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Masters Degrees (System Analysis And Design)

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With the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course at City you can unravel a business system and prepare to work as an analyst within the industry. Read more
With the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course at City you can unravel a business system and prepare to work as an analyst within the industry.

Who is it for?

The course is for motivated students who enjoy working within high-pressure environments often to tight deadlines. You will need a good undergraduate degree as well as the tenacity and patience to understand business systems and the ability to adapt to constant change.

Objectives

There is a common misconception in building business systems: that users know their requirements. Often they don’t. This postgraduate Business Systems Analysis programme has been designed to address this problem.

The MSc in Business Systems Analysis and Design is not about developing algorithms and coding. We work with technology but we are not technicians because we know that to become an IT consultant or business analyst, you need to understand the disparate areas that make up the discipline. This is a Masters degree where you will design a business system; in order to do this you will unpick the information infrastructure to find out if the system works.

Analysing a business system is a process that demands constant re-evaluation. By investigating system requirements, considering how information flows through it, and exploring the pitfalls that emerge within user hierarchies, at City we examine the business system as a whole. This approach is essential to respond to rapid business change.

These are some of the questions the course poses:
-What is the right system to address the problem?
-Does the system meet the needs of the business now and will it be able to adapt in the future?
-How is information flowing within the system?
-How will users interact with the system throughout the project life cycle?

Placements

As a student on this programme you can undertake an internship in the July to December period, for up to six months. You can work under a client’s direction for all or part of this time. Many students use the internship as an opportunity to carry out a specific project which forms the context for their final dissertation.

One current student is working within a user experience design company to investigate how scents affect the emotional perception of digital fruit images displayed on a desktop service.

Academic facilities

As a student on the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course you will have access to dedicated labs and use specialist software such as SAP. At City we also have access to Microsoft Dynamics ERP software to support the enterprise information system module. Microsoft Dynamics is an industry-based CRM system. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We provide a diversity of teaching approaches so you get a diversity of learning experiences in the form of traditional lectures, live classroom demonstrations, tutorials, laboratories, and TV studio role-playing. We encourage you to engage with the material in an active way. As a postgraduate student, we expect you to take responsibility for your own learning and use non-timetabled hours for your own private study or group interactions.

You will be assessed in a variety of ways from coursework and laboratory work to presentations, examinations and a project dissertation. By successfully completing eight taught modules and the research project you will be awarded a Master of Science (MSc) degree. All modules in this course are supported by Moodle, City's online learning environment.

The course is available full time (12 months) and part time (up to 28 months - two days a week). The Department is aware that this involves considerable commitment from part-time students, and we try to be as flexible as we can so you can successfully combine your work and study.

By completing eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed the eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. If you successfully complete four modules (60 credits) you will be awarded a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

There are six core modules and four electives from which you can choose two topics. Practical work is emphasised throughout the degree programme to develop your understanding and skills, which is strengthened by interactive teamwork. The course has an excellent track record in producing employable hybrid IT/business professionals.

In the industry you need to communicate your expertise in lay terms. The modules give you experience in working on group projects so you can manage roles and responsibilities and build a set of professional values. The core content will also give you the ability to set strategies, manage information flows and deal with problems such as overload and risk.

The course develops:
-Skills in business awareness, design and consultancy to facilitate the alignment of IT systems and services to business objectives
-The specialist understanding of theoretical principles in business systems analysis and design.
-Technical skills, through practical laboratory work, so you can apply your knowledge of IT and how it affects business competitiveness.

The course will give you specialist knowledge ranging from business systems requirements analysis and design, software systems engineering, data modelling to business intelligence, project management and business engineering with ERP solutions.

Core modules
-Business engineering with ERP solutions INM342 (15 credits)
-Business intelligence & analytics INM451 (15 credits)
-Practical business systems consultancy INM353 (15 credits)
-Project management INM372 (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues INM373 (15 credits)
-Systems specification INM312 (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose from one module in the first term from the following:
-User-centred design INM355 (15 credits)
-Information and knowledge management INM351 (15 credits)

Choose from one module in the second term from the following:*
-Databases INM343 (15 credits)
-Information Retrieval (IR) INM351 (15 credits)

*Note: Databases is compulsory for students who do not have prior knowledge at the discretion of the programme director.

Career prospects

As a City graduate you leave with front-line knowledge. With insight from major areas of research including software engineering, human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence, you will be able to assimilate your skills within the industry and offer a future-focused mindset.

From Unilever to HMV and from Accenture to ITN, City graduates are employed across sectors in consultancy companies, software houses, the public services, telecommunications, multinational manufacturers, and large retailers. The programme will help you build a strong peer network as well as a solid network of contacts for your continued career development.

