
This course aims to give students an appreciation of risk from individual and societal perspectives as well as understanding the basic principles of risk assessment and modelling and how safety management works in practice.

• Systems Reliability
Gives an understanding of the qualitative and quantitative techniques that are used in the reliability, availability and maintainability analysis of all types of engineering systems.

• Learning from Disasters
Provides students with an in depth understanding of some of the classic disasters and their consequences by using a range of practical accident investigation techniques. Students will learn to analyse complex histories in order to find the underlying root cause.

• Safety, Risk and Reliability
Leads to an understanding of the principles of structural reliability theory and its application to risk and reliability engineering.

• Fire Safety, Explosions and Process Safety
Introduces students to the basic principles of fire safety science and engineering, and develops skills in associated modelling leading to an understanding of principal fire/explosion related issues in process safety.

• Data Analysis and Simulation
Develops knowledge of statistical data analysis and its application in engineering and science and introduces the concepts of using simulation techniques for analysis of complex systems. It also teaches linear optimisation techniques and the ability to apply them to solve simple problems.

• Human Factors Methods
This course will equip students from academic and/or industrial backgrounds with knowledge on, and the means to deploy, a wide range of specialist human factors techniques. The emphasis is on method selection, application, combination and integration within existing business practices. Students will develop a critical awareness of what methods exist, how to apply them in practice and their principle benefits and limitations.

•Environmental Impact Assessment
Provides the candidate with the knowledge and understanding of the principles and processes of the Environmental Impact Assessment. By the end of the course, the student should be familiar with the European EIA legislation and its translation into the Scottish planning system, and be able to demonstrate an understanding of the EIA process, the tools and the agents involved in an EIA and the possible problems with using EIA as a decision making tool. It is also intended that the student will be able to appreciate the purpose of the EIA process from a number of perspectives; that of a developer, an EIA practitioner and a policy maker.

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NHS staff from all professions will need to acquire an understanding of analytic tools and techniques that help determine the system deficiencies and approaches to ensuring issues identified can be addressed. Read more
NHS staff from all professions will need to acquire an understanding of analytic tools and techniques that help determine the system deficiencies and approaches to ensuring issues identified can be addressed.

The Improving Safety and Quality in Health Care module will enable you to reflect on the challenges of improving healthcare delivery and specifically enhancing patient safety. The module incorporates the latest thinking relating to improvement models and the contribution of human factors to patient safety.

Module content

Day 1
-Understanding the concept of variation in healthcare, how it can be identified and measured.
-Reflect upon the link between variation in delivery systems and overall system reliability and resilience.
-Explore the connection between variation, system performance and patient safety.

Day 2
-Explore models of improvement, the strengths and weaknesses of various tools and techniques.
-Understand systems thinking from the perspective of improvement and performance.
-Analyse the difference between personal v systems failure in contributing to patient safety.

Day 3
-Measurement of system performance, specifically statistical process control, risk assurance, both qualitative and quantitative data
-Contribution of patient (user input to health system assessment).
-The potential learning from other sectors, notably the nature and contribution of safety cases to improving patient safety.

Day 4
-The nature of error/failure modes and assessment approaches.
-Contribution of human factors, performance influencing factors and organisational culture to improvement and safety.
-Engagement of staff in improvement/safety and sustainability of interventions/improvements.

Day 5
-Matching capacity and demand in healthcare.
-Learning from other industries.
-Assignment planning.

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The International Master of Science in Fire Safety Engineering (IMFSE) is a two-year educational programme in the Erasmus+ framework. Read more

Applications for this programme should be made through Ghent University.

Programme description

The International Master of Science in Fire Safety Engineering (IMFSE) is a two-year educational programme in the Erasmus+ framework.

This masters programme is jointly offered by the following three full partner universities:

-The University of Edinburgh, UK
-Ghent University, Belgium (coordinator)
-Lund University, Sweden

Additionally, there are three associated partners where students can perform thesis research:

-The University of Queensland, Australia
-ETH Zurich, Switzerland
-The University of Maryland, United States of America

Classes in Edinburgh focus on fire dynamics, fire safety engineering and structural design for fire. Classes in Ghent have a more general fire safety engineering focus. Classes in Lund emphasise enclosure fire dynamics, risk analysis and human behaviour.

