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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Read more
The PhD (or doctorate) is the highest academic qualification available. A PhD degree is designed to provide strong grounding in highly specialised areas through research. Its goal is to enable students to be researchers in psychology, contributing to academic knowledge and developing work of internationally publishable quality. Bangor Psychology offers PhD supervision in the following specialisms:

• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Learning and Development
• Language
• Clinical Neuroscience
• Clinical and Health Psychology
• Experimental Consumer Psychology

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS
You must have an undergraduate degree in psychology or a related subject, with a minimum degree class of 2:1 or equivalent, and additional postgraduate training (see below).

STUDY MODE AND DURATION
Full-time PhD students normally spend three years in study. If you do not already have a Master’s degree, then we would normally expect you to complete such a degree prior to starting the PhD programme.If you have already obtained an appropriate Master’s degree, you may be required to take one or more relevant modules in the School’s MSc in Psychological Research to complement your background and expertise.

Part-time students have five years to complete the PhD.
SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE
Three members of academic staff will be helping you with your research: a principal supervisor, a second supervisor and a chairperson - this last from a different research specialism. The major role of the second supervisor is to provide additional input on your research and to take over the supervision of the dissertation should the primary supervisor need to withdraw. The major responsibility of the chairperson is to ensure that a "best fit" is found between you and your supervisor. This group meets periodically with you in order to provide guidance on your research and to help with any difficulty that you might be experiencing.

REVIEWS AND PROGRESS TOWARDS THE PhD DEGREE

Probationary period
The first year acts as a probationary period. Your progress will be reviewed in February and June (for full-time students), according to the requirements of the School and the goals outlined in your individual course of study. If, after these reviews, your supervisory committee considers that your progress has been fully satisfactory, then you will cease to be “probationary”.

Subsequent reviews
During the second year there will be another research review in June, and again in February of your third year. If you have not completed the write-up of your thesis by June of the third year, there will be another review meeting in June of that year (and every February and June of subsequent years until completion).

The purpose of these meetings is to ensure that you are always moving forward effectively towards completion, and to enable your committee to provide any assistance that may be necessary to help guarantee completion of the work.

YOUR PhD THESIS
Your research thesis is a large project. It will require attention throughout your studies. We have established a system to keep your research on track and help you manage your time. Completing a successful thesis builds on skills and knowledge acquired throughout the MSc modules. It constitutes an original piece of research, usually including several experiments or observational studies.

Your PhD thesis must be defended at the end of your studies in a viva voce examination. This comprises an oral report of the research in the presence of an examining committee.

CHOOSING A RESEARCH TOPIC AND SUPERVISOR
If you are thinking of studying for a PhD degree, one of your first actions, before applying for admission to the programme, is to identify and communicate with a potential supervisor in the relevant area. The research interests and publications of our academic staff are listed within our web pages. Contact the people whose research is most relevant to the area in which you wish to work. In many cases, it is best to make initial contact by e-mail or by letter.

FUNDING
Funding for full-time PhD study (tuition fees plus living allowance) is available through a number of sources, including the ESRC, the University of Wales Bangor, and the School of Psychology, which offers a number of studentships aimed at exceptional candidates from the UK, Europe, and internationally. Our website offers more details on the funding available for PhD students.

You can obtain more information on funding opportunities from our Deputy School Administrator (Paula Gurteen, ). Alternatively, you can discuss funding options with your potential supervisor.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
We invite applications for our funded studentships at set times throughout the year, both on our website and on jobs.ac.uk.

Applications from students who have already obtained funding for their studies are welcome at any time and can be done online on the University website.

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This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and, upon completion, provides students with eligibility to apply to the register to practice as Forensic Psychologists in the UK. Read more

Course Overview

This course is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and, upon completion, provides students with eligibility to apply to the register to practice as Forensic Psychologists in the UK.

The course is designed to be placement based, with various workshops for students as well as clinical and academic supervision. Workshops are usually delivered in block teaching sessions and students are expected to be in Cardiff for around 15 days over the course of their study. We have students from all over the UK so we aim to make access to workshops as straightforward as possible for those students who have to travel long distances to attend.

Each student will be allocated both a clinical supervisor and an academic supervisor – at least one of these supervisors will be an appropriately qualified and experienced Forensic Psychologist. Students should consider the availability of a forensic psychologist who is willing and able to offer supervision in their workplace or placement site for the duration of their studies.

Next intake April 2016 - applications open 1st December 2015 to 29th January 2016

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology-(Practitioner-Programme)---PgD-.aspx

Course Content​​

There are 5 modules to the programme:
- Professional Portfolio in Forensic Psychology (80 credits, Level 8)
This is the largest assessed piece of work and it provides credits towards a Professional Doctorate qualification that students may wish to undertake following this programme or at a later stage in their career. The portfolio is a collection of exemplars of work students have undertaken to demonstrate competence in the application of forensic psychology to assessment and intervention work with service users. It will include exemplars of clinical practice (assessments, interventions, evaluation and recommendations) reflective evaluations, practice logs (detailing a minimum of 360 days of professional practice), supervision logs and a variety of placement checklists.

- Consultancy (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology in the context of consultancy, developing policy and evaluating service provision.

- Teaching and Training (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology in the context of teaching and training.

- Ethical and Professional Practice (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology within the appropriate ethical and professional boundaries that are required by the Regulatory Body (Health and Care Professions Council, HCPC), by appropriate professional bodies (British Psychological Society, BPS) and by the relevant placement organisations.

- Functional Assessment and Formulation (10 credits, level 8)
This module explores the experience students have in demonstrating the application of psychology in applying psychological models of assessment, particularly functional assessment and case formulation.

Learning & Teaching​

​Our students are placement based and the programme follows an apprenticeship model, where students work under the supervision of a qualified forensic psychologist and aim to demonstrate their developing competency in the areas identified as relevant to the role (HCPC Standards of Proficiency). So, the primary mode of learning on this programme will be through supervised practice.

To support the learning of students we also offer workshops. Some of the workshops are compulsory and mean that students need to attend Cardiff for around 15 days over the course of their study with us.

We make no apology when stating that this course is challenging and will require a great deal of investment from students in order to complete it. Our students on placement (not employed by placement provider) we expect to be in placement 4 days a week and spend an additional day in study. It is very much a full time programme of study and whilst there are part time options, the commitment is something we urge applicants to consider.