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Structural Design aims to provide an understanding of aircraft structures, airworthiness requirements, design standards, stress analysis, fatigue and fracture (damage tolerance) and fundamentals of aerodynamics and loading. Read more

Course Description

Structural Design aims to provide an understanding of aircraft structures, airworthiness requirements, design standards, stress analysis, fatigue and fracture (damage tolerance) and fundamentals of aerodynamics and loading. The suitable selection of materials, both metallic and composite is also covered. Manufacturers of modern aircraft are demanding more lightweight and more durable structures. Structural integrity is a major consideration of today’s aircraft fleet. For an aircraft to economically achieve its design specification and satisfy airworthiness regulations, a number of structural challenges must be overcome. This course trains engineers to meet these challenges, and prepares them for careers in civil and military aviation.

Overview

This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience.

The Structural Design option consists of a taught component and an individual research project.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following outcomes from this degree course:
- To build upon knowledge to enable students to enter a wide range of aerospace and related activities concerned with the design of flying vehicles such as aircraft, missiles, airships and spacecraft
- To ensure that the student is of immediate use to their employer and has sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression
- To provide teaching that integrates the range of disciplines required by modern aircraft design
- To provide the opportunity for students to be immersed in a 'Virtual Industrial Environment' giving them hands-on experience of interacting with and working on an aircraft design project.

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Core Modules

The taught programme for the Structural Design masters is generally delivered from October to March. After completion of the four compulsory taught modules, students have an extensive choice of optional modules to match specific interests.

Core:
- Fatigue Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance
- Finite Element Analysis (including NASTRAN/PATRAN Workshops)
- Design and Analysis of Composite Structures
- Structural Stability

Optional:
- Loading Actions
- Computer Aided Design (CAD)
- Aircraft Aerodynamics
- Aircraft Stability and Control
- Aircraft Performance
- Detail Stressing
- Structural Dynamics
- Aeroelasticity
- Design for Manufacture and Operation
- Initial Aircraft Design (including Structural Layout)
- Airframe Systems
- Aircraft Accident Investigation
- Crashworthiness
- Aircraft Power Plant Installation
- Avionic System Design
- Flight Experimental Methods (Jetstream Flight Labs)
- Reliability, Safety Assessment and Certification
- Sustaining Design (Structural Durability)

Individual Project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place from January to September.

Recent Individual Research Projects include:
- Review, Evaluation and Development of a Microlight Aircraft
- Investigation of the Fatigue Life of Hybrid Metal Composite Joints
- Design for Additive Layer Manufacture
- Rapid Prototyping for Wind Tunnel Model Manufacturing.

Group project

There is no group project for this option of the Aerospace Vehicle Design MSc.

Assessment

Taught modules (20%); Individual Research Project (80%)

Career opportunities

The AVD option in Structural Design is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

Graduates from the have gone onto pursue engineering careers in disciplines such as structural design, stress analysis or systems design. Many of our former graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/AVD-Option-in-Structural-Design

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With increasing traffic density of civil aircraft, and the need for increased military precision in conflicts around the world, safer aircraft operations require more sophisticated avionic systems. Read more
With increasing traffic density of civil aircraft, and the need for increased military precision in conflicts around the world, safer aircraft operations require more sophisticated avionic systems.

This specialist option of the MSc Aerospace Vehicle Design (http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/courses/taught/aerospace-vehicle-design) provides you with an understanding of avionic systems design, analysis, development, test and airframe integration.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students with a background in aeronautical or mechanical engineering or those with relevant industrial experience. It provides a taught engineering programme with a focus on the technical, business and management aspects of aircraft design in the civil and military aerospace sectors.

Why this course?

The Avionic Systems Design option aims to provide an understanding of avionic systems design, analysis, development, test and airframe integration. This includes a detailed look at robust and fault-tolerant flight control, advanced 4D flight management and RNP navigation, self-separation and collision avoidance and advanced digital data communications systems, as well as pilot-friendly and intelligent cockpit displays and situation awareness.

We have been at the forefront of postgraduate education in aerospace engineering since 1946. Aerospace Vehicle Design at Cranfield University was one of the original foundation courses of the College of Aeronautics. Graduates of this course are eligible to join the Cranfield College of Aeronautics Alumni Association (CCAAA), an active community which hold a number of networking and social events throughout the year.

Cranfield University is well located for students from all over the world, and offers a range of library and support facilities to support your studies. This enables students from all over the world to complete this qualification whilst balancing work/life commitments.

Informed by Industry

The course has an Industrial Advisory Committee with senior members from major UK aerospace companies, government bodies, and the military services. The committee meets twice a year to review and advise on course content, acquisition skills and other attributes are desirable from graduates of the course. Panel members include:

- BAE Systems
- Airbus
- Royal Air Force
- Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform
- Royal Australian Air Force
- Messier-Dowty
- Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces.

We also arrange visits to sites such as BAE Systems, Thales, GKN and RAF bases which specialise in the maintenance of military aircraft. This allows you to get up close to the aircraft and components to help with ideas for the group project

Accreditation

Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) - http://aerosociety.com/
Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) - http://www.imeche.org/

Course details

This option is comprised of 14 compulsory modules and a minimum of 60 hours of optional modules, selected from a list of 10 options. You are also required to complete a group design project and an individual research project. Delivered via a combination of structured lectures, industry guest lectures, computer based workshops and private study.

A unique feature of the course is that we have four external examiners; two from industry who assess the group design project and two from academia who assess the individual research project.

