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Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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This Masters in Bioinformatics is a new, exciting and innovative programme that has grown out of our well-regarded MRes in Bioinformatics. Read more
This Masters in Bioinformatics is a new, exciting and innovative programme that has grown out of our well-regarded MRes in Bioinformatics. Bioinformatics is a discipline at the interface between biology and computing and is used in organismal biology, molecular biology and biomedicine. This programme focuses on using computers to glean new insights from DNA, RNA and protein sequence data and related data at the molecular level through data storage, mining, analysis and display - all of which form a core part of modern biology.

Why this programme

◾Our programme emphasises understanding core principles in practical bioinformatics and functional genomics, and then implementing that understanding in a series of practical-based elective courses in Semester 2 and in a summer research project.
◾You will benefit from being taught by scientists at the cutting edge of their field and you will get intensive, hands-on experience in an active research lab during the summer research project.
◾Bioinformatics and the 'Omics' technologies have evolved to play a fundamental role in almost all areas of biology and biomedicine.
◾Advanced biocomputing skills are now deemed essential for many PhD studentships/projects in molecular bioscience and biomedicine, and are of increasing importance for many other such projects.
◾The Semester 2 elective courses are built around real research scenarios, enabling you not only to gain practical experience of working with large molecular datasets, but also to see why each scenario uses the particular approaches it does and how to go about organizing and implementing appropriate analysis pipelines.
◾You will be based in the College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences, an ideal environment in which to train in bioinformatics; our College has carried out internationally-recognised research in functional genomics and systems biology.
◾The new programme reflects the development and activities of 'Glasgow Polyomics'. Glasgow Polyomics is a world-class facility set up in 2012 to provide research services using microarray, proteomics, metabolomics and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Its scientists have pioneered the 'polyomics' approach, in which new insights come from the integration of data across different omics levels.
◾In addition, we have several world-renowned research centres at the University, such as the Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology and the Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, whose scientists do ground-breaking research employing bioinformatic approaches in the study of disease.
◾You will learn computer programming in courses run by staff in the internationally reputed School of Computing Science, in conjunction with their MSc in Information Technology.

Programme structure

Bioinformatics helps biologists gain new insights about genomes (genomics) and genes, about RNA expression products of genes (transcriptomics) and about proteins (proteomics); rapid advances have also been made in the study of cellular metabolites (metabolomics) and in a newer area: systems biology.

‘Polyomics’ involves the integration of data from these ‘functional genomics’ areas - genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics - to derive new insights about how biological systems function.

The programme structure is designed to equip students with understanding and hands-on experience of both computing and biological research practices relating to bioinformatics and functional genomics, to show students how the computing approaches and biological questions they are being used to answer are connected, and to give students an insight into new approaches for integration of data and analysis across the 'omics' domains.

On this programme, you will develop a range of computing and programming skills, as well as skills in data handling, analysis (including statistics) and interpretation, and you will be brought up to date with recent advances in biological science that have been informed by bioinformatics approaches.

The programme has the following overall structure
◾Core material - 60 credits, Semester 1, made up of 10, 15 and 20 credit courses.
◾Elective material - 60 credits, Semester 2, students select 4 courses (two 10 credit courses and two 20 credit courses) from those available.
◾Project - 60 credits, 14 weeks embedded in a research group over the summer.

Core and optional courses

◾Programming (Java)
◾Database Theory and Application
◾Foundations of Bioinformatics
◾Omics and Systems Approaches in Biology
◾These 4 courses are obligatory for those taking the MSc degree and the PgDip; they are also obligatory for those with no prior programming experience taking the PgCert.
◾60-credit summer research project lasting 14 weeks - this is also obligatory for those taking the MSc programme; normally this will be with one of the research laboratories in Glasgow associated with the programme, but there is also the opportunity to study in suitable laboratories in other parts of the world.

Optional courses include:
◾RNA-seq and next generation transcriptomics
◾Metagenomics
◾Pathogen Polyomics
◾Using Chemical Structure Databases in Drug Discovery for Protein Targets
◾Identification of disease-causing genetic variants
◾A range of more general biology and computing biology courses are also available in semester 2.

Career prospects

Most of our graduates embark on a research career path here in the UK or abroad using the skills they've acquired on our programme - these skills are now of primary relevance in many areas of modern biology and biomedicine. Many are successful in getting a PhD studentship. Others are employed as a core bioinformatician (now a career path within academia in its own right) or as a research assistant in a research group in basic biological or medical science. A postgraduate degree in bioinformatics is also valued by many employers in the life sciences sector - e.g. computing biology jobs in biotechnology/biosciences/neuroinformatics/pharma industry. Some of our graduates have entered science-related careers in scientific publishing or education; others have gone into computing-related jobs in non-bioscience industry or the public sector.

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The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Read more
The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This programme aims to provide students with a sound background in social research design and the most up-to-date training in methods of data collection and analysis. The combination of core modules and short courses on more advanced topics provides maximum flexibility for taught postgraduate and research students throughout their study.

