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PLEASE NOTE. This course will run in September 2016. This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor. Read more
PLEASE NOTE: This course will run in September 2016

This is an innovative course, taught over four, week-long residential retreats over one year (full time) and will commence in September - some of these are in Central London, others in beautiful Egham Campus near Windsor.

Between retreats the course is run via distance-learning with a website, chat room and e-tutorials. This makes it possible for those living outside the UK, and those with busy working lives, for instance freelancers and those in the film and TV industries, to take time out to attend. We have a wide variety of students on the course including established actors, comedy writers, editors, producers, novelists and many others.

During the MASTFiR course (MA in Screenwriting for Televion and Film - Retreat) you will cover writing for feature film and television as well as new developments such as web drama. You will develop a range of ideas, then go on to write film and television outlines, and several drafts of a feature film screenplay, a TV single drama, or a TV series or serial bible and sample episodes. You will be immersed in a creative atmosphere conducive to concentrated learning and group interaction; a core unit is the Development Lab, where you will present your work in progress to the group for criticism and feedback, and experiment with co-writing.

You will also meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mascreenwritingfortelevisionandfilmretreat.aspx

Why choose this course?

- in the fast-changing world of digital drama, new media and new film markets, you will become skilled in producing strong and original fiction writing.

- the course director is Ivan Levene, a practising screenwriter and script editor with over 15 years of experience in the industry. He currently has two produced feature films, and has been involved in the development of numerous other film and TV projects, including a recent major international release. Before this he worked in acquisitions and development, advancing over £15m of film and TV production from inception to marketplace. Current commissions include a supernatural thriller with Matthew Rhys, and a biopic set in Gilded Age New York about Harriet Hubbard Ayer - socialite, proto-feminist, and the first person to create an international cosmetics business.

- teaching television is screenwriting lecturer Adam Ganz, whose TV credits include Pillow Talk and Murder Without Motive; and guest lecturing in television are Gillian Gordon and Jonathan Powell.

- despite the first students only graduating in 2008, we have already had a host of successes with many of our students finding success in the industry.

- you will meet and work with industry and independent producers, directors, agents, writers and actors to provide a production context. We have recently had guests from Working Title, Channel Four, the BBC, Script Factory, Blake Friedmann Agency and many others.

Department research and industry highlights

- the MA Screenwriting for Television and Film Retreat course (MASTFiR) only began graduating students in 2008 but already we have had a host of successes - Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units.

Core course units:
Script Craft
This unit will focus on the acquisition of basic writing skills, and is a gateway to the ‘Story and Theme’ unit. You will explore the specifics of scene and dialogue construction, formatting and issues around research and around adaptation from source materials – e.g. plays, novels and news stories.

Story and Theme
This unit teaches the essential components of story and structure, the specific language of film storytelling and genre. It will include lectures, screenings of films and extracts, and individual and group analysis of films. You will produce ideas, formal outlines and a feature-length screenplay or TV series bibles and episode.

Development Lab
This is a discussion forum to which you bring the work above, where it is critiqued and debated from a number of points of view including aesthetic, generic, marketing, audience and budget. Development Lab is interactive and is at the core of the course; it replicates many of the development processes you will face in the film and television industry.

Contexts: Current British Film and TV Practice
This unit covers current aesthetic and generic trends in British film and television. There will also be lectures and seminars on budget, schedule, commissioning, finance, contracts, casting and marketing, and you will explore the production and marketing implications of your own screenplay projects.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- the ability to discriminate between project ideas, present ideas and drafts to others effectively, and both give and receive constructive criticism

- the understanding of the aesthetic and economic conditions of the marketplace, how their work may be viewed in terms of budget and audience, and the stages a screenplay will go through in development and production

- a broad and detailed understanding of the nature of the film and television screenplay- how it signifies, how it communicates meaning to the film producer, director, actor and to the audience

- advanced understanding of the processes of writing a screenplay, from initial concept to final draft

- advanced understanding of the various stages of script development and how each is documented- outlines, treatments, pitch documents and so on

- critical knowledge of the current genres and trends in film and television and how they have evolved in recent years, particularly in the context of economic and market developments in these industries

- an understanding of the UK film and television industries, including their structure, institutions and working practices

- a broad understanding of the group nature of writing and development, and how the roles played by the various parties- producer, script editor, director and so on- shape and influence the screenplay.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including script outlines and scenes, a completed feature film screenplay and/or TV series episode and ‘bible’, and marketing and pitch documents.

