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Masters Degrees (Surveillance)

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This is a joint programme provided by the School and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC). There is a shortage of trained veterinary epidemiologists and there are excellent career opportunities for graduates. Read more
This is a joint programme provided by the School and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC). There is a shortage of trained veterinary epidemiologists and there are excellent career opportunities for graduates. This course provides training in essential methodological skills for the design, conduct, analysis, interpretation and communication of epidemiological studies; and surveillance and disease control in animal and human populations.

This course is also available as a Postgraduate Diploma

Graduates from this course hold positions in a variety of organisations including: Ministries of Agriculture & Food; Veterinary Investigation Laboratories; Animal Disease Research Institutes; Animal Health Trusts; Veterinary Faculties in Universities and International Organisations concerned with global health (DFID, FAO, WHO, OIE, etc).

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/vet_epi_programme_specification.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msve.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students will be able to:

- design and implement epidemiological studies and surveillance systems

- analyse and interpret data from epidemiological studies

- undertake risk analysis and apply this to animal health economics

- apply epidemiological principles to disease control within animal and human populations

- give pragmatic advice on animal health linked to welfare, production and public health

- communicate effectively on the health of animal and human populations to a range of audiences, including the general public, farmers, researchers, politicians and other key policy makers

Structure

Term 1:
All students take the compulsory modules and usually take the recommended modules.

Compulsory modules:

Extended Epidemiology
Epidemiological Aspects of Laboratory Investigation
Surveillance of Animal Health & Production
Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health
Data Management for Epidemiological Studies
Communication Skills in Epidemiology

Recommended:
Public Health Lecture Series

Optional:
Epidemiology in Context
Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases
Introduction to Computing

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five compulsory study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.).

Slot 1: Animal Health Economics

Slot 2: Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

Slot 3: Modelling and the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases

Slot 4: Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases

Slot 5: Applied Veterinary Epidemiology

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tvet.html

Project Report (MSc only):
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project on a topic in veterinary epidemiology, for submission by early September.

Intercalating this course

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msve.html#sixth

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In a world where global transport links allow rapid movement of people and animals, disease can spread more quickly than before and is harder to control than ever. Read more
In a world where global transport links allow rapid movement of people and animals, disease can spread more quickly than before and is harder to control than ever. In such a world there is a growing need for trained epidemiologists at the front line of disease surveillance.

The UK leads the way in providing this training and, in order to meet the demand for skilled professionals, the RVC has developed a unique postgraduate veterinary epidemiology course, delivered jointly with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

Under the microscope

This demanding masters in veterinary epidemiology programme is led by veterinary epidemiologists and supported by policy makers from the forefront of UK government and you will gain a fascinating insight into the work of the Department for Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA, formerly AHVLA). Your areas of study will combine LSHTM’s strengths in epidemiological principles and communicable disease epidemiology, with the RVC’s expertise in veterinary epidemiology, animal health and production.

The course

All students are required to study the core units and usually the recommended units. Students are advised to take at most one optional unit unless they are very familiar with the content of several core or recommended units.

Term one core units:
- Extended epidemiology
- Statistics for EPH
- Epidemiological aspects of laboratory investigation
- Surveillance of animal health and production
- Data management using epi-data
- Communication skills in epidemiology

Recommended unit: Public health
Optional units: Epidemiology in context, Introduction to computing

Term two core units:
- Animal health economics
- Epidemiology and control of communicable diseases
- Statistical methods in epidemiology
- Applied risk assessment and management

Term three core unit:
- Advanced statistical methods in veterinary epidemiology

Recommended units: Modelling and dynamics of infectious diseases, Methods of vector control


Projects - you will spend the second part of the year working full-time on an individual project with the guidance of a supervisor. If you have been sponsored by an employer, you may undertake a project related to your work.

Assessment - you will be assessed by two written exams in June, six in-course assessments throughout the year, and a project report with oral examination in September.

How will I learn?

You can choose to complete the Veterinary Epidemiology post-graduate course over one year full-time study, or part time over two years.

All participants begin the course in September. Over three terms, you will be taught through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and tutorials. Both MSc and Diploma students complete the Term One foundation module. MSc students then complete a further five compulsory modules over Terms Two and Three, while Diploma students complete a further four modules, with some module choice available.

Students on both courses sit written examination papers in June, after which the veterinary epidemiology MSc students will work on a research project from June to August, culminating in an oral examination in September.

Part-time students attend the course full-time from October to December in year one, followed by classes two to three days a week from January to May. You will usually study the remainder of the course in year two, including the summer research project (MSc students only).

We recognise the need for flexibility, however, and are happy to tailor your part-time study to meet your specific requirements (subject to agreement with the course director).

Learning outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course you will be able to:

- Demonstrate and understand the key concepts underpinning the discipline of veterinary and medical epidemiology
- Select an appropriate study design when confronted with an epidemiological research question and develop a detailed study protocol capable of answering the research question
- Analyse and interpret epidemiological data derived from cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies
- Review critically the published epidemiological literature
- Apply epidemiological principles to surveillance, and infection and disease control, within animal and human populations
- Communicate effectively with researchers from different disciplinary backgrounds
- Communicate effectively with other people with an interest in human and animal health, including the general public and key policy makers.

