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This intensive summer programme enables graduates with one modern or community language to develop a second modern language (French) which can then be taught with confidence and accuracy to pupils during Key Stage 3. Read more
This intensive summer programme enables graduates with one modern or community language to develop a second modern language (French) which can then be taught with confidence and accuracy to pupils during Key Stage 3.

All SKE programmes in priority subjects are funded by National College for Teaching & Leadership (NCTL). Training bursaries are also available to eligible candidates.

More about this course

The course is a full-time, intensive face-to-face course running from the end of May to mid-to-late August. The course consists of whole group communicative language classes, supplemented by a mixed programme of films, small group conversation classes, cultural input and tutorials.

Integrated self-study, including London Metropolitan University's own online French programmes and virtual learning environment, will be a vital component of the course. You'll be expected to undertake 15 hours a week on this.

There is continuous assessment throughout the course.

To successfully complete the course you must:
-Attend fully and punctually
-Complete all self-study tasks set (including a weekly extended writing task)
-Complete in-class progress tests and end-of-course skills tests
-Compile a portfolio of work showing progress throughout the course and evidence of independent learning

By doing the above, students should aim to demonstrate CEFR B1/B2 (target level) in all four skills by the end of the course.

Modular structure

This is a full-time, intensive, face-to-face 12-week course running from end of May to late August, Monday to Friday, 10am-3.30pm.

The course consists of whole group communicative language classes (morning), supplemented by a mixed afternoon programme of films, small group conversation classes, cultural input and tutorials, as well as self-study.

Language level: Progression from CEFR A1/A2 to B1/B2.

After the course

Students are all expected to proceed to ITT and subsequent teaching careers in Secondary Modern Foreign Languages (MFL).

"I am currently teaching a lot of French in my Secondary School (The Heathland School). I teach nine lessons a week to students from KS3 and KS4 (this year taking Y11 for the first time). I teach classes in Year 7, Year 8, Year 9 and Year 11, so a range of ages. Without the French Extension Course, I 100 per cent would never had found the time or effort to improve my French to an ability to teach it. Therefore, without it, I definitely wouldn't be teaching it as much as I do now (if at all). I believe that it is a great way for trainee teachers to get themselves another language to be able to teach (at least to KS3)." Lewis Dodge, The Heathland School. French Extension Course 2009. PGCE St. Mary's University College 2010/11.

Quote from external assessor

"My opinion about the London Metropolitan University French Extension course remains totally unchanged: it is a highly effective, high quality motivational course. The course team does not rest on its laurels. Directors, tutors and language assistants strive to offer students a better and better product. The team's clarity of purpose, its organised approach to the implementation of the plans, its caring monitoring of students' progress, achievements and needs, its good relationships with the students (as a group and as individuals), its willingness to hear and to respond to needs, all contributes to a course of high quality". Michèle Deane, external assessor

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

You’ll also undertake the African field course is based at Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia, Kenya. You’ll gain a first-hand appreciation of the ecology and conservation concerns of an African savannah community, both for the wildlife and the people who live in the area. As well as learning about the local environment, flora and fauna, you’ll spend most of the time designing and carrying out group research projects.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The two independent research projects are one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and allow you to develop a range of research skills. A number of our students have been based overseas for their summer project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The programmes are made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • MRes Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 15 credits
  • African Field Ecology 20 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MRes Research Project 1 40 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MRes Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MRes Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MRes student, you’ll carry out two research projects. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. The first (winter) project is usually Leeds-based, while the second (summer) projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas. Projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical and analytical research skills through modules such as Insect Identification, Plant Identification, the GIS modules and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses). Statistical methods using R are a key component of the compulsory skills modules.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: multiple-choice testing, practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, discussion groups (face-to-face and online), computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area.



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You will be provided with rigorous training in the analysis of issues in finance and corporate policy while improving your analytical and technical expertise. Read more
You will be provided with rigorous training in the analysis of issues in finance and corporate policy while improving your analytical and technical expertise. The programme is ideal for those whose career objectives lie broadly with the financial services and banking sectors. You will have the opportunity to gain an in depth grounding with core courses such as Foundations in Finance, Corporate Finance and Quantitative Methods in Finance, and subsequently tailor your programme to match your end goals through the range of optional courses on offer. These include Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives, Investment and Portfolio Management and Decision Theory and Behaviour amongst others.

You will be taught by a top-ranking Department of Economics with expertise in a broad range of areas, including people who have worked and are still working in the finance industry in the broad areas of asset allocation and risk, as well as algorithmic trading.

With a relatively small intake each year you will benefit from a strong sense of group identity and will enjoy close contact with the academic staff of the department. The course director and course coordinators serve as your personal advisors up until the spring, when you will then be assigned a personal dissertation supervisor.

The MSc Finance is an excellent preparation both for a career in the financial services, banking and business sectors and policy making, as well further academic study.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/economics/coursefinder/mscfinance.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course offers an excellent opportunity to get a strong grounding in core areas of Finance and to specialise your knowledge further through the optional courses on offer.

-You will be taught by academics who produce world leading research some of whom are also currently working in the Finance and Banking sectors. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were ranked among the top 10 Economics Departments in the UK

- Students attend a two week pre-sessional quantitative methods course to ensure they are in a good position to start this challenging Masters courses

- The Department of Economics at Royal Holloway is unique in being a young department, created in 1995, in an established and prestigious college of the University of London.

