• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
"summer" AND "courses"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Summer Courses)

We have 947 Masters Degrees (Summer Courses)

  • "summer" AND "courses" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 947
Order by 
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

Read less
Who is it for?. Our proposed programme is designed to provide a foundation to those who will determine the scope and direction of data analytics research within their organisation, and communicate the research outcomes to the ultimate decision-makers. Read more

Who is it for?

Our proposed programme is designed to provide a foundation to those who will determine the scope and direction of data analytics research within their organisation, and communicate the research outcomes to the ultimate decision-makers. Our graduates are trained to participate in the strategic management process, improve the organisation’s financial performance and help design the effective measures of performance of an organisation for which evidence-based data become a strategic asset in the decision-making process. Therefore, the primary goal is to provide an insight into business data analytics and prepare the students to develop the set of skills and attitudes that will evolve into effective leadership skills.

Objectives

This programme is subject to approval later in the year. Course content may change.

The main purpose of the programme is to develop a comprehensive set of skills and to encourage the positive attributes that are essential to becoming a successful business analyst.

The degree is committed not only to imparting specialist skills, but also to developing the so-called "soft skills” which are important in influencing people and organisations. As well as obtaining effective and persuasive communication skills, the module leaders also learn about ethics-related issues, which are another key ingredient to responsible leadership.

Structure

  • Extract valuable information from the data in order to create a competitive advantage
  • Make use of analytical skills to evaluate and solve complex problems within the organisation’s strategic perspective
  • Present and explain data via effective and persuasive communication
  • Show commercial focus and the ability of strategic thinking
  • Demonstrate depth and breadth of using analytical skills to interrogate data sets
  • Illustrate professional integrity and show sensitivity towards ethical considerations.

Pre-study modules

The MSc in Business Analytics starts online in the summer before the beginning of term 1 with three pre-courses which ensure that every student has the minimum specific background required by all other modules. These subjects are key elements of your course and you are strongly encouraged to complete the modules before you arrive at Cass in order to avoid being at a disadvantage.

  • Introduction to Python
  • This module is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of Python programming and no previous programming experience is expected. The teaching model is learning by doing and basic concepts are built up in an incremental manner. The online material is formulated via multiple Python code examples that enable the students to work independently when dealing with small Python programming tasks.
  • Introduction to R Programming
  • This module is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of R programming and no previous programming experience is expected. The teaching model is learning by doing and basic concepts are built up in an incremental manner. The online material is formulated via multiple R code examples that enable the students to work independently when dealing with small R programming tasks.
  • This module is designed to prepare you for understanding and performing the computer based exercises and tasks that you encounter in all core MSc in Business Analytics modules and will therefore be completed prior to beginning your course.
  • Professional Ethics and Good Academic Practice
  • This module aims to cultivate your awareness of some key ethical issues prevalent in data analysis and statistics, in particular those issues emerging in the applications of modern data science.
  • You will also develop your awareness of what constitutes good academic practice and learn how to properly reference your work and avoid issues such as plagiarism and poor scholarship in your work.

Term 1

Core modules:

Term 2

Core modules:

Term 3

In term three you will study:

  • An applied research project (20 credits)
  • Four electives (10 credits each).

Research Project

Assessment methods

Assessment

To satisfy the requirements of the degree course, students must complete:

  • Eight core modules (15 credits each)
  • Four elective modules (10 credits each)
  • One applied research project (20 credits).

Assessment of modules on the MSc in Business Analytics, in most cases, is by means of coursework and unseen examination. Coursework takes a variety of formats and may consist of individual or group presentations/reports, set exercises or unseen tests.

Induction weeks

There is a compulsory two week induction programme just before Term 1 starts, which is a dedicated introduction to the course and to business analytics. You are required to complete a number of induction workshops at the beginning of the course as follows:

  • Team building
  • Career induction and careers fair
  • Professional development skills.

How to apply

Documents required for decision-making

  • Transcript/interim transcript
  • CV
  • Personal statement (500-600 words)

Documents also required (may follow at later date)

  • IELTS/GMAT reports
  • Two references, one of which MUST be an academic reference
  • Work experience is not a requirement of this course, applicants with in excess of three years of experience should consider the MBA programme
  • For a successful application to receive an unconditional status all documents must be verified, so an original or certified copy of the degree transcript must be sent by post to Specialist Masters Programme Office, 106 Bunhill Row, London, EC1Y 8TZ, UK

We cannot comment on individual eligibility before you apply and we can only process your application once it is fully complete, with all requested information received.

Individual Appointments

If you would like to visit us to discuss your application please do arrange an individual appointment.



Read less
The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Read more
The College of Social Sciences welcomes all postgraduates to the recently redesigned MA in Social Research programme which continues to enjoy full RT (research training) recognition by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This programme aims to provide students with a sound background in social research design and the most up-to-date training in methods of data collection and analysis. The combination of core modules and short courses on more advanced topics provides maximum flexibility for taught postgraduate and research students throughout their study.

The core elements of the programme are delivered by staff across the entire College, many of whom are engaged in cutting-edge research in their own fields. Students will benefit by undertaking the modules with others from different departments within the School of Government and Society, eg, Political Science and International Studies; the Centre for Russian and East European Studies; the Institute for Applied Social Studies; and within the wider College. Students will also receive training on more discipline-specific research elements, as well as dissertation supervision, provided by individual departments. On completion of this MA, many students continue their PhD studies or pursue a career in research in the public, private or voluntary sector.