The core elements of the programme are delivered by staff across the entire College, many of whom are engaged in cutting-edge research in their own fields. Students will benefit by undertaking the modules with others from different departments within the School of Government and Society, eg, Political Science and International Studies; the Centre for Russian and East European Studies; the Institute for Applied Social Studies; and within the wider College. Students will also receive training on more discipline-specific research elements, as well as dissertation supervision, provided by individual departments. On completion of this MA, many students continue their PhD studies or pursue a career in research in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Programme content
Term 1:

Introduction to Social Research (20)
Research Design (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Information Skills for Social Sciences
University Programme of Skills Training (as necessary)
Dissertation-related preparation
Term 2:

Social Research Methods I (20)
Social Research Methods II (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Summer Term:

Four Short courses (10)
Dissertation (60)
All students registered on the MA in Social Research will take:

1) Four core modules:

Introduction to Social Science Research (20 credits)
Research Design (20 credits)
Social Research Methods I (20 credits)
Social Research Methods II (20 credits)


2) Four elective modules (10 credits each) from the short course programme below
3) A 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits)

Short courses
All short courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These short courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These short courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to to so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Short course programmes
From Multiple linear to Logistic regression
Narrative Research
Analyzing Hierarchical and Panel Data
Visual Research Methods
Linguistic Ethnography
Documentary Research in Education, History and the Social Sciences
Researching Disability
Approaches to Research on Discourse
Policy Evaluation
Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis (using NVivo)
Secondary Research Data Analysis in Social Research
Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Social Science
Overseas Research
Q Methodology – A Systematic Approach for Interpretive Research Design
Activity Theory and its research applications
Some courses have pre-requisites, eg, to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis and Narrative Research; you will need to have passed Data Analysis (20 credits module) or equivalent. For the latter, you will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

Please be aware that some of these courses run on the same dates. Make sure you have not picked courses that clash with each other. For further details or to sign up for these short courses, please email the course names, your name, student ID and your programme to |.

Skills and attributes gained
Students will have acquired a solid foundation of a broad range of research methods that are widely used in the social sciences and will have developed:

A sound understanding of the methodological debates
An overview of the philosophy of social science and how this informs research design, methods chosen of data collection and analysis
An ability to use a range of research techniques appropriate to their subject area
Competence in the representation and presentation of information and data
An ability to communicate research findings effectively to a wider range of audiences
An appreciation of the potential use and impact of their research within and beyond academia
An ability to engage with relevant users at all points in the research process, from devising and shaping research questions through to enhancing practice
Learning and teaching
Students are expected to engage in high-level discussion during all sessions. Teaching will be delivered by a combination of lectures, seminars and computer workshops. Some fieldwork involving primary data collection is required where appropriate.

Careers
Many students go on to do a PhD after completing this MA. Others have followed a career in local authorities, government departments, health authorities, management consultancy, media, the voluntary sector and so on.

Assessment
All core modules are assessed by a 4000-word essay or report. On most short courses, a 3000-report is usually required. The dissertation length is 14,000 words and students are expected to utilise the knowledge and skills they learned from the taught elements in this programme.

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at one of our on-campus open days (Friday 13 November 2015 and Friday 4 March 2016). Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism.

Graduates will find a wide range of career options open to them, in particular those involving inter-cultural or international contact, such as in international organizations, government institutions, non-profit organizations, and journalism, but also museums, educational institutions, or the publishing sector more generally. It would also be a suitable preparation for students considering embarking on a research degree focusing on one of the regional or topical areas of expertise represented in the department.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

This is the only Master-level programme in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK, and can therefore offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on the history of these regions. The programme provides a sound training in the historical sciences.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The programme includes the following elements totalling four units: Courses totalling at least two units from List A [History courses], including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; further minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; and a dissertation of 10,000 words written in conjunction with the Major course (one unit).

There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units, including their Major.

In the two-year intensive language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

MA History and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 362kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/file93560.pdf

Aims and Outcomes

- An advanced understanding of the historical sciences and its various methodologies and approaches in general, and specialist knowledge of Asian and African history in particula

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- The critical, conceptual, and analytical skills required for historical research as well as for positions of responsibility in all other professions

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:
1. Factual knowledge about the histories of Asian and African societies, the ways they interacted with each other and other world regions of the world, and the major historical forces that shaped our contemporary world.

2. Familiarity with a variety of different approaches to historical research and current scholarly debates, and, on that basis, the ability to formulate a valuable research question.

3. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

4. Language skills appropriate to chosen region and field of study (recommended).

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should be able to synthesize different kinds of information, become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and analyse and reassess evidence and research questions for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, including relevant professional databases, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Ability to formulate research questions and design an independent research project, including the use of primary sources.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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We are offering two social work qualifications - an MA and a PGDip - for applicants who hold a relevant degree and experience of paid or voluntary work with vulnerable people within the UK. Read more
We are offering two social work qualifications - an MA and a PGDip - for applicants who hold a relevant degree and experience of paid or voluntary work with vulnerable people within the UK.