- Our courses are small and select, thus ensuring that you will receive individual attention from the academic staff.

Department research and industry highlights

Economics is among the top departments in the UK for Research Excellence. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 80% of the Department's research submitted was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent (rated 3* and 4*).

A recent analysis of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) shows that the Economics Department at Royal Holloway is ranked 8th best department in the UK for publications. The study by Jim Taylor and Ian Walker provides further insight into the research standing of UK economics departments. Previous rankings from the data already showed the Department in the top 10 in the UK.

We run a weekly Internal Seminar which provides a lively forum for work at an early stage of development. Our External Seminar Series runs weekly during term and during the last academic year, welcomed over 20 external speakers from prominent places. Invitees are the usual mixture of established names and newer entrants to the profession thought to be doing exciting work. Our Discussion Paper Series provides a forum for journal-ready work.

Course content and structure

You will study five core course units and, in addition, a mathematics refresher course and a dissertation, as well as choosing two elective course units.

Core course units:
- Pre-sessional mathematics refresher course
All students attend the compulsory pre-sessional mathematics refresher course, which runs for 2 weeks in September, before the start of term. There are no additional fees for this course however students will need to pay for accommodation for the period of this course.

- Corporate Finance
You will be introduced to the techniques of financial analysis and their applications to corporate finance. The concepts developed form the foundation of most elective finance course units. You will learn about the time value of money and the net present value rule, how to value financial assets, capital budgeting decisions, uncertainty and the risk-return trade-off and corporate governance.

- Quantitative Methods in Finance
This course unit will introduce you to mathematical statistics and theories that are applied in financial econometrics. The second half of the unit concerns the analysis of time series data including ARMA models, the analysis of non-stationary time series data, cointegration analysis, vector autoregressive models, modelling volatility in asset returns, forecasting and bootstrapping.

- Foundations of Finance
The course unit in finance will expose you to the structure of the financial markets, the instruments traded and the participants. You will be provided with the necessary tools with which to analyse how the financial markets function and how problems arise from their operations.

- Research Methods
While conducting research sounds like an easy task, it can present difficulties. This unit aims to help you avoid such traps and to assist you in developing strong research skills so that you can conduct an efficient piece of research at the end of your degree.

- Dissertation
The dissertation gives you the opportunity to analyse an economics issue in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and, by the end of March, will submit a preliminary dissertation report that contains a clear statement of the problem under consideration, the structure of the project and the research methods that are going to be applied. The dissertation is then written over the summer.

Elective course units:
- Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives
You will gain an introduction to the alternative forms of financial assets that are traded in addition to stocks. Fixed income securities are bonds, bills and notes that offer a certain stream of income to holders. Derivatives are contingent and non-contingent claims on financial assets and are widely used for hedging risk. You will learn how to price these assets, and how to use them effectively in managing portfolios and hedging risk.

- Empirical Finance
The broad aims of this unit are to give you advanced-level training in evaluation of empirical models in finance. It will enable you to apply both quantitative techniques and qualitative methods, learnt elsewhere, to test theories and get acquainted with the existing literature in the field of finance.

- Investment and Portfolio Management
Underlying theory and empirical evidence in portfolio management will familiarise you with its practice in the finance sector. You will acquire an understanding of how funds are allocated when constructing a portfolio.

- Decision Theory and Behaviour
This course unit will deepen your knowledge of rational decision making through the exploration of behavioural models, their formalization and their scope, including applications to finance. You will also become familiarized with both theoretical and experimental methods for research in decision theory and behavioural economics.

- Public Economics
Public Economics is concerned with the study of the effects of government policy and the design of optimal policies. You will assess the implications of basic welfare economics in public policy. A number of recent research areas in public economics are then discussed including income taxation, tax evasion, externalities and social security.

- Political Economy
This course will provide an advanced treatment of the tools used in political economy to tackle some major questions faced by public sector economists. It will in particular focus on the modelling of voters and politicians’ behaviours to address the role played by incentives and constraints faced by politicians when choosing public policies. The effect of different forms of institutional arrangements on public decision making and electoral accountability will be analysed from both a theoretical and empirical perspective.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different economics-related areas, including careers as economists, financial analysts, accountants, bankers, journalists and business analysts. Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, TNS, RBS, Deloitte, and Baker and McKenzie. At the same time, this course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies. Your careers ambitions are supported by our College Careers Service, located right next door to the economics department. They offer application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions, and the opportunity to network with major finance employers on campus. Our careers service is provided by the Careers Group, the main provider of graduate recruitment services in London. Thus, you will have additional access to a wealth of presentations and networking opportunities which make the most of London’s financial centre.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online.

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The Masters in Public Administration is a well established and prestigious programme aimed at students who aspire to access or progress within a public service or a voluntary sector career. Read more
The Masters in Public Administration is a well established and prestigious programme aimed at students who aspire to access or progress within a public service or a voluntary sector career. Benefiting from a work placement with an organisation from our wide network of public and voluntary sector employers, this programme offers an intensive year of professional and academic development at the highest standards. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The aim of this course is to equip present and future public service practitioners with the skills and understanding needed to play a significant role as change agents within their home professional environments.