Programme content
Term 1:

Introduction to Social Research (20)
Research Design (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Information Skills for Social Sciences
University Programme of Skills Training (as necessary)
Dissertation-related preparation
Term 2:

Social Research Methods I (20)
Social Research Methods II (20)
Thesis-related preparation
Summer Term:

Four Short courses (10)
Dissertation (60)
All students registered on the MA in Social Research will take:

1) Four core modules:

Introduction to Social Science Research (20 credits)
Research Design (20 credits)
Social Research Methods I (20 credits)
Social Research Methods II (20 credits)


2) Four elective modules (10 credits each) from the short course programme below
3) A 14,000 word dissertation (60 credits)

Short courses
All short courses run as 2-day intensive workshops from 10–4pm with breaks. This list is updated regularly as new courses are approved so do check this website from time to time to see what is on offer.

These short courses are open to all research students in the College (and some departments in other Colleges, such as Geography, subject to the discretion of the Programme Team). However, places on each course are limited and priority will be given to MA Social Research students.

These short courses are also open to all staff in the University who may wish to attend without completing the assessments. However, all doctoral researchers and staff who wish to to so will be placed on a waiting list. Confirmation will be sent a week before the course dates.

Short course programmes
From Multiple linear to Logistic regression
Narrative Research
Analyzing Hierarchical and Panel Data
Visual Research Methods
Linguistic Ethnography
Documentary Research in Education, History and the Social Sciences
Researching Disability
Approaches to Research on Discourse
Policy Evaluation
Advanced Qualitative Data Analysis (using NVivo)
Secondary Research Data Analysis in Social Research
Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Social Science
Overseas Research
Q Methodology – A Systematic Approach for Interpretive Research Design
Activity Theory and its research applications
Some courses have pre-requisites, eg, to register on Multiple Linear and Logistic Regression, Factor Analysis and Narrative Research; you will need to have passed Data Analysis (20 credits module) or equivalent. For the latter, you will need to provide evidence that you have passed a similar course on quantitative/qualitative data analysis where appropriate.

Please be aware that some of these courses run on the same dates. Make sure you have not picked courses that clash with each other. For further details or to sign up for these short courses, please email the course names, your name, student ID and your programme to |.

Skills and attributes gained
Students will have acquired a solid foundation of a broad range of research methods that are widely used in the social sciences and will have developed:

A sound understanding of the methodological debates
An overview of the philosophy of social science and how this informs research design, methods chosen of data collection and analysis
An ability to use a range of research techniques appropriate to their subject area
Competence in the representation and presentation of information and data
An ability to communicate research findings effectively to a wider range of audiences
An appreciation of the potential use and impact of their research within and beyond academia
An ability to engage with relevant users at all points in the research process, from devising and shaping research questions through to enhancing practice
Learning and teaching
Students are expected to engage in high-level discussion during all sessions. Teaching will be delivered by a combination of lectures, seminars and computer workshops. Some fieldwork involving primary data collection is required where appropriate.

Careers
Many students go on to do a PhD after completing this MA. Others have followed a career in local authorities, government departments, health authorities, management consultancy, media, the voluntary sector and so on.

Assessment
All core modules are assessed by a 4000-word essay or report. On most short courses, a 3000-report is usually required. The dissertation length is 14,000 words and students are expected to utilise the knowledge and skills they learned from the taught elements in this programme.

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at one of our on-campus open days (Friday 13 November 2015 and Friday 4 March 2016). Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
About the European MSc. Photonics. The European MSc. in Photonics is an English-taught multidisciplinary programme of two years (120 ECTS) which leads to a joint degree from Ghent University and Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Read more

About the European MSc. Photonics

The European MSc. in Photonics is an English-taught multidisciplinary programme of two years (120 ECTS) which leads to a joint degree from Ghent University and Vrije Universiteit Brussel.

Programme Highlights

  • Core and advanced photonics courses complemented with electronics, physics, optics and engineering
  • Strong focus on hands-on training in highly equipped research labs
  • International experience and exchange opportunities with 20 partners
  • Dynamic link with industry through lectures and internships

Structure

The first year you can develop your skills in laser engineering, optical communication, optical materials, microphotonics and optical sensors. The first semester is devoted to the fundamental basics of photonics, while the second focuses on engineering skills and photonics applications. As this master is organised by two leading universities in Belgium, you have the possibility to follow courses entirely at VUB or to choose specific courses at UGent. 

The second year opens the international gateway. Enrich your experience by choosing one of the international exchange tracks to follow courses, take up an internship or do a master thesis at an international partner. 

Approach

Core and advanced photonics courses:

The first year will be devoted mainly to a programme of core photonics courses with essentially the same content at all institutes, complemented by a number of advanced photonics courses as well as several courses in related disciplines and transferable skill courses.

Move to another location:

In the second year you will move to another location where you will continue to take advanced photonics, multidisciplinary and transferable skill courses and where you will carry out your master thesis (30 ECTS) in a photonics sub-field of their choice. In addition to the regular courses, all students will attend a two-week summer school at the end of the first and second year of the programme.

International opportunities

The second year contains a mandatory external mobility component. You can spend one semester or do your master thesis abroad. Alternatively, you can do both thesis and courses abroad during two semesters, or do a 12-week industrial internship in the photonics industry or a research institute. You choose one of the four mobility tracks, allowing you to define the extent of your stay abroad. It allows you to benefit from the enriching expertise of our partner universities.

Professional perspectives

The European MSc. in Photonics has all the right ingredints to prepare you for a bright future. The valuable internships with industry and research institutes abroad enhance your employability significantly. 

As consultant, engineer or researcher you might find yourself in the driver seat working domains as life sciences, biotechnology, telecommunications, sustainable energy, agrifood or Industry 4.0.



Read less
The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism.