Students are provided with a supervisory team which is comprised of a work placement supervisor (we refer to this supervisor as the clinical supervisor) and a supervisor from the University (we refer to this supervisor as an academic supervisor). Both of these supervisors will be forensic psychologists, except in exceptional circumstances where the course leader has approved a different arrangement. Both supervisors will provide support to the student and will encourage their development and provide pastoral support. Additional support is provided through the Peer Mentors, other students who are a step further along the process.

Assessment

Students are assessed for competency and professionalism, these issues are reviewed in tri-partite supervision sessions every quarter for full time students. In addition to this there are 5 modules that students will complete. The largest of these is the Portfolio where students will gather exemplars of their work with forensic psychology service users following the processes of assessment, intervention, evaluation and recommendation. Additionally, students will complete four reflective report modules on aspects of their practice; Functional Assessment and Formulation, Ethical and Professional Practice, Teaching and Training and Consultancy.

Employability & Careers​

The purpose of the PG Dip in Practitioner Forensic Psychology is to allow students to progress on from Masters level study towards Practitioner status, thereby boosting their employability. At the end of the programme successful students can apply to the HCPC to be registered as Forensic Psychologists. This course is essentially for students who wish to progress on to clinical work within forensic settings or more widely with forensic clients. The programme is placement based and provides supervised support towards developing the competencies required to be an autonomous practitioner.

100% of the graduates from this programme are employed as Forensic Psychologists and so working in professional roles within a variety of organisations in the UK. Some of our graduates may consider returning to complete the Doctorate in Forensic Psychology (Top-Up) once they have decided which area they would like to specialise in.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. Read more
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. You will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor who is expert in that particular field, and alongside other members of the research group including academics, post-doctoral researchers as well as fellow postgraduate students.

As a research student in the Department of Chemistry, you can expect:
-A dedicated supervisor to help direct your research and training
-A Thesis Advisory Panel (TAP) comprising two members of staff to monitor your progress and offer impartial advice
-TAP meetings every six months for which you are required to prepare a report on your research
-Progress meetings with your supervisor approximately every 2 months, and more informal interactions with your supervisor on a day-to-day basis
-Training programmes designed to provide you with research, teaching and transferable skills. This is delivered through our Innovative Doctoral Training in Chemistry Programme
-Seminar programmes from leading scientists, and opportunities to present your own research
-A student mentor to support your transition to postgraduate research and provide collaboration and networking opportunities

Facilities

The Department of Chemistry offers all research students the opportunity to access its state-of-the-art research facilities as required by their research. This includes a range of NMR Spectrometers, Mass Spectrometers, Laser Spectrometers, X-Ray Diffractometers, EPR Spectrometers, Electron Microscopes, and a dedicated Crystallisation Suite.

All Chemistry research students are provided with access to dedicated research space within the Department. This includes allocated writing space with others from your research group, which is usually adjacent to your supervisor’s office to facilitate regular discussions about progress. if your project is laboratory-based, you will also have access to a fume hood or bench space in a purpose-built research laboratory. All research students have access to a communal area for discussions with other researchers.

Careers

During your time at York, you will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, which will support not only your studies, but also prepare you for the world of work beyond your research degree. The Researcher Development Team offer a wide range of training under the Research Development Framework, and the Careers Service provides a wealth of guidance and opportunities to develop the types of skills employers are looking for.

The Chemistry Department has a dedicated Employability and Diversity Officer who arranges a range of careers events for postgraduate chemists each year. She also offers one-to-one careers advice sessions for all graduate students to support you to develop your Curriculum Vitae, complete job applications and prepare for interviews. Your supervisor will also offer support and guidance for your career development.

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In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. Read more
In the Department of Chemistry we offer a range of programmes that can be taken full or part time. Research projects can be carried out in virtually any area of chemistry as long as a suitable project and supervisor can be allocated, meaning you can specialise in your own specific area of interest. You will work under the guidance of an academic supervisor who is expert in that particular field, and alongside other members of the research group including academics, post-doctoral researchers as well as fellow postgraduate students.

As a research student in the Department of Chemistry, you can expect:
-A dedicated supervisor to help direct your research and training
-A Thesis Advisory Panel (TAP) comprising two members of staff to monitor your progress and offer impartial advice
-TAP meetings every six months for which you are required to prepare a report on your research
-Progress meetings with your supervisor approximately every 2 months, and more informal interactions with your supervisor on a day-to-day basis
-Training programmes designed to provide you with research, teaching and transferable skills. This is delivered through our Innovative Doctoral Training in Chemistry Programme
-Seminar programmes from leading scientists, and opportunities to present your own research
-A student mentor to support your transition to postgraduate research and provide collaboration and networking opportunities

Facilities

The Department of Chemistry offers all research students the opportunity to access its state-of-the-art research facilities as required by their research. This includes a range of NMR Spectrometers, Mass Spectrometers, Laser Spectrometers, X-Ray Diffractometers, EPR Spectrometers, Electron Microscopes, and a dedicated Crystallisation Suite.

All Chemistry research students are provided with access to dedicated research space within the Department. This includes allocated writing space with others from your research group, which is usually adjacent to your supervisor’s office to facilitate regular discussions about progress. if your project is laboratory-based, you will also have access to a fume hood or bench space in a purpose-built research laboratory. All research students have access to a communal area for discussions with other researchers.

Careers

During your time at York, you will have the opportunity to develop a wide range of skills, which will support not only your studies, but also prepare you for the world of work beyond your research degree. The Researcher Development Team offer a wide range of training under the Research Development Framework, and the Careers Service provides a wealth of guidance and opportunities to develop the types of skills employers are looking for.

The Chemistry Department has a dedicated Employability and Diversity Officer who arranges a range of careers events for postgraduate chemists each year. She also offers one-to-one careers advice sessions for all graduate students to support you to develop your Curriculum Vitae, complete job applications and prepare for interviews. Your supervisor will also offer support and guidance for your career development.