Employability & career opportunities

On graduating, you will be well prepared for careers in television and feature film screenwriting and script development.

Our recent graduate successes include:

Janice Hallett's feature screenplay Retreat is now being shot in Canada with a star cast; Olivia Wakeford has a writing credit on the feature film Baseline (2009) and several writers have gained agents and development commissions. Kay Stonham has work commissioned by the BBC and two of our younger writers are working on a C5 youth drama series. Adam Rolston has had a highly successful musical on Doris Day's life performed at a variety of London venues. Many students have won festival awards for their short films.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA History will allow you to focus on a particular period or geographical area, or to study a specific theme such as economic and social history, international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval and maritime, or gender history. Read more
The MA History will allow you to focus on a particular period or geographical area, or to study a specific theme such as economic and social history, international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval and maritime, or gender history. Students also have the option of following one of our specialist pathways or select from our full range of modules by following our open pathway.

Specialist pathways

Early Modern History; Maritime History; Medical History and War and Society

Modules

A wide range of optional modules are available which reflect the varied research interests of academic staff. These interests range widely from the early medieval period to the twentieth century and cover Britain, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. All aspects of the discipline are represented, from social, religious, cultural and gender history to the study of politics, economic development, international relations, and military conflict in a variety of contexts and eras. Particular areas of strength include early modern history, naval and maritime history, medical history, and the history of the connections between war, state and society.
Your choice of optional modules may include subjects as diverse as ritual in the Middle Ages; witchcraft and the supernatural in the 16th and 17th centuries; maritime and naval history; sexuality; health, medicine; gender and the body; party politics and international diplomacy; and the impact of modern wars on culture, economy, society and memory.

The programme

- offers an excellent education in a very wide range of historical subjects and geographical locations over a broad time-span from Anglo-Saxon England to modern Western and Eastern Europe, some parts of Asia, North and South America, and Africa;
- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;
- draws on the expertise of a number of highly respected research centres which are at the forefront of their respective disciplines;
- participation in joint seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms;
- excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Research Areas

Research is at the heart of History and our students are encouraged to come to Departmental Research Seminars and become an active part of wider research community. Our research centres regularly hold seminars and other research events which MA students are welcome to attend. Our current research centres include:
• Centre for Early Modern Studies
• Centre for Imperial and Global History
• Centre for Maritime Historical Studies
• Centre for War, State and Society
• Centre for Medical History
• Centre for Medieval Studies
• Institute of Cornish Studies

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The MRes in Economic and Social History will allow you to focus specifically on economic and social history and its methods of analysis, while giving you the opportunity to study other topics in international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval or gender history. Read more
The MRes in Economic and Social History will allow you to focus specifically on economic and social history and its methods of analysis, while giving you the opportunity to study other topics in international history, religious and cultural history, political history, naval or gender history.

You can select from option modules that include subjects such as ritual in the Middle Ages; witchcraft and the supernatural in the 16th and 17th centuries; sexuality; health, medicine; gender and the body; party politics and international diplomacy; and the impact of modern wars on culture, economy, society and memory.

The MRes provides essential training for PhD study in History, as well as an opportunity to develop particular interests in the history of different countries and periods through taught modules and a 25,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choosing within the MRes programme subject area.

The Programme

- offers an excellent education in a very wide range of historical subjects and geographical locations over a broad time-span from Anglo-Saxon England to modern Western and Eastern Europe, some parts of Asia, North and South America, and Africa;
- produces graduates who are highly competent in subject-specific, core academic, and personal and key skills that are both relevant and transferable to employment;
- draws on the expertise of a number of highly respected research centres which are at the forefront of their respective disciplines;
- participation in joint seminar programmes offering insights into a very wide range of research cultures and specialisms;
- excellent preparation for students intending to continue on to doctoral-level research with a good track record in obtaining funding for further study.