Graduates will find a wide range of career options open to them, in particular those involving inter-cultural or international contact, such as in international organizations, government institutions, non-profit organizations, and journalism, but also museums, educational institutions, or the publishing sector more generally. It would also be a suitable preparation for students considering embarking on a research degree focusing on one of the regional or topical areas of expertise represented in the department.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

This is the only Master-level programme in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK, and can therefore offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on the history of these regions. The programme provides a sound training in the historical sciences.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The programme includes the following elements totalling four units: Courses totalling at least two units from List A [History courses], including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; further minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; and a dissertation of 10,000 words written in conjunction with the Major course (one unit).

There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units, including their Major.

In the two-year intensive language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

MA History and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 362kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/file93560.pdf

Aims and Outcomes

- An advanced understanding of the historical sciences and its various methodologies and approaches in general, and specialist knowledge of Asian and African history in particula

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- The critical, conceptual, and analytical skills required for historical research as well as for positions of responsibility in all other professions

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:
1. Factual knowledge about the histories of Asian and African societies, the ways they interacted with each other and other world regions of the world, and the major historical forces that shaped our contemporary world.

2. Familiarity with a variety of different approaches to historical research and current scholarly debates, and, on that basis, the ability to formulate a valuable research question.

3. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

4. Language skills appropriate to chosen region and field of study (recommended).

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should be able to synthesize different kinds of information, become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and analyse and reassess evidence and research questions for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, including relevant professional databases, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Ability to formulate research questions and design an independent research project, including the use of primary sources.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This programme gives you the chance to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a rich variety of courses led by internationally renowned experts. Read more

This programme gives you the chance to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a rich variety of courses led by internationally renowned experts. A core research training course will introduce you to key skills in postgraduate study, while a flexible degree structure allows you to select from the full range of optional courses on offer from the School of Critical Studies. You can also choose courses from elsewhere in the College of Arts or from other Schools and Colleges across the University. The programme ends with an opportunity to write a dissertation on an English Literature-related topic of your choice.

Why this programme

  • The structure of the degree allows you to follow either a bespoke English Literature MLitt programme, constructing your own pathway through a range of different courses, or one of several specialist pathways to suit your interests (see below).
  • You will have access to world class libraries and museums, as well as the extraordinary diversity of cultural, literary and artistic events that makes Glasgow such a vibrant place for postgraduate study.
  • The core research skills programme includes tailored workshops with the University’s archives and world-class Special Collections, as well as providing the academic and technical skills you will need to succeed at postgraduate level in the university and other professional environments.

Programme Structure

The programme is mostly comprised of optional courses, enabling you to tailor your own Masters programme to your area of interest. All students will study our 20-credit core English Literature Research Training Course. You then take five more 20 credit courses and one 60 credit dissertation. The structure for full-time students is as follows:

Semester 1:

  • Core Course: English Literature Research Training
  • Two optional courses

Semester 2:

  • Three optional courses

Summer:

  • Dissertation

The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology.

It is also possible to write a dissertation made up of creative writing with a critical component. Normally this possibility is only available to students who have taken the Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) as one of their options.

Part-time students

Part-time students take the English Literature Research Training Course and three 20 credit courses in their first year of study, and two 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year.

Pathways

If you have already identified your area of interest, there are five different pathways through the MLitt in English Literature at Glasgow:

Each pathway will give you a different mix of core and optional courses.

Find out more about core and optional courses.

Career prospects

Our MLitt programmes provide excellent preparation for PhD studies and an academic career. They also develop key skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking.

Past Glasgow MLitt graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, the media, heritage and creative industries, and numerous other related professions.



Read less
Gain a strong grounding in advanced economics, and take your knowledge an important step further by applying it to the field that most interests you. Read more

Gain a strong grounding in advanced economics, and take your knowledge an important step further by applying it to the field that most interests you.

Our MSc Applied Economics is a suite of taught courses that provides rigorous training in all the main aspects of economics.

Starting with a comprehensive refresher course in essential maths and economics skills, you will go on to receive advanced training in the analysis of problems in applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and strategic decision-making.

Most importantly, you will then have the opportunity to tailor the course to the area of business or policy you are most interested in, giving you additional expertise and a head start when seeking work in that field.

We are one of the only universities in the UK offering this level of specialisation on this type of master's. You can select from MSc Applied Economics as a standalone option or with one of four specialist pathways:

Whichever pathway you choose, you will develop your knowledge of quantitative methods beyond undergraduate level and gain the mathematical, statistical and econometric skills to carry out quantitative analyses of applied economics problems.

You will consolidate your research skills further during the dissertation, which you will work on over the summer under the supervision of one of our experienced lecturers. The research training you receive will prepare you well for going into research positions in a government or commercial context.

By the end of the course you will be able to:

  • analyse and interpret economic data and critically evaluate existing research
  • apply economic concepts to specific economic and policy questions, focusing in particular on the area of business or policy that most interests you
  • design and undertake independent research projects

Learning and teaching

Our teaching staff are all active researchers and regularly publish in the top economics journals, so you will be working with some of the UK’s leading thinkers in economics.

Graduate prospects

This course is ideal preparation for careers within government or industry that require a thorough knowledge of economics.

We expect graduates of the Banking and Financial Markets pathway to be particularly suited to jobs in banks and other financial institutions.

Graduates of the Public Policy or Environmental Policy pathways are especially well-placed to find jobs within government and non-governmental organisations.

Graduates of the Behavioural Science pathway will be ideally suited to work within government or large private sector firms.

Course structure

This course lasts 1 year. Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

Units

Compulsory course units

These compulsory units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

Semester 1

  • Applied microeconomics
  • Applied macroeconomics
  • Applied econometrics
  • Strategic decision making and games
  • Applied research methods

Semester 2

  • Five optional units

Summer

  • Dissertation

Optional course units

These optional units are currently being studied by our students, or are proposed new units.