Our Building Research Establishment (BRE) Centre for Fire Safety Engineering hosts bespoke equipment to support groundbreaking research and teaching, with combined thermal and mechanical loading and use of the latest image analysis techniques.

IMFSE is very pleased to involved seven industrial partners as official sponsors. With their annual financial contributions, it has been made possible to create the IMFSE Sponsorship Consortium, which awards IMFSE students with full or partial scholarships. The current sponsors are:

-Arup
-IFIC Forensics
-UL
-Promat
-FPC
-BRE
-Fire Engineered Solutions Ghent

Programme structure

The programme consists of four semesters each worth 30 ECTS credits. Changing study location after each semester lets you benefit from the expertise of each university.

Learning outcomes

The course contents and learning outcomes of IMFSE have been jointly developed, taking into account the specialties and experience of each of the three IMFSE universities. All three partners have extensive experience in teaching the different courses and integrating them into different degree requirements.

Competence in one/more scientific discipline(s)
For a masters degree (two years), students must be able to:

-master and apply advanced knowledge in the field of engineering in case of complex problems
-apply Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools and sophisticated calculation and communication instruments in a creative and target-oriented approach
-master and apply knowledge of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer to critically analyse and evaluate the development of fires in enclosures
-master and apply knowledge of 'element methods' and dynamics of structures to critically analyse and evaluate the behaviour of simple structures in case of fire
-master and apply knowledge of explosions to critically analyse and evaluate associated risks
-master and apply the advanced knowledge of fire dynamics, risk assessment, human behaviour and integrate this in a performance-based fire safety design

Skills and abilities
For a masters degree (two years), students must be able to:

-analyse complex problems and convert them into scientific questions.
-perform research by making use of scientific literature.
-select and apply appropriate models, methods and techniques in different circumstances
-develop and validate mathematical models and methods
-analyse own results and results of others in an objective manner
-critically elaborate problems of fire risk assessment with autonomy and flexibility, using a limited amount of data
-perform valid computer simulations of development and consequences of enclosure fires

Intellectual competence
For a masters degree (two years), students must be able to:

-take independent positions on complex situations and be able to defend the point of view
-use own knowledge in a creative, target-oriented and innovative way regarding research, conceptual design and production
-reflect on the own way of thinking and acting and be conscious of the own expertise
-be aware of ongoing evolutions in the field of interest and maintain competence on the expert level
-flexibly adapt to changing professional circumstances.
-develop scientifically sound arguments to optimise passive and active fire protection measures

Competence in cooperation and communication
-discuss field of specialisation in English
-project planning: formulate objectives, report efficiently, keep track of end-goals and progress of the project
-cooperate and take the lead in a team in a multi-disciplinary working-environment
-report on technical or scientific subjects orally, in writing and in graphics
-function in an international environment (students, PhD students, scientific co-workers, scholars)

Societal competence
-Act in an ethical, professional and social manner.
-Be aware of the most important corporate and legal aspects in their field of engineering.
-Interpret the historical evolution of the own field of engineering and its social relevance.
-Master and apply critical insight in existing fire safety legislation and regulations in the development of a fire safety design.
-Act in an ethical, professional and social way when developing and presenting a performance-based fire safety design.

Profession-specific competence
-Master the complexity of technical systems by use of system and process models.
-Reconcile conflicting specifications and boundary conditions and transform them into high-quality, innovative concepts and processes.
-Transform incomplete, contradictory or redundant data into useful information.
-Select enough knowledge and comprehension to control the results of complex calculations or make approximate estimates.
-Pay attention to entire life-cycles of systems, machines and processes.
-Pay attention to energy-efficiency, environmental pressure, use of raw materials and labour costs.
-Pay attention to all aspects of reliability, safety and ergonomics.
-Be aware and insightful of the importance of entrepreneurship in society.
-Show perseverance, drive for innovation and a sense for the creation of added value.