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The Advanced Technology programme has been designed to allow you to study a range of engineering and technology subjects at postgraduate level. Read more
The Advanced Technology programme has been designed to allow you to study a range of engineering and technology subjects at postgraduate level. It offers a choice of flexible options – you can choose to study full time at the University, to combine work and study (where the majority of your study will be based in your place of work) or to study by distance learning, if that suits you best. This course provides an opportunity for you to earn a Masters degree by studying in different formats, in work, distance learning of full time. There are a number of prescribed subtitles of MSc Advanced Technology:
-Mechanical Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Electrical Engineering
-Technology Management
-Energy Technology
-Design Technology
-Sports Technology
-Digital Media Technology

You can also negotiate to study in a different area that the faculty can support using the MSc Advanced Technology title.

Course content

Work Based Study
Your work may already be of Masters level, using the MSc Advanced Technology award you can get full recognition for it by submitting it towards a Masters degree from Staffordshire University. This is also a way in which your employer may provide an opportunity for you to further your education in areas of study directly related to your employment thus making you a more efficient employee. Virtually all parts of the course can be studied at your place of work. You need to attend the University only to maintain contact with tutors and to present your work at seminars.

Part Time Study
This is for students who are employed in industry in a capacity which provides an appropriate setting for MSc study. You will be assigned a supervisor who will guide your studies throughout the course. Your supervisor will set assignments for you and will recommend material for you to study as required to complete your assignments by self study. Your supervisor will be available for consultation via email, phone etc.

Full Time Study
This course is primarily offered on a part time basis, but you can also study full time if you wish. You will need to be available at Staffordshire University full time during teaching semesters. You may be given taught classes to attend as part of your studies for Modules 1, 2 and 3. These classes will be selected to provide appropriate contributions to your course of study, but will not provide all the content required for all of the modules.

You will also be assigned a supervisor who will give you additional assignments for self study to complete the requirements for Modules 1, 2 and 3. Your supervisor will recommend study material as required for you to complete these assignments. Your supervisor will be available for consultation on a weekly or bi-weekly basis.

All students study the same four modules below, however, the contents of each module vary depending on the subject areas you have chosen for your project. Supervising staff assist students in identifying and defining the detail of the module content, much of which is based on research and project work. Whilst most study and assessment is assignment based, you also have the opportunity to attend appropriate formal lectures at the University.

Module 1 Project Management and Research Methods (30 credits) provides basic knowledge of project management techniques and research methods required for industrial research and development work and to undertake MSc project work. It also teaches you how to communicate the findings in a concise and professional manner.

Module 2 Advanced Technology (30 credits) refreshes and enhances your knowledge in a broad range of interrelated subject areas within the chosen discipline. If you plan to proceed to an MSc, the material studied in this module provides a broad foundation for the research topic chosen for Module 4.

Module 3 Specialist Technology (60 credits) provides a high level of technical expertise in a specialist area for students who wish to graduate with a postgraduate diploma. It also provides the required specialists technical knowledge required to proceed to the MSc project in Module 4.

Module 4 MSc Project and Thesis (60 credits) lets you apply the material studied in the previous modules to an advanced research project. It prepares you for planning and undertaking leading edge industry based research and development work with a high degree of competence and minimal supervision.

Employment opportunities

Many students take this course as a way of securing promotion or use it to cover the further learning requirements to gain Chartered Engineering status. Other options on graduation are progression to further study of MPhil or PhD qualifications.

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This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/. Read more
This is an advanced practice-based research programme for students wishing to extend their research into the areas of film, photography and electronic arts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mres-filmmaking-photography-electronic-arts/

The programme is particularly relevant for students who have an MA degree and are looking to postion and develop their research and practice work.

It will be tailor-made to your individual research area and practice, giving you the opportunity to develop research skills and pursue your own area of interest.

You'll work closely with a personal supervisor to develop your work in the areas of filmmaking, photography and digital arts.

You’ll also receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to your chosen subject.

The programme meets the needs of two groups:

students who have completed an MA in Filmmaking, Photography, or Electronic Arts and cognate programmes (for example, our MA in Photography: The Image & Electronic Arts)
film, photography and electronic arts professionals who wish to extend their research-based practice

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sean Cubitt.

Structure

A personalised programme
The programme is personalised for each student, and is based on your individual research into your chosen practice. It gives you the opportunity to develop appropriate research skills and to pursue a research practice project of your own design, developed and reworked in discussion with a personal supervisor.

The curriculum is personalised for individual students, but all students will share a common curriculum and receive training and guidance in ethical and legal obligations, and be encouraged to accommodate feminist, anti-racist, decolonising and other appropriate approaches to their chosen subject.

The course will add value to recent MA practice graduates and to film, photography and electronic arts professionals by giving a deeper and more specialised engagement in a major research project supervised by staff experienced in both creative and professional research. Research training will give you the skills to design and complete your own research and to work to research briefs.

All students undertake the Practice-Based Research Methods Seminar in the first term, producing a detailed 5000 word project outline at the end. They will also take in the second term one of a selected range of optional modules to help develop their critical and theoretical awareness. In the first term, they begin work with their personal supervisor on the design and execution of their project. Supervision will determine the specific means used: some students will embark directly on a single piece of work; others may undertake a series of workshop-based activities.

Aims

The programme's subject-specific learning outcomes require you to think critically about a range of issues concerning the media, understood in the widest sense, and to be able to justify their views intellectually and practically. The central outcome will be to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project.

As appropriate to each individual project, you will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise your chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media. You will learn to produce high quality research under time constraints, by working independently.

All students will develop a range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: ‘the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development’. You will be guided to work independently and to think through the intellectual issues.

Progress is carefully monitored, to make sure that you are making progress towards the achievement of the outcomes. Different kinds of practical and intellectual skills are required for each part of the programme. In consultation with supervisors, you will be guided to the most appropriate practical and intellectual approaches, and to the most appropriate technical and critical sources.

Structure

You take the following modules:

Practice-Based Research Methods (30 credits)
This module provides research methods training for the MRes in Film Photography and Electronic Arts, and may be taken by practice-based students in the MPhil programme in Media and Communications. In all years it will address the legal and ethical constraints operating on research by practice. In any given year, the syllabus will address such topics as technique (colour, composition, editing, post-production, sound-image relations, text-image relations), anti-racist, feminist and decolonial critique; hardware and software studies; environmental impacts of media production, dissemination and exhibition; media critical approaches to art, political economy, and truth. The interests of students and supervisors will guide the selection of specific content of the course in its delivery, whose aim is to inculcate advanced thinking on the making, delivery and audiences for research-based practice.