Group project

The extensive group design project is a distinctive and unique feature of this course. This teamwork project takes place over six months, usually between October and March; and recreates a virtual industrial environment bringing together students with various experience levels and different nationalities into one integrated design team.

You will be given responsibility for the detailed design of a significant part of the aircraft, for example, forward fuselage, fuel system, or navigation system. The project will progress from the conceptual phase through to the preliminary and detail design phases. You are required to run project meetings, produce engineering drawings and detailed analyses of their design. Problem solving and project coordination must be undertaken on a team and individual basis. At the end of the project, groups are required to report and present findings to a panel of 200 senior engineers from industry.

This element of the course is both real and engaging, and places the student group in a professional role as aerospace design engineers. Students testify that working as an integrated team on real problems is invaluable and prepares them well for careers in a highly competitive industry.

Watch past presentation YouTube videos to give you a taster of our innovative and exciting group projects:

- Blended Wing Body Aircraft - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfD0CIAscOI
- A9 Dragonfly Box Wing Aircraft - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4LQzXBJInw
- MRT7 Tanker Aircraft - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNfQM2ELXvg
- A-13 Voyager - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS6Wq7lpmDw
- SL-12 Vimana - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjEEazsVtSc

Individual project

The individual research project aims to provide the training necessary for you to apply knowledge from the taught element to research, and takes place over six months. The project may be theoretical and/or experimental and drawn from a range of topics related to the course and suggested by teaching staff, your employer or focused on your own area of interest.

Assessment

Taught modules 10%, Group project 50%, Individual research project 40%

Your career

The Avionic Systems Design option is valued and respected by employers worldwide. The applied nature of this course ensures that our graduates are ready to be of immediate use to their future employer and has provided sufficient breadth of understanding of multi-discipline design to position them for accelerated career progression.

This course prepares graduates for careers as project design engineers, systems design, structural design or avionic engineers in aerospace or related industries, with the aim of progressing to technical management/chief engineer. Graduates from the MSc in Avionic Systems Design can therefore look forward to a varied choice of challenging career opportunities in the above disciplines.

Many of our graduates occupy very senior positions in their organisations, making valuable contributions to the international aerospace industry. Typical student destinations include BAE Systems, Airbus, Dassault and Rolls-Royce plc

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MA Design Future Society is an 18-month programme, leading to a joint award with Mannheim University of Applied Sciences. The programme includes study at both universities. Read more

MA Design Future Society is an 18-month programme, leading to a joint award with Mannheim University of Applied Sciences. The programme includes study at both universities. If you start the programme at Leeds your first semester will be at Leeds, your second semester will be at Mannheim and then you will return to Leeds for your third semester.

All students registered on the programme may apply for Erasmus+ funding which will contribute to travel and living expenses during the five month exchange. The School of Design and Leeds University’s International Office and Language Centre will provide support for applications for funding, visas and pre-sessional language tuition.

This future orientated programme provides opportunities to integrate research from philosophy, social science and digital technology with design thinking in addressing social issues; realigning design as a discipline with social and cultural value. You will be encouraged to employ design as a catalyst for change; articulating new perceptions, developing appropriate strategies and implementing future-oriented solutions, which affect our society, culture and economy.

Traditionally designers applied their skills post problem identification – we will address that imbalance by positioning the designer at the point of problem identification and need analysis, extending the function and purpose of design beyond fulfilling commercial objectives by developing new and relevant products and implementing sustainable solutions for public, private and third sectors. This unique educational experience embraces collaboration, teamwork and internationalism and we encourage applications from all disciplines.

At the School of Design and Fakultät für Gestaltung, Mannheim University of Applied Sciences you will be able to develop your practice in well-equipped studios and purpose-built computer clusters so you can build your skills on both PC and Mac. There are computer-aided design (CAD) suites with access to the latest design software and some of the latest design technology, such as digital printing and laser cutting facilities, and colour analysis/prediction labs, eye-tracking technology and digital photography.

At Leeds there is also an impressive range of resources you can use for research. We house the M&S Company Archive including documents, advertising, photos, films, clothing and merchandise from throughout Marks & Spencer’s history, offering a fascinating insight into the changing nature of our culture over time.

Course content

Fundamentally multi-disciplinary and collaborative, course content encourages innovation and autonomy in response to set briefs and self initiated study supported by expertise in research, strategic thinking and practical implementation of communication design. Traditional academic study in the form of essays, literature reviews and reports, combines with social projects requiring, empathy, team working, concept realisation and execution. Students are required to provide evidence of effective decision-making, objective self-reflection and critical evaluation through visual and oral presentations, critiques, reflective logs and reports, visual diaries, poster presentations and portfolio development.

In the first semester students undertake theoretical and practical study in integrated media, semiotics, philosophy, sociology and research methodology in order to identify and manage complex social issues and communicate insights and design proposals by effectively employing advocacy skills and presentation techniques. Team work and collaboration are essential to the successful generation and implementation of creative solutions, therefore students are required, within this context, to demonstrate independent judgement, decision-making and personal responsibility.