The programme places great emphasis on:
-Developing a variety of academic capacities and transferable skills related to public administration
-Instilling flexibility of thought and innovation as guiding principles to public sector management and reforms
-Developing a commitment to lifelong learning and reflective practice in students.

This innovative public policy oriented and public management based course is taught by an experienced and dynamic team of academic staff who are active in the international research community in the fields of public management reform in transitional countries, comparative public policy and governance, strategic management in public sector organisations, corruption in transitional countries, and local and regional governance.

Our aim is to develop high quality administrators and managers who will play a critical role in their home country environments. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary programme of study, which is intellectually rigorous and professionally relevant to your local context and organisation. The course is particularly attractive to graduates working in public services abroad who want to develop expertise in public service reform, capacity strengthening and institutional development.

The course meets the demands of an ever more complex and dynamic sector comprised of government departments, local authorities, public agencies and voluntary organisations from Britain and abroad, thus reflecting the need for skilled and innovative public managers, administrators and policy makers acting as agents for change.

Using a blended learning approach incorporating a variety of teaching and learning strategies appropriate to postgraduate level study, the course introduces you to the latest strategic management and planning tools applied in public agencies, overviews emerging trends and best practice in public policy within a comparative context and provides a strong theoretical and methodological grounding. Uniquely, the programme benefits from a bespoke research methodology component focused on public policy and management research and analysis. Moreover, the University’s vanguard Virtual Learning Environment, coming to support the teaching and learning process, as well repeated opportunities to reflect upon personal academic development, add value to your student experience and to the overall value of the programme.

The core teaching team on this course is both experienced and dynamic. The team is involved, on a regular basis, in civil service training, in consultancy and advisory work for public sector organisations, as well as in internationally recognised academic research, thus providing the Master in Public Administration teaching with relevant, informative and contemporary case-studies. One of the course’s greatest strengths is that it achieves a fine balance between its theoretically informed structures and the practical application of skills developed throughout. Expert practitioners from a range of public and voluntary sector organisations contribute to the course.

The course has historically attracted students sponsored by the Commonwealth, the governments of Bangladesh, Indonesia, Japan, Romania, South Korea, Vietnam, and students from (amongst others) Afghanistan, Germany, Kosovo, Morocco, Nigeria, South Africa, Poland, Russia, Ukraine and the USA. Our graduates access managerial and decision-making positions in a range of public and voluntary sector organisations.

A key feature of this course is that it includes a work placement module that offers students the chance to experience directly the work of a relevant area of public service in a London-based organisation over a substantial period of time. You will also benefit from the skills and support from our full-time placement and employability officer.

The course’s variety of teaching and learning styles is reflected in the variety of assessment tools employed throughout the course. Within the general principle of mixed mode formative and summative assessment, we use a diversity of assessment instruments: a range of written assignments, such as essays, reports, portfolios, individual or group classroom presentations, and the dissertation.

The MPA dissertation is a 60 credit project that allows students to pursue individual research on a topic of their choice, within the public administration and public policy fields.

Detailed verbal and written feedback is given on all assessments, and significant tutorial support is given during the dissertation, including bespoke dissertation workshops.

Modular structure

The course consists of five taught modules, a work experience placement in a UK public service organisation (two days a week over 15 weeks), and a triple-module dissertation (which may be completed in your home country).

Core modules cover:
-Strategic Planning and Change Management Core (20 credits)
-Comparative Public Policy Core (20 credits)
-Researching Public Services Core (20 credits)
-Public Administration Dissertation Core (60 credits)

A range of subject-related optional modules within management, community development and European studies. You have the opportunity to specialise in, for example, health management, development and administration, or project and human resources management.

After the course

Graduates can expect a host of public administration job opportunities in the contexts of transition and modernisation – the course is ideal for those already employed in the sector who wish to update their skills, or progress to further study.

The work placement is also an excellent opportunity for you to practice the skills and apply the knowledge acquired during the programme, but also to forge long lasting professional relationships within the sector. The network of employers that offer work placements for our students include: the London Boroughs of Hackney, Harrow, Havering, Islington, Redbridge, Tower Hamlets, Westminster; government bodies such as the Department of Work and Pensions, and voluntary sector organisations such as Thames Reach, amongst others. Students have praised the work placement for its relevance to their career development and the employability skills it fosters.

Our recent graduates have accessed positions in central governments in Romania, Poland, Bangladesh, in executive agencies and local government in the UK and in wide range of voluntary sector organisations in the UK and abroad – to name just a few.

International links

The London Met MPA operated two international franchises in Russia, in conjunction with the Higher School of Economics in Moscow and the Urals Academy of Public Administration in Ekaterinburg. London Met MPA staff are regularly invited to contribute to programmes abroad.

Additionally the International Summer School in Public Administration, delivered by core MPA staff, has run since 2003, attracting students of politics, management and public administration.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment. Read more

This course is designed to prepare you for a career in conservation, or for further research at PhD level. If you’re already an established conservation professional, our modules provide additional skills to support you to progress in your employment.

Distinct from similar courses offered in the UK, the course concentrates on the biological principles underlying biodiversity, its assessment and management. You’ll learn to identify plants and animals, explore the institutional framework underlying biodiversity and conservation and gain key analytical and practical skills for a range of academic and professional careers. You’ll also gain valuable experience in biodiversity and conservation-related research.