Research Project (120 credits)
The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other. The length of the textual element should normally be between 5,000 and 10,000 words. The practical component should be a ‘substantial’ body of work. Given the potential range of media that can be used, and their differing potential relationships with the research process and the textual component, it is impossible to be precise. In the case of film/video it would normally entail the submission of a work (or works) of about 25 minutes in length (or more), but detailed requirements will be worked out on a case-by-case basis.

Students will undertake to design and conduct a substantial practice-based research project in collaboration with their supervisor. The project will be informed by research, as appropriate, into the materials, techniques and critical contexts of production, distribution and exhibition in audiovisual, electronic image and allied arts. As appropriate to each individual project, students will be encouraged to analyse, contextualise, historicise, and theorise their chosen medium with reference to key debates in history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of film and the media, especially in relation to anti-racist, decolonial, feminist, environmental and other key ethical and political dimensions of their aesthetic practice. They will learn to produce high quality research under pressure, by working independently. The exact conceptual and methodological direction of the research must initially come from the student, though this will be developed and reworked in discussion with the personal supervisor. Areas of research can be drawn from a wide remit, including the full range of media and cultural forms of contemporary societies and may be theoretical or empirical; technically- or more academically-based. Projects which are conceptually coherent, and practicable in their aims and methods can be considered, subject only to the in-house expertise of staff. The module encourages the development of knowledge and skills specific to the production, distribution and exhibition of contemporary media.

Assessment

There are two assessment points:

A: You are required to write one 5,000 word essay linked to the Practice-Based Research Methods seminar. The exact theme and title will be decided in discussion between you and your supervisor and relate to your specialist field of research, but as a guide it will demonstrate your readiness to undertake the project through critical evaluation of legal, ethical, critical and reflexive parameters and functions of practice-based research.

In addition, you will be assessed in the option module you undertake during the Spring Term.

B: The project in the MRes Film, Photography and Electronic Arts comprises a portfolio of practical work (such as photographs, video, film, installation, websites or other digital/print material) alongside a textual component. The work submitted should be original, and be as integral to the research aims, processes and outcomes of the project as the textual component. The final project as a whole will therefore demonstrate the integration of its practical and research components, so that text and practice reflect critically on each other.

Department

We are ranked:
22nd in the world for communication and media studies**
1st in the UK for the quality of our research***

**QS World University Rankings by subject 2015
***Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

We’ve also been ranked by LinkedIn as one of the top graduate universities for media professionals, because so many of our graduates go on to find jobs in the industry.

The department includes some of the top academics in the world for this discipline – the pioneers of media, communications and cultural studies. They actively teach on our programmes, and will introduce you to current research and debate in these areas. And many of our practice tutors are industry professionals active in TV, film, journalism, radio and animation.

We also run EastLondonLines.co.uk – our 24/7 student news website – which gives students the opportunity to gain experience working in a real-time news environment.

And we run regular public events featuring world-renowned writers and practitioners that have recently included Danny Boyle, Gurinda Chadha, Noel Clark and Tessa Ross. So you’ll get to experience the latest developments and debates in the industry.

Skills & Careers

The course is designed to support students who wish to strengthen their opportunities in professional media, including the media industries and creative practice, private sector firms, public sector institutions and civil society organisations with communications departments.

We envisage that a small proportion of graduates will seek careers in teaching, including secondary and higher education, in which case their projects and supervision will be tailored to that end.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Graduate training is very different from undergraduate courses. It is based on individual needs and abilities, and is designed to help you to think clearly, originally and practically, and to prepare you for leadership in science. Read more
Graduate training is very different from undergraduate courses. It is based on individual needs and abilities, and is designed to help you to think clearly, originally and practically, and to prepare you for leadership in science. We teach our graduate students how to plan and carry out cutting-edge research. Cambridge is an amazing place to learn how to do research. Visiting speakers and collaborators come from all over the world, and there are simply too many seminars for one person to attend! We have a careful system of monitoring the individual progress of each student; everyone has both a principal supervisor and associated advisor, and there are weekly student-led seminars.

Research training within the Department has several essential components, the first and foremost being the research project itself, to which you will make a significant contribution. This will give you experience and training in a variety of experimental and/or clinical research techniques, but will also teach you how to organise research, plan experiments, and read and digest the scientific literature relevant to your research work. Most research groups have weekly or fortnightly meetings in which all members discuss each others work.

However, other skills are also important. You will be required to attend seminars and round-tables, and you will have the opportunity to go to scientific meetings both in the UK and abroad. These bring you into direct contact with prominent and active scientists in your field from around the world.

You will also give scientific talks yourself. Audiences for such talks are often quite large, and the discussion of your paper is often very lively. You will also be expected to attend courses, either directly related to your research (for example, they might teach you a specific skill or expand your theoretical knowledge) or teach you general skills which are important for well-qualified scientist to know (for example, how to write a scientific paper, use databases, or interact with the media). There are a large number of these courses, and many of them are run by the the Graduate School of Life Sciences, but the Department has its own series of seminars and workshops and an annual Spring School, which is focused each year on a different topic.

We expect our graduate students to publish in high quality journals, and nearly all of them do so.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcnmpmds

Format

You will be assigned a principal supervisor, whom you should expect to see on a regular basis. The department will also appoint a second supervisor whom you will meet less regularly. Typically the second supervisor provides expertise in a related field.

There is a weekly seminar programme that is given by all graduates students in the department. MPhil students get to present their work towards the end of their course. They receive formal feedback on their presentation from the course director.

All students attend regular laboratory meetings with their research group, have one-to-one meetings with their supervisor and co-supervisor, and give a seminar to the department which is scored by the audience. The Director of Training meets all students at least once a year.

Assessment

The MPhil in Medical Science is examined by dissertation and viva. The dissertation must be no longer than 20,000 words and must satisfy the examiners that the candidate can design and carry out an original investigation, assess and interpret the results obtained, and place the work in the wider perspective of the subject.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. Read more

Overview

Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. The Institute accepts only a few M.Phil students every year, mainly because bench space is very limited and so competition for places is particularly fierce. In the main, applicants are successful if they are recognized as bringing a valuable technique or methodology to their host lab.