In Semester 2 there is a five-month exchange programme to Mannheim which involves the application of design thinking within a different cultural environment through independent and group social projects; presenting significant challenges in comprehension, interpretation, empathy and communication. Students are encouraged to develop entrepreneurial attitudes in seeking opportunities for collaboration; contributing to professional development by operating in new areas of influence and articulating complex information into a coherent creative proposal.

In the third semester you will return from Mannheim and the programme concludes with a major research dissertation or innovation project, independently conceived and managed, demonstrating abilities in research, holistic understanding and applying contemporary knowledge to solving future problems. The knowledge, skills and qualities acquired through this postgraduate programme are transferable for employment in a variety of sectors.

Course Structure

Year one compulsory modules

  • Integrated Communication (Design Future Society) 15 credits
  • Social Aesthetics 15 credits
  • Design and Society 15 credits
  • Research Methodology 15 credits
  • Social Design Projects 30 credits
  • Design Futures 30 credits

Year two optional modules

  • Dissertation - Digital Social and Mobile Design 60 credits
  • Digital Innovation Project 60 credits 

For more information on typical modules, read Design Future Society MA in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Lectures, seminars, tutorials, creative and technical workshops, creative studio sessions, group learning, group critiques and peer assessment. There will be an emphasis on social and situated learning where dialogue, reflection, intuition, critical analysis and judgement are exercised within the context of group learning and group assignments, supported by utilising social media networks and content sharing to connect students from both institutions.

By employing social media and digital technology we aim to develop a user-centric information infrastructure and self-organisational system of information sharing in order to encourage the following:

  • Participation, through focused discussion/conversation
  • Responsible, self motivated, intrinsically motivated thesis to demonstrate understanding
  • Exploration, by identifying relevant questions and autonomy in decision-making
  • Experimentation, acknowledging risk, failure, evaluation and reflection
  • Understanding, through action, experiential engagement, observation and analysis

Assessment

You’ll also be assessed by a variety of methods. Your own creative work will be assessed via portfolios and projects, reports, presentations and literature reviews. Formal examinations do not contribute to assessment. Full details of assessment for each module can be found via the programme catalogue.

Career opportunities

Employment opportunities are broad and varied as there is growing demand for communication professionals with social enterprise skills in design and innovation with a clear focus on social and cultural interaction and collaboration. Therefore employment prospects extend beyond the traditional agency model into research, strategy and planning roles within a broad range of companies and organisations. In addition graduates could also consider academic research and take advantage of the significant number of calls for research proposals that currently identify social need.

Placement opportunities

5 month Erasmus+ funded exchange at Mannheim University of Applied Sciences.





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This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. Read more

Course Description

This course provides education and training in selected weapons systems. The course is intended for officers of the armed forces and for scientists and technical officers in government defence establishments and the defence industry. It is particularly suitable for those who, in their subsequent careers, will be involved with the specification, analysis, development, technical management or operation of weapons systems.

The course is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and will contribute towards an application for chartered status.

Overview

The Gun System Design MSc is part of the Vehicle and Weapons Engineering Programme. The course is designed to provide an understanding of the technologies used in the design, development, test and evaluation of gun systems.

This course offers the underpinning knowledge and education to enhance the student’s suitability for senior positions within their organisation.

Each individual module is designed and offered as a standalone course which allows an individual to understand the fundamental technology required to efficiently perform the relevant, specific job responsibilities. The course provides students with the depth of knowledge to undertake engineering analysis or the evaluation of relevant sub systems.

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

English Language Requirements

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 6.5
TOEFL - 92
Pearson PTE Academic - 65
Cambridge English Scale - 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency - C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Course overview

This MSc course is made up of two essential components, the equivalent of 12 taught modules (including some double modules, typically of a two-week duration), and an individual project.

Modules

MSc and PGDip students take 11 compulsory modules and 1 optional module.
PGCert students take 4 compulsory modules and 2 optional modules.

Core:
- Element Design
- Fundamentals of Ballistics
- Finite Element Methods in Engineering
- Gun System Design
- Light Weapon Design
- Military Vehicle Propulsion and Dynamics
- Modelling, Simulation and Control
- Solid Modelling CAD
- Survivability
- Vehicle Systems Integration

Optional:
- Guided Weapons
- Military Vehicle Dynamics
- Reliability and System Effectiveness
- Uninhabited Military Vehicle Systems

Individual Project

In addition to the taught part of the course, students can opt either to undertake an individual project or participate in a group design project. The aim of the project phase is to enable students to develop expertise in engineering research, design or development. The project phase requires a thesis to be submitted and is worth 80 credit points.

Examples of recent titles are given below.
- Use of Vibration Absorber to help in Vibration
- Validated Model of Unmanned Ground Vehicle Power Usage
- Effect of Ceramic Tile Spacing in Lightweight Armour systems
- Investigation of Suspension System for Main Battle Tank
- An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation into a Pivot Adjustable Suspension System as a Low Cost Method of Adjusting for Payload
- Analysis of Amphibious Operation and Waterjet Propulsions for Infantry Combat Vehicle.
- Design of the Light Weapon System
- Analysis of the Off-road Performance of a Wheeled or Tracked Vehicle

Group Project

- Armoured Fighting Vehicle and Weapon Systems Study
To develop the technical requirements and characteristics of armoured fighting vehicles and weapon systems, and to examine the interactions between the various sub-systems and consequential compromises and trade-offs.