Career opportunities

We aim to train the next generation of leaders in this field; there is currently great demand for fire safety engineering graduates worldwide and graduates have gained relevant employment or enhanced career opportunities.

A fire safety engineer fulfils a broad range of duties, in various ways related to fire. This can range from designing fire protection for a space station, to protecting treasures such as the US Constitution, to safely securing the occupants of a high-rise building from fire hazards.

Fire safety engineers are in great demand by corporations, educational institutions, consulting firms, and government bodies around the world. You may find career opportunities in the following industries:

-consulting engineering firms
-fire departments
-fire equipment and systems manufacturers
-government
-hospitals and health care facilities
-insurance industry
-research and testing laboratories
-educational institutions
-entertainment industry
-forensic investigations

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Do you train healthcare providers or organise systems to improve patient safety? This one year masters programme will enable you to apply innovative educational methods and processes to improve patient outcomes. Read more
Do you train healthcare providers or organise systems to improve patient safety? This one year masters programme will enable you to apply innovative educational methods and processes to improve patient outcomes. Explore an in-depth range of simulation-based learning techniques and be equipped with the skills required to plan and conduct your dissertation. Be primed with the advanced knowledge and understanding to confidently lead improvements in the quality of patient safety in your workplace.

Key features

-Explore a range of simulation-based learning methods that can improve quality of patient care. Recent national reports have emphasised the need for widened access to simulation training and the recognition of person-level and system-level human factors in improving patient safety.
-Develop an understanding of the factors involved in quality improvement strategies and their evaluation using outcomes related to patient safety.
-Undertake a critical study of education and expert practice, change management and innovation.
-Equip yourself with the skills to plan and conduct a full masters dissertation.
-Get a variety of hands-on experience – the Simulation and Enhanced Learning module will be delivered at the Horizon Centre, a new innovation, education and research facility at Torbay Hospital. The remaining taught modules will be delivered in the John Bull Building, Plymouth Science Park. Find out more about your teaching locations.
-Advance your knowledge, understanding and skills in patient safety and quality improvement and have the opportunities to apply these skills in the clinical environment.
-Take advantage of our experienced teaching staff drawn from experts in the Plymouth and Torbay NHS trusts and the University, as well as from the higher education sector in the South West region and beyond.
-Benefit from flexible learning – there are a number of continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities relating to this programme where a single module or specific days within a module may be taken independently.
-Graduate with the skills required to implement simulation effectively into educational programmes, and develop and evaluate evidence-based patient safety strategies in organisations.
-You’ll be supported by a PUPSMD staff member and can attend seminars of the medical education research group CAMERA.

Course details

You’ll explore a range of simulation-based learning methods that can improve patient safety and quality of care through enhanced learning. Advance your knowledge, understanding and skills in patient safety and the application of these to your own workplace. You’ll be introduced to the role of human factors and develop a critical understanding of the current state of patient safety within healthcare and examine strategies to improve it. You’ll be provided with the knowledge and skills associated with the project design, development and knowledge transfer process. You’ll also explore the physical and psychological links between organisations, employees and their work environment and how the concept of human factors influences the way we work. The use of simulation for training and assessment of human factors will be integral to the module.

Core modules
-DIS731 Dissertation
-SIM714 Patient Safety and Quality Improvement
-PDD721 Project Design, Development and Knowledge Transfer
-SIM711 Simulation and Enhanced Learning
-SIM715 Human Factors in Healthcare

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

For more information on the part time version of this course, view the web-page: https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/msc-simulation-and-patient-safety

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The aim of this module is to explain the purpose, content and uses of a Safety / HSE Case. Particular attention is focused on the best practical approaches to address legal, industry and company requirements. Read more
The aim of this module is to explain the purpose, content and uses of a Safety / HSE Case. Particular attention is focused on the best practical approaches to address legal, industry and company requirements. The differing types of safety / HSE case during the project lifecycle are discussed, as well as differences in approaches between industries. Links between the case, supporting studies and the management system are studied. Best practices for implementing and maintaining the case are also reviewed.

After the course you will be able to

1. Critically review the reasons for having safety/HSE Cases and the role of the safety/HSE Case
2. Justify the contents of a safety case
3. Discuss the key factors to be considered when planning a safety case.