The MPhil course lasts for 12 months, during which time the student is expected to complete a research project, and write and submit a thesis of less than 20,000 words in length. The student will then be examined orally on the thesis and on the wider field of knowledge into which it falls. The students are provided with information which clearly sets out what is expected of them during their period of research in order to obtain their degree.

Each student has a principal supervisor and is also assigned an adviser who provides additional support. In addition, Ann Kaminski (Head of Scientific Administration) acts as the first point of contact for any student with a query or difficulty that is not directly related to their scientific work.

All student matters in the Institute are overseen by the Cancer Biology Graduate Education Committee, which has the well-being of our students at heart. All first year graduate students are required to attend a series of around 30 lectures on cancer biology which take place in the Institute. The lectures are given by specialists in their fields and they aim to provide all students with a comprehensive overview of cancer biology, ranging from basic cell biology through to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Throughout their period at the Institute, all students are expected to participate in journal clubs, lab meetings, lectures and seminars. They are also encouraged to take advantage of the numerous and varied types of transferable skills training offered by both the Institute and the University. Students are encouraged to attend scientific meetings relevant to their course of study. All students in the Institute are members of the student-run Graduate Society which organises regular scientific and social events.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc

Teaching

The MPhil in Medical Science course is exclusively by research. The project and supervisor are determined during the application process. In addition to the principal supervisor, it is likely that the student will also be appointed a day-to-day supervisor who is able to provide hands-on assistance. Given the interdisciplinary nature of some of the projects, students will also be expected to seek guidance from other colleagues, including post-docs and core facility staff. Students will participate in the Institute's weekly seminar programme.

- One to one supervision
Formal supervision approximately one hour per week, plus also day-to-day supervision in the lab.

- Lectures
2 hours per week

- Journal clubs
5 hours per term

- Feedback
Students should expect to receive on-going feedback from all supervisors involved in their research project. In addition, the principal supervisor will write termly reports on Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System.

Assessment

- Thesis
The student is expected to submit a thesis, which should be less than 20,000 words in length and post-submission, the student will be examined orally by two examiners on the content of the thesis and on the wider field of their research area.

- Other
The student is expected to give a brief presentation (15 - 20 minutes) to the Institute approximately 10 weeks after commencing study. This allows the student to introduce him/herself to all colleagues and to inform them of the nature of his/her project.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc

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This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. Read more
This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. More than half of the curriculum is shared with the MPhils in Public Health and Epidemiology. The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care.

The course draws on local strengths in working with large databases, primary care-based clinical trials and a wide range of other appropriate methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analyses. Throughout the course students are able to draw on the research expertise within the Institute of Public Health and wider expertise in the University.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvphmppcr

Course detail

The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care. Specifically, the course aims to:

1. Contribute to the commitment of the Cambridge University Hospital’s NHS Foundation Trust (CUHNHSFT), Cambridgeshire Primary Care Trust/ Clinical Commissioning Group and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to continuing professional development of NHS staff in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
2. Develop a cadre of primary care clinical research leaders who will pursue clinical Academic careers within academia, the NHS and industry;
3. Contribute to the commitment of the Health Education East of England to continuing professional development of GP Specialty Trainees in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
4. Expand critical and current knowledge of research methodologies through an academically vigorous education programme offered in a world-leading primary care clinical research environment;
5. Equip clinical researchers with knowledge about the complex issues associated with conducting sound translational research in general practice and community settings.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this programme successfully will have gained an understanding of the primary care research context, including the distinctive nature and contribution of primary care research, and the contribution of key underpinning methods. Specifically, graduates will possess a grounding in primary care-relevant epidemiological, psychological, sociological and health services research methods, statistical methods and data analyses including surveys, trials and evidence synthesis. Upon successful completion each student will be able to apply contemporary research tools to clinically relevant areas of investigation in primary care.

Successful completion of the MPhil will also equip students with the skills and knowledge defined by the Academy of Medical Sciences’ Supplementary Guidelines for the Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) for Specialty Registrars undertaking joint clinical and academic training programmes (September 2011).

Michaelmas Term

This term focuses on epidemiological and biostatistical principles and procedures. Teaching sessions during this term will be shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health course. The teaching in this term also includes training in basic data handling and analysis using the statistical package Stata.

The three modules are:

- Epidemiology
- Biostatistics
- Data handling and appraisal

During this term you will also complete an essay on the epidemiology of a chosen condition in a primary care population. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. You should also begin to research an appropriate topic for your MPhil thesis. You should discuss this proposal with you Course Supervisor to assess the suitability of the topic and the availability of relevant data.

There will also be an assessment based on the epidemiological component of the first term. This assessment is informal and does not count towards your degree. The assessment provides your Course Supervisor and Course Directors with a guide to your progress. A guideline answer sheet will be provided at the end of the assessment.

Lent Term

This term includes modular-based lectures and seminars in more advanced aspects of epidemiological research and public health which are shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health, and specific modules on Primary Care Research not shared with other MPhil students.

Modules shared with the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health:

- Health Policy
- Social Science
- Chronic disease epidemiology
- Genetic epidemiology and Public health genomics
- Health Promotion

Primary Care Research modules:

- Introduction to Primary Care Research
- Use of routine data in Primary Care
- Designing, delivering and analysing surveys in primary care
- Qualitative research

Please note some modules may move from term to term.

During this term you will also complete a second essay which should take the form of a protocol for your thesis research. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. Before starting your protocol, the title of your thesis should be agreed with you Course and Thesis Supervisor. Both you Course and Thesis Supervisor should sign the thesis title form confirming the title. All students must have a designated Thesis Supervisor (in some cases this individual may also be the Course Supervisor).

Easter Term

This term includes a small number of modular-based lectures and seminars again shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Publich Health.

- Clinical Trials
- Health Economics
- Ethics and Law

The remainder of the term is dedicated to revision for the written examinations in June and thesis work. The term ends on the last business day of July 2016 with the hand-in of the thesis. If you leave the UK, you must be prepared to travel back to Cambridge for an oral examination, if required.

Assessment

A thesis not exceeding 20,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding tables, appendices, and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine.

Two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words in length, on subjects approved by the Degree Committee

Two written papers, each of which may cover all the areas of study prescribed in the syllabus.