The Social Work MA is a two-year full-time course (maximum 5 years on a part-time basis) while the PGDip can typically be gained in 18 months.

Graduates completing the MA or PGDip are eligible for registration as a qualified social worker with the social work regulatory body, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/social-work/

Why choose this course?

- Our graduates are highly employable with 95% obtaining employment on successful completion of their programme.

- Social Work courses at Oxford Brookes University have been ranked highly in league tables (The Guardian and The Sunday Times University Guides).

- This is an evidence-informed course delivered via innovative mixed mode learning methods (classroom, distance and work-based).

- Our courses access a wide range of work-based learning opportunities in Oxfordshire and neighbouring authorities.

- Our teaching benefits from the input of experienced researchers working in established areas of children and families, drugs and alcohol, ageing, and inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Oxford Brookes offers a broad range of student support schemes to facilitate your learning and development..

Professional accreditation

Graduates completing the MA or PGDip are eligible to apply for for registration as a Qualified Social Worker with the HCPC.

This course in detail

The core modules are:
- Skill Development and Professional Communication
- The Policy and Law Context of Social Care
- Social Work Practice 1
- Social Work Theory, Assessment and Evidence-Informed Intervention with Adults
- Supporting Children and Families: Building the Evidence
- Social Work Practice 2
- Social Work Theory, Assessment and Evidence-Informed Intervention with Children and Families

In addition, MA students will be required to undertake
- Applied Research Methods
- Dissertation

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the list of modules may vary from that shown here.

Approach to assessment

Our modules are assessed in a variety of ways, including written assignments, class tests, portfolios, presentations and a dissertation.

Practice Placements

Both awards require two practice placements, which will include attendance throughout the summer months.

Attendance pattern

The full-time route is a full-time course which requires five days a week commitment to learning in the University, in practice placement and distance learning.

A typical part-time route would be three days a week. This is dependent on modules taken and the number of years. Practice placement requires a minimum of three days per week attendance.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of our programmes will have fulfilled the requirements for social work training specified by the Department of Health and the Health and Care Professions Council.

Careers

On successful completion of the MA and PGDip programmes graduates are eligible to apply for registration as a qualified social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council, and then to enter employment.

Graduates of the MA programme will be well-placed to apply for a place on an MPhil / PhD programme should they wish to pursue a career in research at a later date.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

We have a number of promising and senior experienced researchers working in established areas including children and families, drugs and alcohol, ageing, interprofessional education and collaborative practice.

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In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen.

Tropical Agriculture

Delivers technical knowledge related to agriculture focussing on developing countries. The students can specialize in animal production or plant production by choosing the specific option. The major on Animal Production delivers in depth knowledge on production biology, animal nutrition, pasture management, animal genetics. The major on Plant Production focuses on themes like ethno-botany, crop protection, plant breeding, plant biotechnology. The courses are applicative and aim at presenting solutions for production problems in developing countries in an interdisciplinary way.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning and Outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted)
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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If you want to train as a Secondary subject teacher and do not have the necessary qualifications to enter an Initial Teacher-Training programme such as a PGCE or School Direct Training Programme, we provide subject knowledge enhancement courses to improve your subject expertise prior to your training. Read more
If you want to train as a Secondary subject teacher and do not have the necessary qualifications to enter an Initial Teacher-Training programme such as a PGCE or School Direct Training Programme, we provide subject knowledge enhancement courses to improve your subject expertise prior to your training.

Subjects

We run short enhancement courses over the summer in the following subjects:
* Chemistry
* Computer Science
* Design and Technology
* Mathematics
* Physics

The courses are intended to support graduates as they develop their breadth and depth of the given subject before they begin an ITT course which would lead to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). It is designed to support communication skills and the development of the subject knowledge required for teaching the subject in secondary schools.

Funding

School Direct, PGCE and SCITT trainees are eligible for funding to undertake our courses and may be entitled to a tax-free bursary from the National College for Teaching and Leadership of £200 per week for the duration of the course (subject to confirmation by NCTL).

How to apply

Applications should be made directly to the University by either the student, or the teacher training course provider.

Provider referral
If a school or ITT provider decides that you would be suitable for secondary mathematics teaching, but that you need to develop your subject knowledge, they can offer you a place on their School Direct or PGCE course. However, this offer is made on condition that you successfully complete the SKE course prior to starting the ITT course. There are then two possibilities:
1. Your school or ITT provider contacts us and, provided there are vacancies, refers you to this course, or
2. You contact us directly. In this case we will confirm with your school or provider that they have offered, and you have accepted, an ITT place.

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Rural Economics and Management. Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. Read more
Rural Economics and Management : Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countriesIn the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds.