You’ll also undertake the African field course is based at Mpala Research Centre, Laikipia, Kenya. You’ll gain a first-hand appreciation of the ecology and conservation concerns of an African savannah community, both for the wildlife and the people who live in the area. As well as learning about the local environment, flora and fauna, s, you’ll spend most of the time designing and carrying out group research projects.

The University of Leeds has twice been recognised by the European Union as a "centre of excellence" for biodiversity and conservation training. We believe biodiversity can only be managed and conserved when it can be measured and interpreted properly.

Course content

This degree offers you a wide range of options, allowing you to personalise your study in preparation for further academic research or professional development in the field.

We’ll equip you with a diverse set of skills needed for ecological careers and further research. The course combines theory-based modules on the principles of ecology and conservation with a wide range of practical skills-based modules. These include survey, management and identification skills, where the emphasis is on spending time in the field, and analytical skills such as statistics and GIS.

The independent research project is one of the most important and potentially fulfilling parts of the degree. Projects cover a wide range of topics and usually include around six to eight weeks of practical work. A number of our students have been based overseas for their project.

If you study part time, the course will last for two years and you’ll study around half of the total number of modules each year.

MSc or MRes – what’s the difference?

MRes students have fewer taught modules, and carry out two major research projects rather than one. The MSc is the broader course, suitable for both conservation careers and PhD study, while most students taking the MRes are planning to go on to do a PhD. The MSc allows students to widen their skills base through the additional taught elements that are available. An increasing number of students treat the MSc as a conversion course, after having taken degrees in non-biological subjects.

Course structure

The course is made up of modules that add up to 180 credits, with a mix of compulsory and optional modules. These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills I 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Skills II 10 credits
  • African Field Ecology 20 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation MSc and MRes Summer Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Community Ecology 15 credits
  • Conservation Genetics 15 credits
  • Advanced Statistics 10 credits
  • Habitat Management 10 credits
  • Introduction to GIS Skills for Ecologists 10 credits
  • Population Dynamics 10 credits
  • Biodiversity and Conservation Internships 15 credits
  • Practical Conservation with the National Trust 10 credits
  • Plant Identification 15 credits
  • Insect Identification Skills 15 credits
  • Conservation Skills 5 credits
  • GIS and Environment 15 credits
  • Environmental Economics and Policy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Biodiversity and Conservation with African Field Course MSc Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll have access to the very best learning resources and academic support during your studies. We’ve been awarded a Gold rating in the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF, 2017), demonstrating our commitment to delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for our students.

Your learning will be heavily influenced by the University’s world-class research as well as our strong links with highly qualified professionals from industry, non-governmental organisations and charities.

You’ll experience a wide range of teaching methods including formal lectures, interactive workshops, problem-solving, practical classes and demonstrations.

Through your research project and biodiversity and conservation modules, you’ll receive substantial subject-specific training. Our teaching and assessment methods are designed to develop you into a professional who is able to think independently, solve problems, communicate effectively and demonstrate a high level of practical ability.

Research projects

As an MSc student, you’ll carry out one research project. The range of project topics is large and diverse, covering applied, empirical and theoretical subjects. Projects can be carried out in the UK or overseas: projects have been carried out in over twenty countries so far, and this year alone we have projects in Belize, Thailand, Greece, Bermuda and Morocco.

Practical skills

There are many opportunities to develop valuable practical skills through modules such as Practical Conservation with the National Trust, Insect Identification, Plant Identification, and by overseas field courses within Europe and Africa (see field courses) and research project work. You can also build your analytical skills, with modules in GIS and statistics.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods: practical work, data handling and problem solving exercises, group work, computer-based simulation, essays, posters and oral presentations.

Career opportunities

Specialist and transferable skills are key component of our degrees, opening up diverse opportunities for our graduates. A proportion of both MSc and MRes graduates go on to study for a PhD and enter a research career. Many graduates go on to a career in an applied ecology or conservation-related area.



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The Construction Project Management MSc prepares you for complex construction projects in a constantly changing globalised industry. Read more
The Construction Project Management MSc prepares you for complex construction projects in a constantly changing globalised industry. Such an industry calls for skilled professionals who can deal with the challenges ahead.

What's covered in the course?

Accredited by RICS and CIOB, this course gives you a broad yet rigorous grounding in the fundamentals of organising and managing construction projects, and provides you with the knowledge and skills needed as a project manager. Our Construction Project Management postgraduates are highly sought-after and have secured positions with companies such as Turner & Townsend, Miller Construction and Acivico.

The MSc Construction Project Management course will enable graduates with degrees in surveying, construction, architecture, civil engineering and real estate to enter the construction management profession. Practitioners with extensive construction work experience but without a first degree will also be considered, subject to entrance exam and interview.

The course gives you a broad knowledge of the challenges of a changing construction industry. You’ll cover law and contract, sustainability, business management, project management and innovation. Building Information Modelling (BIM) is embedded in the course for integrated project delivery. An overseas study trip is an exciting opportunity to look at construction project management in a globalised construction environment.

Professional staff with industry experience will offer support and guidance. We are constantly reviewing and researching the most up-to-date construction developments to be able to pass on the latest industry knowledge. This is supported by guest speakers such as Andrew Hornby, one of our graduates, who now works for Arcadis. We also have excellent links with companies in the region, including Willmott Dixon, Galliford Try and Birmingham City Council.