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules which may be available are; Qualitative Methods in Social Research; Applied Quantitative Data Analysis; Philosophy of the Social Sciences ; Gender, Society and Culture in Early Modern England; Medieval Research Skills; Interpreting the Middle Ages; Supervised Independent Study in the Humanities; Supervised Independent Study in the Humanities; British Naval Power in the Era of Sail 1660-1815; Approaches to War and Society in the Twentieth Century; Medicine in Medieval and Early Modern England; Everyday Life in the Soviet Union; War 1450 to the Presen and Empires and Globalisation, c.1800-2000.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

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Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Read more
Our taught MA provision offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present day, from medieval manuscripts to contemporary crime narrative. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programmes offer up-to-date training in research methods and skills and a wide selection of literature modules from which you choose three; you will also write a dissertation. You will have the opportunity to follow up particular interests by studying a named pathway, or to designate your own area of study within the broad MA in English Literary Studies, tailoring an individual programme based on period, theme or genre. An MA in English is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take one of the named pathways, you will be expected to select two modules from those available within a pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to your named pathway. You need not confine your choices to a named pathway, as on the broad MA in English Literary Studies you may choose any three from the full list of modules on offer if you prefer. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules:
Research Methods and Resources
Dissertation

Typical optional Modules might include:
Old Norse
Warrior Poets in Heroic Societies
Old English Language and Literature
Narrative Transformations: Medieval Romance to Renaissance Epic
Middle English Manuscripts and Texts
Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Renaissance Tragedy
Renaissance Humanism
Lyric Poetry of the English Renaissance and Reformation
John Milton: Life, Works and Influence
Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
Romantic Forms of Grief
Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
The Literatures of Slavery
Literature of the Supernatural
Modernism and Touch
Representing the Self: From Sophocles to the Sopranos
Life Narratives
Post-War British Drama
Modern Poetry
The Contemporary US Novel
Blood and Soil: Regionalism and Contemporary US Crime Narrative
The Writing of Poetry

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than twenty of the above will run in any one year.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

Other admission requirements

Please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to provide a personal statement. In addition to your three module choices, you will also need to include a piece of written work of approximately 2,000 words in length on a literary subject. This can be any piece of literary-critical work you have completed recently and may be emailed direct to the Department if you wish (). We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office.

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Our taught MA pathway in Romantic and Victorian Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. Read more
Our taught MA pathway in Romantic and Victorian Literary Studies offers choice, flexibility and the opportunity to specialise within this field. You can learn from the rich variety of research expertise in the Department and you also have the chance to concentrate on a particular area of literary study within the field. Our commitment to research-led teaching means that students are able to explore the cutting edge of the discipline - from Romantics legacies to the representation of women in Victorian poetry and painting, to critical theory. We provide an intimate, dynamic and supportive environment for students of all backgrounds and nationalities.

Our programme offers up-to-date training in research methods and skills. You will choose three modules, at least two of which are from within the pathway, and you will write a dissertation on a subject related to Romantic and/or Victorian studies.

An MA in Romantic and Victorian Literary Studies is often the platform for further research at PhD level, as well as providing an excellent grounding for jobs in education, the arts and the media.

Course Structure

If you choose to take this named pathway, you will be expected to select at least two modules from those available within the pathway and to write your dissertation in an area related to it. Your third optional module may, if you wish, be chosen from the full list of MA modules on offer in the Department. Students may, with permission, take one module from other modules on offer elsewhere in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. All students must take the core Research Methods and Resources module and the dissertation alongside their three optional modules.

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Typical modules might include:
-Reflections on Revolution, 1789-1922
-Second-Generation Romantic Poetry
-Romantic Forms of Grief
-Women in Victorian Poetry and Painting
-Thinking with Things in Victorian Literature
-Literary Masculinity at the Fin-de-Siècle
-Women and the Novel in the Eighteenth Century
-Literature of the Supernatural

Modules are subject to staff availability and normally no more than five of the above will run in any one year.

When applying, please use the 'additional comments' section of the application form to indicate your choice of modules as well as to provide a personal statement.

Learning and Teaching

One of the distinctive features of the Durham MA in Literary Studies is that it permits both a broad-based, eclectic study of literary topics from the earliest periods of literature to the present and the possibility of specialisation through designated pathways in such areas as Medieval and Renaissance Studies or Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Studies. All students take 3 optional modules, taught in small seminar groups of up to 10, with each module generating 18 hours of contact time (9 seminars x 2 hours) over the academic year. A strong emphasis is placed on independent research, and seminars usually involve a considerable amount of preparation, including short presentations and workshop activities. Assessment for these modules is usually by coursework essay.

All students also register for the Research Methods and Resources module, which generates an additional 20 hours of contact time over the academic year. Again, a strong emphasis is given to independent research. Both pieces of assessed written work for the Research Methods and Resources module involve significant preparation for the MA dissertation (and in some cases for doctoral study later on). The MA dissertation is supported by 3.5 hours of dedicated individual supervision time. Drafts of the dissertation are read and commented upon by the supervisor.