The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses.

The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS). The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen:

Rural Economics and Management

Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countries are studied in depth.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning Outcomes

-Understand different socio-economic concepts, theories and multi-disciplinary approaches with respect to rural economies and rural development.
-Have profound insights in different rural development realities, and compare rural development issues, approaches and policies within an international context..
-Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterise and analyse the economic and social problems of rural areas, food and agricultural chains, natural resource management, national and international agriculture.
-Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve problems related to agriculture, food chain and natural resource- management, and to rural development and countryside stewardship.
-Design, implement and monitor national and international agro-food policies, rural institutions and rural development programmes.
-Construct innovative tools and instruments for the (multifunctional) development of rural areas.
-Design and assess research in the domain of rural development, formulating a problem statement and operationalizing objectives and research questions within an adequate research plan.
-Select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect and analyse data from literature and empirical research in the domain of rural development.
-Critically reflect on topical rural development issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.
-Work in an integrated internationally composed team dealing with rural development and food production challenges, interacting respectfully with diverse others and developing a global perspective.
-Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders of the socio-professional world (food sector, NGOs, rural organisations, rural administration, universities and research institutes).
-Communicate convincingly (written, oral, using appropriate tools) about (own) research findings and project results and their underpinning rationale.
-Effectively and appropriately use good language, communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.
-Design and plan own learning processes based on continuous reflection (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, and attitudes and functioning.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.
-Independently perform scientific research in the domain of rural development. Give proof of a clear international orientation.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted).
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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This program develops students to become T-shaped professionals in the new global, knowledge based economy by equipping them with both advanced IT technical and managerial skills needed to pursue a successful career. Read more
This program develops students to become T-shaped professionals in the new global, knowledge based economy by equipping them with both advanced IT technical and managerial skills needed to pursue a successful career.

In this era of market globalization, information technology has emerged as a fundamental factor in the success of business operations. The role of information technology is particularly important for service industries such as finance, insurance, real estates, transport logistics and hospitality in which efficiency provides a definite competitive edge. To improve our service industries and secure Hong Kong’s position as a leading digital city, business managers must be equipped with knowledge of most up-to-date information technology (IT) and business management, and must be able to apply that knowledge to plan and deploy information systems that enhance productivity, competitiveness and performance of their organizations. The Master of Science Program in Information and Technology Management (MSc in ITM) is specially designed to meet this need.

The Program is aimed at individuals with a technical or engineering background who would like to gain the requisite knowledge in technology management, and at business graduates who wish to acquire cutting-edge IT proficiency. The Program also offers a good foundation for students who prepare to pursue further studies in PhD.

Visit the website http://www.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/index.php/programs/masters/msc-in-information-technology-management-1/program-overview/

Program Aims

The Master of Science Program in Information and Technology Management aims to equip students with the latest knowledge and advanced technical and managerial skills in information technology and management required to pursue successful careers in the new global, knowledge-based economy.

Program Features

- Target Students
This taught Master Program is designed for those with either engineering or business backgrounds. The Full-time mode is particularly suitable for individuals from mainland China and other countries, while the Part-time mode suits working professionals.

- Medium of Instruction
In-class lectures and teaching materials are mainly in English, with the exception that some courses with unique nature are preferred to be taught in Chinese.

- Duration of Study
The Program is offered in both Full-time and Part-time modes. Each academic year is divided into regular trimesters (13 weeks each) and an intensive summer term.

- Class Schedule
For Full-time mode, required courses are scheduled in daytime while elective courses are offered during weekday evenings and/or Saturdays. For Part-time mode, classes are held on weekday evenings and/or Saturdays.

Some elective courses are taught intensively over a two-to-three-week period or in Summer Term.

Afternoon and Saturday classes are held at the University's Shatin campus, whereas the weekday evening classes are usually held in the teaching centers in Kowloon Tong or Central, subject to classroom availability.

Curriculum

Our dedicated curriculum offers a selected range of courses in information and technology management, data and knowledge management, supply chain management, total quality management, business process re-engineering, project management, enterprise resource planning, and decision making etc.

- Program of Study
All students are required to attend the mandatory orientation activities.To complete the Program, both Full-time and Part-time students are required to pass 30 credits, comprising 15 credits of required courses and 15 credits of elective courses. Both required and elective courses under ITM curriculum are 3-credit courses.

Program Brochure - http://www.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/images/Master/MScITM_brochure.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/index.php/programs/masters/msc-in-information-technology-management-1/apply-now

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This program aims to equip students with knowledge and tools that can help them derive meaningful information from business data and utilize the information intelligently toward making faster and more effective business decisions. Read more
This program aims to equip students with knowledge and tools that can help them derive meaningful information from business data and utilize the information intelligently toward making faster and more effective business decisions.