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Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. Read more
Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. The automation of visual processing (ie computer vision) has many applications in the modern world including medical imaging for better diagnosis, surveillance systems to improve security and safety, industrial and domestic robotics plus advanced interfaces for computer games, mobile phones and human-computer interfaces. The possibilities are only limited by our imagination.

Key features
-The unique combination of computer vision and embedded systems skills is highly desirable in state-of-the-art industrial applications.
-This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.
-You will have the opportunity to work on your project dissertation in the internationally recognised Digital Imaging Research Centre with groups on visual surveillance, human body motion, medical imaging and robotics and being involved in national and international projects or in collaboration with our industrial contacts.

What will you study?

The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) pathway will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to specify and build computer vision embedded systems, choosing from different imaging devices and applying software that can process and understand images. You will study a range of option modules encompassing computing, engineering and digital media processing. It may also be possible for you to undertake a real-world project in an industrial placement or as part of high-quality research working alongside DIRC (Digital Imaging Research Centre) groups (eg visual surveillance, human body motion analysis, robotics, medical imaging).
The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc course can be combined with Management Studies enabling you to develop business and management skills so you can work effectively with business managers to develop innovative and imaginative ways to exploit computer vision and embedded systems for business advantage. This is a key skill for employability, particularly as organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors grapple with austerity.

Assessment

Coursework and/or exams, research project/dissertation.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

The full MSc course consists of an induction programme, four taught modules, and project dissertation. Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc modules
-Digital Signal Processing
-Real-time Programming
-Artificial Vision Systems
-Project Dissertation
-One option module

Read less
Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. Read more
Vision is the most useful sense we possess and as such accounts for about 30% of the sensing processing of the brain. The automation of visual processing (ie computer vision) has many applications in the modern world including medical imaging for better diagnosis, surveillance systems to improve security and safety, industrial and domestic robotics plus advanced interfaces for computer games, mobile phones and human-computer interfaces. The possibilities are only limited by our imagination.

Key features
-The unique combination of computer vision and embedded systems skills is highly desirable in state-of-the-art industrial applications.
-This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.
-You will have the opportunity to work on your project dissertation in the internationally recognised Digital Imaging Research Centre with groups on visual surveillance, human body motion, medical imaging and robotics and being involved in national and international projects or in collaboration with our industrial contacts.

What will you study?

The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) pathway will equip you with the knowledge and skills required to specify and build computer vision embedded systems, choosing from different imaging devices and applying software that can process and understand images. You will study a range of option modules encompassing computing, engineering and digital media processing. It may also be possible for you to undertake a real-world project in an industrial placement or as part of high-quality research working alongside DIRC (Digital Imaging Research Centre) groups (eg visual surveillance, human body motion analysis, robotics, medical imaging).

The Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc course can be combined with Management Studies enabling you to develop business and management skills so you can work effectively with business managers to develop innovative and imaginative ways to exploit computer vision and embedded systems for business advantage. This is a key skill for employability, particularly as organisations in the public, private and voluntary sectors grapple with austerity.

Assessment

Coursework and/or exams, research project/dissertation.

Work placement scheme

Kingston University has set up a scheme that allows postgraduate students in the Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing to include a work placement element in their course starting from September 2017. The placement scheme is available for both international and home/EU students.

-The work placement, up to 12 months; is optional.
-The work placement takes place after postgraduate students have successfully completed the taught portion of their degree.
-The responsibility for finding the placement is with the student. We cannot guarantee the placement, just the opportunity to undertake it.
-As the work placement is an assessed part of the course for international students, this is covered by a student's tier 4 visa.

Details on how to apply will be confirmed shortly.

Course structure

The full MSc course consists of an induction programme, four taught modules, and project dissertation. Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) MSc modules
-Digital Signal Processing
-Real-time Programming
-Artificial Vision Systems
-Project Dissertation
-One option module

Embedded Systems (Computer Vision) with Management Studies MSc modules
-Digital Signal Processing
-Real-time Programming
-Artificial Vision Systems
-Business in Practice
-Project Dissertation

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Livestock are vital to the lives of millions of people, but endemic and epidemic diseases that affect livestock limit productivity and exacerbate poverty. Read more

Livestock are vital to the lives of millions of people, but endemic and epidemic diseases that affect livestock limit productivity and exacerbate poverty.

The diseases that can be transmitted between animals and people also threaten the health of livestock keepers, their families and their communities. In many developing regions farmers and animal health workers are often ill equipped to deal with this risk.

This programme draws together expertise from across the University to deliver first-class teaching and research to tackle these issues.

Building on a solid foundation of biological, immunological, pathological and epidemiological principles, this online MSc will equip you with the skills needed to identify, control and manage animal diseases and the expertise to tackle the international animal health challenges of the 21st Century.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Students may study to certificate, diploma or masters level.