  • Applied financial economics
  • Financial markets
  • Economics of financial institutions
  • International monetary policy and institutions
  • Public policy analysis
  • Economics of politics
  • Public finance
  • Environmental regulation
  • Environmental and resource economics
  • Applied behavioural economics
  • Experimental economics
  • Applied behavioural finance
  • Health economics

Learning and assessment

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Online resources
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars

Assessment

  • Attendance
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Multiple choice examination
  • Online assessment
  • Oral assessment
  • Practical work
  • Written examination


Read less
The Romantic Worlds Masters focuses on the art and culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Read more

The Romantic Worlds Masters focuses on the art and culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries: a period of radical change and rancorous turmoil during which writers and artists forged works and ideals that continue to exert profound influences over the ways in which we think about our environments, selves and societies. While the pathway provides ample opportunities to engage with the works of canonical Romantic poets and with the great novels written during the period, its approach is interdisciplinary. As well as providing groundings in advanced literary studies and in the traditional cornerstones of British Romanticism, the programme’s courses range across fields including art history, ecocriticism, sociology and urban studies, studying caricature, travel writing, drama, topography, periodicals, portraiture and music alongside novels and poetry. The pathway includes numerous opportunities to work with collections in and around Glasgow.

Why This Programme

  • Based in a longstanding centre of research excellence for Romantic Studies, the Romantic Worlds MLitt provides the chance to work closely with leading experts in the field, specialising in a wide range of different aspects, forms and techniques.
  • You'll have bespoke opportunities to work with Romantic-period books, original manuscripts, visual art and collection objects held by the University Library and Archives and the Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
  • The flexible programme allows you to study the Romantic period in combination with other literary periods or with complementary courses in other subject areas. Students might take courses in Victorian Studies to provide a thorough training in the long nineteenth century; study Romantic-period legacies by taking courses on the American Counterculture or Fantasy literature; or take options in Art History or Music to expand upon elements in the core provision, tailoring their course of study to fit their particular interests and requirements.
  • Glasgow has a thriving research culture, allowing you to expand your interests by providing access to a plethora of seminars, workshops and events in addition to the core provision of the programme.

Programme Structure

You'll take:

  • three core courses
  • three optional courses 

You will also complete a 15,000-word research dissertation. 

Semester One: September to December

  • Romantic Worlds 1: Encountering Environments
  • School of Critical Studies Research Training Course
  • One optional course

Semester Two: January to March

  • Romantic Worlds 2: Selves and Societies
  • Two optional courses

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Part-time Students

Part-time students take all three core courses plus one second-semester optional course in their first year of study, and two optional courses and the dissertation in their second year.

Teaching and assessment

Courses are generally taught through seminars and workshops. Both Romantic Worlds courses incorporate a significant amount of work with collections. Courses are usually assessed through a combination of presentations, mid-term assignments and final essays.

Career Prospects

The collections-related elements of the Romantic Worlds Masters provide experiences of working with heritage materials that are directly applicable to careers in museums, galleries and libraries.

The programme also helps students to develop important transferable skills, including:

  • articulating arguments
  • locating and organising information
  • responsibly managing time
  • clearly and effectively communicating

The Romantic Worlds Masters also provides an excellent grounding for doctoral-level study.



Read less
We are offering two social work qualifications - an MA and a PGDip - for applicants who hold a relevant degree and experience of paid or voluntary work with vulnerable people within the UK. Read more
We are offering two social work qualifications - an MA and a PGDip - for applicants who hold a relevant degree and experience of paid or voluntary work with vulnerable people within the UK.

The Social Work MA is a two-year full-time course (maximum 5 years on a part-time basis) while the PGDip can typically be gained in 18 months.

Graduates completing the MA or PGDip are eligible for registration as a qualified social worker with the social work regulatory body, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/social-work/

Why choose this course?

- Our graduates are highly employable with 95% obtaining employment on successful completion of their programme.

- Social Work courses at Oxford Brookes University have been ranked highly in league tables (The Guardian and The Sunday Times University Guides).

- This is an evidence-informed course delivered via innovative mixed mode learning methods (classroom, distance and work-based).

- Our courses access a wide range of work-based learning opportunities in Oxfordshire and neighbouring authorities.

- Our teaching benefits from the input of experienced researchers working in established areas of children and families, drugs and alcohol, ageing, and inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Oxford Brookes offers a broad range of student support schemes to facilitate your learning and development..

Professional accreditation

Graduates completing the MA or PGDip are eligible to apply for for registration as a Qualified Social Worker with the HCPC.

This course in detail

The core modules are:
- Skill Development and Professional Communication
- The Policy and Law Context of Social Care
- Social Work Practice 1
- Social Work Theory, Assessment and Evidence-Informed Intervention with Adults
- Supporting Children and Families: Building the Evidence
- Social Work Practice 2
- Social Work Theory, Assessment and Evidence-Informed Intervention with Children and Families

In addition, MA students will be required to undertake
- Applied Research Methods
- Dissertation

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the list of modules may vary from that shown here.

Approach to assessment

Our modules are assessed in a variety of ways, including written assignments, class tests, portfolios, presentations and a dissertation.

Practice Placements

Both awards require two practice placements, which will include attendance throughout the summer months.

Attendance pattern

The full-time route is a full-time course which requires five days a week commitment to learning in the University, in practice placement and distance learning.

A typical part-time route would be three days a week. This is dependent on modules taken and the number of years. Practice placement requires a minimum of three days per week attendance.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of our programmes will have fulfilled the requirements for social work training specified by the Department of Health and the Health and Care Professions Council.