Syllabus/curriculum:
- Application of systems engineering practice to an armoured fighting vehicle and weapon system.
- Practical aspects of system integration.
- Ammunition stowage, handling, replenishment and their effects on crew performance and safety.
- Applications of power, data and video bus technology to next generation armoured fighting vehicles.
- Effects of nuclear, biological and chemical attack on personnel and vehicles, and their survivability.

- Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of the group project the students should be able to –
- Demonstrate an understanding of the engineering principles involved in matching elements of the vehicle and weapon system together.
- Propose concepts for vehicle and weapon systems, taking into account incomplete and possibly conflicting user requirements.
- Effectively apply Solid Modelling in outlining proposed solutions.
- Interpret relevant legislation and standards and understand their relevance to vehicle and weapon systems.
- Work effectively in a team, communicate and make decisions.
- Report the outcome of a design study orally to a critical audience.

Assessment

Continuous assessment, examinations and thesis (MSc only). Approximately 30% of the assessment is by examination.

Career opportunities

Many previous students have returned to their sponsor organisations to take up senior programme appointments and equivalent research and development roles in this technical area.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage - https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Gun-Systems-Design

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Nowadays, the term Healthcare indicates a process that requires to create a new complex and multifactorial system in which technological factors, organizational, and human dimensions must find a balanced mix to provide safe and high quality care for patients. Read more

Nowadays, the term Healthcare indicates a process that requires to create a new complex and multifactorial system in which technological factors, organizational, and human dimensions must find a balanced mix to provide safe and high quality care for patients. This also requires clinically effective and well-designed medical devices, as well as effective and reliable healthcare services based upon innovative technologies and systems, and the related organizational models to be implemented.

In the last 20 years the technological development of biomedical devices has reached an enormous progress, in terms of high performance and reliability, and also for safety and quality. Today medicine involves the use of many equipment and devices for the diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation and to support the correct clinical decision or the best treatment. Healthcare industry is requiring this multidisciplinary approach and know-how.

The Specializing Master Product Service System Design for Healthcare aims at providing the students with the fundamentals for designing biomedical devices, starting from the basics of methodologies and technologies for the measurement of physiological signals in clinical and home care applications.

Thanks to the proposed educational activity in the areas of:

  • Research and development,
  • Testing and certification,
  • Regulatory systems and reference models,
  • Marketing and analysis of user needs,

the main career opportunities with a strong orientation to the USER Centred Design and product innovation, process and service with leading-edge technologies, are expected in the following areas:

  • Industrial and Services: for R&D, market analysis and user needs, 
  • Clinical: design and application of systems for diagnosis, cure and theraphy, prevention and rehabilitation,
  • Policy makers and/or policy managers in Healthcare and in technologies for healthcare.

Degree awarded

The Specializing Master grants 62 CFU, equivalent to 62 ECTS. Upon completion, students earn a Politecnico di Milano first-level Specializing Master diploma.

Didactics

The training modules are designed to meet the need for an international panorama of growing competitiveness in which the designer should be able to increase the product value by generating innovations thanks to the technology available.

The mostly used devices will be analyzed and presented during the course. Standards, norms and reference services are another fundamental part of the Specializing Master providing the reference framework for how to develop devices and products for healthcare. Design Methods and Ergonomics will be also presented as reference methodologies in designing innovative product-service systems in healthcare, as well as to support methodologically and with reference data the design of new systems. For a better understanding and participation, visits to medical facilities (hospitals and laboratories) will be proposed.

A final workshop to develop innovative systems will conclude the Specializing Master as practical demonstration of the achieved goals. A stage in selected companies/institutions will make the students to experience the acquired knowledge.

Attendance to the activity is mandatory for at least 75% of the course. 

The modules will cover the following teaching areas:

  • Organizational and management models of the new healthcare processes
  • Technologies and systems
  • Environments and Users
  • Design Methodologies, Standards, Ergonomics in Healthcare Design
  • standard and innovative clinical Challenges
  • Design of products and systems for Healthcare

Internship of 325 hours.

For more info, please visit http://polidesign.net/en/healthcare



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This programme enables students to work effectively in an engineering design role, whether that role concerns the design of products, processes or systems, at an overall or detail level. Read more
This programme enables students to work effectively in an engineering design role, whether that role concerns the design of products, processes or systems, at an overall or detail level. A balance of theory and practice is applied to the solving of real engineering design problems. All projects meet the product design requirements of one of our many co-operating companies.