Year 1: certificate

  • Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance
  • Host Responses to Infection
  • Pathogen Strategies for Transmission and Survival

Year 2: diploma

You will undertake the following compulsory course:

  • Zoonotic disease

Choose one one of the following two courses:

  • Surveillance and control of transboundary diseases affecting international trade
  • An introduction to transboundary diseases and their impact on trade and wildlife populations

Then choose from the following electives (up to 60 credits):

  • Control of economically important parasites
  • Environmental and nutritional diseases of livestock of international importance
  • New developments in epidemiology and the control of vector borne disease
  • Veterinary vaccinology
  • Wildlife animal health and environment
  • Technology advances in veterinary diagnostics
  • Animal disease survey design and analysis
  • Project planning and decision support for animal disease control
  • Animal healthcare systems in the post-privatisation era
  • Introduction to health and production of aquatic species
  • Introduction to GIS and spatial data analysis
  • Advanced GIS and spatial epidemiology and modelling
  • An Introduction of Project Cycle Management
  • Globalisation and health
  • The Modern Zoo
  • The Use of Artificial Reproductive Technologies in Threatened Species
  • Pastoralism and herd health
  • Zoonotic diseases in a global setting
  • Socioeconomic Principles for One Health

Year 3: masters

For a masters, you will choose either to conduct a written reflective element of 10–15,000 words or to take Project Cycle Management and Funding Application Preparation.

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD)

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Please contact the programme team for more information about available courses and course start dates.

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to enhance your career in animal management throughout the world with first-rate expertise and a highly regarded qualification.



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Study for a Masters at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. This well-established Public Health MSc offers a research-informed learning environment which reflects the latest sector developments. Read more
Study for a Masters at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. This well-established Public Health MSc offers a research-informed learning environment which reflects the latest sector developments.

•Masters degree available to study full time (one year) and part time (two years)
•Develop knowledge and skills aligned to the Public Health Training Curriculum and The Public Health Skills and Career Framework
•Study at LJMU's world renowned Centre for Public Health
•Benefit from the research-led content of this longstanding programme
•Enjoy a flexible approach to study and network with full and part time students from differing backgrounds
•Look forward to career opportunities in local authorities, the health sector, voluntary sector, private sector or research
•Support and guidance for placement learning
•This course will only run subject to minimum numbers

Attracting students from a variety of backgrounds, this course prides itself on its inclusive approach, bringing together different disciplines and enabling you to learn from your peers as well as course tutors.

You will explore population health from a number of perspectives, enhancing your understanding of the people and processes involved in promoting public health and reducing health inequalities.

You will learn how the social determinants of health underpin our theoretical understanding of health and health inequalities.
The course has a flexible approach to learning with full and part time study options available. Many modules are stand-alone CPD courses, helping you to study at your own pace and plan your education around your work and family life.

With an emphasis on guided independent learning, you can expect to attend University two days a week (full time) or one day a week (part time). You can, however, spread your learning over a longer period if required.
On joining the course you will be appointed a personal tutor who will provide academic and pastoral support. You will also have at least one supervisor for the duration of your dissertation module.

Formal Teaching takes place in Tithebarn Street which is part of the city centre campus. This vibrant location offers everything you could possibly need during your studies. Tutorial space is also available in the Henry Cotton buildin.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Core Modules:

Epidemiology

Examines the principles and tools of epidemiology and disease surveillance. These principles are then applied to an understanding of communicable and non-communicable diseases and assessment of health inequalities through tools such as health needs assessment and their role in protecting and improving population health.

Public Health: Policy and Practice

Introduces students to the concepts and underpinning theories associated with the public health approach and practices related to the promotion and protection of population health. It reviews historical as well as contemporary public health approaches, policies & strategies. There is a particular focus on examining health inequalities and measures to reduce them. The aim is to identify local, national and international strategic responses to both improving health and reducing health inequalities.

Research Methods

Encourages students to develop their skills as a potential producer of research, as well as their ability to systematically evaluate research outcomes from a variety of sources. In addition, students engage in a variety of data analysis techniques. The module covers quantitative, qualitative, mixed, creative and participatory methodologies.

Health Improvement

Encourages students to develop knowledge and competence in the area of health improvement. The module covers a number of core health improvement approaches: health promotion, prevention, health behaviour change and community participation. It considers the relevancy and value of these approaches to different population groups from a global perspective.

Health Protection

The components and structure of health protection activity are examined. The risks to public health from both communicable and non-infectious environmental hazards are explored in detail. The infrastructure of health emergency planning is critically analysed.

Option Modules:

​Violence

Violence is now regarded as a critical public health concern. The impact of violence on the health of individuals, families and the wider society adds to an increasing burden of ill-health and cost to health and other welfare services. This module critically examines a range of key issues related to violence and health from international, national and local perspectives. It demonstrates the need for an interdisciplinary public health approach when addressing the causes of violence, building prevention control strategies, and promoting safety. The Public Health Institute is a World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention http://www.cph.org.uk/expertise/violence/.