Careers

On successful completion of the MA and PGDip programmes graduates are eligible to apply for registration as a qualified social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council, and then to enter employment.

Graduates of the MA programme will be well-placed to apply for a place on an MPhil / PhD programme should they wish to pursue a career in research at a later date.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

We have a number of promising and senior experienced researchers working in established areas including children and families, drugs and alcohol, ageing, interprofessional education and collaborative practice.

Read less
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. Read more
In the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds. The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses. The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS).

The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen.

Tropical Agriculture

Delivers technical knowledge related to agriculture focussing on developing countries. The students can specialize in animal production or plant production by choosing the specific option. The major on Animal Production delivers in depth knowledge on production biology, animal nutrition, pasture management, animal genetics. The major on Plant Production focuses on themes like ethno-botany, crop protection, plant breeding, plant biotechnology. The courses are applicative and aim at presenting solutions for production problems in developing countries in an interdisciplinary way.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning and Outcomes

Have thorough knowledge and comprehension (theory and practice) l in the interdisciplinary domains: food and feed production, socio-economic, (public health) nutrition and management concepts, theories and skills, and in the main subject specific domains and the chosen major domains. The program additionally focuses on international collaboration.
-Major: Public Health Nutrition : Have profound insights in public health nutrition realities and compare public health nutrition issues, approaches and policies within the international context
-Major Nutrition Security and Management: Have profound insights in different food/nutrition security realities and compare nutrition security issues, approaches and (nutrition) policies within an international context
-Major Plant Production: Have profound insights in plant production realities and compare plant production issues, and approaches within the international context
-Major Animal Production: Have profound insights in animal production realities and compare animal production issues, and approaches within the international context

Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterize and analyse specific problems: food, nutrition and agricultural chains, food sovereignty /safety and security, natural resource management, sustainable production, economic and social problems of rural areas, national and international agriculture.

Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve interdisciplinary related problems in the context of sustainable development.

Apply the interdisciplinary tools to design, implement, monitor and evaluate national and international agro-nutrition policies and programs. More specifically:
-For Human Nutrition: construct innovative tools and instruments for the development of a better nutritional health status of a country/region/area and its inhabitants/households.
-For Tropical agriculture: a more efficient and economic feasible agricultural balanced, food production guaranteeing a better food security situation per country respecting local environment.

Assess the importance and magnitude of a problem, define strategies for intervention and/or identify knowledge gaps. Develop a research protocol based on the analysis of existing evidence and set up a research plan, analyse and interpret the data and present the findings.

Identify, select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect, analyses and critically interpret data.

Critically reflect on program specific issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.

Take up a trans-disciplinary role in an interdisciplinary ((inter)national) team dealing with global challenges, and develop a global perspective.

Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders from peers to a general public to convincingly communicate evidence based research findings and project results.

To effectively use appropriate communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.

Learn to continuously critically reflect (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, attitudes, functioning, and develop an attitude of lifelong learning. This includes:
-Design and plan own learning processes.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted)
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

Read less
If you want to train as a Secondary subject teacher and do not have the necessary qualifications to enter an Initial Teacher-Training programme such as a PGCE or School Direct Training Programme, we provide subject knowledge enhancement courses to improve your subject expertise prior to your training. Read more
If you want to train as a Secondary subject teacher and do not have the necessary qualifications to enter an Initial Teacher-Training programme such as a PGCE or School Direct Training Programme, we provide subject knowledge enhancement courses to improve your subject expertise prior to your training.

Subjects

We run short enhancement courses over the summer in the following subjects:
* Chemistry
* Computer Science
* Design and Technology
* Mathematics
* Physics

The courses are intended to support graduates as they develop their breadth and depth of the given subject before they begin an ITT course which would lead to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). It is designed to support communication skills and the development of the subject knowledge required for teaching the subject in secondary schools.

Funding

School Direct, PGCE and SCITT trainees are eligible for funding to undertake our courses and may be entitled to a tax-free bursary from the National College for Teaching and Leadership of £200 per week for the duration of the course (subject to confirmation by NCTL).

How to apply

Applications should be made directly to the University by either the student, or the teacher training course provider.

Provider referral
If a school or ITT provider decides that you would be suitable for secondary mathematics teaching, but that you need to develop your subject knowledge, they can offer you a place on their School Direct or PGCE course. However, this offer is made on condition that you successfully complete the SKE course prior to starting the ITT course. There are then two possibilities:
1. Your school or ITT provider contacts us and, provided there are vacancies, refers you to this course, or
2. You contact us directly. In this case we will confirm with your school or provider that they have offered, and you have accepted, an ITT place.

Read less
Rural Economics and Management. Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. Read more
Rural Economics and Management : Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countriesIn the first academic year of the MSc. Program the students of the 3 main subjects have several courses in common, aiming in giving them all an in-depth knowledge and know-how related to nutrition and rural development related topics, creating a common academic level between all program students of diverse backgrounds.

The common part of the programme consists on the one hand of basic knowledge, insights and skills in the areas of production, transformation, preservation, marketing and consumption of food products. On the other hand, it contains a practically oriented component that enables the alumni to identify problems by means of quantitative and qualitative research methods and analytical techniques, to assess and rank causes, and to plan, to execute and to evaluate appropriate interventions.

The other part of courses given during the first year are main subject specific courses.