The course components are completed by the end of July. However, to complete the course, students will be required to attend a viva in person on a date (to be announced) in late August or early September.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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We accept students into the Department of Politics and International Relations on the basis of a match between your proposed research and the current research interests of a potential supervisor as well as an assessment of qualifications and suitability for a research degree. Read more
We accept students into the Department of Politics and International Relations on the basis of a match between your proposed research and the current research interests of a potential supervisor as well as an assessment of qualifications and suitability for a research degree.

Initial discussions about supervision are therefore on the basis of a brief research proposal prepared by prospective students before a formal application is made.

If you'd like to come and discuss your research with the Director of Postgraduate Studies and/or with a potential supervisor, please contact the Departmental Secretary to make an appointment.

Registration and study

Initially, you register for a Master of Philosophy (MPhil) programme to train you in the research methods necessary to complete a PhD.

You can apply to upgrade to PhD registration when you have satisfactorily completed an agreed part of the research and training programme; this usually happens before 18 months if you are studying full-time, or before 36 months if part-time.

You should aim to complete and submit your PhD thesis within an agreed period, usually three to four years for full-time students, and four to six years for part-time.

If you decide not to upgrade to PhD registration, you can submit your thesis for an MPhil after two years if you are studying full-time, or after three years if part-time.

With the agreement of your supervisor, you can change your registration from full to part-time or vice versa.

North American applicants especially should note that the British system does not include preparatory taught classes or examinations as part of the MPhil/PhD programme, except for an initial module in research methods.

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Professor Sanjay Seth

Structure

Research supervision

You're assigned members of staff qualified to supervise your research throughout your period of registration. Please see our staff page for details of the teaching staff and their research interests.

You usually have a single supervisor, although in some cases joint supervision is agreed, and two members of staff are involved in the supervision.

Supervision involves regular meetings throughout the period of study, and ideally involves the development of an intensive intellectual relationship between you and your supervisor, from which both parties gain.

Research training

All research students who have not completed an MRes or MPhil degree will have to attend modules on quantitative and qualitative research methods held in their first year of study.

A College-wide programme of research training is also provided, which involves an induction module (which all students should attend), introduction to information technologies and the use of library and bibliographic resources, basic training in quantitative research methods, and sessions on research planning, presentation skills and ethics.

Optional elements

There are seminars held within the Department, which you can attend. Also, you may, after consultation with your supervisor, audit the appropriate postgraduate options from any of the taught MA/MRes programmes offered in the Department. This involves participating in seminar discussions and/or writing coursework, but not being formally assessed for the course.

Assessment

Examination of the MPhil is by a thesis (60,000 words maximum for an MPhil) and a viva voce.

Skills & Careers

Careers

Central and local government; management and personnel work; finance; the media; teaching, lecturing and research; health service administration. Many of our graduates undertake professional training in law, accountancy, journalism, business administration, teaching, social work or nursing.

Skills

You'll develop:
•a critical awareness of social and political issues and processes
•originality in engagement with the discipline of political science
•communication and presentation skills

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths http://www.gold.ac.uk/skills-careers/

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/. Read more
We're committed to developing our postgraduates into skilled researchers who can conduct rigorous research using a variety of methodologies and methods- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-psychology/

Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity.

During your first year you may take a range of taught modules including research design and analysis, methodology, theoretical issues, and statistics; requirements will vary depending on any postgraduate research training you have already undertaken.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

You will attend and contribute to research seminars, and through departmental and Goldsmiths-wide modules you are also encouraged to develop practical skills such as public speaking, poster preparation, scientific writing, and how to deal with the media.

You meet regularly with your supervisor at every stage, and develop a structured approach to designing, executing, analysing and writing up your research.

You will have access to the Department of Psychology's range of laboratories, testing rooms and research equipment. You have an annual allowance to contribute towards your research expenses and participation in at least one national or international conference.

What kind of research could I do?

We are able to support research in most areas of psychology. Some students have already formulated specific research ideas before they apply here, and find a supervisor in the department who is able to help them develop these into a doctoral research programme; if this applies to you, see information on the expertise of all our staff and contact any who you think may be able to help you to pursue these.

Other students are attracted by the research interests of our staff, and may decide to undertake a project which has been suggested by them and which relates to their ongoing research. To explore these or other research ideas, start by emailing the member of staff whose research interests you. Each staff member will discuss research ideas with you via email, skype or phone; and you are very welcome to visit staff at Goldsmiths to discuss your options further.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Denise Barry.

Structure

Our postgraduate students are offered a stimulating study environment in which to research their higher degree.

We have a thriving postgraduate school with some 40 current students on full-time and part-time programmes, including mature students and students from the EU and overseas.

We provide training modules in research methods in your first year, a regular report/presentation schedule, and excellent computing/research facilities.

If you are thinking of doing an MPhil at Goldsmiths, the first step is to get in touch with any members of our staff whose research is in line with your interests.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Training and support

All our MPhil students are assigned a specific research supervisor (or sometimes joint supervisors).

As well as receiving ongoing support and guidance from their allocated supervisor(s), our students undergo comprehensive training in psychological research methods (unless they already hold an MSc approved by the ESRC) in line with current ESRC training guidelines, which includes quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. This is mainly during the first year of registration (or first two years for part-time students. Our MPhil students also attend various short generic research skills and methods training (CRT) modules run by the College, also in their first year (or first two years if part-time).

Our students have full access to the Department's excellent facilities for lab and field research, and first-rate technical support is available from the Department's five-strong team of full-time technical staff.

Your progress

You may have the option to upgrade to a PhD after 12 months full-time, or 20 months part-time.

Your progress on your thesis is regularly monitored by the Department's Postgraduate Programmes Committee. The Head of Department can recommend suspension from the programme at any stage if progress is not satisfactory.

Postgraduate facilities

All full-time students have their own workplace and a networked computer with access to programmes for their research needs, plus email and internet facilities. Part-time students also have access to a networked computer, generally shared between two or three students. In addition, we have a lab solely for the use of postgraduates, and a postgraduate computing room. We also run a psychological test library for staff and students.

Seminars and presentations

Our postgraduates have regular opportunities to meet up with other students and to make contact with staff.

The Department runs a number of active visiting lecturer seminar programmes and a weekly Postgraduate Seminar Series, at which students learn about the research of their colleagues, and receive guidance on topics such as giving presentations or writing up a thesis. There are also several specialised research groups (including affective neuroscience, consciousness studies, development and social processes, occupational psychology, visual cognition) open to staff, researchers and postgraduate students which hold regular discussion sessions and talks.