Systematic Review

​Provides a complete guide and hands on approach to developing a research question and learning the methods and key processes involved in completing a systematic review. Systematic review is a cross cutting methodology which can be used in a variety of disciplines and through interdisciplinary collaboration. The module can be taken by anybody from any discipline who wants to increase their skill set in the methodology. The focus is on application of the systematic review methods to a chosen field of investigation.

Work Related Learning

This is either a project that participants undertake at their place of work or as part of an organised work related placement. The project forms the basis of an action learning process whereby participants reflect on their ability to achieve personal and organisational goals, solve problems and meet self-appointed learning outcomes.

Global Health

Aims to examine the key processes of globalisation and how they impact on the health of populations and their environments. Key public health risks are identified and their strategic response at the global level evaluated. Issues explored include: global disease, risk and surveillance; alcohol and tobacco control; globesity and non-communicable disease; HIV/AIDS; pollution and climate change.​

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change.

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Study for a Masters-level qualification at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. International Public Health offers a broad-based understanding of health and its social and environmental determinants. Read more
Study for a Masters-level qualification at Liverpool John Moores University’s renowned Centre for Public Health. International Public Health offers a broad-based understanding of health and its social and environmental determinants.

•Masters degree available to study full time (one year) and part time (two years)
•Study at LJMU's world renowned Centre for Public Health
•Develop a broad-based understanding of health and its social and environmental determinants
•Follow a curriculum informed by key international strategies, the Sustainable Development Goals and Social Determinants of Health
•Support and guidance for placement learning opportunities
•This course will only run subject to minimum numbers

Course content focuses on public health issues in low and middle income countries although you will also, of course, gain a valuable insight into public health issues in the UK and the rest of Europe.

The course will enhance your capacity to improve the health of the populations you serve and reduce health inequality. It will also develop your critical, analytical, research, collaborative working and evaluation skills - all key requirements in the dynamic public health sector.
The Centre for Public Health offers a flexible approach to learning with full and part time study options available. Many modules are stand-alone CPD courses, helping you to plan your education around your work and family life.

With an emphasis on guided independent learning, you can expect to attend University two days a week (full time) or one day a week (part time). You can, however, spread your learning over a longer period if you prefer.

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.
Core Modules:

Intercultural Learning

Aims to introduce and enhance core learning skills within an intercultural environment. Learning to learn, study, read, write and reflect within a new environment can be challenging and particularly in a new country. Learning how to learn together, share ideas, develop key learning skills and support others are key facets of this module. The module is underpinned by thinking around the internationalisation of higher education.

International Health

Explores the idea of international health and human development. It examines both the determinants of health, and aspects of health system development. It evaluates a number of international strategies aimed at health for all and explores the role of primary health care in local level health improvement.

Global Health

Aims to examine the key processes of globalization and how they impact on the health of populations and their environments. Key public health risks are identified and their strategic response at the global level evaluated. Issues explored include: global disease, risk and surveillance; alcohol and tobacco control; globesity and non-communicable disease; HIV/AIDS; pollution and climate change.

Epidemiology

Examines the principles and tools of epidemiology and disease surveillance. These principles are then applied to an understanding of communicable and non-communicable diseases and assessment of health inequalities through tools such as health needs assessment and their role in protecting and improving population health.

Public Health: Policy and Practice

Introduces students to the concepts and underpinning theories associated with the public health approach and practices associated with the promotion and protection of population health. The module reviews historical as well as contemporary public health approaches, policies and strategies. There is a particular focus on examining health inequalities and measures to reduce them. The aim is to identify local, national and international strategic responses to both improving health and reducing health inequalities.

Research Methods

Encourages students to develop their skills as a potential producer of research, as well as their ability to systematically evaluate research outcomes from a variety of sources. In addition, students engage in a variety of data analysis techniques. The module covers quantitative, qualitative, mixed, creative and participatory methodologies.​

Option Modules:

Violence

Violence is now regarded as a critical public health concern. The impact of violence on the health of individuals, families and the wider society adds to an increasing burden of ill-health and cost to health and other welfare services. This module critically examines a range of key issues related to violence and health from international, national and local perspectives. It demonstrates the need for an interdisciplinary public health approach when addressing the causes of violence, building prevention control strategies, and promoting safety. The Public Health Institute is a World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Violence Prevention http://www.cph.org.uk/expertise/violence .

Health Improvement

Encourages students to develop knowledge and competence in the area of health improvement. The module covers a number of core health improvement approaches: health promotion, prevention, health behaviour change and community participation. It considers the relevancy and value of these approaches to different population groups from a global perspective.

Health Protection

Examines the components and structure of health protection activity. The risks to public health from both communicable and non-infectious environmental hazards are explored in detail. The infrastructure of health emergency planning is critically analysed.