The academic second year provides a more in depth understanding of the specific problems and their solutions for the main subject and major chosen and consists of main subject and major specific courses, elective (optional) courses and Master Dissertation research (30 ECTS). The specific expertise the students receive depends on the main subject, major and optional courses chosen:

Rural Economics and Management

Gives the students specific expertise for detecting and measuring the causes of failing rural development, and for the planning and implementation of sustainable, integrated rural development strategies and interventions. To achieve this, several themes with relation to agricultural, economic, social, ecological, financial, institutional and political aspects of the production systems in rural areas in developing countries are studied in depth.

Structure

Semester 1 (Sept-Jan)
-Preceded by introduction courses.
-Common and main subject specific basic courses.
-Fundamental, in depth and high level knowledge.
Semester 2 (Febr-June)
-Main subject specific courses with special attention to ‘in field’ applications.
-Possibility to do internships in summer holidays.
Semester 3 (Sept-Jan) and Semester 4 (Febr-June)
-Specialised courses (fine-tuned individual programme).
-Master dissertation (at Ghent University, other Belgian institutes/organizations/multinationals or one of our partners in the South or Europe).

Learning Outcomes

-Understand different socio-economic concepts, theories and multi-disciplinary approaches with respect to rural economies and rural development.
-Have profound insights in different rural development realities, and compare rural development issues, approaches and policies within an international context..
-Apply theories and methodological approaches to characterise and analyse the economic and social problems of rural areas, food and agricultural chains, natural resource management, national and international agriculture.
-Design and implement adequate instruments, methods, models and innovative tools to analyse, evaluate and solve problems related to agriculture, food chain and natural resource- management, and to rural development and countryside stewardship.
-Design, implement and monitor national and international agro-food policies, rural institutions and rural development programmes.
-Construct innovative tools and instruments for the (multifunctional) development of rural areas.
-Design and assess research in the domain of rural development, formulating a problem statement and operationalizing objectives and research questions within an adequate research plan.
-Select and apply appropriate research methods and techniques to collect and analyse data from literature and empirical research in the domain of rural development.
-Critically reflect on topical rural development issues, and on ethical and value driven aspects of research and intervention strategies.
-Work in an integrated internationally composed team dealing with rural development and food production challenges, interacting respectfully with diverse others and developing a global perspective.
-Dialogue and professionally interact with different actors and stakeholders of the socio-professional world (food sector, NGOs, rural organisations, rural administration, universities and research institutes).
-Communicate convincingly (written, oral, using appropriate tools) about (own) research findings and project results and their underpinning rationale.
-Effectively and appropriately use good language, communication and behavioural skills in different language and cultural environments.
-Design and plan own learning processes based on continuous reflection (individually and in discussion with others) upon personal knowledge, skills, and attitudes and functioning.
-Self-Directed Learning: work independently, take initiative, and manage a project through to completion.
-Independently perform scientific research in the domain of rural development. Give proof of a clear international orientation.

Other admission requirements

The applicant must be proficient in the language of the course or training programme, i.e. English. The English language proficiency can be met by providing a certificate (validity of 5 years) of one of the following tests: (TOEFL/IELTS predictive tests and TOEIC will not be accepted).
-TOEFL IBT 80.
-TOEFL PBT 550.
-ACADEMIC IELTS 6,5 overall score with a min. of 6 for writing.
-CEFR B2 Issued by a European university language centre.
-ESOL CAMBRIDGE English CAE (Advanced).

Read less
Entry to the actuarial profession is by a demanding series of examinations, but the rewards after qualifying are great. The Institute and Faculty of Actuaries in the UK has four levels of examinations to qualify. Read more

Overview

Entry to the actuarial profession is by a demanding series of examinations, but the rewards after qualifying are great. The Institute and Faculty of Actuaries in the UK has four levels of examinations to qualify. The first level, the Core Technical (CT) subjects, are taught in our BSc or MSc in Actuarial Science and lead to exemptions from CT1 to CT8.

Leading on from this, our established and successful MSc in Actuarial Management (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-actuarial-management/ ) covers the more advanced actuarial subjects and offers exemptions from the syllabuses of the Core Application subjects CA1 and CA3 and Specialist Technical subjects ST2, ST4, ST5, ST6 and ST9.

Students will typically study CA1, CA3 and up to three ST subjects (two ST subjects are needed to satisfy the profession's requirements).

Taking our MSc in Actuarial Management is a great way to speed your progress to this most prestigious of careers - it's designed to take you almost all of the way to qualification. A student who graduates with a full set of exemptions from Heriot-Watt (CT, CA and ST subjects) will only have three more examinations to pass, as well as gaining the necessary work experience, to qualify as a Fellow of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.

Programme duration

The PG Diploma comprises the taught coursework component leading to exemptions from CA1 and the ST professional subjects and takes 9 months to complete. Successful students can then progress to the project work in the summer. This takes the form of industry-relevant case studies, assessed by written reports, which leads to the award of an MSc and exemption from the Subject CA3. In exceptional cases a student may be allowed to write a research dissertation.

The programme is also available to be studied on a part-time basis, over a maximum of 4 years.

Teaching Excellence and Student Satisfaction

30% of our teaching staff are qualified actuaries, the others are leading Mathematicians, Financial Mathematicians and Statisticians, who are nationally and internationally recognised for their research. This expertise ensures that what we teach you is current, applicable to the real workplace and current economy. Our National Student Survey results are consistently high for overall student satisfaction.

Results from the National Student Survey for 2011 reveal that 88% of our Mathematics and Statistics (including Actuarial Science) graduates are employed with a graduate position and/or undertaking further study. Our graduates go on to work for companies such as Swiss Re, Standard Life, Towers Watson, Lloyds Banking Group, Barclays Capital, Scottish Widows, Ernst & Young and many more. Graduates are employed locally in Edinburgh, London and throughout the world.