Hong Kong has been long reputed as a global financial and logistics centre, while new technologies played an important role in facilitating business activities and transactions effectively. Executives rely on sufficient information to make decisions on business activities, how to convert large amount of data into meaningful information and statistics is a great challenge they are facing. Professionals who have the ability of understanding the data, deriving useful information from the data, recommending faster as well as more effective business decisions via analysing business data and applying quantitative tools is highly demanded.

Business analytics makes extensive use of business data, statistical tools, and quantitative methods to drive better business management. Specifically, with continuous and interactive exploration and investigation of data, business analytics helps managers and executives gain new insights and understanding of business performance, predict changes and development of business patterns, and improve decision making on business strategies and planning.

This programs aims to equip students with knowledge and tools that can help them derive useful information from business data and utilize the information intelligently in making faster and more effective business decisions. Graduates from this program are suitable for working in business consulting, finance, marketing, retailing, logistics, and other service industries.

Visit the website http://www.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/index.php/programs/masters/msc-in-business-analytics/program-overview

Program Aims

The Master of Science Program in Business Analytics aims to equip students with knowledge and tools that can help them derive useful information from business data and utilize the information intelligently in making faster and more effective business decisions.

Program Features

The Program is offered in a one-year Full-time mode. Our highly transformational curriculum offers a selected range of rigorous courses in business analytics, including statistical analysis, decision models and applications, data mining for managers, economic analytics, operation analytics, etc.

Target students

This taught Master Program is designed for those who have an interest in exploring business relationships via analyzing business data and applying quantitative tools. The Full-time mode is particularly suitable for individuals from mainland China and other countries.

Medium of Instruction

In-class lectures and teaching materials are mainly in English, with the exception of courses in unique nature which teaching in Chinese is preferable.

Class Schedule

During regular trimesters, classes are held on a full-time basis while, electives may be offered during evenings and/or on Saturday. Some courses are taught intensively over a two-to-three-week period.

Saturday and afternoon classes are held at the University's Shatin campus, whereas the weekday evening classes are usually held in the teaching centers in Kowloon Tong or Central, subject to classroom availability.

Curriculum (2016 - 2017)

To complete the Program, students are required to pass a total of 30 credits of coursework, comprising 15 credits of required courses and 15 credits of elective courses. Both required and elective courses are 3-credit courses.

At least 9 credits of elective courses must be taken from the BA elective courses, and up to 6 credits may be taken from other MSc Programs and Master of Accountancy within CUHK Business School and/ or Faculty of Engineering as Non-BA courses upon approval. Electives may be offered every alternative year and/or in the summer term in the form of intensive course.

Career Prospect

Graduates from this program are suitable for working in business consulting, finance, marketing, retailing, logistics, and other service industries.

Program Brochure - http://www.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/images/Master/MScBA_Brochure.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bschool.cuhk.edu.hk/index.php/programs/masters/msc-in-business-analytics/apply-now

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Entry to the actuarial profession is by a demanding series of examinations, but the rewards after qualifying are great. The Institute and Faculty of Actuaries in the UK has four levels of examinations to qualify. Read more

Overview

Entry to the actuarial profession is by a demanding series of examinations, but the rewards after qualifying are great. The Institute and Faculty of Actuaries in the UK has four levels of examinations to qualify. The first level, the Core Technical (CT) subjects, are taught in our BSc or MSc in Actuarial Science and lead to exemptions from CT1 to CT8.

Leading on from this, our established and successful MSc in Actuarial Management (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-actuarial-management/ ) covers the more advanced actuarial subjects and offers exemptions from the syllabuses of the Core Application subjects CA1 and CA3 and Specialist Technical subjects ST2, ST4, ST5, ST6 and ST9.

Students will typically study CA1, CA3 and up to three ST subjects (two ST subjects are needed to satisfy the profession's requirements).

Taking our MSc in Actuarial Management is a great way to speed your progress to this most prestigious of careers - it's designed to take you almost all of the way to qualification. A student who graduates with a full set of exemptions from Heriot-Watt (CT, CA and ST subjects) will only have three more examinations to pass, as well as gaining the necessary work experience, to qualify as a Fellow of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.

Programme duration

The PG Diploma comprises the taught coursework component leading to exemptions from CA1 and the ST professional subjects and takes 9 months to complete. Successful students can then progress to the project work in the summer. This takes the form of industry-relevant case studies, assessed by written reports, which leads to the award of an MSc and exemption from the Subject CA3. In exceptional cases a student may be allowed to write a research dissertation.

The programme is also available to be studied on a part-time basis, over a maximum of 4 years.

Teaching Excellence and Student Satisfaction

30% of our teaching staff are qualified actuaries, the others are leading Mathematicians, Financial Mathematicians and Statisticians, who are nationally and internationally recognised for their research. This expertise ensures that what we teach you is current, applicable to the real workplace and current economy. Our National Student Survey results are consistently high for overall student satisfaction.