Systematic Review

This module provides a complete guide and hands on approach to developing a research question and learning the methods and key processes involved in completing a systematic review. Systematic review is a cross cutting methodology which can be used in a variety of disciplines and through interdisciplinary collaboration. The module can be taken by anybody from any discipline who wants to increase their skill set in the methodology. The focus will be on application of the systematic review methods to a chosen field of investigation.​

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change.

Read less
One Health is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the complex interactions between human health, animal health and ecosystem health. Read more

One Health is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the complex interactions between human health, animal health and ecosystem health. Its original emergence was largely driven by the threat of global pandemics of disease, in particular highly pathogenic avian influenza and SARS. There was a recognition that the complex health challenges faced in the 21st century required a new interdisciplinary approach that included both the natural and social sciences.

Launched in 2014, this programme utilises the many strengths of the University of Edinburgh across multiple disciplines to provide the key training and skills required for a successful career in this emerging field.

The One Health programme is part of the Global Health Academy and we share many elective courses with other programmes in the Academy. This provides a great deal of flexibility allowing you to personalise your studies to reflect your professional interests and career aspirations. As well as learning from our expert tutors you will join with students from around the world on a number of different master’s programmes to share experiences and knowledge.

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Health Academy.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

Year 1: Courses for the Certificate

The Certificate comprises four compulsory courses. These four courses are:

  • Introduction to One Health (20 credits)
  • Applied Epidemiology and Surveillance (20 credits)
  • One Health Policy (10 credits)
  • Ecosystem Health (10 credits)

Year 2: Courses for the Diploma

For the diploma a selection of courses totalling 60 credits must be made from the following courses. Each 20-credit course is taught over a period of ten weeks, whilst the 10-credit courses are taught over a five-week period.

  • Socio-economic Principles of One Health
  • Zoonotic Diseases
  • Zoonotic Diseases in a Global Setting
  • Emerging Infectious Diseases
  • Communication and Public Engagement of Conservation
  • Introduction to GIS and Spatial Data Analysis
  • Wildlife Disease Management
  • Ex-Situ Wildlife Management
  • Environmental Law
  • Extreme and Fragile Ecosystems
  • Water and Sanitation
  • Introduction to Transboundary Diseases and their Impact on Trade and Wildlife Populations
  • Managing Ecosystems for Human Health and Wellbeing
  • Captive and Free-ranging Wild Animal Welfare
  • Surveillance and Control of Transboundary Diseases Affecting International Trade
  • Pastoralism and Herd Health
  • Animal Disease Survey Design and Analysis

Please note that although all courses are offered, we cannot guarantee that places will be available on all elective courses to all students, each year (it will be at the discretion of the Programme Director to assign places on courses and this will depend on demand).

Year 3: Completion of the MSc programme in One Health

The written reflective element is an assignment of 10-15,000 words (60 credits). This may take the form of one of the following:

  • a written dissertation
  • a casebook (relating to relevant professional experience)
  • a personal portfolio of reflective and practical activity
  • a research project

Students will be required to submit a proposal that demonstrates an appropriate level of critical analysis, academic knowledge and reflection, or one health practice depending on the choice made, prior to being admitted to the masters year. The University of Edinburgh’s common marking scheme will be applied.

Postgraduate Professional Development

Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD) is aimed at working professionals who want to advance their knowledge through a postgraduate-level course(s), without the time or financial commitment of a full Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.

You may take a maximum of 50 credits worth of courses over two years through our PPD scheme. These lead to a University of Edinburgh postgraduate award of academic credit. Alternatively, after one year of taking courses you can choose to transfer your credits and continue on to studying towards a higher award on a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme. Although PPD courses have various start dates throughout a year you may only start a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme in the month of September. Any time spent studying PPD will be deducted from the amount of time you will have left to complete a Masters, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate programme.

Career opportunities

A qualification from our programme will enhance your career prospects in academia, research, government departments, non-governmental organisations, international development and the private sector.

Despite being a relatively new field, One Health is rapidly gaining global recognition and current students have already reported improvements in career development through studying on the programme.



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Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare. Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Read more
Changing environmental, social and agricultural conditions are a threat to animal and human health and welfare.

Many infectious diseases can pass between animals and humans, while food production, human diet and community stability are harmed by diseases that infect livestock and wildlife. Emerging veterinary infectious diseases and human diseases, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, emphasise the threat posed by these issues.

The One Health approach recognises the relationship between health and disease at the human, animal and environment interfaces and has become an important focus in both medical and veterinary science. It promotes a “whole of society” treatment of health hazards and a systemic change of perspective in the management of risk.

Under the microscope

If you are interested in One Health and the control of infectious disease (particularly in the developing world), then this unique course could be for you. We welcome applications from individuals with a background in public health, veterinary sciences, animal or biological sciences, social and environmental sciences, ecology and wildlife health. If you are interested in this field, but do not have the relevant background, please speak with the course directors who can consider such cases on an individual basis.

The course is delivered jointly by the RVC, University of London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).