This course is located in the prestigious £114m Millennium Point building – part of our City Centre Campus – with technology and facilities that reflect advanced professional practice. Our City Centre Campus location is an inspirational place to learn. Birmingham’s Big City Plan, regenerating and developing the city, means there are plenty of opportunities within the built environment. And you’ll have the added advantage of being based near construction sites, including our new Conservatoire development and the new high speed rail track, HS2, giving you invaluable insight into the construction industry.

Why choose us?

The course is fully accredited by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). Successful completion of the course will lead to Professional Membership after the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC).

On completion of the course you’ll have covered both the core content and areas of specialism needed for the opportunity to register for the membership of RICS and CIOB.

You’ll take part in workshops with students from other built environment postgraduate courses. This leads to genuinely multi-professional learning and develops your understanding of all aspects of this industry.

Our strong industry links help you make vital contacts and gain practical experience to back up theory.

Course in depth

The overall teaching, learning and assessment strategy of this course is that you are at the centre of learning and teaching, which has a particular focus on the reflective learner and the development of professional skills and applied research. To achieve this and to ensure that you are exposed to a wide range of learning and teaching methods, we use lectures, seminars, workshops, action learning sets, group work, problem based activities, guest speakers, on-line learning via Moodle, site visits, study trips and discussion forums.

Our teaching is very interactive, and you are encouraged to share your experience and opinions with your peers. Critical thinking is vital in Master’s study, and you are required to develop your own ideas and come up with solutions to problems based on solid evidence and logical analysis. You’ll also be expected to complete reading and assignments outside of class hours.

Although this programme is module based, each module forms part of one of the programme themes. This ensures that module design and associated teaching and assessments link together in progressive subject development. Our part-time students attend lectures on day-release basis, and share the modules with our full-time students.

Modules
-Construction Law and Contract 20 credits
-Project Management Methods 20 credits
-Business Management 20 credits
-Sustainable Construction 20 credits
-Innovation in Construction 20 credits
-Integrated Project Delivery 20 credits
-Dissertation 60 credits

This course is accredited by:

Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)
The course is fully accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). Successful completion of the course will lead to Professional Membership after the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC).

The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB)
The Chartered Institute of Building is at the heart of a management career in construction. Its focus is on those entering and already in a management career in construction, by delivering qualifications and certifications that meet the needs of a changing industry. It works with members, employers, academia and governments across the globe to drive forward the science, practice and importance of management in construction.

Enhancing your employability skills

This course is fully accredited by both The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). All their required competences / learning outcomes are covered in this course.

We have a very close working relationship with our accreditation professional bodies RICS and CIOB. We have annual partnership meetings with them to steer the development of our course. You can participate in regional events such as seminars and site visits as a student member to not only get updated industry knowledge but also network with the practitioners. A visit to RICS HQ during our domestic study trip will provide you with very useful insights into your future career development.

We also work very closely with our industrial partners such as Willmott Dixon, Galliford Try and Birmingham City Council. They are not only actively involved in our course development, teaching and assessment but also contribute in various ways as guest speakers, as well as offering site visits, summer placements, research projects and employment.

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. This MSc Accounting and Finance programme combines advanced studies in accounting with finance. It has been developed as a collaboration between Henley’s Business Informatics Systems and Accounting (BISA) area and the International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre. Read more

This MSc Accounting and Finance programme combines advanced studies in accounting with finance. It has been developed as a collaboration between Henley’s Business Informatics Systems and Accounting (BISA) area and the International Capital Market Association (ICMA) Centre. It is best suited for students who are accounting graduates.

What it gives you

This programme is suited to anyone wishing to deepen their knowledge of accounting and finance, and who wants to enter a career in financial markets or advisory/financial services; either as an analyst, as a professional accountant, or as a preparation for further research at PhD level. The programme curriculum will provide a blend of theoretical-, research- and practice-led content. This will enable students to develop deeper conceptual and theoretically informed perspectives of accounting and financial practices with acknowledgment of the role of information systems in those processes.

Why Henley?

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Compulsory modules

and either / or

Optional modules

Students choosing MMM049 must choose two spring term optional modules to the value of 40 credits. 

Students choosing ACM001 must choose one spring term module to the value of 20 credits. 

Students choosing ACM001 must choose one summer term module to the value of 20 credits.

Careers and accreditations

Students will enhance their employability in their related first-degree disciplines or in any general business management roles. The programme will also enhance career opportunities in more specialised accounting and finance fields. As the programme offers an international perspective, career prospects are likely to be international. In addition, the programme will serve as a good basis for further academic development in accounting- and finance-related disciplines.

This programme is granted exemptions from four Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) professional exams: BA1 - BA4.



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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This a one year (academic) full time course which, upon completion of a course of study leads to an M.Med.Sci Degree in Assisted Reproduction Technology. Read more

Overview

This a one year (academic) full time course which, upon completion of a course of study leads to an M.Med.Sci Degree in Assisted Reproduction Technology. This course provides an avenue for both scientists and clinicians to enter the field of reproductive biology; and for those already familiar with this area, an opportunity to gain greater appreciation of the biological processes of mammalian reproduction that are relevant to the manipulation of fertility and the treatment of reproductive disease.