Each MA student is assigned an Academic Advisor who can guide and support her or his progress during the programme of study. Throughout the taught MA degree programme, all students are strongly encouraged to participate in a lively series of staff-postgraduate research seminars, usually involving invited guest speakers from the UK and beyond.

International applicants

We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications. For advice on the equivalency of international qualifications, please contact our International Office at

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A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence. Read more
A Masters degree in English is a qualification that employers understand and respect. It is powerful testimony to your intellectual competence.

Course overview

English MA combines the study of literatures, linguistics, critical theory and creative writing. The course is incredibly flexible and you can pursue your personal goals for intellectual enquiry and literary exploration, with inspiration and encouragement from our widely-published lecturers.

There is a very clear link between teaching and research on the degree with all the modules above drawing on publications by the module leaders (all of whom were recognised as ‘Internationally Excellent’ or ‘Internationally Recognised’ in the recent REF).

You will first undertake an innovative introductory module called ‘Approaching Literature’ which allows you to study applied literary, critical and linguistic theory as a basis to your whole degree. There is then a wide choice of modules based on the research specialisms of the staff including: 'Gothic', 'Late Victorian Gothic', 'Writing the Borders', ‘Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’, 'Early Humans in Fiction', ‘Irish Literature 1790 to 1831’, ‘Critical Theory and Creative Writing’ and 'Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions’.

You will negotiate the topic of your Masters dissertation to reflect your personal interests. We like to push boundaries and develop modules that combine our research expertise with an awareness of your future career prospects.

The market for places on postgraduate teaching qualifications is becoming increasingly competitive. Many of our students enrol on the MA to improve their subject specialism, thereby giving them a greater chance of success at securing a place on one of these courses. With this in mind, we are attentive to developments in the GSCE and A Level curriculums, in order that our students have relevant, research led subject knowledge to bring to bear on applications.

Through the channels of Spectral Visions Press students are invited to submit their work for publication. If selected original work will be published in one of our professionally assembled annual anthologies the last two of which are currently available on Amazon. Furthermore, many of our students have written articles, reviews and interviews for organisations such as the International Gothic Association; An International Community of Gothic Scholars; and other scholarly networks such as the Open Graves; Open Minds project, Sibeal, and Feminist Studies. These networking opportunities give our students valuable access to the wider academic community, and aid in employment and progression opportunities.

Your training in research skills, together with Masters-level critical thinking, will be transferable to many different types of employment.

We also offer a part-time English MA of this course, which may suit you if you want to combine studying for a Masters degree with other commitments. For more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/educationandsociety/postgraduate/english-part-time/

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and supportive supervision. At MA level, responsibility for learning lies as much with you as with your tutor. Modules on this course include:
Core modules
-Approaching Literature (30 Credits)

Choose three optional modules from a list that may include the following modules
-Gothic (30 Credits)
-The 1790s (30 Credits)
-Late Victorian Gothic (30 Credits)
-‘What Ish My Nation?’: Postcolonial Irish Literatures (30 Credits)
-Language and Ideology in Children’s Fictions (30 Credits)
-Reading ‘Ulysses’ (30 Credits)
-The Global City: Modern to Postmodern (30 Credits)
-Orientalism: Representations of the East in Western Travel Literature and Arab and Iranian Novels (30 Credits)
-‘Strange Country’: Irish Literature 1790 to 1831 (30 Credits)
-Critical Theory and Creative Writing (30 Credits)
-Early Humans in Fiction (30 Credits)
-Reading the Anglo-Scots Borders (30 Credits)
-Reading and Writing the Fantastic, the Marvellous and the Gothic (30 Credits)
-Irish Literature and the Supernatural (30 Credits)

Plus the compulsory dissertation
-Dissertation on a topic that you negotiate with your supervisor (60 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include seminars and discussion groups. We often have visiting speakers and a range of research seminars to enhance your learning opportunities. This includes our widely acclaimed Spectral Visions event, held annually at the University.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include mainly essays. Some options require oral presentations.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has excellent facilities that have been boosted by multi-million pound redevelopments.

Course location
The course is based at the Priestman Building on City Campus, just a few minutes from the main Murray Library and close to Sunderland city centre. It’s a very vibrant and supportive environment with excellent resources for teaching and learning.