Student Actuarial Society

Heriot-Watt has a very active Students' Actuarial Society (See http://hwsas.com/ ) which won several awards at a recent Heriot-Watt 'Oscars' ceremony. This body is completely managed, enthusiastically and professionally, by our students.

Professional recognition

The programme is fully accredited by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.

Programme content

In the taught element of the programme each student takes eight semester-long courses. These are linked in pairs, one per semester. One pair of courses – covering Actuarial Risk Management – is compulsory and corresponds to subject CA1. It applies the principles of actuarial mathematics to a wide range of financial and insurance settings. Students choose a minimum of two pairs of courses from a list including Life Office Management (subject ST2), Pensions (subject ST4), Investment and Finance (subject ST5), Derivatives (subject ST6) and Enterprise Risk Management (subject ST9).

The choice of courses may depend on the coverage of actuarial subjects in the student’s first degree. Depending on individual circumstances, other optional courses may be made available, for example courses from the MSc in Actuarial Science or in other disciplines. However, students choosing to take three pairs of courses, potentially leading to exemptions from three ST subjects, will have an exceptionally broad range of employment opportunities.

Students may graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma at the end of the 2nd semester, after completing the taught coursework component leading to exemptions form CA1 and the ST professional subjects. Successful students can then progress to the project work in the summer. This takes the form of industry-relevant case studies, assessed by written reports, which leads to the award of an MSc and exemption from the Subject CA3. In exceptional cases a student may be allowed to write a research dissertation.The dissertation is an extended research project, with regular supervision, undertaken in the summer. The diploma takes 9 months and the MSc takes 1 year full time and part time options are available.

For more detailed course descriptions, please visit the current student website http://www.ma.hw.ac.uk/ams/teach/courses1314/index.php

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-actuarial-management/

Find videos of students and graduates from the department here http://www.youtube.com/user/HWActuarial?blend=3&ob=5#p/a

Read less
The Masters in Civil Engineering & Management introduces you to contemporary business and management issues while increasing your depth of knowledge in your chosen civil engineering speciality. Read more
The Masters in Civil Engineering & Management introduces you to contemporary business and management issues while increasing your depth of knowledge in your chosen civil engineering speciality.

Why this programme

◾Civil engineering at the University of Glasgow is ranked 4th in the UK and 1st in Scotland (Guardian University Guide 2017).
◾With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2016, Civil Engineering at Glasgow continues to meet student expectations combining both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
◾The University has a long history of research in Civil Engineering. The UK's first Chair of Civil Engineering was established at the University in 1840 and early occupants such as William J. M. Rankine set a research ethos that has endured.
◾You will be taught jointly by staff from the School of Engineering and the Adam Smith Business School. You will benefit from their combined resources and expertise and from an industry-focused curriculum.
◾If you are a graduate engineer looking to broaden your knowledge of management while also furthering your knowledge of civil engineering, this innovative programme is designed for you.
◾You will gain first-hand experience of managing an engineering project through the integrated systems design project, allowing development of skills in project management, quality management and costing.
◾You will be able to apply management to engineering projects, allowing you to gain an advantage in today’s competitive job market and advance to the most senior positions within an engineering organisation.
◾This programme has a September and January intake.

Programme structure

There are two semesters of taught material and a summer session during which you will work on an individual supervised project and write a dissertation on its outcomes. Students entering the programme in January are restricted to civil engineering (i.e. excluding management) topics only.

Semester 1

You will be based in the Adam Smith Business School, developing knowledge and skills in management principles and techniques. We offer an applied approach, with an emphasis on an informed critical evaluation of information, and the subsequent application of concepts and tools to the core areas of business and management.
◾Contemporary issues in human resource management
◾Managing creativity and innovation
◾Managing innovative change
◾Marketing management
◾Operations management
◾Project management.

Semester 2

You will study engineering courses, which aim to enhance your group working and project management capability at the same time as improving your depth of knowledge in chosen civil engineering subjects.
◾Integrated systems design project.

Optional courses

Select a total of 4 courses from Lists A and B, at least 1 must be from List A:

List A

◾Advanced soil mechanics 5
◾Advanced structural analysis and dynamics 5
◾Computational modelling of non-linear problems 5
◾Introduction to wind engineering
◾Principles of GIS.

List B

◾Geotechnical engineering 3
◾Ground engineering 4
◾Recycling urban land
◾Structural analysis 4
◾Transportation systems engineering 4.

Project or dissertation

You will undertake an individual project or dissertation work in the summer period (May–August). This will give you an opportunity to apply and consolidate the course material and enhance your ability to do independent work, as well as present results in the most appropriate format. Project and dissertation options are closely linked to staff research interests. September entry students have a choice of management dissertation topics in addition to civil engineering projects, and January entry students have a choice of civil engineering projects.

Projects

There are two semesters of taught material and a summer session during which you will work on an individual supervised project and write a dissertation on its outcomes. Students entering the programme in January are restricted to civil engineering (i.e. excluding management) topics only.

Semester 1

You will be based in the Adam Smith Business School, developing knowledge and skills in management principles and techniques. We offer an applied approach, with an emphasis on an informed critical evaluation of information, and the subsequent application of concepts and tools to the core areas of business and management.
◾Contemporary issues in human resource management
◾Managing creativity and innovation
◾Managing innovative change
◾Marketing management
◾Operations management
◾Project management.

Semester 2

You will study engineering courses, which aim to enhance your group working and project management capability at the same time as improving your depth of knowledge in chosen civil engineering subjects.
◾Integrated systems design project.

Optional courses

Select a total of 4 courses from Lists A and B, at least 1 must be from List A:

List A
◾Advanced soil mechanics 5
◾Advanced structural analysis and dynamics 5
◾Computational modelling of non-linear problems 5
◾Introduction to wind engineering
◾Principles of GIS.