Results from the National Student Survey for 2011 reveal that 88% of our Mathematics and Statistics (including Actuarial Science) graduates are employed with a graduate position and/or undertaking further study. Our graduates go on to work for companies such as Swiss Re, Standard Life, Towers Watson, Lloyds Banking Group, Barclays Capital, Scottish Widows, Ernst & Young and many more. Graduates are employed locally in Edinburgh, London and throughout the world.

Student Actuarial Society

Heriot-Watt has a very active Students' Actuarial Society (See http://hwsas.com/ ) which won several awards at a recent Heriot-Watt 'Oscars' ceremony. This body is completely managed, enthusiastically and professionally, by our students.

Professional recognition

The programme is fully accredited by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.

Programme content

In the taught element of the programme each student takes eight semester-long courses. These are linked in pairs, one per semester. One pair of courses – covering Actuarial Risk Management – is compulsory and corresponds to subject CA1. It applies the principles of actuarial mathematics to a wide range of financial and insurance settings. Students choose a minimum of two pairs of courses from a list including Life Office Management (subject ST2), Pensions (subject ST4), Investment and Finance (subject ST5), Derivatives (subject ST6) and Enterprise Risk Management (subject ST9).

The choice of courses may depend on the coverage of actuarial subjects in the student’s first degree. Depending on individual circumstances, other optional courses may be made available, for example courses from the MSc in Actuarial Science or in other disciplines. However, students choosing to take three pairs of courses, potentially leading to exemptions from three ST subjects, will have an exceptionally broad range of employment opportunities.

Students may graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma at the end of the 2nd semester, after completing the taught coursework component leading to exemptions form CA1 and the ST professional subjects. Successful students can then progress to the project work in the summer. This takes the form of industry-relevant case studies, assessed by written reports, which leads to the award of an MSc and exemption from the Subject CA3. In exceptional cases a student may be allowed to write a research dissertation.The dissertation is an extended research project, with regular supervision, undertaken in the summer. The diploma takes 9 months and the MSc takes 1 year full time and part time options are available.

For more detailed course descriptions, please visit the current student website http://www.ma.hw.ac.uk/ams/teach/courses1314/index.php

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-actuarial-management/

Find videos of students and graduates from the department here http://www.youtube.com/user/HWActuarial?blend=3&ob=5#p/a

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The Masters in Civil Engineering & Management introduces you to contemporary business and management issues while increasing your depth of knowledge in your chosen civil engineering speciality. Read more
The Masters in Civil Engineering & Management introduces you to contemporary business and management issues while increasing your depth of knowledge in your chosen civil engineering speciality.

Why this programme

◾Civil engineering at the University of Glasgow is ranked 4th in the UK and 1st in Scotland (Guardian University Guide 2017).
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Civil Engineering at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾The University has a long history of research in Civil Engineering. The UK's first Chair of Civil Engineering was established at the University in 1840 and early occupants such as William J. M. Rankine set a research ethos that has endured.
◾You will be taught jointly by staff from the School of Engineering and the Adam Smith Business School. You will benefit from their combined resources and expertise and from an industry-focused curriculum.
◾If you are a graduate engineer looking to broaden your knowledge of management while also furthering your knowledge of civil engineering, this innovative programme is designed for you.
◾You will gain first-hand experience of managing an engineering project through the integrated systems design project, allowing development of skills in project management, quality management and costing.
◾You will be able to apply management to engineering projects, allowing you to gain an advantage in today’s competitive job market and advance to the most senior positions within an engineering organisation.
◾This programme has a September and January intake.

Programme structure

There are two semesters of taught material and a summer session during which you will work on an individual supervised project and write a dissertation on its outcomes. Students entering the programme in January are restricted to civil engineering (i.e. excluding management) topics only.

Semester 1

You will be based in the Adam Smith Business School, developing knowledge and skills in management principles and techniques. We offer an applied approach, with an emphasis on an informed critical evaluation of information, and the subsequent application of concepts and tools to the core areas of business and management.
◾Contemporary issues in human resource management
◾Managing creativity and innovation
◾Managing innovative change
◾Marketing management
◾Operations management
◾Project management.

Semester 2

You will study engineering courses, which aim to enhance your group working and project management capability at the same time as improving your depth of knowledge in chosen civil engineering subjects.
◾Integrated systems design project.

Optional courses

Select a total of 4 courses from Lists A and B, at least 1 must be from List A:

List A

◾Advanced soil mechanics 5
◾Advanced structural analysis and dynamics 5
◾Computational modelling of non-linear problems 5
◾Introduction to wind engineering
◾Principles of GIS.

List B

◾Geotechnical engineering 3
◾Ground engineering 4
◾Recycling urban land
◾Structural analysis 4
◾Transportation systems engineering 4.

Project or dissertation

You will undertake an individual project or dissertation work in the summer period (May–August). This will give you an opportunity to apply and consolidate the course material and enhance your ability to do independent work, as well as present results in the most appropriate format. Project and dissertation options are closely linked to staff research interests. September entry students have a choice of management dissertation topics in addition to civil engineering projects, and January entry students have a choice of civil engineering projects.