University Library Services
We’ve got thousands of books and e-books on topics related to English and literature, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles. Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-Early English Books Online, which provides digital images of virtually every work printed in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and British North America during 1473-1800
-Eighteenth Century Collections Online, which provides 136,000 full-text publications from 1701-1800
-Periodicals Archive Online, which provides digitised literary journals
-Project Muse, which provides over 180 full-text humanities and social sciences journals

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s Library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

This course is relevant to a wide range of occupations because it sharpens your skills of analysis and persuasive communication. At the same time it advances your intellectual development. A Masters degree in English is a qualification that is well-recognised by employers across all sectors. Past graduates have gained employment in areas such as:
-Teaching
-Media and journalism
-Civil Service
-Publishing
-Communications
-Freelance writing
-Arts and creative industries

A Masters degree will also enhance opportunities in academic roles or further study towards a PhD.

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Programme description. This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. Read more

Programme description

This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. It caters for a wide range of interests, with pathways in Traditional Arts and Culture, Medieval and Early Modern Celtic and Gaelic Development and Policy.

You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding in professional research methods and inquiry, language skills, literary and textual analysis or fieldwork and archiving, and a range of core topics in Celtic and Scottish studies.

You will undertake full research training in Celtic and Scottish studies. You will learn to analyse and synthesise this knowledge in an interdisciplinary context, question assumptions about the primacy of one specific discipline over others and receive an introduction to subjects which you may not have experienced at undergraduate level. You will also have the opportunity to take courses offered by the School of History, Classics & Archaeology.

Programme structure

The programme takes one academic year (12 months) of full-time study, or two years (24 months) of part-time study (part-time options are only available for UK or EU students).

You will complete one core course (20 credits total), five option courses (100 credits total) and a dissertation of 15,000 words (60 credits).

Compulsory courses:

  • Research Skills and Methods in Celtic and Scottish Studies

Option courses may include:

  • Celtic & Scottish Studies Internship
  • The Supernatural World
  • Material Culture in Scotland
  • Scottish Emigrant Traditions

Work placement/internship opportunities

The internship is an opportunity for students to gain valuable work experience in an area relevant to their studies. The economic environment is challenging for many graduates, and evidence of an internship is often a decisive factor in hiring decisions.

The internship has three main elements:

  • a work plan agreed between the host institution, the student, and the programme director
  • the work itself
  • an assessed final report

The precise nature of the internship will depend on agreements with the host institution, but it is likely to involve archival work, research assistance, curatorial work, or work in public relations.

Participating institutions may include Storytelling Centre, the National Library of Scotland Special Collections and Manuscripts departments, the National Sound Archive, the National Museums of Scotland, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, and the special collections of Edinburgh University.

Learning outcomes

You will develop the critical skills to evaluate and compare texts and a historical understanding of literature and culture, as well as transferable skills such as carrying out academic research, writing commentaries and essays, improving your analytical thought, using electronic resources and giving oral presentations.

You will gain:

  • familiarity with the broad context of Celtic and Scottish Studies
  • a solid understanding of bibliography and study methods
  • the ability to engage at a high level with the subject material
  • an awareness of current issues and concerns within selected research fields
  • the ability to engage in original research resulting in a dissertation in an area of specialism
  • opportunities for engagement with the professional field through an internship, if desired
  • the opportunity to study modern Scottish Gaelic or medieval Celtic languages

Career opportunities

There are a wide range of sectors within which you could apply your knowledge and skills such as journalism; social, government or cultural research; publishing; higher education; advertising; arts administration; information work; or programme research in broadcasting.



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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our Department of History.

At Essex, you can progress onto our MA History, MA History (Cultural and Social History Pathway), MA History (Local and Regional History Pathway), or MA History (Public History Pathway).

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also gain knowledge of history and an understanding of the methods and techniques of the historical discipline.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our excellent history facilities:
-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Example structure