The course

The MSc consists of eight modules of 15 credits each, plus a compulsory research project (MSc only) of 60 credits -15 credits for integration of One Health principles learnt through development of and writing a research proposal and 45 credits for the empirical or trans-disciplinary innovative study.

The MSc consists of the following modules:
- Foundations of One Health
- Introduction to disease agents for One Health
- Infectious disease emergence core module
- Introduction to One Health epidemiology and surveillance
- Economics of One Health
- One Health skills development
- Medical anthropology and public health
- Optional module choice from; vector biology and vector parasite interactions, environmental epidemiology, epidemiology and control of communicable diseases, and globalisation and health
- Research project (MSc only)

How will I learn?

The MSc may be completed full-time in one year or part-time over two to three years, and consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

The PGDiploma is shorter (eight modules with no research project component) and may be completed in two terms.

The course starts in September each year and you will split your time between the RVC and LSHTM. Students studying the MSc will then undertake a four-month research project in an area and country of their choice.

Learning outcomes

The course will provide you with:

- A comprehensive foundation on the principles of diseases in the context of socio-ecological systems, global health and food safety
- Knowledge and skills in relation to One Health methodologies, transdisciplinary interactions and in using a systems approach

At the end of the course you will be able to:

- Understand the One Health concept and approach problem solving using a trans-disciplinary methodology
- Understand the origin, context and drivers of infectious disease at the human, animal and environment interface
- Evaluate impacts of multi-host infections on human, animal and ecosystem health and economics directly, or indirectly, via food, disease vectors or the environment.
- Develop a One Health systems approach to complex disease issues in monitoring, surveillance, diagnosis, prevention and control
- Critically review published literature
- Design a research project (MSc students only)

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The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Read more
The emergence of new digital communication platforms has had significant impacts. Audiences are transforming into media producers; new business models are emerging; social media campaigns create new forms of politics; digital culture highlights practices of sharing and participation; and data collection and analytics affect an increasing part of our lives.

This offers new possibilities for digital citizens, but it also raises new questions regarding classic notions of privacy and freedom of expression, and it renders information and digital infrastructure a key resource.

The MA Digital Media and Society addresses current challenges of online communication and internet studies. It enables you to develop specialist knowledge in areas such as social media, big data, citizen journalism, digital culture, the creative industries, internet governance, and digital rights. It also provides a theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

This course provides you with a thorough understanding of the current transformations and with the analytical skills to investigate digital media in the context of social, political and economic change. We ask how online communication is shaped by users, states and businesses, and how our society is, in turn, affected by digital media.

This course draws on the strength and diversity of Cardiff University’s staff, giving you a unique opportunity to work with academics whose research explores issues such as citizen journalism, online activism, big data, internet surveillance, internet governance and digital rights.

You can get involved in our Research Group Digital Media and Society and thus become part of a dynamic research environment.

Please note this course focuses on academic research and does not provide extensive practical training.

Distinctive features

• Enables you to develop an in-depth understanding of digital media and their implications for the social, political, economic and cultural environment.

• Conveys specialist knowledge that addresses current areas of concern, such as social media use, big data, the sharing economy, privacy and surveillance, internet governance, digital rights, and citizen journalism.

• Empowers you to assess how technological change is linked to forces of globalisation, political institutions, and historical developments, and how it affects democracy and social change.

• Equips you with a thorough theoretical and methodological grounding in media and communication studies.

• Allows you to apply up-to-date research skills to carry out your own original research for the dissertation and beyond.

• Produces reflective and well-trained graduates who understand the multiplicity of social, cultural, political and technological complexities of digital media and who will be able to solve complex problems and make informed decisions in their future careers.

Structure

This is a one-year full-time course, combining core and optional modules. Over the course duration you will study modules totalling 180 credits.

Core modules:

Politics of Global Communication
Putting Research into Practice I
Putting Research into Practice II
Understanding Digital Media
Citizen Journalism and Digital Publics
Project Based Dissertation

Optional modules:

Media Law
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Reporting the Middle East
Insurgency into the 21st Century
Citizen Media
Global Crisis Reporting
In The Editor's Chair
Reporting Health and Science
Electoral Behaviour, Public Opinion and the Media
Social Media and Politics
Governing the Internet: Digital Freedoms and Restrictions
Big Data, Society and Everyday Life

Teaching

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures and seminars, which complement the academic nature of the course.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. The main method of assessment on this programme is course work.

Career prospects

Graduates of MA Digital Media and Society are employed in a range of occupations, including the non-profit sector, digital business, online journalism, and regulatory institutions. They take on leading roles in social media campaigns, internet policy, human rights organisations, journalism, and creative industries.

As an academic course focusing on critical analysis, this programme also provides a perfect starting-point for PhD research and prepares you for careers in research institutions, both at university and other public or private institutions.