Projects

There are two semesters of taught material and a summer session during which you will work on an individual supervised project and write a dissertation on its outcomes. Students entering the programme in January are restricted to civil engineering (i.e. excluding management) topics only.

Semester 1

You will be based in the Adam Smith Business School, developing knowledge and skills in management principles and techniques. We offer an applied approach, with an emphasis on an informed critical evaluation of information, and the subsequent application of concepts and tools to the core areas of business and management.
◾Contemporary issues in human resource management
◾Managing creativity and innovation
◾Managing innovative change
◾Marketing management
◾Operations management
◾Project management.

Semester 2

You will study engineering courses, which aim to enhance your group working and project management capability at the same time as improving your depth of knowledge in chosen civil engineering subjects.
◾Integrated systems design project.

Optional courses

Select a total of 4 courses from Lists A and B, at least 1 must be from List A:

List A
◾Advanced soil mechanics 5
◾Advanced structural analysis and dynamics 5
◾Computational modelling of non-linear problems 5
◾Introduction to wind engineering
◾Principles of GIS.

List B
◾Geotechnical engineering 3
◾Ground engineering 4
◾Recycling urban land
◾Structural analysis 4
◾Transportation systems engineering 4.

Project or dissertation

You will undertake an individual project or dissertation work in the summer period (May–August). This will give you an opportunity to apply and consolidate the course material and enhance your ability to do independent work, as well as present results in the most appropriate format. Project and dissertation options are closely linked to staff research interests. September entry students have a choice of management dissertation topics in addition to civil engineering projects, and January entry students have a choice of civil engineering projects.

Industry links and employability

◾The programme makes use of the combined resources and complementary expertise of the civil engineering and business school staff to deliver a curriculum which is relevant to the needs of industry.
◾You, as a graduate of this programme, will be capable of applying the extremely important aspect of management to engineering projects allowing you to gain an advantage in today’s competitive job market and advance to the most senior positions within an engineering organisation.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributions in Civil Engineering include: Arup and Mott MacDonald.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the civil engineering industry.

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The Masters in Mechanical Engineering & Management offers you the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills needed for modern engineering or technology management. Read more
The Masters in Mechanical Engineering & Management offers you the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills needed for modern engineering or technology management. The programme content includes design engineering and other mechanical engineering disciplines.

Why this programme

◾The University of Glasgow’s School of Engineering has been delivering engineering education and research for more than 150 years and is the oldest School of Engineering in the UK.
◾You will be taught jointly by staff from the School of Engineering and the Adam Smith Business School. You will benefit from their combined resources and expertise and from an industry-focused curriculum.
◾Mechanical Engineering is a core engineering discipline that has a long history in the University of Glasgow, dating back to the 1760’s and includes famous people as James Watt.
◾If you have a mechanical engineering background, but with little management experience and are wanting to develop your knowledge of management while also furthering your knowledge of mechanical engineering, this programme is designed for you.
◾You will learn to understand management principles and practices in an engineering environment, evaluate engineering information, and apply business and management tools. You will combine engineering and management knowledge and skills in projects and problem solving.
◾The programme is split into two semesters and a summer session. One semester will be based in the Business School and is aimed at developing knowledge and skills of management principles and techniques. An applied approach is adopted, with an emphasis on an informed critical evaluation of information, and the subsequent application of concepts and tools to the core areas of business and management.
◾During the other semester there will be a combination of compulsory and optional courses that will combine to provide the required credits in Mechanical Engineering.
◾In the summer session, a project will be undertaken by MSc students. The topic of the project can be either in Management, or Mechanical Engineering, in which case the topic will usually be closely allied with the research interests of the Discipline.
◾This programme has a September and January intake.

Aims of the programme:
◾To understand management principles and practices in an engineering environment.
◾To evaluate engineering information, and subsequent application of business and management.
◾To combine engineering and management knowledge and skills in projects and problem solving.

Programme structure

TThere are two semesters of taught material and a summer session working on a project or dissertation for MSc students. September entry students start with management courses and January entry students with engineering courses.

Semester 1

You will be based in the Business School, developing knowledge and skills in management principles and techniques. We offer an applied approach, with an emphasis on an informed critical evaluation of information, and the subsequent application of concepts and tools to the core areas of business and management.

Core courses
◾Contemporary issues in human resource management
◾Managing creativity and innovation
◾Managing innovative change
◾Marketing management
◾Operations management
◾Project management.

Semester 2

You will study engineering courses, which aim to enhance your group working and project management capability at the same time as improving your depth of knowledge in chosen mechanical engineering subjects.

Core course
◾Integrated systems design project.

Optional courses
◾Desalination technology
◾Dynamics
◾Materials engineering
◾Vibration.