-English for Academic Purposes
-Making Histories: Concepts, Themes and Sources
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Public History Project Module: Bourne Mill, Colchester (From the 16th to the 21st Century) (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern England (optional)
-The Making of Modern Brazil (optional)
-Resistance and Rebellion in the World of Atlantic Slavery (optional)
-Revolutionary Encounters: China and the World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Mapping History and Heritage in Colchester (optional)
-Supernatural and Natural Worlds in Early Modern Europe (optional)
-Life in the Three Kingdoms: Societies and cultures in early modern Britain and Ireland (optional)
-Consensus Britain? The State and the People, 1945-79 (optional)
-'The Special Relationship'? Anglo-American Relations 1850-2005
-Sex, Class and War at the Movies: Britain, 1930-2000 (optional)
-Witch-Trials in Early Modern Europe and New England (optional)
-Medicine and Society in Britain and France 1700-1860 (optional)
-Reconstructing Family, Residence, Work and Communal Life in Victorian England (optional)
-The African American Experience (optional)
-Human Rights in Historical Perspective (optional)
-South Africa: The Road to Apartheid (optional)
-Literature and the Condition of England (optional)
-Between Protection and Control: Policing Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries (optional)
-The English Revolution (optional)
-British Social History 1830-1950 (optional)
-Crime and Punishment: England in Comparative Perspective 1650-1900 (optional)
-From Stalin to Putin (optional)
-The Tudors and Stuarts on Film (optional)
-Slavery and Plantation Societies in Latin America (optional)
-The British Empire in the Indian Ocean World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Women, Gender and Sexuality in US History (optional)
-Metropolis: Urban Germany 1900-1945 (optional)
-The United States and the Vietnam War (optional)

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Studying in the School of Experimental Psychology will give you the opportunity to be part of a vibrant postgraduate community and a world-class department. Read more
Studying in the School of Experimental Psychology will give you the opportunity to be part of a vibrant postgraduate community and a world-class department. Our postgraduate students are a very important part of the departmental research culture and are a key component in maintaining our international research reputation.

Before submitting an application, we recommend that potential applicants make informal contact with the member of academic staff whose research you are interested in.

Research groups

Research activity in the school is organised into two research themes: Cognitive Processes and Brain, Behaviour and Health. Within each theme, there is a set of focused research groups. An important feature of this research structure is the extent of collaboration across research groups and across the themes. All groups address fundamental questions and look at the impact of their work more broadly in industry, healthcare, education and society. Across these thematic research groups, there are particular strengths in computational neuroscience and neuropsychology.

Cognitive Processes
Focused research groups in cognitive processes are:
-Developmental (includes the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre and Bristol Autism Research Group).
-Language (speech comprehension, speech production, reading and dyslexia, language and thought).
-Memory (short-term memory, modelling, dynamics, lifespan memory).
-Social (social cognition and evolutionary social psychology).
-Vision (fusing cognitive science and information technology to tackle research problems that cannot be comprehensively addressed by the single disciplines alone).

Brain, Behaviour and Health
Focused research groups in brain, behaviour, and health are:
-Neuropsychology (neural basis of both typical and pathological cognition, using a range of methodologies including EEG and fMRI).
-Nutrition and Behaviour Unit (effects of substances on cognition and performance; appetite, weight control, and diet).
-Tobacco and Alcohol Research Group (social drugs and social cognition; plain packaging of tobacco products; carbon-dioxide inhalation model of anxiety).
-Decision-making and rationality (areas of current focus include selecting the appropriate movement response; how properties of the environment shape decisions; structuring the world to facilitate good decisions; food choice and dietary decisions; the origins of supernatural beliefs).

Careers

Many of our PhD graduates work in academia; others work in the private sector or in government institutions.

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You will work with, and be supported by, nationally and internationally recognised experts in the Early Modern Studies subject area. Read more
You will work with, and be supported by, nationally and internationally recognised experts in the Early Modern Studies subject area.

The Masters by Research in Early Modern Studies offers transferrable and employment-related skills. For example: project planning and management; time management; research and data analysis; digital literacy; and communicating complex ideas in writing.

Key features

- The ‘apprenticeship’ model allows you to acquire research expertise in developing and executing your own project while working alongside an expert in your field.

- This programme will develop essential knowledge and skills in your field and offer a clear route into a chosen destination: whether PhD study, professional practice, or an alternative research-related career.

- Our experts specialisms include Shakespeare, Defoe, and the writer and Bishop of Worcester Richard Hurd - as well as the topics of evil, the Devil, and the supernatural within early modern history.

- The Early Modern Research Group brings together researchers with shared research interests c.1550-1800.

How will you be taught?

This MRes includes taught modules, a personal development plan and research project. You will be expected to take and pass two 15- and one 30-credit module before culminating the course with the production of a substantial project of your own.

For the duration of the MRes you will be allocated one or possibly two supervisors who will support you through the personal development plan and research project phases of the programme.

Where there is more than one supervisor, one person will be identified as your lead supervisor or ‘Director of Studies’. They will have responsibility for supervising you regularly and for ensuring that you receive proper guidance and support, while also acting as your personal tutor. The supervisor(s) will have research experience in the area covered by your research project.

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