Core study areas include structural analysis, engineering management and business studies, computer aided engineering, product design and human factors, engineering design methods, sustainable product design, the innovation process and project management, sustainable development: the engineering context and a project.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mechanical-manufacturing/engineering-design/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Structural Analysis
- Engineering Management and Business Studies
- Computer Aided Engineering
- Product Design and Human Factors
- Engineering Design Methods
- Sustainable Product Design
- The Innovation Process and Project Management
- Sustainable Development: The Engineering Context
- Project

Careers and further study

Engineering design related jobs in product, process and system design environments, providing project management and communication skills and direct technical input. Graduates may also study for an MPhil or PhD with the School.

Why Choose Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at Loughborough?

The School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering is a leader in technological research and innovation, with extensive national and international industrial links, and a long standing tradition of excellent teaching.

Our Industrial Advisory Committee, comprising of engineers at senior levels in the profession, ensures that our programmes contain the optimal balance of subjects and industrial relevance, with our programmes accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Institution of Engineering and Technology and Institution of Engineering Designers.

- Facilities
The School has laboratories devoted to disciplines such as; dynamics and control, automation, fluid mechanics, healthcare engineering, internal combustion engines, materials, mechatronics, metrology, optical engineering, additive manufacturing, sports engineering, structural integrity and thermodynamics.

- Research
The School has a busy, multi-national community of well over 150 postgraduate research students who form an important part of our internationally recognised research activities.
We have seven key research centres (Electronics Manufacture, Intelligent Automation, Regenerative Medicine Embedded Intelligence, High Efficiency SCR for Low Emission Vehicles and High Value Manufacturing Catapult Centre) and we are a lead governing partner in the newly formed UK Manufacturing Technology Centre.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment or further study within six months of graduating. Our graduates go on to work with companies such as Airbus, BAE Systems, Caterpillar, EDF Energy, Ford, IBM, Jaguar Land Rover, Millbrook Proving Ground, Rolls Royce and Tata Steel.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/mechanical-manufacturing/engineering-design/

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate diploma. Read more

Introduction

Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate diploma. Explore visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects. This course offers an intensive vocational route in the graphic design profession and is an ideal option if you need a bridge to Masters study.

Content

Build up a strong vocational portfolio on this intensive 30 week course.

The Postgraduate Diploma Design for Visual Communication provides a unique learning experience across an intensive 30 week programme. The highly structured delivery of the first stage of the course places emphasis on the development of fundamental design skills. This is underpinned with the importance of visual research and the development of critical and analytical skills. During the second stage of the course you will choose from a wide range of postgraduate electives and go on to develop a self-initiated major project that focuses on individual interests.

The Postgraduate Diploma is designed to build design skills even if you are relatively new to the subject of graphic design. The course provides you with a strong, vocational portfolio and is also useful in building your confidence to undertake further postgraduate study at Masters level.

The course recognises that graphic design is one of the most important and influential of what has become known as the creative industries and that it contributes significantly, directly and indirectly, to our economic and cultural well being.

Structure

Phase 1 is delivered through three units. Design Resolution is an intensive series of 'hands-on' studio workshops that develop basic design skills including visual grammar, typography, structure and the grid. Research and Development breaks down the research process and encourages contextual understanding of graphic design practice. It is designed to develop understanding of research methods and to provide you with research skills that can be applied to other units on the course.

The third unit encourages you to position your work within the framework of professional and/or academic contexts.
Phase 2 is also delivered through three units beginning with options from the extensive postgraduate elective program. Typical examples might include letterpress, printmaking, sound design, photography, narrative and sequence, typologies, design and politics, moving image and book design. The final units require you to propose, research and bring to completion a substantial practical project.

The major project builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in the first stage and applies these in the creation of a self-initiated design project based on extensive research, analysis, investigation and a clear research question. The major project is supported throughout with weekly seminars and tutorials.

The course, which fits within the University credit framework, comprises: tutored study, self-directed study and access to facilities. Tutored study is generally two days a week. In addition to this you are expected to attend lectures and work independently.

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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings. Read more
This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings.

The course includes a number of interlinked modules that simulate the design and development of a sustainable project. This enables students from different disciplines to develop skills and understanding relevant to their own discipline, be it design or consultancy, and in relation to a national and international context.

Why choose this course?

The course is run by the School of Architecture, which is recognised as one of the country's leading schools of architecture and is consistently ranked by The Architect's Journals one of the five best schools in the UK. You will gain an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. The course attracts some of the best students in the field from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects. You will have the opportunity to go on an annual field trip. This is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark. Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

This course in detail

The course is organised on a modular credit system, 60 credits for postgraduate certificate, 120 credits for the postgraduate diploma (9 months full-time, 20 months part-time) and 180 credits for the master's degree (12 months full-time, 24 months part-time).

Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example, a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 36 hours of which will normally be devoted to lectures, seminars, individual tutorials or other staff contact. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study and assessment.

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown below.

The core modules for the MSc and PGDip are:
-Building Physics (20 credits)
-The Sustainable Built Environment (20 credits)
-Post-occupancy Building Evaluation (20 credits)
-Advanced Low Carbon Building Technologies (20 credits)
-Modelling and Passive Strategies (20 credits)
-Sustainable Design in Context (20 credits)

The compulsory modules for the MSc are:
-Research Methods and Design (10 credits)
-MSc Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with sustainability, low-carbon and resource efficient design.