Outline content

Historical drivers
Legal Requirements - UK, Europe, worldwide
Company and industry body requirements
Differing types of case by project phase (e.g. PSR, PCSR, design, operational, decommissioning)
Safety/HSE Case structure and approach by industry
• nuclear
• offshore oil and gas
• onshore process
• transport
• others
Bridging documents
Links between the case and supporting studies
Links between the case and the management system
Documentation and management / maintenance of the Safety / HSE Case
Roll-out and implementation - keeping the case as a working document
Features of a fit-for-purpose safety case

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Management of environmental, health and safety issues has changed significantly in the past twenty years. The emergence of voluntary standards and codes of conduct, including international standards, coupled with the need to manage costs and limited resources has resulted in a trend to move beyond regulatory compliance. Read more

Program overview

Management of environmental, health and safety issues has changed significantly in the past twenty years. The emergence of voluntary standards and codes of conduct, including international standards, coupled with the need to manage costs and limited resources has resulted in a trend to move beyond regulatory compliance. Now, companies work toward sustainability through the use of integrated environmental, health and safety management systems, which are woven into key business processes. Although they are distinct disciplines, environmental management, occupational health, and workplace safety share many technical, regulatory, and organizational characteristics. Today's professionals now need to be educated in all three areas.

Graduates are employed by Fortune 100 companies, environmental, health and safety consultancies, universities, and government agencies such as the EPA, OSHA, and NYSDEC.

Plan of study

The MS degree in environmental, health and safety management provides students with a solid foundation in the managerial aspects of developing and implementing environmental, health and safety management systems that can move organizations toward a more sustainable and socially responsible future. In addition, students gain a solid technical foundation in air emissions, wastewater, solid and hazardous waste, occupational safety and occupational health (industrial hygiene). Elements of sustainability are integrated into most of the core courses and some electives

The program consists of 33 credit hours and may be completed entirely through online learning, or via a combination of online and traditional on-campus courses. The curriculum consists of core courses, professional electives, and a choice of a graduate thesis, project, or exam.

Professional electives

Professional electives are subject to availability and include Fire Protection, Occupational Health, Solid and Hazardous Waste Management, Industrial Wastewater Management, Air Emissions Management, Occupational Safety, Mechanical and Electrical Controls and Standards, EHS Law, EHS Accounting and Finance, EHS Project Management, and Organizational Behavior and Leadership. Additional professional electives are available in topics such as business management, quality, sustainability, and other areas.

Curriculum

Course sequences differs according to thesis/project/exam option, see website for a particular option's module details: http://www.rit.edu/programs/environmental-health-and-safety-management-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have completed at least 9 semester hours of college-level course work in the sciences, with at least 3 semester credit hours in each of the following categories: chemistry, biology, and physics.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Submit two writing samples to demonstrate written communication skills.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a clearly written one-page statement of purpose.
-Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum acceptable scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score for an unconditional acceptance is 6.5. It is recommended that international students begin the program in the fall semester.

Applicants with acceptable professional certification(s) and/or work experience may have pre-requisite science course work waived.

Applicants without formal academic training or documented experience in air emmisions, waste water, solid and hazardous waste, occupational health, or occupational safety may be required to take professional electives in these areas.

Students without related work experience may complete a graduate cooperative education placement during their program of study. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required; however, applicants may submit test scores to support their candidacy.

Additional information

Transfer credit:
With the permission of the department, relevant graduate course work may be transferred into the program, per the maximum number of credit hours allowed.

International students:
International students enrolled in courses at the RIT campus are required to take at least two traditional classroom courses and one or two online courses per semester. In addition, international students are solely responsible for meeting the requirements of their government and other sponsors, as applicable.