The course was established in 1993, making it the longest running taught masters in the UK providing full-time training in human ART, and aims to furnish graduates with the theoretical and practical training within this highly specialised discipline. Designed to broaden knowledge of the underlying scientific principles and to enhance appreciation of the clinical management of infertility, it aims to encourage independent thought and a research oriented approach to the practice of assisted conception.

A major feature and strength of this course is that the primary components, in terms of reproductive physiology, research methods, clinical embryology, and clinical medicine are all provided by experts who are highly active within their own areas of expertise, giving the information provided to the students an immediacy and relevance that it would be impossible to achieve using a more static and established teaching base.

The course is studied over a period of one year, full time, and has three basic components:
1) Theoretical and Practical Training modules (95 Credits)
2) Development of Research and Presentation skills and Observation (25 Credits)
3) Research project & dissertation (60 Credits)

Delivery method

The taught component of the course is delivered in the Autumn and Spring semesters through a combination of lectures, practicals, seminars, tutorials and other associated activities, such as journal club and guest speakers.

Approximately one third of the total course duration is dedicated to the construction, preparation and investigation of a laboratory-based research project of up to 15,000 words. This is written up in thesis presentation form.

IMPORTANT NOTE

ALL applicants, especially those from a predominantly clinical background, please note:

• This is a laboratory-based, science degree course and not a clinically based infertility treatment course.
• There is no direct contact with patients or tuition in gynaecological/surgical procedures.
• That although training is given in all laboratory aspects of assisted conception (including semen evaluation, IVF, IVM, ICSI and cryopreservation) in the time available, this training can only represent an introduction to these techniques and those graduates wishing to become clinical embryologists will need further training to become competent in those highly specialised techniques.

Course aims

• To encourage independent thought and a research oriented approach to the practice of assisted conception
• To provide theoretical and practical training in Assisted Reproduction Technology
• To broaden the students knowledge of the underlying scientific basis of ART and clinical management of infertility
• To equip graduates with the ability to pursue a career in assisted conception (e.g. clinical embryology, infertility treatment) and/or research in reproductive biology

Course objectives

• To provide successful candidates with a career path within one of the many disciplines that encompass modern assisted reproduction technology and to this end, students are taught by and given the opportunity to interact with, both full-time reproductive biologists and the consultants, clinical embryologists, andrologists and counsellors.

Requirements

Candidates must normally be graduates of an approved university, or other institution of higher education in medicine, nursing or the biological sciences. Normally the minimum requirement for entry is a 2(ii) degree or equivalent, although candidates with a third class degree may be considered at the Course Directors discretion in special circumstances. If you are not sure if you qualify, please do not hesitate to contact the Course Administrator

Candidates will be required to follow a prescribed course of study for one academic year (two 15-week semesters and summer period)

All candidates will be required to undertake a theoretical and practical training programme. Candidates will also be required to submit a dissertation of not more that 15,000 words on a topic relating to an aspect of Assisted Reproduction agreed by the Director of the Course.

English Language Requirements

International students whose first language is not English must achieve an appropriate level in an approved test in English before they can register.

The requirements for this course are above the University minimum standards and are as follows:

• IELTS minimum score of 6.5 (with no less than 6.0 in any element)
or
• TOEFL iBT 87 (minimum 19 in listening, 20 in speaking and 21 in reading and writing)

Examinations should be taken within two years of registering to study at Nottingham. Completion of a previous degree studied in the English language does not exempt applicants from requiring one of the above English qualifications, unless the degree was taken in a country where the first language is English.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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The Executive Masters in Public Administration (XMPA) reflects changes in the public sector and not for profit environment. It explores developments in service provision, at a strategic level as well as critical analysis of Government policy. Read more
The Executive Masters in Public Administration (XMPA) reflects changes in the public sector and not for profit environment. It explores developments in service provision, at a strategic level as well as critical analysis of Government policy. It supports the Government's commitment to provide lifelong learning and the skilling, training and development of public managers to achieve this. To this end it engages in changing styles of public management theory and practice as well as in the evolution public administration and the requirements of managers to develop the skills and knowledge to manage cross sectorally and inter-sectorally.

The XMPA will develop your academic and vocational skills, equipping you for the next stage of your career in the public or nfp sector and as a manager able respond to an ever-changing and challenging environment. You'll gain relevant current knowledge, skills and understanding to enable you to work effectively given the changes in the public sector environment and in public policy.

7 reasons to study here

1. Dual award: academic qualification from LSBU and professional award from the CMI
2. Award winning: LSBU Business School won the government skills framework and prospect awards for teaching
3. Summer School: week-long International Summer School in conjunction with six other leading European universities offering comparable XMPAs where you’ll be exposed to leading academics and practitioners and network with public managers from across the continent
4. Great reputation: We have a great reputation for this course, and the success of our alumni demonstrates this
5. Personal growth: develop transferable skills in leadership, communication, teamwork, innovation, creativity, resilience, dealing with ambiguity, persuasive advocacy, problem solving and critical thinking
6. Career enhancing: Our graduates typically go on to more senior roles in their organisation or take up positions delivering public services
7. Flexible delivery modes: Designed to suit busy senior professionals - flexible delivery on a Thursday afternoon and evening

Who is this course for?