Staff-led lectures provide the framework, background and knowledge base, and you are encouraged to probe deeper into the topics by further reading and review. Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in the lectures are achieved through professional and staff-led workshops, group and one-to-one tutorials, student-led seminars, case studies, and practical work that anticipates the design project.

The course attracts students from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning. You are exposed to a variety of cultural perspectives and issues through the use of international case studies and draw on their diverse strengths through peer learning and group work.

An annual field trip is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects.

We attract some of the best students in the field, drawn by the integrating basis of the programme and its solid theoretical foundation on expertise within the University.

Careers and professional development

Graduates will possess an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. They will be familiar with a range of models, tools and methods with which to quantify, predict, evaluate and manage building performance, and will be able to use them and switch to other tools based on an understanding from first principles.

Drawing on a working knowledge of how to minimise energy, carbon emissions and resource consumption in buildings through the various stages of their life cycles, they will be able to take account of changing, incomplete and uncertain information related to the environment. They will also have well developed skills in auditing, analysis, reporting and presentation and a thorough understanding of the interdisciplinary subject area.

Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

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Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Read more

Introduction

Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Explore visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects. This course offers an intensive vocational route in the graphic design profession and is an ideal option if you need a bridge to Masters study.

Content

London College of Communication’s vocationally-focussed Postgraduate Certificate will help you to build practice-based and professional skills in the highly diverse field of design for visual communication.

Visual communication is a process by which ideas are made visible and conveyed through media to enhance meaning, experience and understanding. This one-year intensive course re-examines the relationship between design principles, research methodologies and the related theoretical contexts.

The programme is ideal for those from diverse academic backgrounds who wish to extend and develop their prior experiences through visual communication. Students on the course have previously studied subjects from molecular genetics to English, architecture to textiles, micro-biology to fine art and product design to geography. The course is a confidence-building bridge to Masters study as well as providing the foundations for professional career development.

You can expect to become part of a unique learning community made up of staff, guest speakers and fellow students from a diverse range of creative disciplines and cultures. Through tutorials, set and self-initiated projects, workshops and group discussions, you will gain a deeper understanding of the design process that will enhance your practice. Visual language and grammar, typographic hierarchy, symbol design, graphic representation, identity and information visualisation are just some of the areas you will explore.
Personal projects will provide you with a foundation in the principles of visual communication whilst engaging with postgraduate level research methods and conceptual development. Examples of personal projects include: mapping directional devices in the city; the promotion of a typeface; visual analysis of people flow and visual surveys of lettering. Graduates from this course have found employment within high profile international creative agencies, design management, teaching and professional practice. Some have established their own design studios, while others have gone on to achieve highly at Master’s level.

Structure

The Postgraduate Certificate Design for Visual Communication has three components:

Research and Development
Design Resolution
Professional and Academic Context

The course includes: visual language and grammar; typographic hierarchy; narrative and sequential design; symbol design; graphic representation; identity; information visualisation; as well as opportunities to pursue projects of individual interest.

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The objective of the Space Engineering MSc is to educate highly skilled professionals, qualified to develop and manage technical activities related to research and design in the space sector. Read more

Mission and goals

The objective of the Space Engineering MSc is to educate highly skilled professionals, qualified to develop and manage technical activities related to research and design in the space sector. Space Engineering graduates have all the competences to fully develop activities related to the design, technical analysis and verification of a space mission. Within these activities, in particular, graduates from Politecnico di Milano can develop specific skills in the areas of: mission analysis, thermal and structural design of space components, design of the space propulsion and power generation system, design of the orbit and attitude control systems, space systems integration and testing.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/space-engineering/

Professional opportunities

The knowledge gained through the degree in Space Engineering is suited to responsibility positions where working autonomy is required. As an example, positions offered by the space industry, research centres, private or public companies involved in the design, manufacturing and testing of space components. Furthermore, the skills and competences of the space engineer are well suited to companies involved in the design and manufacturing of products characterized by lightweight structures and autonomous operation capacity, and more in general where advanced design tools and technologies are adopted.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Space_Engineering_02.pdf
The Master of Science programme in Space Engineering aims at training professionals able to develop and manage technical activities related to research and design in the space sector. Within these activities, students can develop specific skills in the following areas: mission analysis, thermal and structural design of space components, design of the space propulsion and power generation system, design of the orbit and attitude control systems, and space systems integration/testing. Space engineers are suitable for positions offered by the space industry, research centres, private or public companies involved in the design, manufacturing and testing of space components, or generally in the design of advanced technologies. The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

- 1st year
Aerothermodynamics, Orbital Mechanics, Aerospace Structures, Dynamics and Control of Aerospace Structures with Fundamentals of Aeroelasticity, Fundamentals of Thermochemical Propulsion, Heat Transfer and Thermal Analysis, Communications Skills.