Project or dissertation

You will undertake an individual project or dissertation work in the summer period (May–August). This will give you an opportunity to apply and consolidate the course material and enhance your ability to do independent work, as well as present results in the most appropriate format. Project and dissertation options are closely linked to staff research interests. September entry students have a choice of management dissertation topics in addition to mechanical engineering projects, and January entry students have a choice of mechanical engineering projects.

Projects

◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits. This is an integral part of the MSc programme and many have a technical or business focus.
◾You will gain first-hand experience of managing an engineering project through the integrated systems design project, allowing development of skills in project management, quality management and accountancy.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers that you have been working on cutting edge projects relevant to the industry.
◾You can either choose a topic from a list of MSc projects in Mechanical Engineering or the Management portion of your degree. Alternatively, should you have your own idea for a project, department members are always open to discussion of topics.
◾Students who start in January must choose an engineering focussed project.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾In addition to providing an in-depth area in engineering, the programme aims to give graduate engineers with little or no Management experience, the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills needed for modern engineering or technology management.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors, in the area of Mechanical Engineering include: Babcock, Howdens, Doosan & Terex.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in Mechanical Engineering industries.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in project management, engineering design, materials & mechanics, dynamics, control and desalination technology.

Graduates of this programme have gone on to positions such as:
Technology Engineer at Procter and Gamble
Quality Engineer at Worcester Bosch.

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- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree. - Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree.

- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world

- People with professional experience in medical practice who have an interest in cross-cultural understandings of health and illness.

- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics in the anthropology of medicine.

- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

- The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

As one might expect of study at SOAS, our programme is unique in that we take a cultural and phenomenological approach to the anthropology of medicine. That is, we stress a truly cross-cultural method, one which unites all medical systems in a unified comparative perspective. This allows students to grasp the underlying principles and questions common to all therapeutic systems. Given the diversity of the School’s courses, students may choose options which strengthen either the humanities or the development studies aspects of their interests.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/

Structure

- Core course: Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Medical Anthropology and the candidate’s supervisor.

- In addition, all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

- Students without previous experience of anthropology must take the foundation course, Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit).

Option Courses - Group A and Group B:

Students then choose TWO 0.5 unit courses from the Group A and B lists.

- AT LEAST ONE of the two 0.5 unit courses normally must come from Group A
- Students not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology may then select their fourth unit (either a single 1.0 unit course or two 0.5 unit courses) from the Option Courses list.
- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures
- In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Cultural Understandings of Health (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Medical Anthropology and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 230kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/file93566.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- All students are introduced to the types of problem and areas of questioning which are fundamental to the anthropology of medicine.

- Students new to the discipline are given knowledge of the general principles of anthropological enquiry

- All students develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the theoretical approaches which help form an anthropological perspective.

- All students gain an understanding of the practical methods by which this perspective is applied in field research.
All students will be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be familiar with the foundational literature on the basis of which medical anthropology is linked to and emerges from broader disciplinary concerns.

- Students will have knowledge of the intersections linking medical anthropology to related fields, such as social studies of science, studies in bioethics, and critical approaches to public health

- Students will be familiar with the numerous ethnographic studies of health and illness.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to deploy an ethnographic kind of questioning – one directed toward teasing out of complex situations the sets of particular norms or principles which condition or shape them.

- As anthropologists, they will be trained to look for the specifically social in everything (even & especially in the “natural”)

- Students will learn how to form an anthropological problem – that is to distinguish an anthropological problem from a mere topic or area of interest.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Personal drive: Students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning

- Students will develop research skills: including location and adjustment to differing types of library collection, as well as locating organizations and people who hold significant information

- Listening & understanding: Students will be able to assimilate complex arguments quickly on the basis of listening – and to discuss or disagree constructively with points made by others.

- Planning and problem solving: students will be able to set targets and achieve them, and will be able to work well to deadlines.

- Working in a group: students will learn to lead by contributing to the development of consensus.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language.

Transferable skills:

- Students will develop an ability to begin from a general question or issue and develop an appropriate research model and method.
- Ability to clearly represent a concise understanding of a project/problem and its solution.
- An ability to recognize and appreciate for what it is an unconventional approach or an unfamiliar idea
- An ability creatively to resolve conflict while working in a team; being able to see the other person’s point of view
- An ability to work and feel at ease in multicultural or cross cultural environments.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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In the first academic year of the MSc program, the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc program, the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject , major and optional courses chosen.

Human nutrition

Transfers specific and profound knowledge, insights and skills related to the food and public health nutrition security problems and possible solutions at population level. Therefore, this subject focuses on themes such as food chemistry, food and nutrition science, nutritional requirements, food and nutrition policy, nutrition surveillance, nutrition disorders, nutrition research, food and nutrition interventions, food safety, nutrition epidemiology, consumer behaviour, rural development and agriculture, development economics, project management, and project planning.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context.
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context.
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context.
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context.

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission details

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted):
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

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