List B
◾Geotechnical engineering 3
◾Ground engineering 4
◾Recycling urban land
◾Structural analysis 4
◾Transportation systems engineering 4.

Project or dissertation

You will undertake an individual project or dissertation work in the summer period (May–August). This will give you an opportunity to apply and consolidate the course material and enhance your ability to do independent work, as well as present results in the most appropriate format. Project and dissertation options are closely linked to staff research interests. September entry students have a choice of management dissertation topics in addition to civil engineering projects, and January entry students have a choice of civil engineering projects.

Industry links and employability

◾The programme makes use of the combined resources and complementary expertise of the civil engineering and business school staff to deliver a curriculum which is relevant to the needs of industry.
◾You, as a graduate of this programme, will be capable of applying the extremely important aspect of management to engineering projects allowing you to gain an advantage in today’s competitive job market and advance to the most senior positions within an engineering organisation.
◾The School of Engineering has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributions in Civil Engineering include: Arup and Mott MacDonald.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the civil engineering industry.

Read less
In this Master’s degree you will acquire conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study social and cultural geography at postgraduate level. Read more

In this Master’s degree you will acquire conceptual ideas, theoretical approaches and analytical research skills needed to study social and cultural geography at postgraduate level. You will engage with questions that interrogate the foundations of inequality, the relationship between power and dissent, identity and belonging, race, gender, cultural change and conflict. Representations of cultural landscapes and critical cartographies are used to explore the geographical imagination of the world from local to global scales.

UK-focused and international case studies are used to illustrate critical, contemporary challenges, from understanding the dynamics of inequality in a city like London to the cultural processes underpinning the rise in populist politics and social movements across the world. To support the development of learning in areas that are of particular interest, you can choose option modules from a wide variety of subject areas such as urbanisation, culture and development, social anthropology, politics, religion and society.

In addition to core content, you will learn research methods that will enable you to specialise and undertake the researching and writing of a dissertation on a subject that appeals to you, as well as develop skills to conduct independent research in both academic and non-academic contexts.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • This distinctive Master's degree combines theoretical and critical approaches to social and cultural geography using real-world case studies.
  • The programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
  • Our students have the opportunity to access activities and research centres across the College, including the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.

TEACHING

At Birkbeck, almost all of our courses are taught in the evening and our teaching is designed to support students who are juggling evening study with work and other daytime commitments. We actively encourage innovative and engaging ways of teaching, to ensure our students have the best learning experience. In the 2017 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), the government’s system for rating university teaching, Birkbeck was allocated a Silver award.

Teaching may include formal lectures, seminars, and practical classes and tutorials. Formal lectures are used in most degree programmes to give an overview of a particular field of study. They aim to provide the stimulus and the starting point for deeper exploration of the subject during your own personal reading. Seminars give you the chance to explore a specific aspect of your subject in depth and to discuss and exchange ideas with fellow students. They typically require preparatory study.

Our distance-learning and blended-learning courses and modules are self-directed and we will provide you with interactive learning opportunities and encourage you to collaborate and engage via various learning technologies. These courses involve limited or no face-to-face contact between students and module tutors.

In addition, you will have access to pastoral support via a named Personal Tutor.

METHODS OF TEACHING ON THIS COURSE

Teaching is via lectures, seminars, presentations and fieldwork.

CONTACT HOURS

On our taught courses, you will have scheduled teaching and study sessions each year. Alongside this, you will also undertake assessment activities and independent learning outside of class. Depending on the modules you take, you may also have additional scheduled academic activities, such as tutorials, dissertation supervision, practical classes, visits and fieldtrips.

On our taught courses, the actual amount of time you spend in the classroom and in contact with your lecturers will depend on your course, the option modules you select and when you undertake your final-year project.

On our distance-learning and blended-learning courses, discussion, collaboration and interaction with your lecturers and fellow students are encouraged and enabled through various learning technologies, but you may have limited or no face-to-face contact with your module tutors.

INDICATIVE CLASS SIZE

Class sizes vary, depending on your course, the module you are undertaking, and the method of teaching. For example, lectures are presented to larger groups, whereas seminars usually consist of small, interactive groups led by a tutor.

INDEPENDENT LEARNING

On our taught courses, much of your time outside of class will be spent on self-directed, independent learning, including preparing for classes and following up afterwards. This will usually include, but is not limited to, reading books and journal articles, undertaking research, working on coursework and assignments, and preparing for presentations and assessments.

Independent learning is absolutely vital to your success as a student. Everyone is different, and the study time required varies topic by topic, but, as a guide, expect to schedule up to five hours of self-study for each hour of teaching.

On our distance-learning and blended-learning courses, the emphasis is very much on independent, self-directed learning and you will be expected to manage your own learning, with the support of your module tutors and various learning technologies.

ASSESSMENT

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations, although this will vary from course to course - on some of our courses, assessment is entirely by coursework. The methods of assessment on this course are specified below under 'Methods of assessment on this course'. You will need to allow time to complete coursework and prepare for exams.

Where a course has unseen written examinations, these may be held termly, but, on the majority of our courses, exams are usually taken in the Summer term, during May to June. Exams may be held at other times of the year as well. In most cases, exams are held during the day on a weekday - if you have daytime commitments, you will need to make arrangements for daytime attendance - but some exams are held in the evening. Exam timetables are published online.

Find out more about assessment at Birkbeck, including guidance on assessment, feedback and our assessment offences policy.

METHODS OF ASSESSMENT ON THIS COURSE

All assessment is by coursework. You also write a 15,000-word dissertation.




Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X