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This postgraduate course provides relevant, up-to-date experience of food safety management, which is of vital importance both to organisations and individuals in the food industry, enforcement and education. Read more
This postgraduate course provides relevant, up-to-date experience of food safety management, which is of vital importance both to organisations and individuals in the food industry, enforcement and education. MSc Food Safety Management focuses on the important areas of foodborne disease, food safety hazards and the effective management of food safety through application of the risk management system Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP). An online course, Food Safety Management provides learning units and support materials via a secure website. This includes individual and group activities, including live web-seminars, research tasks and case studies provide practical learning opportunities.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Detailed learning materials are all available online. Each topic of study involves a number of learning activities supported by asynchronous discussions, live web-cast workshops and chat activities. To take full advantage of the course, you will need the following software:
-Firefox web browsing software.
-Standard word processing and presentation software, such as Microsoft Word and PowerPoint.
-Standard electronic mail software, such as Outlook or Hotmail.
-Acrobat reader software.
-You will need to have signed up with an internet service provider. Broadband is recommended for full functionality, plus a webcam and headset/microphone

Assessment is done in a number of different ways including a report on an outbreak of foodborne disease, a personal portfolio, critical analysis of papers and case studies. There are no examinations.

PROGRAMME AIMS

To develop an understanding of the theoretical foundations and techniques used in food safety management for health and brand protection in the Global food supply chain.

To enable you to explore and extend an extensive knowledge base and critical appreciation of the control and management of foodborne disease in a global context.

To enable you to apply the principles of food safety management to develop effective management systems for the production of safe and legal food products, thus integrating theory with practice in your own and other food-related environments.

To provide a learning environment in which you are encouraged to achieve personal growth in terms of a wide range of transferable skills, including critical thinking and independence of thought, and communication of complex ideas to a range of audiences.

OPPORTUNITIES

Students on this course are normally working full-time or part-time in and/or go on to develop their careers in the food industry, local government and the private sector.

This course provides progression opportunities up to MPhil/PhD and DProf.

FURTHER INFORMATION

This unique course provides: relevant and up-to-date experience in foodborne disease, HACCP Development, HACCP Audit and Management, Research Methods for Food Safety, Current Issues in Food Safety including the opportunity to study specialist topics; development in essential transferable skills such as IT, communication skills, independent research, information retrieval, project planning and management; and the opportunity for career development and enhancement.

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This Postgraduate Certificate will interest all those in healthcare and healthcare management who want to know more about patient safety from policy to patient care. Read more
This Postgraduate Certificate will interest all those in healthcare and healthcare management who want to know more about patient safety from policy to patient care. Although the recognition of preventable harm has a quite recent history, it is now a priority for all healthcare providers.

During your studies you will develop a stronger understanding of how health professional behaviour, their interactions, and the surrounding healthcare system can lead to error. You will also learn how to accurately describe and measure both threats to patient safety and safety improvements so as to optimize healthcare quality. You will consider the role of the patient in Patient Safety, how they might be involved in improvement and some of the challenges this might create. Additionally, you will be given the opportunity to identify a patient safety problem in your work place and, with management support, plan a solution.

Why Bradford?

At the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, you can choose to study for individual modules, a named award or build module credits through the SSPRD Framework for Flexible Learning to achieve an award relevant to your professional needs.

The Framework for Flexible Learning in Health and Social Care is a Faculty-wide academic structure for Specialist Skills and Post-Registration Development. It offers students increased flexibility and choice in the modules and courses that can be undertaken and it is also responsive to employer needs. The flexibility also allows you to move from one award to another if your career changes or you take time out from regular studying. Shared teaching and research expertise from across the Faculty is offered through interdisciplinary teaching across our core research modules.

The Faculty of Health Studies is regionally, nationally and internationally recognised for its teaching and research, and works with a number of healthcare partners to ensure clinical excellence.

Learning activities and assessment

Students will enrol on a part time basis for either a semester or one academic year. You will be expected to attend University for approximately four days teaching per module, with two additional half days for seminar presentations. On successful completion of the programme (both modules) you will receive a Post Graduate Certificate in Patient Safety or alternatively continue your part time studies through undertaking further postgraduate modules to gain the award of Post Graduate Diploma or Master of Science in Healthcare Studies.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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**Accredited by the Institute of Food Science & Technology (IFST), the leading qualifying body for food professionals in Europe.**. Read more
**Accredited by the Institute of Food Science & Technology (IFST), the leading qualifying body for food professionals in Europe.**

This programme provides graduates with an insight into measures that are required to provide a supply of safe and wholesome food to consumers globally. A wide spectrum of food safety and quality management issues are addressed following the farm to fork approach.