• Middle and senior managers
• Those looking to develop and take the next step in their career
• Those looking for flexible study options with experienced and respected academic staff

Modules

Year 1

• Leadership, Public Management and Governance
• Public Policy and the Managerial Environment
• Managing through Critical Research

Year 2

• Integrative Management and Change
• Contemporary Issues for Public Managers

Plus two of the following optional modules:

• Managing Within a Regulatory Framework
• Equality and Diversity in the Workforce
• Policy Making in Action
• Strategic Management in the Public and Not for Profit Sectors
• Public Sector Entrepreneurship
• The Practice of Management Consulting in the Public Sector
• Social Enterprise
• Law and Ethics for Health Care Managers
• Leadership in Health Services
• International Policy and Governance
• Current Quality Issues in Health Service Management
• Commissioning and Procurement in Health and Social Services
• International Management and Change in Public Services
• Ethical Leadership in International Public Services

Year 3

• Dissertation

Assessment is by course work, assignments, presentations and case studies. There re no formal examinations on this course and this is a deliberate decision.

Diploma in Management Studies

If you hold a Diploma in Management Studies you'll be accredited with 60 course credits and study the following modules:

• Leadership, public management and governance
• Public policy and the managerial environment
• Managing through critical research
• Dissertation

You'll also be required to attend the residential weekend and the International Summer School.

Professional links

European Partner Institutions: Bocconi Milan, Erasmus, Rotterdam, Esade Barcelona, Copenhagen Business School, Potsdam University, Limerick University and Hint and Hist University, Norway. Partners in the International Summer school.

Course participants receive a dual ward from the Chartered Management Institute - The Level 8 Diploma in Strategic Direction and Leadership. They become associate members of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and can access CMI services and publications. On successful completion of the XMPA course participants may be eligible to become Members of the CMI. Part of the assessment of the XMPA course contributes also to professional recognition and Chartered Manager status which course participants can continue on completion.

Employability

Types of careers:

The course is aimed at senior managers (and in this respect differs from the Master of Public Administration which is aimed at overseas students and those wanting to enter a career in public and social sectors). This course enables further career enhancement and development to more strategic levels, providing career sustainability and employability.

Former students have gone onto roles as:

• Director of Health and Social Care
• Strategic Director of Children and Adult Services
• Assistant Director of Education and Training

You can also progress onto the Doctorate in Business Administration (DBA).

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Many events now have an international focus working across cultural, economic and geographical boundaries. Read more
Many events now have an international focus working across cultural, economic and geographical boundaries. Providing a sound theoretical underpinning of the cultural, political, ethical and economic aspects of international events management, this course offers you the practical and strategic understanding required to run international events effectively.

Guest speakers from industry regularly share their knowledge and insights through a series of lectures, case studies and field trips, which keeps the course contemporary and industry focused. You will also be invited to bring your own cultural experience and understandings to the course, making it attractive to home and non-EU students.

You will gain a thorough grounding in key aspects of international events management. This course is suitable if you want to enter the events profession as a manager or if you have events experience and want to enhance your event knowledge in an international context either in the UK or overseas.

For Students from outside the EU who want to improve their English and academic skills we offer a combined masters course with the MSc International Events Management. If you have an IELTS score of 5.0 or 5.5 you can study for two semesters before starting your postgraduate degree. As you will be given one unconditional offer you will not normally need to renew your visa. Find out more about our International Masters (http://courses.leedsmet.ac.uk/main/course.htm?ban=INTMF).

Teaching and Learning

This course is delivered full and part-time. The full-time course is taught over two days per week and if started in September takes twelve months to complete. If you choose to start in January, the course will take eighteen months due to the summer break.

The course requires a great deal of independent learning and study. The course is approximately equivalent to a working week requiring approximately 38 hours study in total, including contact time. However this is only a rough guide and will vary according to the academic workload and the students preferred work mode.

Part-time the course is taught one day per week over a two year period. There is some flexibility with part-time delivery and may have the option to expand or shorten your studies in particular circumstances.

The teaching methods used are diverse and include lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, practical exercises and online learning materials. Some modules adopt a blended learning approach using online materials and face-to-face delivery.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 59% of our research submitted was assessed as world leading or internationally excellent.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/internationalevents_msc

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You can choose from a variety of career opportunities spanning from high-profile large scale events to specialised areas. This diverse industry can offer employment opportunities in charities, film and theatre, music and media, sport, corporate events, conferencing and the public sector. Some of our students have started their own events businesses, while others have moved into academia and research.

- Event Marketing Manager
- International Account Manager
- Conference Operations Manager
- Event Production Manager

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

The UK Centre for Events Management is the world's leading provider of events education, consultancy and research. Our specialist team draws together academics and events professionals who have designed and developed cutting-edge courses that are informed by industry and research.

Our staff are engaged in research and consultancy work, publishing their findings in textbooks and journals of international standing. Some staff still work the festival circuit and offer a wealth of experience in this field. There are also opportunities for students to work at the festivals through our partnerships.

The Centre and staff are members of many key professional associations in events and related fields, including International Festivals and Events Association (IFEA) and British Arts Festivals Association (BAFA). The Centre was recently awarded the NSA Centre for Excellence for Events Management (Sports and Active Leisure). Our courses are accredited by the Institute of Hospitality and are recognised by the National Outdoor Events Associated, the British Hospitality Association and by EUROCHRIE.

David Hind

Head of School

"We work very closely with the travel and tourism industry to ensure that our students are well prepared for careers in the industry."