All postgraduates are invited to attend an annual Research Seminar Weekend in an informal setting at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park, which is funded by the Department. Here, we have a programme of internal and external speakers.

In addition, our annual Postgraduate Poster Party gives students the opportunity to update the Department on their work.

Conferences

Besides the yearly presentation to the Department, our postgraduates are strongly encouraged to present their work, eg as a paper or poster, at external conferences and financial support is set aside for this. Some recent presentations by postgraduates include:

-Priming for depth-rotated objects depends on attention. (Vision Sciences, Sarasota)
-Imagining objects you have never seen: Imagery in individuals with profound visual impairment. (BPS Annual Conference)
-Modelling dopaminergic effects on implicit and explicit learning tasks. (Annual Summer Interdisciplinary Conference)
-Individual differences in affective modulation of the startle reflex and emotional stroop task. (BPS Conference)
-Evolution and psi: Investigating the presentiment effect as an adapted behaviour. (Society for Psychical Research 25th International Conference)
-Presence: Is your heart in it? (4th Annual International Workshop on Presence)
-The effects of state anxiety on the suggestibility and accuracy of child eyewitnesses. (11th European Conference of Psychology and Law)
-The psychosocial sequelae of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. (6th Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Association)
-The role of Electrophysiology in Human Computer Interaction. (HCI Conference)
-Categorical shape perception. Experimental Psychology Society and Belgian Psychological Society)
-Schizotypy, eye movements, and the effects of neuroticism. (10th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Individual (ISSID))
-Eye movements in siblings of schizophrenic patients. (World Congress of Biological Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany)

Assessment

Thesis and viva voce.

Department

Psychology at Goldsmiths is ranked joint 3rd in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

How does music affect mood?
Why do some people believe in the paranormal?
How do people with autism think?

In the Department of Psychology we try and investigate questions like this, conducting research that’s relevant to a range of sectors and industries – from advertising to education, and from banking to the public sector.

You’ll be taught by experts in the field, who are carrying out research that’s world class. And you’ll learn in a department with excellent specialist and general-purpose research laboratories, including:

EEG and brain stimulation labs for neuroscience research
a visual perception and attention laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art eye tracking systems
an infant lab
in-house technical support staff

Skills & Careers

You will receive training in and develop wide-ranging research skills, including:

database searching and bibliographic skills
managing and analysing data
presentation and communication skills
quantitative and qualitative research methods
handling legal and ethical issues in research
research design
project management

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body. Supervision can be offered in any of the areas of departmental activity, as reflected in the research interests of our staff. Please contact a member of staff in the department, before making a formal application, and establish that they would be willing to supervise you in a research area of common interest.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

An approximate timeline of training and research plans and an outline of a previous research project in which you have played a leading role (for instance, a study you conducted for your undergraduate or MSc degree). The personal statement in the Departmental form will be structured in a different way to that on the College form. Please see guidelines on the form itself. Finally, your supervisor will be required to provide a statement detailing ways in which the project fits into their overall research programme and the wider research interests and facilities of the Department. Guidance on how to structure these is given on the form. Please do not exceed the word length, and DO NOT submit additional material emanating from your previous research (e.g. copies of dissertations, published papers) as this will not be read. Note that all aspects of the application are required for an application to be considered.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. Read more
Applications are co-ordinated by CRUK CI. Prior to submitting the on-line application form (GRADSAF), you should identify a supervisor in the Institute who is willing to host you for M.Phil study. The Institute accepts only a few M.Phil students every year, mainly because bench space is very limited and so competition for places is particularly fierce. In the main, applicants are successful if they are recognized as bringing a valuable technique or methodology to their host lab.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvcrmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil course lasts for 12 months, during which time the student is expected to complete a research project, and write and submit a thesis of less than 20,000 words in length. The student will then be examined orally on the thesis and on the wider field of knowledge into which it falls. The students are provided with information which clearly sets out what is expected of them during their period of research in order to obtain their degree.

Each student has a principal supervisor and is also assigned an adviser who provides additional support. In addition, Ann Kaminski (Head of Scientific Administration) acts as the first point of contact for any student with a query or difficulty that is not directly related to their scientific work.

All student matters in the Institute are overseen by the Cancer Biology Graduate Education Committee, which has the well-being of our students at heart. All first year graduate students are required to attend a series of around 30 lectures on cancer biology which take place in the Institute. The lectures are given by specialists in their fields and they aim to provide all students with a comprehensive overview of cancer biology, ranging from basic cell biology through to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Throughout their period at the Institute, all students are expected to participate in journal clubs, lab meetings, lectures and seminars. They are also encouraged to take advantage of the numerous and varied types of transferable skills training offered by both the Institute and the University. Students are encouraged to attend scientific meetings relevant to their course of study. All students in the Institute are members of the student-run Graduate Society which organises regular scientific and social events.

Format

The MPhil in Medical Science course is exclusively by research. The project and supervisor are determined during the application process. In addition to the principal supervisor, it is likely that the student will also be appointed a day-to-day supervisor who is able to provide hands-on assistance. Given the interdisciplinary nature of some of the projects, students will also be expected to seek guidance from other colleagues, including post-docs and core facility staff. Students will participate in the Institute's weekly seminar programme.

Students should expect to receive on-going feedback from all supervisors involved in their research project. In addition, the principal supervisor will write termly reports on Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System.

Assessment

The student is expected to submit a thesis, which should be less than 20,000 words in length and post-submission, the student will be examined orally by two examiners on the content of the thesis and on the wider field of their research area.

The student is expected to give a brief presentation (15 - 20 minutes) to the Institute approximately 10 weeks after commencing study. This allows the student to introduce him/herself to all colleagues and to inform them of the nature of his/her project.

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities: http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Department of Physics and Astronomy is one of the oldest departments at the University of Calgary, and since its establishment it has excelled in both research and teaching. Read more
The Department of Physics and Astronomy is one of the oldest departments at the University of Calgary, and since its establishment it has excelled in both research and teaching.

Master's (MSc) Thesis-based

This degree must be completed on a full-time basis.

Program Requirements
1. The student must choose one of five broad areas of specialization: Astrophysics, Physics, Radiation Oncology Physics, Space Physics, and Medical Imaging (interdisciplinary).