Topics covered include: good governance and national control systems; food inspection and testing services; legislation and private standards; and management of food safety and quality within the supply chain as well as in hotels and restaurants.

Students also acquire a knowledge of the design and management of safety and quality management systems based upon risk analysis, e.g. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP), ISO 9001:2008 designed to meet the requirements of national and international legislation and private standards. Students sit the Royal Society for Public Health Level 3 Award in HACCP for Food Manufacturing and are also given membership of the Institute of Food Science and Technology.

Individual courses are offered on a stand-alone basis. These are attended by professionals working in the food industry. Lectures are also delivered by experts currently working in the food sector. This gives our postgraduate students the opportunity to interact with and learn from a range of practitioners.

Students have the opportunity to apply for short placements in the food sector, which provides them with the all important experience that they need to demonstrate when applying for jobs.

The aims of the programme are:

- To prepare graduates for careers in the national and international food chain, e.g. food businesses, consultancy, research and development

- To equip graduates with the knowledge and skills that will enhance their employability

- To enrich graduates understanding of the dynamics of food safety and quality management systems and the context under which they operate at national and international levels.

Visit the website http://www.gre.ac.uk/pg/engsci/foodsaf

Food and Agricultural Sciences

The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) has an internationally-recognised academic reputation and provides taught postgraduate courses in a wonderful environment for students.

NRI provide research, consultancy, training and advisory services to underpin sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction. The majority of our activities focus on the harnessing of natural and human capital for the benefit of developing countries, though much of our expertise has proved to be of growing relevance to industrialised nations.

What you'll study

- Food Safety (30 credits)
- Food Safety and Quality Management (30 credits)
- Research Methods (15 credits)
- Research Project (MSc only) (60 credits)
- Two or three optional courses chosen from a range of themes running across the programme (45 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Railway risk and safety management, are both vitally important worldwide, for not only the ongoing operation of existing railways but also for the design and the development of new systems. Read more
Railway risk and safety management, are both vitally important worldwide, for not only the ongoing operation of existing railways but also for the design and the development of new systems. Much work is being done by companies involved in both mainline and urban transportation systems to improve safety, for the public, their passengers and their workforce. In the last two years alone there have been around 60 railway crashes and incidents reported worldwide. The prevention of the associated loss of life and livelihood are high priorities for all organisations involved.

This programme in Railway Risk and Safety Management (RRSM) is the first of its kind in the UK and is jointly delivered by the Universities of Birmingham and York. You will benefit from the expertise of two leading UK universities and spend around half of your time with the Birmingham Centre for Rail Research and Education (BCRRE) and half at the High Integrity Systems Engineering Group (HISE) in York.

The programme will give you a deep and robust understanding of the approaches to managing safety and risk in transport systems and related projects. The York modules are highly structured around the general topics of risk and safety management, while the Birmingham portion of the programme focuses on railway systems and the application of risk management principles in this sector. Although different transport sectors and modes have their own specific features, this course will give you a thorough education of knowledge which can take you into many areas of engineering and business management.

About the School of Civil Engineering

Civil Engineering is the key to many of the issues affecting our lives today. Civil Engineers solve problems, design, build and maintain our living and working spaces. You might design a new stadium, work on a local by-pass or railway line, assess a damaged structure, provide immediate and safe drinking water to a refugee camp, or manage a multi-million pound construction project.
We tackle the problems faced by society today: we aim to develop the knowledge and tools to build the communities of the future. Many of our projects have already had a significant impact on society; the impact of others will be felt by generations to come.
The performance of Civil Engineering in the Research Excellence Framework (REF), the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions, has shown that the majority of its research was rated as internationally excellent.
We work closely with industry, charities and research councils to encourage innovative thinking which has an impact on our lives. As a result we are proud of our heritage of internationally-recognised, multidisciplinary research in a stimulating research environment.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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