David has been involved in tourism education in the UK since 1985 and entered higher education following a career working for specialist tour operators in SE Asia, USA and Europe. He is currently Head of one of the largest schools of its kind in Europe - 1800 students and 60 full time academic staff - home to the UK Centre for Events Management and the first School in the UK to be recognised as a Centre of Excellence by the Institute of Travel & Tourism.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in 100 acres of parkland with easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Read more
Much contemporary debate relates to global patterns and global change, and also to the history of the European empires which were a key part of 'globalization' from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. This course addresses issues of growing concern, and builds on the current expertise within our department to offer a distinctive programme which is not found in any other Scottish university.

Why study Global Empires at Dundee?

This degree programme is designed to provide you with an understanding of the development of the major European empires from the early modern period to the present. The course provides an opportunity for you to examine issues such as the impact of empires on the rest of the world, their rivalries, and the economic consequences of their imperial activity.

The course is taught by leading specialists in American, Spanish, Dutch and British history and utilises archival and digital resources held at the university and in nearby collections.

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. The MLitt in Global Empires is a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for all students who wish to gain a grounding in, and a deeper appreciation of, the major topics and historiography of the major European global empires and the historical origins of modern globalisation. It is also suitable if you are interested in gaining additional skills and knowledge to further your employment prospects. If you wish to proceed to further study for a PhD, this course will also provide you with the necessary research skills.

Research Skills:
You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such oral history or historical databases. The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Aims of the Programme

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of aspects of imperial and global history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed these developments over the past five centuries.

In addition the course aims to equip you with the core competencies, knowledge and skills required to understand and interpret sources and historiography in the context of your own research and to gain experience in using those skills in independent research. Finally the course aims to further develop your written communication and presentation skills.

How is the course taught?

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. The modules are taught through mixtures of introductory lectures, seminars, involving students in weekly journals, and group work.

Programme content

The course is made up of the following modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

Careers

Due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

However, for those wishing to use their studies directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of Scottish history and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

The course will therefore contribute to enhancing prospects in careers such as: teaching, libraries, archives, museums, heritage and tourism industries, as well as providing content relevant to the continuing professional development of employees in many public-facing roles.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This innovative course offers both MSc and MA streams. It has been designed to develop your ability to apply economic analysis to policy issues and business problems, which are often ambiguous and multi-faceted. Read more
This innovative course offers both MSc and MA streams. It has been designed to develop your ability to apply economic analysis to policy issues and business problems, which are often ambiguous and multi-faceted. Although there is a strong theoretical core, the course focus of the course is very much on the practical application of economic techniques to problems, and on developing the ability to communicate the insights that economic analysis can provide.

The course has been created in conjunction with the Government Economic Service (GES) – a major employer of economics graduates in the UK. The University of Westminster is the only English university to have secured GES recommended status for a postgraduate course in economics.

The course aims to provide you with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the latest developments in economics, with a focus on practical skills and development of the skills needed by a working economist. It is specifically aimed at those with a genuine interest in the application of economics to real-world situations.

As well as enhancing your ability to apply relevant economic principles in the support of policy and strategy development, the course aims to develop your ability to communicate complex issues to wide audiences, your awareness of significant sources of economic and financial data, the problems faced when carrying out policy evaluation and your capability for self-awareness and group working.

Course content

You will gain an understanding of the key concepts in economics that underpin public sector policy and business decision making. This includes the various scenarios where we explore opportunity cost, equilibrium and disequilibrium, strategic interaction, market failure and the related concept of externalities.

You'll develop your analytical skills by applying these concepts to current challenges that face the profession, at both macro and micro levels, and in both private and public sectors. This will provide you with the latest insights drawn from both the academic and practitioner arenas.

Around a common core of modules covering key theoretical and practical elements, the MSc stream offers the possibility of pursuing a course of study in economics with a greater quantitative focus, while the MA stream has a stronger international emphasis.

Students on this course benefit from free access to part of the material on the course reading list and an online subscription to Financial Times. In addition, you will get exposure to a global network of professional economists through a free student membership to the Society of Business Economists.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. For more details on course structure and modules, and how you will be taught and assessed, see the full course document.

Core modules
-Economic Evaluation Project
-Macroeconomic Analysis and Policy
-Microeconomic Analysis and Policy
-Research Methods
-Strategy and Appraisal in Economics
-Data Analysis
-Economic Policy Perspectives

Option modules
-Innovation Economics
-Labour Economics

Accredited internship

All students on our full-time business Masters courses can apply to undertake the PG/MBA Internship Programme Reflective Practitioner Module. This is an 8 week unpaid accredited internship, which can be taken in addition to option modules and will help students to gain invaluable work experience. The internships, which are with London-based organisations, take place during the summer period. To apply, students must submit a completed application form and a copy of their updated CV to the Business Experience Team; the team then shortlist from the applications and conduct group meetings with the applicants.

Ultimately it is up to our internship employers to decide whether they would like to interview the candidate(s) and offer him/her an internship. We have received very positive feedback from both postgraduate students and employers and expect that the internship programme will continue to remain popular amongst our students.

Careers

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

In addition to this, you will receive careers support from academic staff and faculty work placement teams, offering targeted course-specific careers advice and assistance in securing a work placement during your time at Westminster.

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