2. All students must have a supervisor. When admitted to our graduate program, you are assigned an interim supervisor to assist you with your course selection, registration, etc., however this may not be your final supervisory. You have a maximum of four months from the time your program begins (either September or January) to finalize your supervisor. Your supervisor is then responsible for directing the research component of your degree, as well as for some fraction of your financial support package.

3. Course requirements:
-For students specializing in Astrophysics, Physics, or Space Physics, four half-course equivalents, including at least two of PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613, and PHYS 615, plus two elective courses at the 500- or 600-level, as approved by the Graduate Chair.
-For students specializing in Radiation Oncology Physics, eight half-course equivalents. Six of which are MDPH 623, MDPH 625, MDPH 633, MDPH 637, MDPH 639, MDSC 689.01, then two Physics graduate core courses such as PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613 or PHYS 615.
-In addition, all students are required to take a minimum of three terms of the Graduate Seminar, although the normal load is four terms, and additional terms may be required of students on an as need basis.

4. Thesis submission and defense

Master's (MSc) Course-based

This program may be done part time or full time, and in fact we encourage professionals in the field to consider doing this program as a part-time, professional development student.

Suitable for students not necessarily oriented towards research activity.

Program Requirements
1. The student must choose one of three broad areas of specialization: Astrophysics, Physics, or Space Physics. The Radiation Oncology Physics specialization is not available as a course-based degree.

2. All graduate students must have a supervisor. For a course-based MSc program, this is quite straightforward, as the graduate chair acts as supervisor for all course-based MSc students.

3. The student must complete ten half-course equivalents, made up of:
All six of the core experimental and theoretical physics courses: PHYS 603, PHYS 605, PHYS 609, PHYS 611, PHYS 613, PHYS 615. Plus four half course equivalents determined by the specialization area:
-Astrophysics - ASPH 699 plus three half-course equivalents labeled ASPH (two of these may be at the 500-level). PHYS 629 and SPPH 679 may be taken instead of ASPH courses
-Physics - PHYS 699, one half-course equivalent labeled PHYS, at the 600-level or above, and two half-course equivalents labeled ASPH, PHYS, or SPPH (these may be at the 500 level)
-Space Physics - SPPH 699, plus three half-course equivalents labeled SPPH at the 600-level or above. PHYS 509 may replace a SPPH course

4. A comprehensive examination with a written and oral component.

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This course makes an ideal stepping-stone for those considering PhD or company-based research and provides an opportunity for you to explore your interest in the biosciences in depth while showing a commitment to a research-focused career. Read more

About this course

This course makes an ideal stepping-stone for those considering PhD or company-based research and provides an opportunity for you to explore your interest in the biosciences in depth while showing a commitment to a research-focused career. Our course is flexible, allowing you to explore and specialise in an area of biology that fascinates you with the personalised support of a supervisor. With over 200 members of staff, the breadth of research and expertise in the institute means that you can undertake research in any one of the many areas of specialisation including, zoology, plant breeding, microbiology, bioinformatics, animal or equine science, marine biology and ecology.

Why study Biosciences at Aberystwyth University?

IBERS has been judged world leading in areas such as zoology, grassland science, biochemistry, animal science, marine biology, microbiology, plant biology and ecology.

No matter which area of Biology you specialise in, you will be working alongside some of the world’s biggest names in their respective fields.

We have excellent research facilities including aquariums (marine, freshwater, tropical), a bioinformatics hub, ion-torrent sequencers, and extensive glass house facilities.

We operate several farms and own significant tracts of natural woodland, while our coastal location close to several nature reserves and national parks offers unique opportunities for a broad range of bioscience research.

Opportunity to work within research teams with your supervisor, research staff and other postgraduate students.

This course is suitable for students who are not yet ready or do not wish to begin a PhD but who would like to develop their research skills first. It is also suitable for students that would like to combine research with the support of a taught element of a postgraduate course.

In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) review of university achievement, 78% of our research was classed as world-leading or internationally excellent, and 76% of our work was recognised as having a practical applied impact on society at a world-class level.

Aberystwyth is a safe, vibrant, and friendly town that comprises a multinational community.

Course structure

This course can be studied one year full-time or 24 months part-time. Students on this course complete 40 credits of core modules centred on research and laboratory techniques, and 20 credits giving them an insight into themes/approaches to the biosciences. These modules are delivered via fieldtrips, practicals, lectures, workshops and tutorials.

The core element of this course is the MRes Dissertation, for which students will have supervision meetings to give them guidance before undertaking a prolonged period of experimental work/data gathering, research, and writing up of the dissertation, under the supervision of their dissertation supervisor. All postgraduate students in IBERS also have a named personal tutor, with whom they can discuss personal or domestic concerns that impact on their studies.

Course content

The modules included in this programme are designed to provide a fundamental basis for understanding and contributing meaningfully to biological science research. This qualification combines taught elements that focus primarily on how to undertake excellent research and how research can address grand challenges in biology that we face as a society.

This interdisciplinary research training provides you with the skills needed to complete your individual Research Dissertation. The key feature here is that you are able to explore an area of biology that fascinates you and undertake higher level research with the personalised support of a supervisor.

Core modules:

Field and Laboratory Techniques
MRes Dissertation (A)
MRes Dissertation (B)
Research Methods in the Biosciences
Frontiers in the Biosciences

Contact time

Up to 10 hours per work are spent in taught modules in semesters 1 and 2. The rest of the time in semesters 1 and 2 and the whole of semester 3 are spent conducting your research project. Depending on your project this may include laboratory, field or computer-based research supported by regular meetings with your supervisor.

Assessment

The taught modules are assessed by scientific writing assignments (such as reports, critical reviews, essays and journalistic articles), presentations, contribution to group discussions in seminars, and online assignments.

Subsequent successful submission of your dissertation leads to the award of an MRes.

Skills

Throughout this course you will:

Develop strong data collection/analysis, fieldwork and laboratory skills

Enhance your scientific communication and team work skills

Write for a range of audiences including academics and the wider public

Enhance your analytical abilities and problem solving skills

Develop study and research skills

Develop and sustain a self-initiated programme of study underpinned by good time management skills

Work effectively and independently

Enhance your project management skills to deliver a demanding combination of research, analysis, communication and presentation

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