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The International Master Program in Image Processing and Computer Vision provides specialized training in a field of increasing importance in our daily lives. Read more

The International Master Program in Image Processing and Computer Vision provides specialized training in a field of increasing importance in our daily lives. It is essential in domains such as medicine, surveillance, industrial control, remote sensing, e-commerce and automation. The program covers a wide range of methods in computer vision thus guaranteeing highly-qualified graduates in this field. Three partner universities, with internationally recognized experience in these domains, have pooled their complementary expertise and developed this international postgraduate cooperation initiative.

The result is a high-quality, strongly recognized, triple Master degree that respects the 120 ECTS syllabus, and is well adapted to job market criteria. In order to benefit from the knowledge of these three partner universities and their professors, students spend an entire semester in each university.

Program structure

All students follow the same curriculum with some optional courses. The program is organized as follows:

Semester 1: PPCU, Budapest, Hungary

  • Functional Analysis (5 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Parallel Computing Architectures (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Numerical Analysis 1 (4 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Basic Image Processing Algorithms (5 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Data mining (5 ECTS) - Compulsory
  • Stochastic Signals and Systems (4 ECTS) – Optional
  • FPGA-based Algorithm Design (5 ECTS) – Optional
  • Biomedical Signal Processing (4 ECTS) – Optional
  • Programming Methodology (5 ECTS) – Optional
  • Intelligent Sensors (3 ECTS) – Optional

Semester 2: UAM, Madrid, Spain

  • Applied Bayesian Methods (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Biomedical Image Processing and Applications (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Biometrics (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Video Sequences Analysis for Video Surveillance (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Tutored Research Project 1 (6 ECTS) - Compulsory

Semester 3: UBx, Bordeaux, France

  • Image and Inversion (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Variational Methods and PDEs for Image Processing (6 ECTS) - Compulsory
  • Advanced Image Processing (3 ECTS) - Compulsory
  • Video and Indexing (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Image Acquisition and Reconstruction (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • IT Project Management (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Tutored Research Project 2 (6 ECTS) – Compulsory

Semester 4: Internship in academic or industry laboratory

Strengths of this Master program

  • International program taught by experts from three different universities in Europe.
  • Triple Master degree.
  • International mobility period in three countries.

After this Master program?

After graduation, students have access to career opportunities such as engineers or further research as PhD students.

Their educational background makes them attractive candidates for companies in the following areas: E-commerce, Medical imaging, Personal assistance, Automation, Industrial control, Security, Post-production, Remote sensing, Software publishing.



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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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*This is a new course and is subject to academic approval. The course may be subject to change and confirmed details of the content of the course will be published in our online prospectus from June 2016, subject to the course having been approved for delivery. Read more
*This is a new course and is subject to academic approval. The course may be subject to change and confirmed details of the content of the course will be published in our online prospectus from June 2016, subject to the course having been approved for delivery.

Engage with human rights practice by linking the legal, theoretical and technical skills needed to work in international organisations, fighting injustice, oppression and persecution.

You will study contemporary debates in human rights promotion and protection, researching the stories of violations, asylum, surveillance, peacekeeping and torture that are behind many of today's news headlines. Working with your tutors and alongside industry professionals, you will have the opportunity to investigate claims of human rights abuses, gather evidence and build cases for legal proceedings.

Your course will also hone your research and project management skills and develop your ability to write compelling funding applications and construct budgets, which are essential requirements for a career in this area.

Created in collaboration with tutors from our Leeds Law School, your course will provide you with the expertise and practical skills to help protect human rights and tackle abuses.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/internationalhumanrights_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Careers options include working for Non-Governmental Organisations, legal and security services and international organisations. Employers will value your critical and analytical skills and personal effectiveness. Our expert staff engage with many major organisations, which will benefit you when looking for a career in this field.

- Research & Project Manager
- Grant writer & Fundraiser
- Campaigner
- Human Rights Practitioner

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will learn from a highly-skilled and research-active teaching team who are experts in human rights law and practice, security, peace studies, evidence-gathering and crime investigation.

Our team of academics include Dr Steve Wright, an expert on torture technologies and surveillance employed by governments across the world, Dr Robin Redhead an expert on indigenous people and women's rights, Professor Eddie Halpin who is Chair of HURIDOCS, the Geneva-based human rights information and documentation centre and Dr Rachel Julian who was invited by the international NGO Nonviolent Peaceforce to evaluate their project in Georgia using unarmed civilian peace-keepers.

Other tutors have worked closely with organisations such as Amnesty International, CND, the UN and the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict. Guest lectures will provide you with the chance to engage with professionals working in the field, ensuring your course is at the cutting-edge of human rights practice. Recent speakers include Andrew Gilligan, London Editor of The Sunday Telegraph, Tony Bunyan, Director of Statewatch and Stephen Bowen, Director of the British Institute of Human Rights.

John Willott

Senior Lecturer

"I love working with students from across the globe - seeing them learning from each other and sharing experiences is a big part of our course. Our involvement in international research, consultancy and advocacy, and links to key organisations means we know the kinds of knowledge and skills graduates need to develop their careers and make a difference."