- 2nd year
Spacecraft Attitude Dynamics and Control, Space Propulsion and Power Systems, Space Physics, Numerical Modeling of Aerospace Systems, Experimental Techniques in Aerospace Engineering, Aerospace Technologies and Materials, Telecommunication Systems, Space Mission Analysis and Design, Graduation Thesis and Final Work.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/space-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/space-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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This course is a professionally accredited Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and Architects Registration Board (ARB) route to apart 2 qualification in architecture. Read more

This course is a professionally accredited Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and Architects Registration Board (ARB) route to apart 2 qualification in architecture. It is suitable for part 1 graduates with or without practical experience, as it provides the opportunity to work alongside your studies.

The course creatively explores the role of architecture as a socially and environmentally sustainable practice with which to design spaces, buildings and cities for an increasingly uncertain future.

Across a range of design, technical, social and theoretical modules, you explore the potential of a socially and physically sustainable approach to design, architecture and urbanism.

The course provides a platform for you to develop an ambitious and exciting personal agenda within architecture. You are encouraged to produce original, visionary, and aspirational design propositions, which are always rooted in, and emerge from, real existing conditions.

You apply your skills and knowledge on an international field trip in year two or three.

Through the design projects and related modules, you develop experimental design and critical research skills.

In year four, the design studio 4 module uses collective research to allow you to develop individual proposals for new social and architectural interventions within Sheffield. Studio 4 is building a body of research and proposals around our city; recent themes have included Reintroducing Death to the City, Controversies of Architecture at Park Hill, and Hacking the Upper Don Valley.

Years five and six employ a vertical system for design, with three Atelier. Design projects have been sited in The Netherlands (Rotterdam, Utrecht and Delft) and in various locations across the UK. The Atelier sessions all pursue the development of innovative and creative architectural design proposals in response to your study and analysis of real-life social, cultural and environmental conditions.

Professional recognition

This course is a professionally accredited Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and Architects Registration Board (ARB) route to a Part 2 qualification.

Course structure

Three years full-time

Starts September and October

Year one core modules

  • Design Studio four
  • Theories of architecture and design

Year two core modules

  • Design studio five
  • Urban Strategies
  • Sustainable city ecologies
  • Critical study

Year three core modules

  • Design studio six
  • Scenario mapping
  • Integrated practice

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Design portfolio
  • Exhibition
  • Essays
  • Reports

Employability

The three year route, allows you to learn while in practice. Your academic study gives you an advanced entry point into the architectural profession and an added level of preparation for the Part 3 final examination in architecture.

This course improves your present working practices through deeper understanding, knowledge and focused professional skills.

You gain expertise in sustainable approaches to design – a subject of increasing global importance.

Although the focus is on gaining a professional qualification in architecture, the course also gives you access to related careers in • design • planning and urban design • construction • conservation • environmental design.



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Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. Read more
Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. This course is ideal if you have existing programming skills and want to understand software users and work with them to create positive user experiences. The MRes Interaction Design course will help you stand out from other graduates by providing you with the skills and theoretical understanding needed to create successful products in industry or go on to further postgraduate study in a Interaction Design/User Experience/HCI related research field. There is a vibrant international research community developing new methods and theories that underpin this discipline within the broad field of HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) and more specific Interaction Design (IxD ) and User Experience (UxD) areas.

INDUSTRY LINKS

As part of the course you will have opportunities to work with external partners. At UCLan we work with a range on businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

We aim to provide a challenging and stimulating environment in which you can develop and learn new skills. As an MRes student you will be supported in exploring your full potential through taught modules and an extended project. Teaching is done in small groups with plenty of opportunities for practical work, networking with students and staff, and to get involved with research activities.

Assessment methods will include individual and group assignments, presentation and seminars.

FACILITIES

The course is delivered in the Computing and Technology Building at the City Campus in Preston at which students have access to the latest technology, and can study in a supportive environment. Facilities include a purpose built Human-Computer Interaction Suite which is used for the evaluation of software products.

OPPORTUNITIES

The goal of the course is to guide you, depending on your interests, to either go out into Industry or to progress to an academic research career. We aim to produce Interaction Design practitioners who understand how to create excellent interaction designs for a range of different scenarios.

Placement opportunities are available as an option for students who want to gain some work experience as part of the course.

We also aim to give you a thorough grounding in the Interaction Design research area so you are ready to start a PhD. After completing the MRes there will be opportunities for students to continue to MPhil or PhD study.

Our alumni have gone on to work a range of destinations including UX specialists, the BBC, and Tata.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Interaction Design is a branch of Computing concerned with how users interact with computer systems. This includes the roles of users in analysis, design and evaluation of systems, as well as methods for the system developer to create usable and useful interactive products for people, and extends to consideration of social aspects of computer use. In fact it is often more helpful to regard the computer program and its users as each being a component of a system. Many systems fail because of problems with the user interaction, rather than problems with the underlying code. This is because the human is the most complex component of the system, and the least well understood.

This course is suitable for:
-Those who wish to enter a career in Interaction Design or User Experience Design
-Those who wish to enhance their appeal to employers and stand out from other computing graduates.
-Those who wish to go on to study at PhD level
-Those in employment who wish to use the MRes project to develop a product for their employer and develop personally

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