John has recently been working on a UN-funded project to combat violence against women in Uganda, Cambodia and Nepal. He authored 'Acid Violence in Uganda: A Situational Analysis', helping develop a co-ordinated action plan to address the problem, which was presented to the government and legal, health and social services.

Facilities

- Library
Our Library is open 24/7, every day of the year. However you like to work, we have got you covered with group and silent study areas, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Study areas
Our City Campus has plenty of dedicated social areas for you to work with your peers. You will have modern spaces and the latest IT equipment which will allow you to debate and discuss ideas with fellow students.

- Teaching spaces
Our classrooms and lecture theatres offer the ideal space to learn about the experiences and opinions of expert academics and visiting industry speakers.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. Read more
How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. On our course you explore the nature of crime, criminal justice and punishment within wider social contexts.

Criminology at Essex builds on strong sociological foundations and reflects the diversity of staff interests, including leading contributors to studies of women, young people and criminal justice, prostitution, homicide, victimisation, visual criminology and media, organised crime and law enforcement, terrorism and surveillance, environmental crime and more. Our courses provide critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of crimes and harms, from the local to the global.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues covered by cutting-edge criminology. You explore a wide range of topics, including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of crime
-Globalisation and various forms of crime
-Security and the state
-New criminological theory
-Terrorism, counter-terrorism, surveillance and human rights

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

You are taught by a team of award-winning internationally renowned scholars widely regarded as leading experts in their fields.

Criminology at Essex is led by Professor Eamonn Carrabine, Professor Pamela Cox, Dr Isabel Crowhurst, Professor Pete Fussey, Dr Anna Sergi, Professor Nigel South, Dr Darren Thiel and Dr Jackie Turton.

All staff are actively engaged in research at the cutting edge of their respective fields of interest and specialism and bring the very latest developments and findings into the classroom. All are prominent writers and the criminology team collectively author the best-selling criminology textbook, Criminology: A Sociological Introduction (now in its 3rd edition), used on undergraduate courses across the country.

Our staff have worked at local, national and international level with bodies from local councils and the Home Office, to Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Specialist facilities

-Our Centre for Criminology hosts expert speakers and practitioners
-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities through a unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society is a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and research organisations.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Formative Debates in Criminology
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)

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This programme is for registered nurses or midwives who want to gain registration on Part 3 of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register as a specialist community public health nurse (occupational health). Read more
This programme is for registered nurses or midwives who want to gain registration on Part 3 of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) register as a specialist community public health nurse (occupational health). It offers you the opportunity to gain registration as an occupational health nurse and for academic development at master’s level.

Course details

You develop public health practice knowledge and skills in addressing health inequalities and the health needs of the working population, through development of expertise in hazard and risk assessment, health surveillance and protection, sickness absence management and public health leadership skills, to enable you to contribute to improving the health of the working population.

What you study

You study evidence based practice and the factors which impact on the health and well-being of the working population; the recognition of hazards and risks within the working environment, the application of health and safety legislation, health surveillance and sickness absence management skills within the workplace; public health, personal leadership philosophies and behaviours and their application within organisational settings; public health nursing practice, legal and ethical dimensions also designing and managing a service evaluation.

Modules
-Advancing Health and Safety in the Working Environment
-Advancing Leadership and Management in the Context of Specialist Practice
-Advancing Occupational Health Practice
-Advancing Public Health
-Contemporary Issues in Public Health
-Designing Research Projects
-Evidence-based Practice
-Specialist Community Public Health Nursing Practice

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The programme comprises 50% theory and 50% practice within an integrated approach. Practice based learning – you are allocated a practice teacher by your sponsoring organisation who facilitates your learning in practice and is responsible for the assessment of your competence in practice.

Teaching methods include lecturers, seminars, experiential learning, scenarios, problem based learning, case study work, simulations, action learning sets, and peer led seminars and discussions.

Learning in practice is supported with the development of a practice progress file, which includes self-assessment activities, learning contracts, learning logs, reflective dialogue and discussion with practice teachers, mentors and academic staff.

Assessments include examinations, a defended poster, essays, case study analysis, research proposal and simulations. Practice is assessed via the practice progress file through the mechanism of the tripartite meetings which include you, your practice teacher and your academic mentor.

Employability

Following successful completion of the required theoretical learning outcomes (120 credits at master’s level) and the specialist community public health nursing practice competencies (NMC 2004) you are eligible to register as a specialist community public health nurse (occupational health) and are eligible for the award of Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (Occupational Health Nursing).

Following completion of the PgDip in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (Occupational Health Nursing) an opportunity will be available to continue your studies and complete a 60 credit master’s level dissertation module leading to an MSC Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (Occupational Health Nursing). This is undertaken as one year part-time or six months full-time study after SCPHN (OH) registration with the NMC. It must be completed within five years of commencing the PgDip.

The course prepares you to work as an occupational health nurse and to take practice forward to meet the challenges of improving health within a wide range of workplace settings.

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